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U.S. Army
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action in the
Global War on Terrorism
(2001 - Present)

Links to Army GWOT Silver Star Citations

A-C  D-F  G-I   J-L  M-Q  R-S  T-Z

.

 

 To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:
This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918
Has Awarded


THE SILVER STAR
TO

 

JACOBSEN, PETTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Petter Jacobsen, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 28 January 2006, at Najaf, Iraq. Master Sergeant Jacobsen's heroism and bravery under intense enemy fire provided effective and accurate suppressive fire that supported the withdrawal of dismounted Iraqi army scouts, saving their lives. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, Special Operations Task Force - Central, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Master Sergeant Petter Jacobsen distinguished himself by gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in combat against enemy forces on 28 January 2006, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, at Najaf, Iraq. In the early morning hours of January 28th, a small contingent of Iraqi Army Scouts and the An Najaf Police attempted to negotiate with the "Soldiers of Heaven," an extremist militant group that was preparing to assassinate some of the Islamic world's most prominent Shi'a religious leaders, at their compound and, if necessary, detain the leaders. Gunfire erupted as the Iraqi Force approached the compound. Initial fighting was ferocious, as the vastly outnumbered Iraqi Force fought for survival. Although pinned down, with many casualties and half of their vehicles disabled, they continued to inflict heavy casualties on the much larger enemy force. At approximately 0700 hours, the Detachment 566 Commander received an urgent phone call from the Iraqi Army Scouts requesting immediate assistance. While U.S. Special Forces and Iraqi elements were preparing to move to the battle grounds, they received a second phone call. The An Najaf Governor requested the help of both U.S. ground and air combat support against the amassed enemy force. As Detachment 566 arrived on the battlefield, the Iraqi Scouts were isolated and suppressed by the heavy enemy fire. The detachment advanced to support the Iraqi Scouts and immediately received heavy volumes of enemy small arms, machine gun, rocket propelled grenade, and mortar fire. Master Sergeant Jacobsen, observing 15 pinned down Iraqi Scouts, disregarded heavy enemy machine gun fire, dismounted his vehicle, and used a shallow ditch for protection while engaging the enemy. He pounded the enemy's fortified positions with LAW shoulder-launched rockets, forcing them out of their defenses into a less defendable area. As Master Sergeant Jacobsen then moved toward the pinned Iraqi Scouts, enemy reinforcements moved back into the fortified positions and resumed heavy fire. Master Sergeant Jacobsen, again ignoring his own safety, continued to suppress the enemy. His selfless, valorous actions allowed the 15 Iraqi Scouts to withdraw to friendly defensive positions, saving their lives. With the air strikes and arrival of Iraqi re-enforcements the enemy appeared to have been subdued with only pockets of resistance remaining. At this time, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi Forces counterparts, withdrew from the battlefield to refit and reorganize at their base. As these forces left the battlefield, Detachment 563 with their Iraqi Police Counterparts arrived to assist the Iraqi Forces in securing the enemy compound. They were not aware that over 750 fanatical militants remained in the well defended compound awaiting their chance to fight. When Detachment 563 and their Iraqi counterparts advanced on the compound, they were ambushed by a force firing from behind a large berm. The Green Berets responded by assaulting directly into the enemy fire, forcing the enemy back, and occupying the vital defensive position. The enemy fire once again intensified, and a U.S. Army Apache helicopter, supporting the ground troops, was shot down on the far side of the enemy compound away from the U.S. and Iraqi Forces. Detachment 563, facing overwhelming enemy resistance, was fully engaged and unable to secure the downed helicopter crew. With the renewed enemy resistance and a U.S. helicopter down behind enemy lines, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi counterparts returned to the fight. However, the battle was now at an even more intense level than before, and the Green Berets coordinated a massive effort including additional air strikes and re-enforcement by a U.S. Army Stryker battalion. Meanwhile, Detachment 563 continued to repel the enemy force and, with the help of close air support, began to push the enemy back and advance on their positions. Although two of the Green Berets received wounds and several of the Iraqi Soldiers were also wounded, they continued to drive back the enemy. As they secured the first trenches, they identified the level of sophisticated defensive positions the enemy had established. There were trenches behind the berms as far as the team could see. As Detachment 563 fought on, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and the Iraqi Forces were seeking the wreckage of the downed helicopter in hostile territory. The rescue element turned onto a road with a large berm, overlooking their exposed vehicles. Without warning, the enemy attacked from the top of this berm with rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. The Green Berets and Iraqi Forces engaged enemy as close as two meters away along a 300 meter gauntlet of fire. Master Sergeant Jacobsen's vehicle was securing the rear of the column and was completely exposed to enemy machine gun fire. He engaged the enemy with his M240 machine gun, until it was damaged by direct enemy fire. As he transitioned to his M4 rifle he was struck in the helmet and arm by enemy rounds, and his M4 disabled by a third round. Wounded, he drew his pistol and continued to engage the enemy. Although this engagement resulted in the loss of several more Iraqi soldiers and the wounding of several Green Berets, their valiant efforts fended off the massive enemy ambush. Only later was it realized that the rescue element had driven through the heart of the enemy stronghold. The rescue element soon located the helicopter wreckage but was unable to secure it as they were still outnumbered by the enemy. The rescue team held a defensive position as close as they could to the downed helicopter in order to protect it from enemy approach. Once the U.S. Army Stryker battalion arrived, they were able to safely move to the crash site. Although the two-man crew of the Apache had died in the crash, the actions of the rescue element prevented the enemy from seizing the remains of these brave Americans. On the other side of the battlefield, Detachment 563 continued to suppress enemy resistance with their direct fire and firepower from U.S. air support. The enemy was now pinned between the two U.S. and Iraqi elements, and through coordinated air strikes which continued through the night, enemy resistance was broken. In the end, the U.S. and Iraqi forces had sustained casualties, but had killed hundreds of militants and detained over 200 more. This battle decisively destroyed the "Soldiers of Heaven" cult, and thwarted an attempt to assassinate several major Shia religious leaders. The actions of the U.S. and Iraqi Forces on 28 January 2007 prevented an extremist cult from disrupting the Iraqi efforts to rebuild their country.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart


JOHNS, STEPHAN
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Stephan Johns, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Special Forces Sniper on a Special Operations Team, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, on 30 May 2004, in Afghanistan. On that date, Sergeant First Class Johns was in the last helicopter of a group mounting an assault on Al Qaeda and Taliban fighters in a valley in northeast Afghanistan. His job was to shoot at the enemy from the air to provide cover to ground forces. When his helicopter was hit and briefly forced down, Sergeant First Class Johns jumped out to set up a one-man defensive wall between a group of enemy fighters and the main American assault group. Alone on the ground for 30 minutes before being picked up by another helicopter, he killed nine enemy fighters who repeatedly rushed him.
Home Town: Pleasantville, New Jersey
If you can help us locate SFC Johns' Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.


*JOHNSON, ALLEN C. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Allen C. Johnson, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Special Forces Medical Sergeant with an Operational Detachment of the 1st Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, near Khanaqin, Afghanistan, on 26 April 2005.
Born: at Sun Valley, California
Home Town: Los Molinos, California
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Bronze Star, Purple Heart
If you can help us locate SFC Johnson's Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.



JOHNSON, THOMAS H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas H. Johnson, Jr., Captain, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while Commanding Troop F, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, during the period 10 April 2004 to 24 June 2004, in Iraq. In the face of the enemy, Captain Johnson's personal valor as well as his combat leadership was pivotal to the success of the Brigade reconnaissance troop in multiple engagements. His leadership and relentless attitudes towards the enemy inspired his troops to fight harder and more determined than the enemy thought possible, breaking enemy morale. His actions and leadership are second to none and are in the best traditions of the officer corps. Captain Johnson's exceptional performance is in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, Fox Troop, 4th Cavalry Division, 3d Brigade Combat Team, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Captain Thomas H. Johnson, Jr., distinguished himself by gallantry in action while Commanding Troop F, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, during the period 10 April 2004 to 24 June 2004, in Iraq. On 10 April 2004, Captain Johnson led two platoons on a dismounted assault of four reinforced enemy positions. After personally supervising the emplacement of a support by fire from F Troop gun trucks and directed well-aimed fires from Kiowa Warriors, tanks, and 155-mm. artillery, Captain Johnson led a 600 meter dismounted assault across an open field and through three irrigation ditches onto the objective. Captain Johnson's valorous actions and leadership that day, led to the destruction of several armed insurgents including one mortar team. On 4 May 2004, Captain Johnson took his Headquarters elements on patrol to check his platoon sector. As he was moving through sectors he monitored a call on the battalion radio that another unit was in contact. He immediately led his Headquarters elements, with only two gun trucks and an FLA, to the scene. Once on scene, he took command of the two separate units and led a dismounted assault. Under enemy fire, Captain Johnson led the assault across 400 meters of open fields and captured 12 insurgents, weapons, and IED materials. Captain Johnson's courageous leadership of F Troop during its intense twelve-hour firefight in Buhriz on 17 June 2004, was instrumental to the BRT's success. Under constant enemy fire, Captain Johnson occupied the most dangerous position on the rooftop of the Troop's strongpoint in order to command and control his Troop. On several occasions he was nearly shot because of his disregard for his own personal safety. His actions and examples allowed his soldiers thirteen confirmed enemy KIAs with zero friendly casualties. From 23 to 24 June 2004, Captain Johnson was tasked with strong pointing the stadium in the city of Ba'qubah. In route to that mission he was informed that he was to turn over his Troop to the Executive Officer and take command of a Mechanized Infantry Company from the 30th Enhanced Brigade, which had lost their commander that morning. Quickly organizing the new command, he led an assault into the Northern portion of the city. Neutralizing small pockets of resistance in house-to-house fighting, he personally led his men in the pacification of the sector. Captain Johnson's exceptional performance is in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, Fox Troop, 4th Cavalry Division, 3d Brigade Combat Team, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), 4@ Army Commendation Medals


JONES, BENJAMIN
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Benjamin Jones, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Senior Weapons Sergeant with Operational Detachment Alpha 344 (ODA-344), Company A, 2d Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), in action against enemy forces in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan.
If you can help us locate SFC Jones' Photo, Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.


JORDAN, PATRICK
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Patrick Jordan, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 37th Armored Regiment, 1st Armored Division, in action against the enemy in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM on 4 April 2004, in Iraq. On that date, Sergeant Jordan ignored heavy enemy fire from small arms and rocket propelled grenades to help rescue 20 soldiers pinned down in a Baghdad ally. When one Humvee broke down under heavy enemy fire, by quick thinking Sergeant Jordan was able to save his comrades. During the four-hour convoy, Sergeant Jordan bravely stuck his head out of the hatch of his tank, firing more than 400 rounds and killing or wounding between 20 and 30 insurgent enemy troops.
Born: at Des Moines, Iowa
Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa
If you can help us locate Sgt Jordan's Photo, Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.


JOSEPH, JOSHUA V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joshua V. Joseph, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 172d Stryker Brigade Combat team, at Mosul, Iraq, on 19 November 2005, during military operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM III. Private First Class Joseph's courage and disregard for his own welfare resulted in saving the lives of his fellow comrades who were severely wounded. His bravery is in keeping with the highest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, his unit, the United States Army, and the United States of America.
Home Town: Indianapolis, Indiana
If you can help us locate PFC Joseph's Narrative for Award, Please E-Mail us.


JULIAN, MATTHEW
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Matthew Julian, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 1st Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Oruzgan Province of Afghanistan, in October 2005. Sergeant First Class Julian and his team had been conducting cordon and search operations in a valley known to be a Taliban sanctuary when his team was attacked. Sergeant First Class Julian jumped out of his vehicle and started firing a 60 mm mortar at the enemies. When enemy fire increased, he began firing shells to the north and made other tactical maneuvers that helped save his detachment.
If you can help us locate SFC Julian's Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.

 

KAY, SHANNON
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Shannon Kay, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 11 December 2004, in Iraq. Staff Sergeant Kay helped to save the lives of seven members of his squad after they were attacked with rockets and mortars by a suicide bomber at a traffic checkpoint. Staff Sergeant Kay and others used fire extinguishers to save their burning Stryker vehicle and killed at least eight enemy fighters. Though wounded in four places, Staff Sergeant Kay refused medical attention to continue the defense of his vehicle and his comrades.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart
If you can help us locate S/Sgt Kay's Photo, Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.



KEEFE, MATTHEW
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Matthew Keefe, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as the Detachment Junior Engineer Sergeant for Operational Detachment Alpha 323 (ODA-323), 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), Task Force 31, CJSOTF-A, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, on 25 July 2005, in in the Syahcow, Oruzgan Providence, Afghanistan.
If you can help us locate S/Sgt Keefe's Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.


KEIL, BLAKE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Blake Keil, Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Company Commander of Battery A, 2d Battalion, 15th Field Artillery, 2d Brigade, 10th Mountain Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, in Iraq. Captain Keil distinguished himself by his gallant leadership in planning and leading multiple operations to combat al Qaeda forces around Mahmudiyah, Iraq.
If you can help us locate Cpt Keil's Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.


KELLER, GREGORY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gregory Keller, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA- 566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 28 January 2006, at Najaf, Iraq. Staff Sergeant Keller's heroism and bravery under intense enemy fire provided effective and accurate suppressive fire that supported the withdrawal of dismounted Iraqi Army Scouts, saving their lives. Staff Sergeant Keller's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Special Operations Task Force - Central, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Staff Sergeant Gregory Keller distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in combat against enemy forces on 28 January 2006, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, at Najaf, Iraq. In the early morning hours of January 28th, a small contingent of Iraqi Army Scouts and the An Najaf Police attempted to negotiate with the "Soldiers of Heaven," an extremist militant group that was preparing to assassinate some of the Islamic world's most prominent Shi'a religious leaders, at their compound and, if necessary, detain the leaders. Gunfire erupted as the Iraqi Force approached the compound. Initial fighting was ferocious, as the vastly outnumbered Iraqi Force fought for survival. Although pinned down, with many casualties and half of their vehicles disabled, they continued to inflict heavy casualties on the much larger enemy force. At approximately 0700 hours, the Detachment 566 Commander received an urgent phone call from the Iraqi Army Scouts requesting immediate assistance. While U.S. Special Forces and Iraqi elements were preparing to move to the battle grounds, they received a second phone call. The An Najaf Governor requested the help of both U.S. ground and air combat support against the amassed enemy force. As Detachment 566 arrived on the battlefield, the Iraqi Scouts were isolated and suppressed by the heavy enemy fire. The detachment advanced to support the Iraqi Scouts and immediately received heavy volumes of enemy small arms, machine gun, rocket propelled grenade, and mortar fire. Staff Sergeant Keller dismounted his vehicle and began organizing Iraqi Scouts into defensive positions. His own vehicle quickly became a primary target and was raked by enemy fire. Staff Sergeant Keller observed fifteen Iraqi Scouts pinned down between his position and the enemy. With enemy rounds impacting all around him, he moved fifty meters to a position which allowed him to provide critical supporting fire to the trapped Iraqi Scouts. Despite being wounded by the nearby explosion of a rocket propelled grenade, Sergeant Keller held his precarious position and continued to fire on the enemy with his M4 rifle and M79 grenade launcher. His selfless, valorous actions allowed the 15 Iraqi Scouts to withdraw to friendly defensive positions, saving their lives. As U.S. and Iraqi Forces began to advance on the enemy positions they immediately came under intense enemy fire. Detachment 566 advanced 200 meters across an open field and Staff Sergeant Keller engaged the enemy with his individual weapon while simultaneously directing the return fire of their vehicle-mounted heavy machine guns. Staff Sergeant Keller's vehicle sustained dozens of direct hits as he continued to push forward. When the vehicle next to his was disabled, Sergeant Keller dismounted his vehicle under a heavy barrage of fire and engaged the enemy with his M79 grenade launcher. Staff Sergeant Keller's actions temporarily disrupted the enemy fire; protecting his comrades as they recovered the disabled vehicle. Despite the skilled and valiant efforts of the U.S. and Iraqi Forces, the enemy continued to mass their numbers, and the U.S. and Iraqi Forces fell back to allow air strikes to attack the enemy. With the air strikes and arrival of Iraqi re-enforcements the enemy appeared to have been subdued with only pockets of resistance remaining. At this time, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi Forces counterparts, withdrew from the battlefield to refit and reorganize at their base. As these forces left the battlefield, Detachment 563 with their Iraqi Police Counterparts arrived to assist the Iraqi Forces in securing the enemy compound. They were not aware that over 750 fanatical militants remained in the well defended compound awaiting their chance to fight. When Detachment 563 and their Iraqi counterparts advanced on the compound, they were ambushed by a force firing from behind a large berm. The Green Berets responded by assaulting directly into the enemy fire, forcing the enemy back, and occupying the vital defensive position. The enemy fire once again intensified, and a U.S. Army Apache helicopter, supporting the ground troops, was shot down on the far side of the enemy compound away from the U.S. and Iraqi Forces. Detachment 563, facing overwhelming enemy resistance, was fully engaged and unable to secure the downed helicopter crew. With the renewed enemy resistance and a U.S. helicopter down behind enemy lines, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi counterparts returned to the fight. However, the battle was now at an even more intense level than before, and the Green Berets coordinated a massive effort including additional air strikes and re-enforcement by a U.S. Army Stryker battalion. Meanwhile, Detachment 563 continued to repel the enemy force and, with the help of close air support, began to push the enemy back and advance on their positions. Although two of the Green Berets received wounds and several of the Iraqi Soldiers were also wounded, they continued to drive back the enemy. As they secured the first trenches, they identified the level of sophisticated defensive positions the enemy had established. There were trenches behind the berms as far as the team could see. As Detachment 563 fought on, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and the Iraqi Forces were seeking the wreckage of the downed helicopter in hostile territory. The rescue element turned onto a road with a large berm, overlooking their exposed vehicles. Without warning, the enemy attacked from the top of this berm with rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. The Green Berets and Iraqi Forces engaged enemy as close as two meters away along a 300 meter gauntlet of fire. Although this engagement resulted in the loss of several more Iraqi soldiers and the wounding of several Green Berets, their valiant efforts fended off the massive enemy ambush. Only later was it realized that the rescue element had driven through the heart of the enemy stronghold. The rescue element soon located the helicopter wreckage but was unable to secure it as they were still outnumbered by the enemy. The rescue team held a defensive position as close as they could to the downed helicopter in order to protect it from enemy approach. Once the U.S. Army Stryker battalion arrived, they were able to safely move to the crash site. Although the two-man crew of the Apache had died in the crash, the actions of the rescue element prevented the enemy from seizing the remains of these brave Americans. On the other side of the battlefield, Detachment 563 continued to suppress enemy resistance with their direct fire and firepower from U.S. air support. The enemy was now pinned between the two U.S. and Iraqi elements, and through coordinated air strikes which continued through the night, enemy resistance was broken. In the end, the U.S. and Iraqi forces had sustained casualties, but had killed hundreds of militants and detained over 200 more. This battle decisively destroyed the "Soldiers of Heaven" cult, and thwarted an attempt to assassinate several major Shia religious leaders. The actions of the U.S. and Iraqi Forces on 28 January 2007 prevented an extremist cult from disrupting the Iraqi efforts to rebuild their country.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart


KIRKWOOD, SEAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Sean Kirkwood, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA- 566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 28 January 2006, at Najaf, Iraq. Master Sergeant Kirkwood's heroism and bravery during the attack against an enemy camp containing 500 terrorists and securing a downed helicopter were critical to his element's success against a numerically superior enemy force. Master Sergeant Kirkwood's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Special Operations Task Force Central and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Master Sergeant Sean Kirkwood distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in combat against enemy forces on 28 January 2006, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, at Najaf, Iraq. In the early morning hours of January 28th, a small contingent of Iraqi Army Scouts and the An Najaf Police attempted to negotiate with the "Soldiers of Heaven," an extremist militant group that was preparing to assassinate some of the Islamic world's most prominent Shi'a religious leaders, at their compound and, if necessary, detain the leaders. Gunfire erupted as the Iraqi Force approached the compound. Initial fighting was ferocious, as the vastly outnumbered Iraqi Force fought for survival. Although pinned down, with many casualties and half of their vehicles disabled, they continued to inflict heavy casualties on the much larger enemy force. At approximately 0700 hours, the Detachment 566 Commander received an urgent phone call from the Iraqi Army Scouts requesting immediate assistance. While U.S. Special Forces and Iraqi elements were preparing to move to the battle grounds, they received a second phone call. The An Najaf Governor requested the help of both U.S. ground and air combat support against the amassed enemy force. As Detachment 566 arrived on the battlefield, the Iraqi Scouts were isolated and suppressed by the heavy enemy fire. The detachment advanced to support the Iraqi Scouts and immediately received heavy volumes of enemy small arms, machine gun, rocket propelled grenade, and mortar fire. As reinforcements from AOB 510 and Iraqi Forces arrived, Master Sergeant Kirkwood led an assault on the enemy. He was soon wounded by small arms and rocket propelled grenade fire, but continued to maneuver his force against the enemy. With the combined firepower of Detachment 566, AOB 510, and Iraqi Forces with them, the Iraqi Scouts and Najaf Police survived overwhelming enemy opposition and were now ready to turn the tide. However, there were still hundreds of enemy amassed in the trenches. With the air strikes and arrival of Iraqi re-enforcements the enemy appeared to have been subdued with only pockets of resistance remaining. At this time, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi Forces counterparts, withdrew from the battlefield to refit and reorganize at their base. As these forces left the battlefield, Detachment 563 with their Iraqi Police Counterparts arrived to assist the Iraqi Forces in securing the enemy compound. They were not aware that over 750 fanatical militants remained in the well defended compound awaiting their chance to fight. When Detachment 563 and their Iraqi counterparts advanced on the compound, they were ambushed by a force firing from behind a large berm. The Green Berets responded by assaulting directly into the enemy fire, forcing the enemy back, and occupying the vital defensive position. The enemy fire once again intensified, and a U.S. Army Apache helicopter, supporting the ground troops, was shot down on the far side of the enemy compound away from the U.S. and Iraqi Forces. Detachment 563, facing overwhelming enemy resistance, was fully engaged and unable to secure the downed helicopter crew. With the renewed enemy resistance and a U.S. helicopter down behind enemy lines, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi counterparts returned to the fight. However, the battle was now at an even more intense level than before, and the Green Berets coordinated a massive effort including additional air strikes and re-enforcement by a U.S. Army Stryker battalion. Meanwhile, Detachment 563 continued to repel the enemy force and, with the help of close air support, began to push the enemy back and advance on their positions. Although two of the Green Berets received wounds and several of the Iraqi Soldiers were also wounded, they continued to drive back the enemy. As they secured the first trenches, they identified the level of sophisticated defensive positions the enemy had established. There were trenches behind the berms as far as the team could see. As Detachment 563 fought on, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and the Iraqi Forces were seeking the wreckage of the downed helicopter in hostile territory. The rescue element turned onto a road with a large berm, overlooking their exposed vehicles. Without warning, the enemy attacked from the top of this berm with rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. The Green Berets and Iraqi Forces engaged enemy as close as two meters away along a 300 meter gauntlet of fire. Although this engagement resulted in the loss of several more Iraqi soldiers and the wounding of several Green Berets, their valiant efforts fended off the massive enemy ambush. Only later was it realized that the rescue element had driven through the heart of the enemy stronghold. The rescue element soon located the helicopter wreckage but was unable to secure it as they were still outnumbered by the enemy. The rescue team held a defensive position as close as they could to the downed helicopter in order to protect it from enemy approach. Once the U.S. Army Stryker battalion arrived, they were able to safely move to the crash site. Although the two-man crew of the Apache had died in the crash, the actions of the rescue element prevented the enemy from seizing the remains of these brave Americans. On the other side of the battlefield, Detachment 563 continued to suppress enemy resistance with their direct fire and firepower from U.S. air support. The enemy was now pinned between the two U.S. and Iraqi elements, and through coordinated air strikes which continued through the night, enemy resistance was broken. In the end, the U.S. and Iraqi forces had sustained casualties, but had killed hundreds of militants and detained over 200 more. This battle decisively destroyed the "Soldiers of Heaven" cult, and thwarted an attempt to assassinate several major Shia religious leaders. The actions of the U.S. and Iraqi Forces on 28 January 2007 prevented an extremist cult from disrupting the Iraqi efforts to rebuild their country.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart


KOBES, GERRIT
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gerrit Kobes, Specialist, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment, 160th Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, in Fallujah, Iraq, on 2 November 2004. Specialist Kobes was a Medical Aidman serving with Company B on an escort mission to ferry Iraqi soldiers to Fallujah for an upcoming operation when their convoy was attacked by insurgents firing rocket propelled grenades and small arms. A truck was quickly disabled, causing five Iraqi soldiers serious wounds. With the convoy blocked and enemy fire coming from several locations, Specialist Kobes disregarding his personal safety, moved through the convoy on foot and reached the wounded men. Under covering fire from Marines trying to secure the site, Specialist Kobes began medical treatments. By the time the convoy began moving again, he had stabilized the wounded, permitting their evacuation for further medical care. One Iraqi soldier died of his wounds, but four others were saved by the dedicated actions of Specialist Kobes.
Home Town: Kettle Falls, Washington
If you can help us locate Spc Kobes' Citation &/or Narrative, Please E-Mail us.

 

LACAMERA, PAUL
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Paul Lacamera, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Task Force ONE, 87th Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan, during Operation ANACONDA, on 4 March 2002.
Home Town: Westwood, Massachusetts
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LaFRENZ, MATTHEW
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Matthew LaFrenz, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, during the period 3 to 4 March 2002, during Operation ANACONDA in Afghanistan. Sergeant LaFrenz's valorous actions while in direct contact with enemy forces and in the face of extreme duress during the successful rescue of Special Operators contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and to the saving of additional lives. In five separate occasions, Sergeant LaFrenz exposed himself to enemy fire while providing medical support to casualties. Sergeant LaFrenz was able to consolidate all casualties within four hours providing aid to nine casualties in an exhausting frigid environment. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant LaFrenz during 18 hours of combat is in keeping with the highest standards of valor. Through his distinctive accomplishments, Sergeant LaFrenz reflected great credit upon himself, the United States Army, and the Department of Defense.


LAMKIN, ANDREW J. A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Andrew J. A. Lamkin, Specialist, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Combat Medic with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 5 September 2004 during Operation IRON FURY II, in Iraq. Specialist Lamkin's personal bravery and selfless actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the First Cavalry Division, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Specialist Andrew Lamkin distinguished himself by his gallantry and personal courage while assigned as Combat Medic with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division on 5 September 2004 during Operation IRON FURY II. Specialist Lamkin established his platoon's Casualty Collection Point (CCP) in a building adjacent to the corner of Route BRAVO and Route MAINE, deep in Sadr City, Iraq. The platoon made contact with Mahdi Militia fighters, and a soldier was wounded in a squad on an adjacent rooftop. Without hesitating, he left his covered and concealed position and made his way toward the injured infantryman. The enemy massed their fires on him as he moved to treat the casualty in an effort to pin him down, but he continued undeterred. Noticing that two insurgent gunmen were exposed on a rooftop across the street, Specialist Lamkin halted and quickly killed them both with accurate rifle fire. Rushing to the side of the wounded soldier, Private First Class Young, he immediately assessed the casualty and began treating him for a gunshot wound to his arm. He soon realized that he could not effectively treat Private First Class Young's injury at that location due to the high volume of incoming fire. Specialist Lamkin saw a locked door that appeared to lead downstairs, and ran toward it at full speed, knocking it off its hinges. He dragged the door to the casualty and, using empty ammunition bandoliers, fashioned a makeshift litter, which he used to drag Private First Class Young to safety. Once out of direct fire contact, he stabilized Private First Class Young until his platoon could evacuate him. Less than an hour after the first casualty, another soldier was critically wounded. Private Second Class McCauley had been shot in the head, and needed immediate medical attention. Again, without hesitation, Specialist Lamkin ran to the side of the fallen soldier and began treating him under fire. With another soldier's help, he dragged Private McCauley to a sector of the rooftop that seemed safer and less exposed. Upon reaching it, however, Specialist Lamkin and his patient were immediately taken under heavy rifle and RPG fire from insurgent gunmen across the street. Without regard for his own safety, Specialist Lamkin used his own body as a shield, and began to stabilize his seriously wounded comrade as withering fire raked the rooftop around him. Specialist Lamkin realized that Private McCauley was unconscious and choking on his own blood. He quickly opened the casualty's airway using a "J-tube", enabling him to breathe although he was unconscious. The enemy continued to hammer the rooftop with RPG and rifle fire, but Specialist Lamkin shielded Private McCauley's body with his own. Securing the "J-tube" with 550-cord in order to move his patient, Specialist Lamkin called for the evacuation vehicle. Before he could evacuate the casualty, however, Specialist Lamkin helped carry him over a four-foot high wall, under fire, and then down three flights of stairs to the evacuation vehicle--an impressive show of stamina and strength. On the ground floor, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle tasked to evacuate Private McCauley backed up to the door. As the wounded soldier's squad placed him in the Bradley, Specialist Lamkin continued to scan for insurgent fighters. He identified two that were repositioning to interdict the MEDEVAC vehicle, and killed them both with accurate rifle fire. Specialist Lamkin demonstrated his expert marksmanship, medical skills and conspicuous gallantry; he is truly the epitome of the combat medic.


LAMOREAUX, CORY L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Cory L. Lamoreaux, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy on 3 March 2002 to 4 March 2002 while serving as a Medic on an MH-47E Helicopter of the 2d Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), in support of Special Operation Forces engaged in combat actions during Operation ANACONDA, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan. Master Sergeant Lamoreaux's actions under direct enemy fire were instrumental in the survival of his comrades in the moments preceding and immediately following the shoot down of his aircraft and subsequent actions on the objective and helped set the conditions for the rescue operation of United States Forces under fire. After his helicopter, transporting U.S. Army Rangers, was shot down by enemy ground fire, Master Sergeant Lamoreaux returned fire on enemy attackers with his personal weapon, without thought for his own safety, and attempted to shield casualties with his own body.
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LANCEY, RAYMOND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Raymond Lancey, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 28 January 2006, at Najaf, Iraq. Master Sergeant Lancey's heroism and bravery under intense enemy fire allowed him to organize the initial attack to recover isolated Iraqi army scouts from certain death. He maintained the intense tempo of the attack for over twelve hours of direct combat even with numerous detachment casualties. Master Sergeant Lancey's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Special Operations Task Force -Central, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Master Sergeant Raymond Lancey distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 566 (ODA-566), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), in combat against enemy forces on 28 January 2006, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, at Najaf, Iraq. In the early morning hours of January 28th, a small contingent of Iraqi Army Scouts and the An Najaf Police attempted to negotiate with the "Soldiers of Heaven," an extremist militant group that was preparing to assassinate some of the Islamic world's most prominent Shi'a religious leaders, at their compound and, if necessary, detain the leaders. Gunfire erupted as the Iraqi Force approached the compound. Initial fighting was ferocious, as the vastly outnumbered Iraqi Force fought for survival. Although pinned down, with many casualties and half of their vehicles disabled, they continued to inflict heavy casualties on the much larger enemy force. At approximately 0700 hours, the Detachment 566 Commander received an urgent phone call from the Iraqi Army Scouts requesting immediate assistance. While U.S. Special Forces and Iraqi elements were preparing to move to the battle grounds, they received a second phone call. The An Najaf Governor requested the help of both U.S. ground and air combat support against the amassed enemy force. As Detachment 566 arrived on the battlefield, the Iraqi Scouts were isolated and suppressed by the heavy enemy fire. The detachment advanced to support the Iraqi Scouts and immediately received heavy volumes of enemy small arms, machine gun, rocket propelled grenade, and mortar fire. Master Sergeant Lancey, responding to the enemy fire, quickly directed the return fire of his .50 caliber machine gun, then dismounted his vehicle. He then led a three-man dismounted team through a hail of enemy fire to establish a support by fire position near the pinned down Iraqi Soldiers. His selfless, valorous actions allowed the 15 Iraqi Scouts to withdraw to friendly defensive positions, saving their lives. As U.S. and Iraqi Forces began to advance on the enemy positions they immediately came under intense enemy fire. Detachment 566 advanced 200 meters across an open field and Master Sergeant Lancey engaged the enemy with his individual weapon while simultaneously directing the return fire of the team's vehicle-mounted heavy machine guns. As they moved across the field, Master Sergeant Lancey was wounded in the face with shrapnel from an enemy round which ricocheted off a nearby vehicle, yet continued to fight. With the air strikes and arrival of Iraqi re-enforcements the enemy appeared to have been subdued with only pockets of resistance remaining. At this time, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi Forces counterparts, withdrew from the battlefield to refit and reorganize at their base. As these forces left the battlefield, Detachment 563 with their Iraqi Police Counterparts arrived to assist the Iraqi Forces in securing the enemy compound. They were not aware that over 750 fanatical militants remained in the well defended compound awaiting their chance to fight. When Detachment 563 and their Iraqi counterparts advanced on the compound, they were ambushed by a force firing from behind a large berm. The Green Berets responded by assaulting directly into the enemy fire, forcing the enemy back, and occupying the vital defensive position. The enemy fire once again intensified, and a U.S. Army Apache helicopter, supporting the ground troops, was shot down on the far side of the enemy compound away from the U.S. and Iraqi Forces. Detachment 563, facing overwhelming enemy resistance, was fully engaged and unable to secure the downed helicopter crew. With the renewed enemy resistance and a U.S. helicopter down behind enemy lines, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and their Iraqi counterparts returned to the fight. However, the battle was now at an even more intense level than before, and the Green Berets coordinated a massive effort including additional air strikes and re-enforcement by a U.S. Army Stryker battalion. Meanwhile, Detachment 563 continued to repel the enemy force and, with the help of close air support, began to push the enemy back and advance on their positions. Although two of the Green Berets received wounds and several of the Iraqi Soldiers were also wounded, they continued to drive back the enemy. As they secured the first trenches, they identified the level of sophisticated defensive positions the enemy had established. There were trenches behind the berms as far as the team could see. As Detachment 563 fought on, Detachment 566, AOB 510, and the Iraqi Forces were seeking the wreckage of the downed helicopter in hostile territory. The rescue element turned onto a road with a large berm, overlooking their exposed vehicles. Without warning, the enemy attacked from the top of this berm with rocket propelled grenades and machine guns. The Green Berets and Iraqi Forces engaged enemy as close as two meters away along a 300 meter gauntlet of fire. Although this engagement resulted in the loss of several more Iraqi soldiers and the wounding of several Green Berets, their valiant efforts fended off the massive enemy ambush. Only later was it realized that the rescue element had driven through the heart of the enemy stronghold. The rescue element soon located the helicopter wreckage but was unable to secure it as they were still outnumbered by the enemy. The rescue team held a defensive position as close as they could to the downed helicopter in order to protect it from enemy approach. Once the U.S. Army Stryker battalion arrived, they were able to safely move to the crash site. Although the two- man crew of the Apache had died in the crash, the actions of the rescue element prevented the enemy from seizing the remains of these brave Americans. On the other side of the battlefield, Detachment 563 continued to suppress enemy resistance with their direct fire and firepower from U.S. air support. The enemy was now pinned between the two U.S. and Iraqi elements, and through coordinated air strikes which continued through the night, enemy resistance was broken. In the end, the U.S. and Iraqi forces had sustained casualties, but had killed hundreds of militants and detained over 200 more. This battle decisively destroyed the "Soldiers of Heaven" cult, and thwarted an attempt to assassinate several major Shia religious leaders. The actions of the U.S. and Iraqi Forces on 28 January 2007 prevented an extremist cult from disrupting the Iraqi efforts to rebuild their country.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart


LARA, PETER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Peter Lara, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an enemy of the United States while serving as a Platoon Leader for 2d Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment (Task Force 2-1), 172d Stryker Brigade Combat Team, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 19 November 2005, while deployed to Mosul, Iraq. Sergeant First Class Lara, despite being gravely wounded, continued to lead his men in an assault against a fortified terrorist safe house. His actions are directly responsible for the destruction of a terrorist cell and allowing for the rapid evacuation of his wounded platoon members. His men are alive today because of the sacrifice and heroism he demonstrated that morning. Sergeant First Class Lara's courage, leadership, and complete disregard for his own wounds are in keeping with the highest tradition of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, Task Force 2-1 Infantry, the 172d Stryker Brigade Combat Team, and the United States Army.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart


LEWIS, ANDREW
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Andrew Lewis, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, during Operation Anaconda, on 5 March 2003, in Afghanistan. On that date Sergeant First Class Lewis, together with Sergeant First Class Joshua D. Betten, departed their fire base on the border of Afghanistan for a planned six-day, two-man sniper/observer mission, intended to provide early warning to their base and to interdict enemy infiltration. The two men prepared a night position about 1,600 meters from the base. Soon they were engaged by a large force of the enemy, moving on their position. Sergeant Lewis fired a claymore mine and set to cover their position, eliminating on attacker and then shot a second one with his pistol. Simultaneously, Sergeant Betten opened fire on other enemy soldiers, killing three of them. The team was quickly under fire from two sides and they were forced to cover each other as one reloaded and the other fired. At one point enemy soldiers were so close that Sergeant Lewis threw three grenades, finally breaking up the direct attack, though they remained under constant fire, while Sergeant Lewis was in constant communication with their base, which advised the two men that it would be 10 minutes before a relief force could arrive. When the two soldiers tried to move to a less exposed position, they came under machine gun fire from two directions. After expending all their rifle ammunition and with only their pistols, the two men slid 500 meters down a canyon cliff where they found cover while waiting for the relief force composed of other Special Forces members and Afghanistan soldiers. Once rescued, their report made it obvious that a large force was massing to attack the base. The quick and determined actions of these two soldiers gave enough advanced warning that the base was spared an attack. Both men defended not only each other, but all of the men in the base by their quick and effective actions by their bravery and quick response in the face of an overwhelming enemy assault.
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LOGSDON, KEITH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Keith Logsdon, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Operational Detachment Alpha 324 (ODA-324), Company B, 1st Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, on 25 July 2005, in Afghanistan. Master Sergeant Logsdon's selfless acts of heroism, disregard for his own personal safety, and dedication to duty reflect great credit upon himself, the 3rd Special Forces Group, the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, and the United States Army. 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: 
Master Sergeant Keith G. Logsdon, United States Army, distinguished himself by exceptional gallantry in action under intense small arms and heavy weapons fire against a well entrenched and numerically superior force as the Detachment Operations Sergeant for Operational Detachment Alpha 324 (ODA-324), Company B, 1st Battalion, 3d Special Forces Group (Airborne), Task Force 31, Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan in the village of Syahcow, Oruzgan Province, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan on 25 July 2005. Master Sergeant Logsdon personally led a squad of Afghan National Army (ANA) Soldiers to the town of Syahcow under intense and accurate small arms and heavy weapons fire with complete disregard for his own personal safety in order to secure the eastern side of village. Upon reaching the village Master Sergeant Logsdon began engaging the enemy, killing three in the process. Following this engagement and in 115 + degree temperatures, Master Sergeant Logsdon, still directing the QRF, began his sweep from the northeastern side of the objective. Under a hail of enemy small arms and RPG fire emanating from the towns eastern side. Master Sergeant Logsdon led the soldiers to an assault position in an effort to gain a foothold in the town. Exiting the assault position, still under intense RPG fire, Master Sergeant Logsdon personally ran down and engaged five enemy combatants attempting to flank friendly positions to the southeast with his M-4 and grenades, killing one in the process. He then moved forward in order to establish a foothold in Syahcow. Once in the town, Master Sergeant Logsdon advanced on and destroyed multiple enemy positions, clearing over 14 compounds in the process of the 14 hour battle. During the early stages of the battle Master Sergeant Logsdon relayed critical information to the commander about enemy strongholds in order to fix their positions and call in mortar fires and later Close Air Support. These fires were extremely effective on the enemy positions and at times danger close. After softening these targets Master Sergeant Logsdon pressed the assault forward leading the QRF soldiers to clear multiple compounds and discovering a network of aqueducts used by the insurgents to move through the town. At one point in the battle Master Sergeant Logsdon moved alone, under intense enemy fire, in order to reach an infantry squad from the QRF who sustained two casualties. Once he reached the squad he rendered advanced medical aid to the soldiers and attempted to save the life of a mortally wounded infantryman. He then coordinated a critical link-up with a cordon element in order to transport the wounded to an HLZ for MEDEVAC. Master Sergeant Logsdon then gave direction to the infantry squad redirecting their efforts for the continued assault. Finally, Master Sergeant Logsdon liked up with a fellow detachment member to coordinate the final assault against the last enemy holdouts. Master Sergeant Logsdon's gallantry under fire throughout the 14 hour long battle was critical to the overall mission's success and helped save the lives of US and ANA personnel. During the course of the assault he constantly provided leadership, direction, and motivation to his ANA soldiers and passed critical information to his fellow maneuver elements. His efforts contributed to fifteen confirmed enemy KIAs, the capture of fourteen insurgents, and recovery of over thirty light and heavy weapons. Master Sergeant Logsdon's selfless acts of heroism, disregard for his own personal safety, and dedication to duty reflect great credit upon himself, the 3rd Special Forces Group, the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan, and the United States Army.


LOWE, DAVID
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David Lowe, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 1st Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan, on 10 June 2005. On that date, Sergeant Lowe's team, accompanied by Afghan forces, began climbing a steep mountainside to reach an element of 82nd Airborne paratroopers fighting off pockets of enemy on all sides when they also came under fire from insurgent forces. During a six-hour firefight, Sergeant Lowe moved deliberately to aid the wounded -- at one point dashing over 150 yards of open ground. He climbed an exposed rock pinnacle to shoot down a fighter who had a teammate pinned down, and helped kill six other attackers, including some who shot at his soldiers as they attempted to carry out the body of a dead comrade.
Home Town: Lancaster, Pennsylvania
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LUNDGREN, CURTIS
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Curtis Lundgren, Specialist, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 2d Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 9 June 2007, in Iraq. When Specialist Lundgren's squad was ambushed by multiple enemy fortified positions, he braved the hailstorm of enemy bullets to rescue a comrade who was shot by insurgents. Specialist Lundgren, who was shot in the back, suppressed enemy positions, evacuated his fellow wounded squad mate, and used his body as a shield to prevent further wounds.
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*LYBERT, PATRICK (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Patrick Lybert, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with 3d Squadron, 71st Cavalry Regiment (Recon), 3d Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, in action against enemy forces in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM on 21 June 2006, near Gowardesh, Afghanistan. On that date, K Team (a forward observer element) and members of Company C, 3-71 Cavalry, executed a two-day climb to assigned watch/hide position on a ridge approximately 4 to 5 miles from the Pakistan border. K Team took up a position along Hill 1610, a small ridge which ran north to south. On the 21st of June at approximately 1415 hours K Team, just recently supplied by helicopter, set up in three small groups along the ridge top. Staff Sergeant Lybert was in the southern most group of soldiers on that ridge. The soldiers had just finished packing away their supplies and started laying out their security plan by pushing further out up the trail when they came under a combined arms attack initiated by rocket propelled grenades, simultaneously accompanied by intense machine-gun and small arms fire. The direction of the attack came from a north to south direction running the full length of the 50 meter deep defensive perimeter set up by K Team. The attack was so violent that one K Team soldier was immediately wounded by shrapnel from a rocket propelled grenade and simultaneously shot by small arms fire. The enemy launched its attack with violence and surprise, butt by stalling the attack and causing the enemy to take cover at a greater distance, Staff Sergeant Lybert aided in providing enough time for his team to recover from the initial shock of the attack, gain momentum, and able to call in indirect fire to inflict casualties on the enemy. Staff Sergeant Lybert engaged targets close enough and returned fire long enough that others could recover from the ferocity of the enemy's attack, return fire, treat the wounded and call in indirect fire from 120 mm mortars, 105 mm Howitzers and air support from A-10 fighter aircraft, C-130 Specter Gunships and B-1 Bombers, before he was mortally wounded. His professionalism and ability to accomplish the mission set him apart from his peers. Staff Sergeant Lybert's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 3d Squadron, 71st Cavalry, Combined Task Force SPARTAN, Combined Joint Task Force-76, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ladysmith, WI
Personal Awards: Silver Star (War on Terrorism), Purple Heart

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