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Citations For
U.S. Army 
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action During

The Vietnam War

Posted June 1, 2008 - Next Scheduled Update: July 2008

Vietnam War Army Silver Star Citations
A-L   M-Z

 

*MADDEN, RORY ANTONIO (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Rory Antonio Madden (0-5329224), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while engaged in close combat against an armed hostile force while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Madden distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 October 1967, while serving as the Platoon Leader of a Reconnaissance Platoon on a combat operation in the jungles of Vietnam. As the unit moved through an area of thick vegetation, it suddenly came under an intense volume of automatic and semi-automatic weapons fire from a well-concealed Viet Cong force estimated to be of company size. Seeing two of his men fall wounded in the initial burst of enemy fire, Lieutenant Madden immediately rushed forward to the soldiers in an effort to move them back to a covered position. Although exposing himself to a torrent of enemy fire, Lieutenant Madden bravely advanced forward, pouring a devastating volume of fire on the insurgents. As he neared the position of the two wounded soldiers, Lieutenant Madden was struck by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire and critically wounded. He was quickly evacuated to a medical facility where he succumbed to his wounds. Lieutenant Madden's unwavering dedication to the safety of his men and his extreme courage were an inspiration to all those with whom he served and contributed significantly to the overwhelming defeat of the enemy force. First Lieutenant Madden's extraordinary heroism while engaged in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Kingstown, Oklahoma


*MARKOVICH, DOUGLAS JOSEPH (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Douglas Joseph Markovich, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Markovich distinguished himself while serving as a Rifleman with Company A, 3rd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 1 March 1969, Specialist Markovich was on one of the first helicopters to set down in a landing zone northwest of Kontum and immediately assumed a position to provide security for the incoming helicopters. As the fourth helicopter touched down, an unknown sized enemy force subjected the landing zone with intense automatic weapons small arms and mortar fire from their well-concealed fortified positions. Continually exposing himself to devastating enemy attack, Specialist Markovich placed accurate suppressive fire on the enemy positions. During the ensuing firefight Specialist Markovich was mortally wounded by enemy shrapnel. His heroic actions were instrumental in repulsing the determined enemy attack. Specialist Four Markovich's courageous acts, initiative and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: August 31, 1947 at Newark, New Jersey
Home Town: Madison, New Jersey


MARQUEZ, CARLOS E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Carlos E. Marquez, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Marquez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967, as Crewchief of an Ambulance Helicopter of the 45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, on a rescue mission near Cu Chi. His helicopter received an urgent request to evacuate twelve seriously wounded men and immediately flew to the battle area. The mission was undertaken by the crew despite the knowledge that several rescue ships had previously been shot down in the area. The pilot made an unhampered landing and Specialist Fourth Class Marquez began loading the patients. Murderous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire suddenly erupted from a nearby tree line, riddling his helicopter. With four casualties loaded, the pilot ordered Specialist Fourth Class Marquez to climb aboard and took off to prevent further damage to the ship. The hostile barrage in the landing zone ceased, and the helicopter returned to rescue the remainder of the casualties. The enemy force launched a second fusillade on his ship, and he was wounded as rounds tore into the craft. Ignoring his wound and mounting damage to the helicopter, he remained on the ground until all of the injured were loaded. The pilot then took off and skillfully nursed the badly crippled ship to an airfield. Specialist Fourth Class Marquez's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.


MARTIN, DONALD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald C. Martin, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 24 March 1967 while serving as assistant team leader of a Special Forces reconnaissance patrol on combat operations deep in hostile territory. While deployed along a trail to observe enemy activity in the area, Sergeant Martin detected a hostile soldier aiming at his team leader from behind. Completely ignoring his own safety, he dove into the middle of the path and killed the insurgent with an accurate burst as he hit the ground. He quickly moved forward to search the body, but was driven back by a withering barrage from a numerically superior North Vietnamese force advancing on his position. Realizing that any information would be lost if his lines were overrun, he moved through a hail of bullets to search for intelligence materials. He crawled among the enemy dead and wounded collecting all valuable intelligence materials. An enemy casualty next to him received three bullets which were fired at him. Despite bullets striking all around him, he ran back to his perimeter and radioed for rescue helicopters to make an immediate extraction. He fought furiously against the advancing hostile force until the evacuation aircraft moved in and carried his team to safety.
RV, General Orders No: 6082 - (November 24, 1967)

MARTIN, DONALD C.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Donald C. Martin, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 6 October 1967 while serving as assistant team leader of a six-man Special Forces reconnaissance team on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. Shortly after infiltration, his team detected three enemy soldiers moving toward them Sergeant Martin quickly deployed his men in an attempt to capture one of the insurgents,, but two other hostile soldiers discovered their location and moved in for an ambush. Completely ignoring his own safety, he stood up and exchanged fire with the advancing enemy,, killing both insurgents with accurate bursts,. Although wounded in this action, he refused aid to direct the defense of his team when a large North Vietnamese force suddenly attacked. After calling for air strikes on the enemy positions, he braved a savage bombardment to crawl toward fallen hostile soldiers in an attempt to gather intelligence materials The insurgents concentrated their fire on him, but he refused to take rover until he had collected as much equipment and as many documents as possible With bullets striking all around him, he carried the materials back to his team's position and prepared his men for extraction. The enemy closed in as the helicopters arrived, but he skillfully led his team in evasive tactics and attained a successful evacuation.
RV, General Orders No: 6212 - (December 2, 1967)
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam)


*MARTIN, JAMES LOUIS (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Louis Martin (US-54967472), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Martin distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 16 June 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Shelby, Michigan


MARTINEZ, ALVARO M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Alvaro M. Martinez (US-54508522), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Martinez distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a squad leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his unit was participating in a combined infantry- armored cavalry operation in Duy Xuyen District. As the force neared the hamlet of Ap Bon (1), they suddenly came under intense small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket fire from an enemy force of undetermined size located in fortified positions around the outskirts of the hamlet. Sergeant Martinez immediately moved to the front of his platoon to direct the movement of his men and to locate the enemy positions. While his men provided cover fire, Sergeant Martinez swiftly advanced on the enemy bunkers and personally destroyed them with his accurate fire and hand grenades. Through his courageous actions, he personally knocked out three enemy positions and killed our enemy soldiers before returning to the rear for more ammunition. Heavily laden with grenades, Sergeant Martinez quickly ran through a withering hail of enemy fire to resume his assault on the enemy positions. Displaying tremendous determination and professional ability, he again moved against the enemy positions. Displaying tremendous determination and professional ability, he again moved against the enemy positions, destroying four additional bunkers. Sergeant Martinez' unquestionable valor while in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.


MARTINEZ, ERNESTO F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ernesto F. Martinez, Jr. (RA-18769288), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on the morning of 10 February 1968, while serving as a Tactical Operations Specialist with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, during a mortar and rocket attack on the brigade's base camp at Tan An, Vietnam. When many serious casualties were taken during the initial barrage, Specialist Martinez volunteered to leave the safety of his duty station in the Tactical Operations Center and gave medical aid to the wounded. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Martinez braved intense mortar, rocket and small arms fire to run 200 meters to the base camp's aid station, secure a medical kit and run to the scene of the heaviest fighting. There he moved from bunker to bunker, treating the most serious wounds of his injured comrades. Although blown off his feet and wounded by the blast of an exploding enemy rocket, Specialist Martinez continued to administer aid to the casualties until ordered to seek attention for his own wounds an hour and a half later. Specialist Five Martinez's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a Viet Cong force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 2854 (April 30, 1968)
Home Town: Houston, Texas


MATHIS, JAMES RHONDA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James Rhonda Mathis, Hospital Corpsman Second Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Senior Corpsman of Company I, Third Battalion, Twenty-Sixth Marines, THIRD Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 9 April 1968, while occupying a defensive position on Hill 881 South near Khe Sanh, Company I suddenly came under an intense North Vietnamese mortar attack and immediately sustained a casualty. Reacting instantly, Petty Officer Mathis unhesitatingly maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to the side of the injured man and assisted him to a position of relative safety. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he skillfully administered first aid to his wounded comrade and supervised his evacuation. When numerous additional Marines were wounded, he fearlessly moved from one position to another, shielding each man with his own body while providing medical assistance. While moving to assist a casualty, Petty Officer Mathis suddenly came under a heavy volume of hostile small arms fire which knocked him violently to the ground. Ignoring the enemy rounds impacting near him, he resolutely continued to advance through the intense fire while assisting his injured comrades. After the intensity of the enemy attack decreased, he was supervising the evacuation of the wounded when the Marines again came under a heavy volume of hostile mortar fire. Disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly maneuvered across the hazardous area on two additional occasions and rendered vital medical treatment. His heroic actions and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades in the face of extreme personal danger inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of numerous Marines. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Petty Officer Mathis upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


MAXWELL, ROBERT V., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert V. Maxwell, Jr. (0-5428206), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Maxwell distinguished himself on 15 May 1968 while serving as a Forward Observer with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, while at the base of Hill 352, his company came under an intense hostile mortar barrage and machine gun and other automatic weapons fire. Lieutenant Maxwell immediately left his covered position, and with complete disregard for the enemy fire, moved to higher ground with a radio to call in artillery. Almost immediately he received a fragment wound in the left knee, but he refused medical aid and remained exposed to adjust the artillery fire. With complete disregard for his painful wound, he moved about the perimeter adjusting artillery and air strikes. While moving to another observation point, he was wounded again, receiving a shrapnel wound in the left arm. Although his condition was considerably worse, he still refused medical aid or evacuation, and he kept moving around the perimeter through the heavy fire, adjusting the artillery and air strikes. Second Lieutenant Maxwell's heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 5397 (August 9, 1968)


MCCLEERY, FINNIS DAWSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Finnis Dawson McCleery (RA-18145176), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant McCleery distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was assigned the mission of performing a sweep through the village of Lo Giang (1) to clear it of a reinforced Viet Cong Battalion. As the unit crossed an open rice paddy near the village they came under intense mortar and small arms fire. When the enemy charged out of a tree line at the friendly force, Sergeant McCleery accurately fired his M-72 light automatic weapon and killed six insurgents. The company was then ordered to withdraw and regroup. Since the 1st Platoon Leader had taken command of the company, Sergeant McCleery assumed leadership of the 1st Platoon and deployed his men in defensive positions around an abandoned graveyard. From this position, he directed a withering hail of fire to protect the withdrawal of the company. As the company moved back on to the battlefield, Sergeant McCleery carried a machinegun with him to cover the withdrawal of all the wounded personnel. He repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire as he enabled the wounded to reach safety. Turning the machinegun over to a member of his platoon, Sergeant McCleery rushed into the open rice paddy amidst a torrid hail of hostile fire to assist the seriously wounded. Staff Sergeant McCleery's unquestionable valor in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3029 (June 4, 1968)
Born: December 25, 1927 at Stephenville, Texas
Home Town: San Angelo, Texas
Personal Awards: Medal of Honor (Vietnam)


*MCGREGOR, DONALD VERNON (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Donald Vernon McGregor (0-74381), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while engaged in military operations against an armed enemy on 13 August 1963. Captain McGregor demonstrated sound judgment, fortitude, and professional competence as an infantry unit advisor to the 51st Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. When a lead company of Vietnamese forces received hostile gun fire from ambush during a routine battalion operation, Captain McGregor disregarded his own personal safety, proceeded to the forward area, and advised the leading company commander in the most effective tactics and maneuvers to achieve military objectives. His courageous action, personal example, and dedicated devotion to duty inspired the Vietnamese officers and men to greater efforts and assured the success of the mission. Throughout the entire day of combat operations, he rendered invaluable assistance, advice and encouragement to his Vietnamese comrades until he was mortally wounded. Captain McGregor's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 3 (January 28, 1964)
Home Town: Rupert, Idaho


MCLAUGHLIN, PATRICK M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Patrick M. McLaughlin, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 29 October 1967, during Operation Shenandoah II. Sergeant McLaughlin, Company C, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry was serving as a squad leader on a search and destroy mission in a dense rubber plantation near Loc Ninh. A friendly patrol had made contact with a large Viet Cong force approximately 1 kilometer from the battalion's night defensive perimeter and was in need of reinforcements and supplies. Sergeant McLaughlin immediately volunteered to lead a squad of the relief force. Upon reaching the battle site, they were subjected to intensive rocket, machine gun, and automatic weapons fire. Sergeant McLaughlin unhesitatingly moved through a hail of incoming fire to the front of his squad. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained in the open and deployed his men into advantageous firing positions. Ignoring relentless enemy fire, he moved about the area shouting words of encouragement to his men and directing devastating fire onto the insurgents. On one occasion the Viet Cong attempted to breach the hastily formed perimeter. Although the enemy closed to within meters of his position, Sergeant McLaughlin refused to withdraw and engaged them in extremely close combat. After a fierce battle, the hostile force retreated in complete disorder. Sergeant McLaughlin's dynamic leadership and exemplary courage significantly contributed to the overwhelming defeat of the enemy. Staff Sergeant McLaughlin's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


MCMAKEN, RAYMOND E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Raymond E. McMaken (0-5326282), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 2 February 1968 while serving with Advisory Team 4, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. On that date a determined, reinforced North Vietnamese Army regiment attacked Cam Lo District Headquarters with a heavy barrage of enemy mortar, recoilless rifle, rocket, and automatic weapons fire. When one third of the defenders including the Senior District Advisor became casualties, Captain McMaken dashed to the alternate command bunker to establish communications with higher headquarters and requested a flare ship. He then returned to the command bunker and, finding the Senior District Advisor mortally wounded, took command of the compound and led the defense against a sustained, five-hour enemy attack. Realizing that close artillery support was the key to the compound's defense, he left his position to adjust artillery fire to within 20 meters of the inner perimeter. Although suffering from multiple wounds, Captain McMaken moved throughout the compound to direct defenses. He personally manned a grenade launcher and machine gun to stop the enemy from penetrating the defensive perimeter. By his aggressive leadership and courageous actions, Captain McMaken successfully directed the defense of the headquarters and eliminated a potential disaster while inflicting heavy casualties on a numerically superior enemy force. Captain McMaken's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military forces.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2340 (July 30, 1968)


*MIHILAKIS, ELLA L. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ella L. Mihilakis, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Mihilakis distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 9 July 1968 while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 5139 (August 4, 1968)


MIRUS, JOHN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John E. Mirus (OF-100956), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Mirus distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 11 November 1967 while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 11 November 1967, Company C was conducting a search and destroy operation south of Dak To in the Central Highlands. As the unit moved up onto Hill 724 to establish a defensive perimeter and construct a helicopter landing zone with Companies B and D, all three units came under a heavy rocket and mortar attack, followed by a strong ground assault by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength. Despite the intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, Captain Mirus effectively directed the defense of his unit. Upon learning that Company B's Commander had been mortally wounded, he crossed seventy-five meters of open terrain to take command of Company B while still controlling his own unit. He continually exposed himself to hostile fire as he crawled to the unit's left flank to rally the men and readjust defensive positions. After re-establishing badly-needed communications, he pulled several wounded men to safety and directed artillery fire on suspected enemy mortar positions. Throughout the night, he moved about the battle area, encouraging his men and directing the completion of a helicopter landing zone to facilitate medical evacuation and emergency supply. Captain Mirus' extraordinary heroism in close combat against an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No 1187 (March 29, 1968)


MONEY, JAMES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James D. Money (US-56686451), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Money distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 April 1967, while serving as a member of a night ambush patrol operating in the vicinity of Dong Tam, Vietnam. Private Money and his platoon leader left the remainder of the patrol in order to set out an anti-intrusion device approximately 50 meters in front, in dense jungle. While his platoon leader was setting up the device and Private Money was holding both rifles approximately 15 meters distant, a sizeable Viet Cong force entered the area. In total disregard for his own safety, Private Money shouted a warning to his platoon leader, who managed to conceal himself just as the Viet Cong approached. The platoon leader then rolled three hand grenades down the jungle path, and Private Money exposed himself to the numerically superior enemy in order to deliver a withering barrage of fire upon them. These brave actions threw the Viet Cong into panic, killing four of them and allowing the two friendly soldiers to return to their comrades. Private Money quickly related the action to his fellow soldiers, who then decimated the area with automatic weapons and rifle grenade fire. Private First Class Money's extraordinary heroism in close combat with a hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7086 (December 1, 1967)


*MOON, WALTER H. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Walter H. Moon (0-63424), Major (Infantry), [then Captain], U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations during the period April 1961 to July 1961. Major Moon was serving in an advisory capacity in Laos when he was captured by hostile forces. From the initial time of his capture, he was kept in solitary confinement and subjected to extreme mistreatment, abuse and vile physical environment. Despite the never-ending brutalities, he constantly demonstrated boldness, tenacity, and courage by his continuous overt actions against his captors. Although faced with insurmountable odds, he repeatedly attempted to escape and was seriously wounded during his first break for freedom. From the time of his first attempt to escape until his death, he refused to collaborate with, and resisted the cruel efforts of his captors and prevented their making propaganda capital at the expense of the United States. Wounded, and weakened physically, Major Moon fought with the guards inflicting as much bodily harm on them as possible, until he was completely overpowered and mortally wounded. Major Moon's intrepid conduct, aggressive actions and self-sacrifice are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 52 (December 18, 1963)
Home Town: Rudy, Arkansas


*MRAZIK, JAMES PATRICK (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Patrick Mrazik (US-54977554), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Mrazik distinguished himself by heroic actions on 24 October 1968, while serving as an RTO with Company C, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. While on a combat operation Company C came under an intense hostile attack, inflicting several casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Mrazik exposed himself to a heavy volume of hostile fire as he moved through the bullet swept area to evacuate his wounded comrades to safety. Returning to the area of contact, Private Mrazik secured desperately needed ammunition. As he was bringing the ammunition to a machine gun position he was fatally wounded. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and defeat of the hostile force. Private Mrazik's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 8341 (November 24, 1968)
Home Town: Mio, Michigan


MYERS, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald L. Myers, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 27 October 1966 while serving as Special Forces team leader of a reconnaissance team on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. While moving through thick jungle late in the afternoon, his patrol was suddenly at-tacked by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Sergeant Myers exposed himself to the intense fire to direct his men in repulsing the attack. Quickly moving into a defensive perimeter, he tried to radio friendly forces for support. Unable to make contact, he called in air strikes within thirty meters of his position and exposed himself to direct gunships on the enemy positions. When the enemy started to pull back, he called for exfiltration helicopters to evacuate the team. Seeing that the helicopters could extract only one man at a time, he stayed on the ground to cover the operations. The insurgents launched a furious assault on his position in an attempt to shoot down the hovering aircraft, but he remained in the open and drove off the attack at point blank range. Only when he was sure that his men were safe did he allow himself to be hoisted to safety.
RV, General Orders No: 5002 - (October 2, 1967)


*NEEL, FRANKLIN WYLIE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Franklin Wylie Neel (RA-234562491), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Neel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 23 December 1969, while serving as squad leader for the ready reaction force with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Brigade (Airmobile), 1st Cavalry Division in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Neel deployed his squad to their assigned positions in order to counter an anticipated sapper attack. Within five minutes, a second barrage of rockets and mortars fell on the ready reaction force positions. Sergeant First Class Neel left the relative security of his covered position to ensure that his squad was properly deployed and taking advantage of all existing cover. While engaged in these duties, a mortar round landed directly in front of him, killing him instantly. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 1241 (January 21, 1970)
Home Town: Gap Mills, West Virginia


*NELSON, PAUL VINCENT (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Paul Vincent Nelson, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Nelson distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 31 May 1969, while serving as a radio telephone operator with Company B, 1st Battalion, 52nd Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade (Light). On that date, the company was on a search and clear mission near Landing Zone Stinson when the point element came under intense enemy fire. Observing one of his comrades fall seriously wounded, Private Nelson, disregarding the danger involved, braved the enemy fire to assist in evacuating the wounded soldier. Returning to the area of contact, Private Nelson remained exposed to locate the enemy position. Despite the hostile barrage impacting all around him, Private Nelson located the insurgents' position and then directed gunship fire on the enemy targets. At this point, Private Nelson was mortally wounded from the hostile fire. His timely and courageous actions were responsible for saving the life of his comrade and the defeat of the enemy force. Private First Class Nelson's personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Born: September 5, 1948 at Newark, New Jersey
Home Town: Belleville, New Jersey


*NICHOLS, THOMAS EDWARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas Edward Nichols (0-2303639), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while assigned to Advisory Team 95, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, on 12 October 1967 while serving as an Infantry Advisor to the 4th Battalion, 50th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, the battalion headquarters, Long An Province, came under attack from an estimated reinforced Vietcong company. At the onset, Captain Nichols and members of his team were manning the advisory bunker. The bunker was the target of two accurately thrown hand grenades which exploded within the bunker causing serious wounds to Captain Nichols. The force of the grenade blew him out of the bunker and he landed in a pool of water. Upon recovery, and despite his wounds, the loss of his glasses and his weapon, Captain Nichols noticed that two Vietcong soldiers were approaching the bunker and without regard for his safety he stood up and detracted the enemy. Captain Nichol's action allowed the two remaining inhabitants of the bunker to escape. Captain Nichols, then ignoring the extreme danger, assisted a seriously wounded fellow advisor to safety and then assumed a position in a small perimeter and then fought off the enemy. As a result of his extraordinary valor and absolute dedication to duty, this action allowed other team members to remove the wounded to a secure area and return to help fight off the enemy until a reactionary force arrived. Captain Nichols' conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 231 (January 28, 1968)
Home Town: Amarillo, Texas


NOEL, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas E. Noel (US-56438202), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Noel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a Medical Aidman with the Reconnaissance Platoon of Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his platoon was participating in a combined infantry-armor sweep into the hamlet of Ap Bon (1) when they came under intense automatic weapons and rocket fire from a North Vietnamese Army force of Company size. Without regard for his own safety, Private Noel repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved throughout the area administering aid to his wounded comrades and pointing out enemy positions. He aided four men before the unit was directed to withdraw and allow supporting artillery fire to be brought in upon the enemy locations. As they withdrew, Private Noel noticed a wounded soldier about 100 meters back. He unhesitatingly dashed across an open rice paddy amidst a withering hail of hostile fire to reach the man and carry him to safety. He then aided several more men in the same manner. Private First Class Noel's conspicuous gallantry and tenacious devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2753 (May 25, 1968)


*O'CALLAGHAN, BRIAN JOSEPH (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Brian Joseph O'Callaghan, First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant O'Callaghan distinguished himself while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 69th Armor, 4th Infantry Division. On 8 January 1970, Company C was conducting an assault of Hill 564 northwest of Landing Zone Scheuller when Lieutenant O'Callaghan's platoon came under heavy fire from anti-tank rockets, mortars, and small arms. When one of his tanks was immobilized and the safety of its crew jeopardized, Lieutenant O'Callaghan maneuvered his vehicle into a fighting support position to shield and protect the disabled vehicle. As Lieutenant O'Callaghan was effecting emergency recovery procedures, his vehicle received a direct hit, seriously wounding him. Refusing medical attention, Lieutenant O'Callaghan remained with the disabled vehicle until it was moved to safety, and continued to direct operations and engage the enemy until he was mortally wounded. First Lieutenant O'Callaghan's extraordinary courage, determination and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: Alexandria, Virginia


*ODOM, JOHN THOMAS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John Thomas Odom (RA-24602563), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, on 18 February 1967, in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Private First Class Odom was accompanying a team from the reconnaissance platoon on a patrol in the vicinity of Phan Thiet,. While his unit was moving down the trail, a mine was command detonated. Private First Class Odom, the radio telephone operator, was mortally wounded along with two men who were seriously wounded. Immediately after the detonation of the mine, Viet Cong snipers began firing intensely on the two remaining members of the squad. Private First Class Odom realized that if the snipers continued to keep the two men pinned down the entire squad would be annihilated. Even though mortally wounded and in extreme pain he began placing effective suppressive fire on the enemy, giving the two pinned down men the cover fire they needed to maneuver on the insurgents. Sustaining his fire, he radioed to another element for assistance. Private First Class Odom was solely responsible for saving the patrol from annihilation. His unimpeachable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and cast great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Alexander City, Alabama


OLLER, STEVEN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Steven W. Oller (RA-18906188), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Oller distinguished himself while serving as a Senior Medical Specialist with Company D, 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. On 11 May 1969, Landing Zone Oasis came under heavy rocket, mortar, and ground attack by a large North Vietnamese sapper unit. Specialist Oller, with complete disregard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to treat the wounded. Moving from bunker to bunker he treated the casualties and carried several of them across a large open area to safety. His actions were directly responsible for the saving of many lives. Specialist Fifth Class Oller's personal bravery, determination and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3104 (June 16, 1969)
Born: January 22, 1948 at Vallejo, California
Home Town: Crescent City, California
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Army Commendation Medal w/V, Combat Medic Badge


*ORETO, JOSEPH ANTHONY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Joseph Anthony Oreto (US-51670676), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 13 April 1969 while serving as Squad Leader with the Aero Rifle Platoon, Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while conducting a bomb damage assessment in a heavily- fortified enemy base camp, the platoon suddenly came under intense machine gun and antitank rocket fire from a well-concealed and well-entrenched hostile force. Sergeant Oreto and his lead squad were immediately pinned down in an open area directly in front of the enemy positions. Realizing the desperate situation he and his men were in, Sergeant Oreto single-handedly assaulted the nearest enemy bunker. While the hostile fire was concentrated on him, his men were able to maneuver into more secure positions. As he prepared to throw a hand grenade into the enemy bunker, he was fatally wounded by hostile fire. Sergeant Oreto's outstanding courage, unwavering devotion to duty and deep concern for the welfare of his men were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1104 (May 2, 1969)
Home Town: Westminster, Maryland


ORTH, GREGG G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gregg G. Orth (0-5531748), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Orth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 September 1967, while serving as Commanding Officer, Company A, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, during a search and destroy mission near Khiem Ich, Vietnam. As the friendly force was negotiating difficult terrain, they were suddenly ambushed by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. In complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Orth rallied his men and countered the ambush, succeeding against overwhelming odds, amidst a withering barrage of automatic weapons and small arms fire. After regrouping his men, Captain Orth alertly observed that part of one of his platoons was completely pinned down. Although wounded himself in the ensuing action, he led the beleaguered soldiers out of their trap, personally carrying an injured comrade over 400 meters through intense fire to safety. Captain Orth's heroic actions in close combat with an armed hostile force are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7196 (December 9, 1967)


ORTIZ, ANGEL J.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Angel J. Ortiz, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Ortiz distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 25 May 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7753 (October 3, 1968)


*ORTIZ, JOHN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John Ortiz (RA-16460144), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Ortiz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 January 1968, while serving as a Tank Commander with Company H, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, on a reconnaissance in force mission during Operation Fargo in Loc Ninh Province. Sergeant Ortiz's tank, in the lead position, came under heavy recoilless rifle and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. An anti-tank round struck his vehicle, causing it to burst into flames. Directing his men to abandon the flaming tank, Sergeant Ortiz covered their exit with highly accurate suppressive fire from his .50 caliber machine gun. When his men were safely evacuated, Sergeant Ortiz turned his main gun on the enemy fortification, destroying at least one of the recoilless rifle teams. While still firing devastating rounds into the insurgent positions, Sergeant Ortiz was mortally wounded by an exploding antitank round. Sergeant Ortiz's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 2280 (April 9, 1968)
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois


OVIEDO, CARL M.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Carl M. Oviedo, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Oviedo distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 23 December 1967 while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 0492 (February 3, 1968)


OWEN, EVAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Evan L. Owen, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force, while serving with the 235th Aviation Company, 1st Aviation Brigade, on 23 March 1972, in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Owen distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while performing his duties as Operations Officer with a forward element of an Allied weapons company. When Khe Sanh became the target of an enemy artillery and mortar barrage, he immediately saw to the safety of his men, moving the men into the bunkers throughout the area. With the incoming artillery and mortar rounds falling in the immediate vicinity, he returned to the sleeping area to gather up radios, weapons and ammunition. With full knowledge of the dangers at hand, he returned several times to recover valuable equipment. Captain Owen set about to establish a perimeter of defense using the personnel he had available. During the following hours he made numerous trips between the defensive positions insuring that they were both properly manned and tactically sound. On each of the trips, he again exposed himself to the enemy fire. His gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 1st Aviation Brigade, General Orders No. 4073 (May 17, 1971)


*PACHECO, JAIME (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Jaime Pacheco, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Four Pacheco distinguished himself on 25 May 1972 while serving as medic on a Ranger Team which was on a reconnaissance mission in Tan Uyen Province, Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Pacheco walked as rear scout for a four man point reconnaissance element when the element discovered an enemy bunker complex. As the first three men of the element exhausted their first magazines, Specialist Pacheco immediately recognized the danger caused by the lull in firing and rushed the bunkers firing his own weapon and throwing fragmentation grenades. As the team withdrew from the bunker complex, he remained in his position and continued to throw a total of twelve fragmentation grenades, covering the team's withdrawal. By holding the enemy at bay his fellow soldiers were able to escape without injury. When he attempted to rejoin his team, he was hit by enemy fire which wounded him fatally. His actions gave the team the precious time they needed to reach safety. Specialist Pacheco's gallantry in action and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1923 (August 19, 1972)
Home Town: Hobbs, New Mexico


PARKER, OTIS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Otis Parker (RA-14668481), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 4 May 1965, while serving as advisor to a friendly force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Parker was with the lead elements of a friendly battalion on a search and clear operation when they were attacked by a Viet Cong battalion. With the friendly position subjected to heavy insurgent automatic, small arms and mortar fire, Staff Sergeant Parker repeatedly exposed himself to assist in directing effective friendly fire against the communists. After approximately forty-five minutes of intense fighting, the friendly company commander was wounded and his troops started a hasty withdrawal inadvertently leaving some of the injured behind. Observing this action, Sergeant Parker disregarding his personal safety, moved forward in full view of the enemy to carry the wounded company commander to a safe location. The friendly troops, seeing Staff Sergeant Parker's outstanding example of personal heroism, rallied and resumed the engagement resulting in the defeat of the Viet Cong. Staff Sergeant Parker's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, MACV, General Orders No. 2365 (November 12, 1965)
Home Town: Green Cove Springs, Florida
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)


*PAYNE, LLOYD ADRIAN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Lloyd Adrian Payne, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in Vietnam on the 14th and 15th of December 1963. As Senior Advisor to a Vietnamese Battalion, Captain Payne rendered invaluable assistance, advice, and encouragement to the Battalion during a military operation. When the Battalion had been subjected to sporadic sniper fire throughout the day, he advised the Battalion Commander to send out several patrols to locate the sniper; and although these efforts diminished the frequency of fire, it started again after the Battalion had closed in for the evening and continued throughout the night. During the entire operation, Captain Payne was at the side of his counterpart advising him in weapons placement, necessary patrol action, and personally checking perimeter security. As the Battalion elements were preparing to move out of their position on the following morning, they sustained heavy sniper fire from the north side of a ridge and, before they could take cover, heavy automatic weapons fire was received from both the north and south ridges. Despite the precarious position, Captain Payne continued to leave his protective cover and bravely moved from position to position offering assurance and advice to the Battalion Commander in coping with the situation. Although he was exposed to this automatic weapons fire, he completely disregarded his own personal safety and continued his advisory efforts until mortally wounded. Captain Payne's conspicuous gallantry and unselfish actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 15 (April 23, 1964)
Home Town: Sandersville, Georgia


PEARSALL, DAVID A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David A. Pearsall, Warrant Officer, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Pearsall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967, as Co-Pilot of an Ambulance Helicopter of the 45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, on a rescue mission near Cu Chi. Mister Pearsall's helicopter received an urgent request to evacuate twelve seriously wounded men and immediately flew to the battle area. The mission was undertaken despite the knowledge that several rescue ships had previously been shot down in the area. After an unhampered landing the crew began loading the patients. Murderous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire suddenly erupted from a nearby tree line, riddling his helicopter. With four casualties loaded, the pilot ordered the medic and crew chief to climb aboard and took off to prevent further damage to the ship. The hostile barrage in the landing zone ceased, and they returned to rescue the remainder of the casualties. The enemy force launched a second fusillade on his ship, and both he and the pilot were wounded as rounds tore into the craft. Despite mounting damage to the helicopter, the helicopter remained on the ground until all of the injured were loaded. They then took off and together with the wounded pilot, Mr. Pearsall ignored his own wounds to aid in skillfully nursing the badly crippled ship to an airfield. Warrant Officer Pearsall's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.


PENROD, DONALD R.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald R. Penrod, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Penrod distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 18 November 1968 while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 0092 (January 4, 1969)


*PERPETUA, ROQUE, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Roque Perpetua, Jr. (RA-10106904), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Platoon Sergeant Perpetua distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 17 December 1966, while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company D, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during an air assault operation in the Republic of Vietnam. Moments after landing in an area of enemy operations, Sergeant Perpetua's company began receiving sporadic hostile fire. Deploying his men on line, Sergeant Perpetua led the right flank of one platoon forward through a series of hedgerows toward the enemy positions. With bullets striking all around him, he moved up and down the lines encouraging his men and leading them through the intensifying hostile fire. As other elements became pinned down, Sergeant Perpetua continued leading his men forward until they were engaging the numerically superior force at a distance of less than thirty meters. Realizing at this point that the North Vietnamese force was much larger than originally suspected, Sergeant Perpetua endeavored to free his men from their tenuous position. Crawling up and down his lines through the intense enemy fire, Sergeant Perpetua located the key bunker to the enemy's defensive network. Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he stood up in the fire-swept field and advanced on the bunker, firing his rifle. Although startled by his aggressive action, the well entrenched enemy quickly recovered and began engaging the valiant sergeant with numerous automatic weapons. Even after he had been wounded, Sergeant Perpetua continued his one-man assault on the enemy position. He drove to within five meters of the bunker before falling mortally wounded. Sergeant Perpetua's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 381 (January 28, 1967)
Home Town: Kauai, Hawaii


PERRY, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James E. Perry, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force. Sergeant First Class Perry distinguished himself by heroic action from 21 January 1968 and 22 January 1968, while serving with Advisory Team FOUR, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. On 21 January 1968, a Regiment of North Vietnamese Army force attacked the District Headquarters at Huong Hoa (Khe Sanh). At the beginning of the attack, Sergeant Perry immediately converted the advisory team quarters into a makeshift dispensary. Throughout the battle, he moved about the compound carrying the wounded and dying on his back to the dispensary. At one point, when the Regional Force Company was being hit the hardest, Sergeant Perry moved from position to position to treat the wounded. When one of the bunkers took a direct hit, Sergeant Perry left the protection of the advisory bunker to pull the wounded from the rubble. Sergeant Perry's conspicuous bravery, initiative and devotion to duty were responsible for the saving of lives and were an inspiration to all, especially his Vietnamese comrades. Sergeant First Class Perry's heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Advisory Team 4, and the United States Army.


PEYTON, JOEL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joel C. Peyton (US-51947865), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Specialist Fourth Class Peyton distinguished himself by heroic actions on 11 June 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While established in a night defensive position, elements of the 27th Infantry came under an intense enemy mortar attack, which was followed by a massive ground assault. As the battle ensued, several casualties were sustained. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Peyton moved through the bullet swept area to one of the wounded men's positions. Upon reaching the injured man, Specialist Peyton treated the man and evacuated the man to a safe location. When other mortars impacted within the perimeter, Specialist Peyton again exposed himself to the holocaust of exploding projectiles as he maneuvered to the injured men's positions and administered first aid to his fallen comrades. Throughout the battle, Specialist Peyton constantly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to treat the wounded men. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives. Specialist Peyton's bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 10698 (August 22, 1969)
Born: May 24, 1942 at Ellisburg, Kentucky
Home Town: Hustonville, Kentucky
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Air Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Combat Medic Badge


PHILLIPS, GREGORY P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gregory P. Phillips, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 7 May 1970. Specialist Phillips distinguished himself while serving as a grenadier in Company D, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, defending Fire Support Base Maureen, Republic of Vietnam. While situated in night defensive positions, the company came under intense fire from a large heavily-armed enemy force, and there were numerous friendly casualties. Specialist Phillips, maneuvering to the hardest hit sector of the perimeter, effectively engaged the hostiles with grenade fire. Depleting his ordnance, he obtained a rifle and, despite hostile fire, assaulted enemy positions outside the perimeter. When wounded, he maintained his heavy volume of suppressive fire. Finding a wounded comrade, he carried the man to safety. Specialist Phillips' personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 11664 (September 22, 1970)
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama


PICARELLI, JOSEPH HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph Henry Picarelli (US-52687949), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 28 April 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Picarelli distinguished himself while serving as a radio-telephone operator for the company commander of Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company had set up a night position when they suddenly came under intense small arms fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. While his company commander was busy on the company frequency, Specialist Picarelli established communications with battalion headquarters and quickly requested gunships for defense of the company perimeter. As the gunships arrived on station, they were unable to determine the company's perimeter due to the total darkness and density of the vegetation. Upon hearing the problem from the gunships, Specialist Picarelli, with disregard for his own safety, took a strobe light and moved about the company's perimeter, marking the friendly positions. Although he was wounded by shrapnel from an enemy hand grenade, he courageously continued to exposed himself to the hostile fire as he marked his perimeter until the enemy force was repelled and forced to retreat. Specialist Fourth Class Picarelli's unquestionable valor while in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force and his avid devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3254 (June 17, 1968)


PICKETT, HENRY W.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Henry W. Pickett, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Pickett distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 31 January 1968 while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1384 (March 18, 1968)


PIERCY, NORMAN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Norman R. Piercy, Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class], U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 20 October 1966 while serving as team leader of a six man Special Forces reconnaissance team on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. While attempting to land, the infiltration aircraft was brought under intense hostile ground fire. Master Sergeant Piercy directed hart men to fire on the enemy positions while the pilot maneuvered over the area, since the savage barrage prevented landing. He immediately called for gunships to cover the operation and again attempted to land. The ship received another tremendous barrage of fire, but landed under cover of friendly air strikes. The landing zone was swept by withering fire, but he led his non through the enemy lines surrounding the area. By skillful maneuvering, he was able to break contact with the pursuing insurgents and locate the hostile battalion base camp suspected in the area. He immediately directed air strikes on the camp and remained in the area until the position was completely destroyed. Returning to the landing zone, he once again passed through enemy lines s surrounding the area. As the helicopter came in, three insurgents appeared in the opening to shoot down the craft. Sergeant Piercy directed a heavy volume of fire on the enemy and succeeded in silencing them. He led his men across the bullet riddled opening to the waiting aircraft and waited on the ground until all his men were aboard. After taking off, he directed gunships on the hostile positions until they were destroyed.
RV, General Orders No: 5245 - (October 13, 1967)


PILLER, WILLIAM A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William A. Piller, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Piller distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1774 (April 5, 1968)


POLAND, JOHN M.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John M. Poland, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Poland distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2835 (May 28, 1968)


*POOLAW, PASCAL CLEATUS, SR. (KIA)
(Fourth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Pascal Cleatus Poolaw, Sr. (18131087), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 7 November 1967, while serving with Company C, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. On this date, during Operation SHENANDOAH II, First Sergeant Poolaw was accompanying his unit on a two-company search and destroy mission near Loc Ninh. As the patrol was moving through a rubber plantation, they were subjected to sniper fire. Within minutes, the area was raked with intensive claymore mine, rocket, small arms, and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. First Sergeant Poolaw unhesitatingly ran to the lead squad which was receiving the brunt of the enemy fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he exposed himself to assist in deploying the men and establishing an effective base of fire. Although wounded, he continued to move about the area encouraging his men and pulling casualties to cover. He was assisting a wounded man to safety when he was mortally wounded by Viet Cong fire. His dynamic leadership and exemplary courage contributed significantly to the successful deployment of the lead squad and undoubtedly saved the lives of many of his fellow soldiers. First Sergeant Poolaw's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 8380 (November 20, 1967)
Born: January 29, 1922 at Apache, Oklahoma
Home Town: Apache, Oklahoma
Personal Awards: Silver Star (WWII), 2@ Silver Stars (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


*POSO, JOHN R. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John R. Poso (RA-19478538), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Platoon Sergeant Poso distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a Platoon Sergeant for the 2d Platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was going to the aid of a Marine unit just south of DaNang when they became pinned down by a devastating barrage of rocket, mortar, and automatic weapons fire from an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese Regulars. Sergeant Poso immediately began moving from position to position to account for all the members of his platoon and to give them encouragement. When his platoon leader gave the command to withdraw to a more secure area, Sergeant Poso again exposed himself to the hostile fire to effectively direct he wounded men of his platoon to the designated area. He then, along with 12 other men of the platoon, formed an unyielding defensive line to hold off the enemy and allow for the withdrawal of the wounded soldiers. Sergeant Poso and his comrades brought effective suppressive fire upon the enemy, killing more than 60 North Vietnamese soldiers who were using human wave tactics in their attempt to overrun the friendly positions. Sergeant Poso displayed extraordinary valor during extremely close-quarter fighting before he was mortally wounded. Platoon Sergeant Poso's unquestionable heroism in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1864 (April 10, 1968)


POWELL, ERVIN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ervin E. Powell, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Powell distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 9 January 1971 while serving as a Radio Telephone Operator with Company E, 1st Battalion, 46th Infantry. On that date, the company was conducting a reconnaissance patrol in Tien Phuoc District when it was assaulted by an unknown size North Vietnamese Army force. Ignoring his painful wounds suffered in the initial exchange of fire, Sergeant Powell placed highly effective suppressive rounds on the hostile emplacements and began maneuvering to close with the insurgents. Denying himself medical attention, he repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy barrage in order to reach a wounded comrade and administer emergency first aid to the friendly casualty. Ignoring the danger involved, Sergeant Powell unhesitatingly braved the hostile fusillade in order to move his fellow soldier to a secure position and immediately rejoined the assault. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he occupied a strategic position and provided his fellow soldiers with devastating volumes of cover fire enabling his element to rout the insurgents from the area. Through his timely and courageous actions, Sergeant Powell was responsible for saving the life of a wounded comrade and the expeditious defeat of the determined enemy force. His personal heroism, professional competence and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 23rd Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


POWELL, GEORGE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George W. Powell (0-5434118), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Battery C, 1st Battalion, 40th Field Artillery Regiment, 108th Field Artillery Group, in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Powell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 April 1969 as fire direction center officer at his battery's location in Quang Tri Province. Approximately one hundred and fifty North Vietnamese supported by mortars, machine guns and rocket propelled grenades, launched a massive ground attack. When he found that communications to the howitzers had been destroyed, Lieutenant Powell risked the Communists' fusillade going from gun to gun supervising the return fire. Noticing that an M548 cargo vehicle on the perimeter was burning and the position had been left unattended, he returned to the fire direction center through an enemy machine gun barrage and took two men with a machine gun back to the vehicle where he placed them to provide effective fire on the foe. He then returned to a howitzer and continued to supervise fire against the North Vietnamese until they broke contact and fled. First Lieutenant Powell's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2043 (June 9, 1969)


PRATHER, DAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Dan E. Prather (OF-105801), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Prather distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, he was maneuvering his company to the location of another company which was in heavy contact with a numerically superior enemy force. As they approached the village of Lien Lac (2), his company came under intense small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire from a battalion-size force of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. While expertly directing the movement and fire of his men, Captain Prather, with disregard for his own safety, continually maneuvered among his men in an effort to pinpoint the enemy positions. After quickly locating the insurgents' positions, he personally directed air and artillery support. With expert rifle fire and skillful maneuvering, Captain Prather and his command silenced the enemy within the area and continued to move further in search of remaining enemy forces. Captain Prather's personal bravery, professional leadership, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3105 (June 8, 1968)


*PRATT, WALTER R. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Walter R. Pratt, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Pratt distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1347 (March 17, 1968)


PRICE, JAMES T.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James T. Price, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Price distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 12 May 1968 while serving as Commanding Officer, Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 6769 (August 31, 1968)


PURTELL, JAMES F.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James F. Purtell, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Purtell distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 9 May 1968 while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 6121 (August 20, 1968)


*RACCA, WILLIAM (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to William Racca (0-5346486), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while involved in military operations involving conflict with a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Racca distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 9 April 1969 while serving as a platoon leader with Company B, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a search and clear mission in Binh Long Province, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became heavily engaged with a large force and sustained a casualty, First Lieutenant Racca exposed himself to the intense hostile fire as he moved forward and assisted in carrying the wounded soldier to a secure position. He then reorganized his platoon and maneuvered them forward. When the lead element was pinned down First Lieutenant Racca directed the fire of his men and successfully relieved the pressure on the element. Upon discovering that one soldier could not be withdrawn, First Lieutenant Racca rushed forward with his machine gunners and several riflemen and provided cover for the man's withdrawal. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 5536 (1969)
Home Town: Washington, D.C.


RAMIER, HUBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Hubert R. Ramier, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Ramier distinguished himself by valiant actins while serving as the Platoon Sergeant of the 3d Platoon of Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. As the platoon approached the village of Ap Bon (1) during a search and clear mission, they suddenly came under a heavy volume of enemy small arms, automatic weapons and rocket fire. Disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Ramier unhesitatingly rushed forward to lead his platoon against the enemy force entrenched in and around the village. After directing a successful assault upon the enemy perimeter defense positions, Sergeant Ramier moved his men into the interior of the enemy camp. During the assault upon the remainder of the bunker complex, Sergeant Ramier continuously moved among his men, directing their fire and giving words of encouragement. He displayed exceptional personal bravery as he moved through heavy enemy fire to close within hand grenade range of several enemy emplacements destroying them with accurate fire. His heroic actions while under enemy fire inspired his men and contributed greatly to the rout of the hostile force. Sergeant First Class Ramier's unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2477 (May 11, 1968)


*RAY, JAMES MICHAEL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Michael Ray, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving as a Prisoner of War in South Vietnam during the period June and July 1969. Sergeant Ray distinguished himself by attempting to escape from an enemy prison camp. He recognized that odds for success were slight and if he was recaptured he would receive severe torture, long periods of solitary confinement, and possible death by execution. Although he was recaptured, he maintained strong conviction in the Code of Conduct. In June 1969, Sergeant Ray was punished for violation of camp regulations by being placed in double chains, one on each ankle. Then in July 1969 while en route to the latrine, he attempted to escape by assaulting a guard. At that time, he had a chain locked to each ankle and was carrying the excess chain in each hand. As he approached the guard sitting on a stool in the guard hooch. he suddenly stopped, dropped the chains, and hit the guard in the face with his fist, knocking him from the stool to the ground. He then reached and grabbed the guard's rifle and started to turn when he slipped and fell. As Sergeant Ray fell to the ground, the additional guard who unlocked him jumped on him, wrapping the chain around his neck and began beating him with his fist. The guard who had been knocked to the ground got up and started to kick and beat on Sergeant Ray. Then both guards wrapped Sergeant Ray in the chains and locked them and then threw him into his bunker. He was left over- night wrapped in the chains and the next day he was again secured to his bunker with two chains, one attached to each ankle. He was not allowed outside his bunker, and his rations were cut to one meal a day. Shortly after this, he was removed from the camp and was never seen again. This extreme gallantry exhibited by Sergeant Ray was amply illustrated by the fact that so few prisoners ever tried to escape, primarily due to the rigid security measures imposed by the camp. This courageous escape attempt served more than to merely get him out of the prison camp. More guards were required, and prisoner morale soared. This act of gallantry, with recognition of the grave risk to his own life, demonstrated a great devotion to duty and his country, which reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Born: November 10, 1949 at Cambridge, Massachusetts
Home Town: Woonsocket, Rhode island


*REES, RICHARD MORGAN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Richard Morgan Rees (274367706), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 11 April 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam while assigned to Detachment A-302, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group. On this date a two-company task force engaged a well-entrenched and determined enemy force at approximately 1300 hours, while the Special forces unit was performing a search and destroy mission. During the ensuing action, Captain Rees exposed himself to vicious and deadly enemy fire while extricating his seriously wounded Task Force Commander and an enlisted member of the unit. He then took command of the American force, successfully overran the enemy positions and assured the evacuation of all friendly casualties. His determined actions and outstanding bravery in the fierce combat action became an inspiration to his troops and did much to assure their victory on that date. Captain Rees' performance of duty reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Home Town: Kent, Ohio
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)


*REYES, ANGEL L. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Angel L. Reyes, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Reyes distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 1 September 1968 while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7088 (September 10, 1968)


*RICE, ROBERT THOMAS, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert Thomas Rice, Jr. (273-42-1782), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, First Lieutenant Rice distinguished himself while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company B, 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 8 August 1970, Company B was set up in a night location when they suddenly began receiving intense hostile mortar fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Rice moved across the perimeter to direct his men to fighting positions. Lieutenant Rice continued to move from position to position, despite enemy rounds impacting all around him, and insured the safety of all his men. While still dangerously exposed, Lieutenant Rice was mortally wounded by shrapnel from one of the hostile rounds. First Lieutenant Rice's personal bravery, outstanding leadership and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4369 (August 23, 1970)
Home Town: Springfield, Ohio


*RICHARD, DONALD W. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Donald W. Richard, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Richard distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 23 December 1967 while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 0134 (January 22, 1968)


*RIECK, JOHN JAMES, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John James Rieck, Jr. (US-51825322), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, on 17 June 1967, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date during Operation BILLINGS, Private First Class Rieck was serving as a rifleman. While moving through the dense jungle near Chu Linh, his unit came under attack from a reinforced Viet Cong battalion. Both Private First Class Rieck's squad leader and team leader were wounded in the opening moments of the battle. Private First Class Rieck immediately took command of the squad and with effective direction of his men, repulsed a massive Viet Cong human wave assault. Later in the battle, an insurgent squad moved to within 10 meters of the friendly lines in an effort to capture weapons and equipment from the wounded soldiers. With complete disdain for the vicious enemy fire, Private First Class Rieck led his squad to meet the insurgents. The Viet Cong were soon forced to withdraw after minutes of violent fighting. The enemy fire was still intense when Private First Class Rieck saw a wounded squad member lying within the hostile kill zone. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he crawled to the casualty, administered first aid and then pulled the soldier from the open terrain to the cover of a small berm. When reinforcements had arrived, Private First Class Rieck again exposed himself to enemy fire to bring medical aidmen to the friendly casualties. He then returned to his squad to lead them in aggressive counterassaults against the enemy. Due in large measure to the courage and calm demeanor Private First Class Rieck displayed in the face of enemy fire, the lives of many fellow soldiers were saved and a large hostile force defeated. Sergeant First Class Rieck's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5026 (July 12, 1967)
Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio


*ROEDIGER, CHRISS LESLIE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Chriss Leslie Roediger (562-64-7702), Captain, U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 8 October 1969, while serving with Company D, 158th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter), 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Captain Roediger distinguished himself while serving as team leader of two AH-1G Cobra helicopters. During the early evening hours of 8 October 1969, an aircraft was forced down in the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam. Although darkness and marginal weather presented an obstacle to flight, Captain Roediger unhesitatingly volunteered to lead a search and rescue mission. He remained airborne for over an hour, skirting the weather and attempting to reach the downed aircraft. While returning to Camp Evans to refuel before continuing the mission, his aircraft came under enemy ground fire. As a result of the damage caused by the hostile fire, the aircraft crashed and Captain Roediger was killed. His personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 13864 (November 15, 1969)
Home Town: Fair Oaks, California


ROGER, RICHARD N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard N. Roger (0-5712698), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Roger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 January 1968 as surgeon of a Special Forces mobile strike unit during the Lunar New Year battle for Pleiku. The unit was conducting a search and clear operation in the outskirts of the city and was pinned down by intense enemy fire, suffering numerous casualties. Captain Roger unhesitantly proceeded into the midst of the battle and began to render aid to the wounded. He crawled one hundred meters through savage automatic weapons fire to an American tank which had sustained a direct hit from an enemy anti-tank weapons. Heedless of exploding ammunition in the fiercely burning vehicle, he rescued a severely wounded crew member, administered professional medical treatment to him and directed the immediate evacuation of the other wounded tankers. Captain Roger was informed that the unit commander was seriously wounded and lying in an entirely exposed position. Braving a withering hail of bullets, he moved to the stricken officer, treated him and supervised his evacuation from the raging battlefield. He then continued his lifesaving mission until the last friendly casualty had been treated and safely evacuated. Captain Roger's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1359 (March 27, 1968)


ROGERS, BERNARD WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Bernard William Rogers (0-25867), Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force while serving as Assistant Division Commander of the 1st Infantry Division, in action against the enemy on 11 December 1966 in the Republic of Vietnam. During the late morning hours General Rogers was flying in his command and control helicopter when he was notified that a friendly platoon had been engaged by a Viet Cong company near Suoi Da. General Rogers immediately instructed his pilot to proceed to the battle area. He quickly made an aerial reconnaissance and, comprehending the tactical situation, radioed for reinforcing elements to be air lifted into the location. General Rogers directed the landing of his helicopter in the unsecured area in order to implement and coordinate the stratagem he had devised. Next, General Rogers ordered the clearing of the most suitable ground for a landing zone. Due to General Rogers' planning and supervision, the integration of the reinforcing elements with troops already deployed was accomplished with precise coordination. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he ignored the intense hostile fire and fearlessly moved about the area of conflict issuing directives, maintaining fire discipline and supervising the evacuation of the wounded. His dynamic personality infused new vigor and determination into his men. General Rogers' brilliant employment of the infantry forces was of singular importance in this mission and resulted in the overwhelming defeat of the Viet Cong. Brigadier General Rogers' unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. ??? (February 6, 1967)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)


ROGERS, BRIAN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Brian G. Rogers, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam during the period, 30 May 1969 to 1 June 1969, while serving with Battery C, 1st Battalion, 92nd Artillery, as a member of a forward observer team with the 11th Vietnamese Ranger Battalion in the vicinity of Ben Het. As he and the other members of his team became separated from their unit under fire, Specialist Rogers and the others joined with the 11th Rangers. After overtaking an enemy-held hill, the force came under siege on 31 May 1969 from 0630 to 2230 hours. Specialist Rogers' accurate M-16 fire and ability to toss hand grenades where they were needed most became a point of admiration among the South Vietnamese, as he rose time after time to stop an advance with a volley of extremely accurate grenade throws. His concentrated efforts continued even after he was wounded in the arms and shoulders by numerous pieces of shell fragments. By continually coordinating with the artillery and Spooky gunships, Specialist Rogers enabled the force to escape the grasp of the enemy under cover of darkness. He refused treatment for his wounds and assisted the more seriously wounded. Specialist Rogers insisted on carrying a man back to the friendly lines rather than allow him to lag to the rear where the enemy forces were following closely. In the dense jungle underbrush, with the darkness of nightfall and the severe pain of his wounds, Specialist Rogers thought only of others as he issued words and gestures of encouragement to people of another language and led them by superb example. Specialist Rogers' extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior enemy force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.


*ROGERS, LESTER ALLEN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Lester Allen Rogers (0-5320517), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while serving with Advisory Team 39, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. First Lieutenant Rogers distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 28 February 1966 while serving as advisor to the Regional Force/Popular Force, An Phuoc District, Ninh Thuan Province, Republic of Vietnam. While on a combat patrol the unit was subjected to heavy Viet Cong fire from a well prepared ambush position. Though isolated from the remainder of the group, along with two other seriously wounded American advisors, Lieutenant Rogers immediately began placing suppressive fire on the enemy positions until the hostile fire ceased. After administering emergency medical treatment and moving his injured comrades to a safer location, Lieutenant Rogers attempted to locate the remainder of the patrol. Failing to do so, he returned to the wounded soldiers and established a small defensive position. When the insurgent force began the attack once more, Lieutenant Rogers disregarded his personal safety to engage the hostile force until he was mortally wounded by the communist fire. Lieutenant Rogers' conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 599 (April 30, 1966)
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri


ROMERO, ARTENIO, JR.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Artenio Romero, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Romero distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 8879 (November 18, 1968)


ROSE, LEO DALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Leo Dale Rose (RA-17659435), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fourth Class Rose distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 11 March 1967, while serving as a radio-telephone operator with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a company mission near the village of My Phu, Republic of Vietnam. When the company commander was wounded while attempting to better his observation, Specialist Rose ran to the fallen leader and pulled him to a covered position. As he began administering first aid, another burst of enemy fire killed the commander and severely wounded Specialist Rose. Specialist Rose immediately returned the fire and eliminated the enemy weapon. He then continued to relay communications and personally guided a relieving element to the aid of a platoon which had become pinned down. Despite being wounded, he exposed himself to intense hostile fire in order to observe the enemy locations and direct the maneuvering element. He remained in his exposed position until the relief element had silenced the enemy weapons to his front. Consenting to be evacuated, he waited for other wounded to be extracted before he himself boarded a helicopter. Specialist Rose's personal bravery and aggressive action in close combat are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 3661 (July 2, 1967)


SAMANIEGO, JOE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joe Samaniego, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Samaniego distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 12 June 1968, while serving as a machine gunner with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a search and destroy mission in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam.


*SANDERS, RICHARD LEE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Richard Lee Sanders (US-56704066), Corporal, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Sanders distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 November 1967, while serving as a medic on a search and destroy mission in the northern portion of Bien Hoa Province, Vietnam. As the unit moved through an area of dense jungle vegetation, it suddenly came under an intense volume of automatic and semiautomatic weapons fire from a well concealed and determined company of Viet Cong. Seeing several of his comrades fall in the initial burst of enemy fire, Private Sanders immediately rushed to their aid. Although exposing himself to a torrent of insurgent fire, Private Sanders brilliantly succeeded in rendering professional first aid to the wounded men and carrying them to a position of relative safety. Without regard for personal safety and fully aware of the peril of the situation, Private Sanders rushed to a soldier who had been wounded during the conflict. After reaching the man, Private Sanders began administering aid when suddenly the wounded soldier became hysterical and started to run towards his unit's position. Fearing for the safety of the man, Private Sanders dove at the soldier in an attempt to keep him in a position that afforded some cover from the intense fire. It was during the courageous act that Private Sanders and the wounded soldier were mortally wounded by a burst of automatic weapons fire. Private First Class Sanders' extraordinary heroism is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7492 (December 30, 1967)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California


SCHNESE, CALVIN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Calvin G. Schnese, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1967 as assistant patrol leader of a six-man Special Forces long range reconnaissance team operating in enemy territory. His team had halted near the construction site of a large enemy camp when it was discovered and surrounded by a large Viet Cong force. While the patrol leader called for air support, Sergeant Schnese crawled to within a few meters of the encircling enemy lines, located a weak point and returned to the team's location. The tactical aircraft arrived overhead and began firing rockets at Viet Cong positions. Braving intense small arms fire, Sergeant Schnese led his fellow soldiers through the lightly defended point he had discovered to relative safety outside the enemy lines while the team leader remained behind to adjust the airstrikes. Sergeant Schnese then courageously exposed himself to the insurgents and placed fierce fire on them to draw their attention and fire away from his trapped comrade, enabling him to escape.
RV, General Orders No: 1993 - (2 May 1968)


*SCHOFIELD, ALFRED VINCENT (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Alfred Vincent Schofield (0-5346343), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Schofield distinguished himself by heroic actions on 16 September 1968, while serving as a platoon leader with Company C, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On that date his unit was escorting a convoy on a road security mission when they came under heavy enemy fire. The lead vehicle was disabled and Lieutenant Schofield's armored personnel carrier was trapped in the killing zone. The initial burst of enemy fire killed or wounded several members of his platoon. Hearing a plea from one of the wounded men, Lieutenant Schofield, with complete disregard for his personal safety, braved the devastating enemy fire as he treated the ailing man. While carrying his comrades to the rear Lieutenant Schofield was fatally wounded by an enemy rocket. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives and the successful completion of the mission. Lieutenant Schofield's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No.: 7043 (October 4, 1968)
Home Town: Quincy, Massachusetts


SELF, CLARENCE MICHAEL
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Clarence Michael Self, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Self distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 3 July 1969, while serving as platoon sergeant with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. While moving through dense jungle, Company B, engaged an unknown sized enemy force. Laying down an intense volume of fire Company B forced all but two of the enemy to withdraw. The remaining soldiers, hidden deep within a camouflaged bunker, continued to place accurate fire on the company. Staff Sergeant Self, seeing one of his men lying wounded in a small clearing directly in front of the bunker, immediately, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged the bunker. Staff Sergeant Self, along with a member of his platoon, used effective fire and maneuver techniques to reach the top of the enemy bunker after a speedy dash across a small clearing. From this position he effectively eliminated the enemy by rolling fragmentation grenades into their bunker. His display of personal bravery and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 10360, (August 24, 1969)

SELF, CLARENCE MICHAEL
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Clarence Michael Self, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Self distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 5 September 1969, while serving Company B, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a ground reconnaissance mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. When Staff Sergeant Self's unit became engaged by an estimated company-sized enemy force in a bunker complex, intense enemy fire separated the two platoons and pinned the lead platoon down prohibiting advance or withdrawal. Staff Sergeant Self immediately maneuvered his platoon as to cover the withdrawal of the first platoon. Repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire, Staff Sergeant Self inspired his men to keep up the base of fire. He also directed a portion of his force to the rear, securing additional ammunition and smoke to assist in bringing in supporting artillery and aerial rocket artillery fire. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 10360, (August 24, 1969)
Home Town: Caddo, Oklahoma
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam)


SHAFER, JOHNNY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Johnny A. Shafer, Warrant Officer (WO-1), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Troop B, 7th Armored Squadron, 17th Air Cavalry Regiment, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer Shafer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the rescue of two airmen trapped in the burning wreckage of their helicopter which had been downed by enemy ground to air fire. Observing the crash, Warrant Officer Shafer immediately landed approximately 50 meters from the wreckage and dashed across the open terrain in full view of the enemy soldiers who were directing fire at him from a nearby treeline. During the three minutes it took him to free and pull the critically injured pilot and observer from the flaming wreckage, Warrant Officer Shafer refused to be deterred in his rescue as he braved the intense heat and frequent sniper fire directed at him by the enemy. Warrant Officer Shafer's exemplary courage most certainly saved the lives of these two critically injured airmen. His gallant actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Aviation Brigade, General Orders No. 5088 (June 29, 1971)


SHELTON, WILLIAM R.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William R. Shelton, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Shelton distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2002 (April 16, 1968)


*SHIPE, THOMAS A. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas A. Shipe, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a rifleman of Company B, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade, on a combat operation in the Nui Mieu Mountains in the Republic of Vietnam, on 19 September 1970. On that date, while searching for a Viet Cong Political Prisoner of War camp in an area known to contain many enemy soldiers, Private Shipe's element spotted an enemy soldier at the entrance to a cave and took him under fire. Realizing the importance of intelligence that could be obtained from inside the cave, Private Shipe volunteered to be one of two men to enter and search it. After entering the cave a short distance he came under enemy fire at a very close range and was immediately wounded. He began to return fire in the direction of the enemy muzzle flash in order to enable his comrade to reach the cave entrance and signal for help. He continued to return fire until he was mortally wounded by the enemy fire, sacrificing his own life in an attempt to accomplish the mission. By his valorous actions he imparted a sense of urgency, purpose, and determination to the men that ultimately played a key role in the success of the mission. His efforts proved to be the force that helped disrupt the enemy's mission and indirectly saved the lives of many other comrades. Private First Class Shipe's extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Venetia, Pennsylvania


*SHREWSBERRY, ROGER L. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Roger L. Shrewsberry, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Shrewsberry distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 1 September 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7222 (September 17, 1968)


SHRIVER, JERRY MICHAEL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jerry Michael Shriver (RA-315461629), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Command and Control South, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Shriver distinguished himself on 27 October 1966 while serving as assistant team leader of a four man Special Forces reconnaissance team on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. While moving through thick jungle terrain, his team was attacked by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Sergeant Shriver and his men succeeded in repulsing the first attack and immediately pulled back into a defensive perimeter. He then moved out of the perimeter to reach the body of a dead insurgent in an attempt to gain intelligence material. The Viet Cong had removed all equipment from the body so he moved back passing with-in ten meters of two insurgents. He attempted to make radio contact with friendly forces but was unable to in the thick terrain. The enemy forces soon surrounded his team but he directed heavy fire on them and repulsed their numerous probes. Finally making contact, he called in air strikes on the Viet Cong positions to cover evacuation operations. Because of the terrain and heavy firing, the helicopters were only able to hoist one man at a time. Sergeant Shriver volunteered to remain on the ground to cover the operations and directed deadly fire on the concentrated attacks by the hostile soldiers. Ignoring the hail of bullets striking around him, he fought furiously until all his men were aboard.
RV, General Orders No: 4999 - (October 1, 1967)
Home Town: Sacramento, California


SHUBERT, EARL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Earl D. Shubert (RA-16895505), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Shubert distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Squad Leader for Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was conducting a search and clear mission south of DaNang when they came in contact with a hostile force consisting of more than 300 soldiers armed with automatic weapons and mortars. The company was immediately pinned down, with the lead platoon suffering heavy casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Shubert left his position and moved forward 100 meters through intense enemy fire across open rice paddies to rescue a wounded soldier. As he approached his wounded comrade, Sergeant Shubert took several insurgents under fire, killed two of them, and saved the soldier from almost certain death. Sergeant Shubert's unquestionable valor in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2449 (May 10, 1968)


SIEBEL, RICHARD JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard Joseph Siebel (US-55837695), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fourth Class Siebel distinguished himself by heroic actions on 3 November 1966, while serving as a Radio Operator for the Company Commander of Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. On this date, the company was airlifted into a jungle area long known to be a Viet Cong stronghold. As the company advanced, it came under murderous automatic weapons fire from the front and right flanks. As the company commander moved through the battle area, Specialist Siebel was always at his side monitoring all communications. Early in the battle he was wounded in the leg by small arms fire, but refused evacuation and continued to move with the company commander. When the company commander was fatally wounded, he moved him to a more secure area and started first aid. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he carried the company commander through an open area to the approaching helicopter, which was surrounded on two sides by snipers with automatic weapons. Upon departure from the landing zone with the wounded, the helicopter was shot down. Specialist Siebel returned to the area and retrieved the company commander. Specialist Siebel also rendered calm and precise reports to the battalion commander appraising him of the situation until another officer assumed command. As the battle terminated and all wounded were evacuated, Specialist Siebel again refused evacuation. He remained with the company during the next twenty-four hours during which the company was again engaged in heavy fighting. Specialist Siebel's personal courage and his great loyalty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 101 (January 9, 1967)
Born: at Waterloo, Iowa
Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Purple Heart


*SINK, OTIS BEVERLEY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Otis Beverley Sink (RA-13578725), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Sergeant Sink distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 27 February 1967, while serving as a team leader with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during an engagement with a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. When Sergeant Sink's squad became engaged in a fire fight in a rock complex with an enemy force of unknown size and sustained several casualties including the squad leader, Sergeant Sink immediately took command of the unit. Displaying extraordinary courage and resourcefulness, Sergeant Sink crawled and climbed through the rock complex in an attempt to locate the enemy position. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire while checking the area, he soon located the position. Pulling back his squad, he then directed his men in throwing hand grenades at the enemy's location. Fully aware that he might be taken under fire, Sergeant Sink then climbed back up to the position to determine the results of the grenade bombardment. Finding one of the North Vietnamese dead, Sergeant Sink was climbing down a rock to check for more of the enemy when he was struck and mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his courageous action and complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Sink was instrumental in the elimination of the North Vietnamese Army force, and in preventing any casualties among his own men. Sergeant Sink's display of personal bravery and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Elliston, Virginia


SLOAN, DONALD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald H. Sloan, Captain, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Sloan distinguished himself on 25 November 1969 in the vicinity of Bu Prang. While serving at the Fire Support Coordination Center, the Special Forces outpost at Bu Prang received a heavy enemy mortar, rocket and recoilless rifle attack. Without regard for his own safety, Captain Sloan displayed remarkable courage by running through the impacting rounds to render emergency medical treatment to several wounded personnel. At one point, while assisting an indigenous soldier to the safety of a bunker, he was caught in the open and exposed to an intense recoilless rifle attack. He unhesitatingly threw himself across the wounded man to protect him from further injury. During a lull, he took charge of a litter party and assisted in removing other injured soldiers to safety for treatment. When the camp came under heavy fire again, Captain Sloan continued to exhibit exemplary courage and leadership he led the evacuation of many fallen comrades. Captain Sloan's devotion to duty and personal bravery were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


*SMITH, PATRICK EDWARD, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Patrick Edward Smith, Jr. (US-51832197), Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Sergeant Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 26 November 1968, while serving as a squad leader with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a search and clear mission in Quan An Loc Province, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit came into heavy contact with a well fortified enemy force, Specialist Smith and several other men were seriously wounded. Disregarding his wounds, Specialist Smith exposed himself to the intense hostile fire as he dragged the other men to safety. Only after he was sure that all his wounded comrades were retrieved did Specialist Smith allow himself to be medically evacuated. The medical evacuation helicopter was shot down shortly after take off, however, and Specialist Smith was fatally injured. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 14978 (December 14, 1968)
Home Town: Avon, Ohio


*SMITH, TERRY HUGH (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Terry Hugh Smith (56956786), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Samaniego distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 12 June 1968, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a search and destroy mission in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam.
Born: April 17, 1947 at Laramie, Wyoming
Home Town: Bingen, Washington
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Purple Heart


*SMITH, TERRY LEE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Terry Lee Smith (US-53399140), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, on 21 October 1966, in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Specialist Smith was called with the rest of his platoon to provide security for several men who had been wounded by two command detonated Viet Cong claymore mines. The injured men were being harassed by an estimated ten men insurgent force in the jungle region south of Lai Khe base camp. Immediately upon reaching the embattled men Specialist Smith detected several Viet Cong talking in an area to his front. He immediately fired upon their position with his machine gun. The insurgents countered with an intense barrage of fire striking Specialist Smith in the chest. Weak from his injury, Specialist Smith protected the assistant machine gunner from the intense hostile fire with his own body. When his strength returned Specialist Smith disregarded this painful wound, took over the machine gun and commenced firing at the Viet Cong until he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Smith's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3244 (November 24, 1966)
Home Town: Piedmont, South Carolina


*SMITH, WILLIAM DAVID (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to William David Smith (RA-437827144), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile enemy force while serving with Troop F, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Smith distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 24 March 1971 in the Republic of Vietnam. During a reconnaissance mission over a well fortified enemy bunker complex, Specialist Four Smith, the door gunner, observed several enemy soldiers as his aircraft began its descent into the hostile environment. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Four Smith engaged the enemy with effective suppressive fire. As Specialist Four Smith attempted to protect the aircraft from the hostile forces, an enemy rocket struck the aircraft amidst a lethal crossfire from the enemy forces. Specialist Four Smith's gallantry in action and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Lafayette, Louisiana


*SPEAKS, MAC WAYNE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Mac Wayne Speaks (0-2307556), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Detachment A-102, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Speaks distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 March 1968 as Special Forces advisor to two Vietnamese platoon during an enemy attack on their outpost near Tien Phuoc. During the early morning hours, the camp was subjected to heavy enemy mortar fire followed by a furious ground assault by a large Viet Cong forces armed with automatic weapons, rockets, and grenades. Braving a savage hail of bullets and flying shrapnel, Captain Speaks quickly adjusted illumination flares to expose the advancing insurgents. He then raced from position to position, shouting words of encouragement to his defending troops and placing fierce fire on the enemy. Moving to the outpost's mortar emplacement, Captain Speaks directed intense counter-mortar fire on the attackers until he was seriously wounded by enemy fire. Captain Speaks' gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Alexander City, Alabama


*STEARNS, MICHAEL FORRESTER (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Michael Forrester Stearns (RA-19760833), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Detachment A-108, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Stearns distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 March 1967 while serving as Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese reaction force during the relief of a beleaguered unit near Minh Long. After landing with his unit, a short distance from the conflict, Sergeant Stearns immediately deployed his men to secure the zone and took charge of incoming troops as helicopters delivered them. While leading the troops toward the besieged unit, the force was struck by intense machine gun fire. Although Sergeant Stearns was seriously wounded, he never wavered in trying to lead his troops out of the dangerous area. Ignoring the bullets striking all around him, he ran to the aid of a Vietnamese sergeant and was struggling to get him to safety when he was fatally wounded. Staff Sergeant Stearns' gallantry in action, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1595 (April 10, 1967
Home Town: San Francisco, California


STEVENS, LOWELL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lowell W. Stevens, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 15 July 1967 as Special Forces team leader of a six-man patrol on a reconnaissance mission in enemy territory. The patrol had just completed a helicopter infiltration when it was subjected to intense automatic weapons fire from a North Vietnamese Army company in well fortified positions on three sides of the landing zone. Forming his troops in a hasty perimeter, Sergeant Stevens directed helicopter gunship strafing runs against the entrenched enemy. A rescue helicopter attempted to extract the surrounded patrol from the landing zone but was riddled by a savage hostile fusillade and forced to depart. Sergeant Stevens then led his comrades to a relatively secure position, adjusted napalm and bomb strikes of friendly fighter aircraft on the North Vietnamese, and guided his team aboard a second evacuation helicopter. As the ship ascended, it was hit by a hail of enemy bullets and forced to crash land. Braving relentless hostile fire, Sergeant Stevens led his team and the helicopter crew members from the wreckage into the nearby jungle and directed tactical aircraft in a devastating air attack which finally silenced the North Vietnamese. His fearless leadership saved the lives of his fellow soldiers and resulted in forty-three enemy killed.
RV, General Orders No: 1992 - (May 2, 1968)


STRAW, WADE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wade C. Straw, Warrant Officer (WO-1), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 20th Artillery Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Warrant Officer Straw distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 May 1970, in the Republic of Vietnam. When a base came under enemy attack, Warrant Officer Straw ignoring the fire directed at his ship, silenced one enemy position and continued to fire until his ammunition was expended. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 16267 (September 4, 1970)


STRONG, MICHAEL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael D. Strong (0-5254792), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Strong distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as Battalion Surgeon with the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, a rifle company of his battalion came under heavy contact with a reinforced enemy battalion near Lo Giang and were sustaining numerous casualties. Immediately, Captain Strong insisted upon accompanying the first medical evacuation helicopter to go to the aid of the company. Arriving at the company command post, he took charge of caring for the wounded and their immediate evacuation. Despite the fact that the position was still under heavy small arms and mortar fire, Captain Strong moved about the exposed area, treating the seriously wounded, comforting men and ensuring that all wounded men were moved to a central location for treatment and evacuation. When the company launched a counterattack to drive the enemy from the field, more casualties were brought into the command post. Although the position was still receiving hostile fire, Captain Strong courageously made numerous trips into the open rice paddies to pick up wounded men from carrying parties. The immediate and skillful care he was able to provide was instrumental in saving the lives of many soldiers. Captain Strong's conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3182 (June 13, 1968)


SUNLEY, LEONARD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Leonard D. Sunley (US-56587154), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Sunley distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a rifleman in Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, which was conducting a search and clear operation. As his platoon approached a wooded village, they suddenly came under intense small arms and rocket fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. Specialist Sunley immediately rushed forward to the front of his platoon and began to hurl grenades at the enemy positions. With complete disregard for his own safety, he began to eliminate position after position with his grenades and small arms fire. His aggressive actions allowed his platoon to move out of an exposed rice paddy and gain a foothold in the village. When his supply of grenades was exhausted, he quickly returned to the rear to get a re-supply for himself and his comrades, so they could continue to press the attack. Throughout the battle, he ignored the heavy enemy fire and continually engaged the enemy forces at close range. His heroic actions accounted for five bunkers destroyed and seven enemy killed. Specialist Fourth Class Sunley's unquestionable valor in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2523 (June 13, 1968)


SWANK, LAURENCE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Laurence C. Swank (0-5424508), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Swank distinguished himself by exceptionally valiant actions while serving as a Forward Observer with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was crossing an open rice paddy near the village of Log Giang (1) during a sweep mission when they came under intense fire from a reinforced battalion of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. Lieutenant Swank was moving with the command group when the insurgents opened fire and, almost immediately his radio and telephone operator was wounded. Without regard for his own safety, Lieutenant Swank exposed himself to hostile fire to aid the wounded soldier. He then dragged the injured man a distance of 400 meters to the safety of the weapons platoon perimeter. Lieutenant Swank rushed to the nearest radio and commenced adjusting the artillery fire which had been called in by the acting company commander. He continuously exposed himself to hostile fire as he moved out in the open rice paddy to accurately adjust the supporting artillery fire. First Lieutenant Swank's unquestionable valor in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3032 (June 5, 1968)


THORSGARD, GRAYDON B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Graydon B. Thorsgard (US-55931435), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class thorsgard distinguished himself while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. On 9 May 1969, when Landing Zone Penny was attacked by enemy ground forces, Specialist Thorsgard immediately engaged them with grenade and M-16 fire. The resistance and firepower supplied by Specialist Thorsgard during the first ten minutes, enabled the landing zone's forces to be organized and the enemy advance halted. When his weapon jammed, he joined his Commanding Officer in advancing on an enemy-held bunker with only a few grenades. Although wounded by enemy shrapnel, he continued to advance and engaged the enemy with his grenades. Specialist Fourth Class Thorsgard's courageous actions, determination and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3160 (June 18, 1969)
Home Town: Northwood, North Dakota
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Purple Heart


*TIMBOE, ARTHUR RICHARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Arthur Richard Timboe (OF-108972), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while assigned to Advisory Team 70, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. First Lieutenant Timboe distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 1 February 1968 while serving as Assistant Battalion Advisor, 1st Battalion, 7th Regiment, 5th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Lieutenant Timboe was accompanying the 1st Battalion and other elements of the 5th Infantry Division on a search and destroy operation near the city of Phu Cuong. As the 1st Battalion approached the south side of the city along Highway 13, it came under intense mortar, rocket, automatic and small arms weapons fire. When the Vietnamese soldiers moved out of the heavy vegetation in order to move into firing position, the enemy took them under direct fire. The Vietnamese Company Commander dispatched a light machinegun team to establish a base of fire but before the team could reach the highway, a burst of automatic fire wounded the gunner. Lieutenant Timboe unhesitatingly left his position of safety and, ignoring the extreme danger, ran to the aid of the wounded man. He dashed across 10 meters of open terrain, physically picked up the wounded soldier and started back to a protected area. At this time he was subject to enemy automatic weapons fire and was mortally wounded. First Lieutenant Timboe's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 402 (February 25, 1968)
Home Town: San Francisco, California


*TOTTY, DELBERT C. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Delbert C. Totty (RA-19305441), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, on 31 March 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Sergeant Totty was serving as platoon sergeant during Operation JUNCTION CITY. His company had assumed defensive positions on a landing zone near Quan Loi when they were suddenly subjected to an intense mortar barrage followed by a concentrated insurgent ground attack. The insurgents breached the lines of another company and threatened to overrun the command post. Sergeant Totty rallied his men and led them to the assistance of the embattled friendly element. They encountered the Viet Cong before they overran the command post and halted the insurgent advance with rifle fire and grenades. The Viet Cong brought up their support elements and began another assault of friendly positions. Undaunted, Sergeant Totty led his men into the center of the battle. After moments of violent hand to hand combat and effective fire into the insurgent ranks, the Viet Cong were forced to retreat. Sergeant Totty and his comrades regained the territory lost in the initial attack and with suppressive fire forced the Viet Cong back into a devastating air strike and mortar barrage. The desperate Viet Cong attempted to break the cordon that closed around them. Sergeant Totty again moved to the area of heaviest fighting to assist his embattled comrades. He continued to fight courageously and killed many Viet Cong before he was mortally wounded by an enemy grenade. Platoon Sergeant Totty's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Headquarters, First Infantry Division (July 1, 1966)
Born: August 27, 1928 at Wheeler, Texas
Home Town: Wasco, California


*TREDINNICK, CHARLES NICHOL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Charles Nichol Tredinnick (RA-52357613), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Tredinnick distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 January 1968 as a member of a small Special Forces rescue party on a search and rescue mission near Khe Sanh. When his team came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, Sergeant Tredinnick fearlessly led his small group in a blazing assault against a numerically superior force. The ferocity of the assault caused the enemy to abandon their well fortified positions. When Sergeant Tredinnick spotted an enemy platoon attempting to outflank his position, he personally took them under fire, delivering such a withering and accurate volume of machine gun fire that he broke the flanking maneuver, causing the enemy to flee. When he saw one of his comrades fall, he showed a complete disregard for his own safety by running through a curtain of fire to pull his comrade to safety. Sergeant Tredinnick was mortally wounded while placing the welfare of his comrades above his personal safety. Sergeant First Class Tredinnick's gallantry in action, a the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: December 13, 1934 at Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Dallas, Pennsylvania


TURCOTTE, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard Turcotte (RA-67189893), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 18 May 1969 while serving as a cannoneer with Battery D (Machine Gun), 71st Artillery, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date when Husky Compound at Xuan Loc came under an enemy rocket, mortar, and ground attack, Specialist Turcotte and the other members of his machine gun crew immediately began placing a heavy volume of fire on the advancing enemy. As the battle increased in intensity, his emplacement was hit by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade, destroying the weapon and mortally wounding two of his comrades. While helping to evacuate the casualties, Specialist Turcotte observed several hostile soldiers moving toward a perimeter bunker which had been neutralized by enemy fire. Using the machine gun mounted on his vehicle, he fired at the advancing enemy and forced them to take cover. He then ran to the bunker, secured a machine gun that had been abandoned inside, and raked the hostile troops with devastating fire, killing three of them and forcing the others to retreat. When he had expended all of his ammunition, Specialist Turcotte moved to a howitzer position in order to assist the crew in directing point-blank fire at the assaulting enemy. He continued to aid his comrades in repelling the hostile troops until he was wounded when an enemy rocket impacted near his position. Again he exposed himself to the hostile fusillade in order to evacuate the more seriously wounded soldiers to a safe position for medical assistance. Specialist Four Turcotte's outstanding courage, unwavering devotion to duty, and deep concern for his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force (Vietnam), General Orders No. 1631, (June 19, 1969)
Home Town: Moses Lake, Washington


*WAGNER, DAN, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Dan Wagner, Jr. (RA-15546691), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Forward Operational Base Number Two, Command and Control Detachment, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Wagner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 December 1967 while serving as patrol leader of a long range reconnaissance team operating in enemy controlled territory. His team was infiltrated into an area containing major enemy troop concentrations and installations, with the mission of locating them and destroying them with tactical air strikes. Although the patrol was discovered and pursued, Sergeant Wagner declined to call for evacuation and expertly maneuvered his team to evade the enemy. During this movement, he pinpointed several large troop concentrations. He then led the patrol to high ground and requested fighter aircraft. As he directed devastating air strikes on the hostile forces and equipment, the team suddenly began receiving intense fire from an enemy unit which had followed the patrol's maneuver. Sergeant Wagner alertly diverted the air strikes to the attackers. Exposed to a savage hail of bullets, he continued to direct the fighter aircraft until the insurgents fled in disorder. Sergeant Wagner was mortally wounded by sniper fire while skillfully adjusting lethal air strikes on the routed enemy. His courageous actions saved the lives of his comrades and enabled them to complete the mission. Sergeant First Class Wagner's gallantry in action, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 6650 (December 28, 1967)
Home Town: Pineville, Kentucky


WALLACE, FRANKIE LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frankie Lee Wallace (OF-10237), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Second Lieutenant Wallace distinguished himself on 4 February 1966 while leading a squad size patrol on a routine search of several villages in the Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 1430 hours as Second Lieutenant Wallace's squad approached a village, they were suddenly engaged by small arms and automatic weapons fire by an estimated Viet Cong squad. Exposing himself to the deadly insurgent fire, Second Lieutenant Wallace led an assault on the hostile positions. The assault was so aggressive that the Viet Cong were forced to withdraw. Second Lieutenant Wallace then led his patrol across an open rice paddy, skillfully executing fire and movement in pursuit of the insurgent force. The Viet Cong squad joined an estimated platoon size force who were well entrenched. Second Lieutenant Wallace directed effective artillery fire and air strikes on the hostile positions. When the supporting fires lifted, Second Lieutenant Wallace led his squad in an assault and was met by intense automatic weapons and mortar fire which forced him to withdraw. In the withdrawal, one fire team leader fell wounded.....Without hesitation, Second Lieutenant Wallace ran in to the open rice paddy to aid his wounded comrade and was wounded in the leg before he could reach him. Unmindful of his wound, Second Lieutenant Wallace got up and continued toward the wounded man. As he approached the stricken soldier, he killed two Viet Cong who were also attempting to reach the wounded man. Fully exposed to the intense Viet Cong fire concentrated on him, he aided the wounded soldier. Second Lieutenant Wallace was mortally wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire while assisting his wounded comrade to safety. Due to his courage, inspiring example, and his leadership, he was instrumental in saving the life of a fellow soldier and accounted for twenty-seven Viet Cong killed. Second Lieutenant Wallace's unimpeachable valor in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United State Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 3694 (June 12, 1966
Home Town: Cherokee, Alabama


WARCZAK, DAVID J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David J. Warczak, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 3 October 1966 as team leader of a four-man Special Forces recon-naissance patrol that had penetrated deep into hostile territory. Having made contact with two squads of Viet Cong, Sergeant Warczak and his patrol were engaged in an intense firefight when his assistant team leader was seriously wounded. Without thought for his personal safety, he ran through devastating hostile fire to the wounded man, dragged him into a position of relative safety, and administered first aid. When the extraction aircraft arrived overhead, he realized that it would be unable to help the team at its present location due to the impenetrable vegetation. Sergeant Warczak lifted the wounded man and carried him through the thick brush toward a clear landing zone. Constantly subjected to intense hostile fire, he moved over one hundred meters to the landing zone, waited until his teammates had been extracted then boarded the helicopter. His courage against a numerically superior enemy force turned the tide in what could have been a fatal situation.
RV, General Orders No: 2726 -( June 6, 1968)


*WARREN, GALEN EUGENE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Galen Eugene Warren (3909539), Hospitalman, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Hospital Corpsman with 2nd Platoon, Company L, Third Battalion, Ninth Marines, THIRD Marine Division (Reinforced) in the Republic of Vietnam on the evening of 20 May 1967. During operation Hickory, 2nd Platoon was point Platoon of Company L moving to bring a relief force to an embattled sister company when it engaged a strong enemy blocking force. The enemy opened up on the relief force with heavy automatic fire and grenades wounding several of the Marines on point. Without hesitation, responding to cries for help from the wounded Marines, and calmly accepting the consequences of his actions, Petty Officer Warren ran into the heavy enemy fire to aid the wounded Marines. With complete disregard for his own safety, Petty Officer Warren administered critical medical aid to the wounded Marines while under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire and a barrage of grenades. Petty Officer Warren shielded several of the wounded Marines from a grenade blast and continued to render medical aid until he was mortally wounded. Petty Officer Warren's outstanding courage, valiant fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty reflect great credit upon him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Seattle, Washington


WENDOVER, WILLIAM L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William L. Wendover (0-5340808), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Wendover distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was engaged with a reinforced battalion of North Vietnamese Army Regulars and sustained numerous casualties during the initial action. As soon as the company commander was wounded, Lieutenant Wendover took command of the company and moved his platoon back, while at the same time directing their fire on the enemy to cover the withdrawal of the rest of the company. After reorganizing the unit, Lieutenant Wendover exposed himself to the hostile fire and moved among his men giving encouragement and placing them in effective firing positions. In response to Lieutenant Wendover's request, artillery, air strikes, and helicopter gunships were brought in to subdue the enemy force, which had begun swarming out of their positions in an attempt to overrun the company. The enemy was finally repulsed after advancing to within 100 meters of the friendly force, and Lieutenant Wendover immediately moved his company forward and went on to rout the remainder of the Viet Cong battalion. Second Lieutenant Wendover's unquestionable valor in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3031 (June 5, 1968)


*WEST, NOEL THOMAS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Noel Thomas West (US-56427096), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medic with Company A, 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class West distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions 19 June 1967, while serving as a medical corpsman with his unit on a search-and-destroy mission near the village of Can Giouc, Vietnam. As the allied force was traversing a muddy rice paddy, they were met by a hail of automatic and semi-automatic fire from a well-entrenched Viet Cong force concealed in a clump of trees. Immediately upon receiving fire, West, in complete disregard for his own safety, began to treat the wounded. As bullets pounded the ground and filled the air around him, West dashed from casualty to casualty, rendering aid that in several cases proved to be of a life-saving nature. Hostile machine gun fire sprayed the rice paddy, and West, while aiding yet another wounded soldier, was hit and mortally wounded. West gave his life in order that others might live; he was an inspiration to the men around him. West's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Tacoma, Washington


*WHITMORE, WILLIAM L. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to William L. Whitmore (543461754), Captain, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Troop A, 2d Squadron (Airmobile), 17th Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 July 1970. Captain Whitmore distinguished himself while serving as pilot of an CH-6A light observation helicopter supporting a Ranger team in heavy contact with an enemy force. Despite intense hostile fire directed against his aircraft, Captain Whitmore flew at low level and marked the enemy positions for supporting armed helicopters. When the Ranger team leader was seriously wounded, Captain Whitmore descended through the hostile fire to the team's position. Although a heavy volume of enemy fire was directed against the aircraft, Captain Whitmore hovered in the landing zone until the wounded Ranger was placed aboard. Evading the hostile fire, Captain Whitmore then ascended and flew the wounded man to the nearest medical facility. Captain Whitmore's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 9361 (August 15, 1970)


WILLOUGHBY, LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence Willoughby, Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in Vietnam on 6 July 1963. Captain Willoughby demonstrated fortitude and professional skill s an Advisor to an Army of Vietnam Psychological Warfare Team during a military operation which included a Vietnamese Ranger Company. As these Vietnamese elements approached a narrow, densely wooded mountain trail, they were suddenly ambushed by hostile forces, pinned down by heavy gun fire, and forced to take cover in a shallow ditch. Realizing the high probability of casualties by remaining in this untenable position, Captain Willoughby displayed complete disregard for his own safety, left the protection of the ditch, charged to the strongest point of ambush, and caused the insurgents to withdraw. He then proceeded to the Ranger Company's 60-mm. mortar and directed operations to rid the area of the fleeing forces. While still under flanking fire, he brought two wounded Vietnamese soldiers to the safety of the ditch. His courageous conduct, unselfish actions, and devotion to duty inspired his Vietnamese comrades to pursue their defense efforts and enabled the unit to successfully complete its mission. Captain Willoughby's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 15 (April 23, 1964)


*WILSON, RAY GENE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ray Gene Wilson (US-54669934), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving an armed hostile force while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam on 23 February 1969. On that date, Private First Class Wilson was serving as a radio-telephone operator with his platoon on a night ambush near the village of Phouc Bien II. At approximately 0300 hours, he detected seven Viet Cong within 50 meters of his ambush site. During the ensuing firefight, Private First Class Wilson maneuvered through a hail of hostile rounds with his platoon leader and maintained constant communications with the friendly elements. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private First Class Wilson proceeded to a forward position and put forth devastating fire with his automatic rifle which killed one insurgent. Realizing that illumination was imperative to expose the enemy locations, he braved the aggressor barrage and fired hand flares until he was mortally wounded. His selfish courage, professionalism, and perseverance significantly contributed to the success of the engagement. Private First Class Wilson's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 2064 (March 25, 1969)
Home Town: Hugo, Oklahoma


*WILSON, RONALD ALTON (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ronald Alton Wilson (US-56833645), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Private First Class Wilson distinguished himself by heroic action on 13 June 1968, while serving with Company C, 2nd Battalion, 27 Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, on a reconnaissance in force operation near Gin Thois Nhut, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit came under heavy fire from an estimated battalion size hostile force several men were wounded. Observing an enemy position to his front, Private Wilson laid down a suppressive base of fire that successfully neutralized the Viet Cong. He noticed two wounded comrades in an open area that was 30 meters from his position and took it upon himself to extract them. Fearlessly he ran through the hail of hostile weapons fire to reach the wounded men. Upon arrival he picked up one man and while carrying him to the rear was severely wounded. Ignoring the pain, Private Wilson completed his mission before his wound proved fatal. Due to his valorous actions, several lives were saved and the enemy force defeated. Private Wilson's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Oakland, California


*WISKOW, INGO J. R. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ingo J. R. Wiskow, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Five Wiskow distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 April 1968 as assistant patrol commander of a Special Forces Platoon on a relief mission near Song Be. A small ambush patrol had been pinned down by a numerically superior enemy force in a heavy firefight. Responding to a request for reinforcements, Specialist Wiskow's unit moved to the battle area aboard helicopters. After landing, he led his men through the jungle and secured a hill to the rear of the beleaguered friendly troops. Although visibility was hampered by dense ground fog, he then maneuvered to link up with the ambush patrol. As he led his men down the hill, the enemy launched a devastating automatic weapons barrage on them. Ignoring his safety, Specialist Wiskow moved through a hail of bullets to rally his troops and prepare them for an assault. Firing withering bursts from his rifle, he led a fierce charge into the face of the enemy weapons. Bullets struck all around him as he moved up and down his advancing lines and encouraged his men to press their attack. He was mortally wounded while leading his men in close combat with the enemy. His fearless leadership inspired his men to continue their mission, beat back the enemy, and save the trapped patrol from total annihilation. Specialist Five Wiskow's gallantry in action, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


*WYNN, GERARD MICHAEL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Gerard Michael Wynn (0-73940), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 13 and 14 November 1967 Major Wynn distinguished himself while serving as Operations Staff Officer of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, operating near Xuan Que. Companies A and B were heavily engaged with a large force of determined North Vietnamese Regulars. Major Wynn and the Battalion Command flew to the area in the Command and Control helicopter. To better direct the companies' efforts, they elected to fly extremely low to overcome the poor visibility in spite of increasing the danger of being hit by enemy fire. While deploying the companies to maintain contact with the North Vietnamese, they flew directly over the enemy forces and were hit. The helicopter was downed but Major Wynn was airborne within an hours and again aiding the ground forces. The next morning, Major Wynn and the Battalion Commander continued their mission and again elected to direct operations from an extremely low altitude. Once more their helicopter received heavy automatic weapons fire. The helicopter went out of control and crashed. Major Wynn was mortally wounded in the crash. His personal courage and devotion to his men and to his duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: North Arlington, New Jersey


WYNNE, OSCAR B., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Oscar B. Wynne, III (W-3156390), Warrant Officer 1 (WO-1), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Wynne distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967, as Pilot of an Ambulance Helicopter of the 45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, on a rescue mission near Cu Chi. Mister Wynne received an urgent request to evacuate twelve seriously wounded men and immediately flew to the battle area. He did this despite the knowledge that several rescue ships had previously been shot down in the area. He made an unhampered landing and his crew began loading the patients. Murderous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire suddenly erupted from a nearby tree line, riddling his helicopter. With four casualties loaded, he ordered the medic and crew chief to climb aboard and took off to prevent further damage to the ship. The hostile barrage in the landing zone ceased, and he returned to rescue the remainder of the casualties. The enemy force launched a second fusillade on his shi, and he was wounded as rounds tore into the craft. Ignoring his wound and mounting damage to the helicopter, he remained on the ground until all of the injured were loaded. He then took off and skillfully nursed the badly crippled ship to an airfield. Warrant Officer Wynne's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1203 (March 19, 1968)


*YAMANE, BENJI (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Benji Yamane (US-56823799), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Yamane distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 16 March 1968 while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Oakland, California


*YATES, CHARLES MICHAEL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Charles Michael Yates (US-54437147), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 January 1967. Private First Class Yates was serving as a rifleman of the Third Platoon of Company A, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, while on a search and destroy mission. The unit was brought under fire by a sizable enemy force armed with automatic weapons. Private Yates was wounded in the initial contact but refused to be evacuated, choosing instead to help the other wounded personnel. Moving through the heavy fire fight in order to reach the other wounded personnel and render medical aid, Private Yates successfully treated one of the wounded men and assisted him to safety, he returned to aid the other wounded personnel. But as he moved through the embattled area, his movements were detected by the enemy and he was fatally wounded. Private Yates' actions undoubtedly saved the lives of several of his wounded comrades. His outstanding aggressiveness, devotion to duty and personal bravery are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, I Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 244 (March 11, 1967)
Home Town: Dallas, Texas


YATES, GEORGE C.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George C. Yates, Private, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action on 13 - 14 April 1971 while serving as a Light Weapons Advisor to 54 Company, 5th Airborne Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. His duties were to hold a night defensive position, but as morning approached, the unit received an intense barrage of mortar, rocket and small arms fire. When the requested gunships arrived, without regard for his own personal safety, Bateman exposed himself to the hail of fire while marking the enemy position with smoke. Seizing this moment of fire superiority, he joined the company commander, rallied the paratroopers and led a savage assault on the stunned, but still deadly North Vietnamese Army soldiers. During the battle, he could be seen engaging and striking down the enemy with his pistol at ranges of less than 3 meters.


YEISLEY, KENNETH B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Kenneth B. Yeisley (RA-52357613), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Troop C, 1st Squadron (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Yeisley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 30 December 1969, while serving as observer during a search and rescue mission near Song Be, Republic of Vietnam. Flying to the site of a downed aircraft and coming under fire from enemy automatic weapons and heavy machine guns, Staff Sergeant Yeisley leaned far out of his craft as he placed accurate suppressive fire on the hostiles. When sighting the wounded pilot, he climbed onto the skid exposing himself to the enemy fire as he directed the pilot to an area more suitable for the hazardous rescue. Dropping twenty feet into the heavy bamboo below, he crawled to the seriously injured pilot, administered first aid, and helped him get into a medical evacuation sling. Staff Sergeant Yeisley's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Issaquah, Washington


*YOUNG, DONALD RAYMOND (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Donald Raymond Young (US-51614765), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 27 April 1967 while assigned to Company E, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light), in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Private First Class Young was serving with his platoon which was conducting a search and destroy operation near the village of Tan Nuit. Approaching a canal surrounded by dense vegetation, the unit suddenly came under intense small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire from a well-entrenched Viet Cong force. The platoon suffered immediate casualties and its left flank was pinned down by machinegun fire coming from a reinforced Viet Cong bunker. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Private Young disregarded his own safety and began to crawl toward the bunker with the intent of neutralizing the threat to his comrades. After moving over forty meters under intense fire, he was painfully wounded in his left shoulder. Undaunted and without regard to the enemy bullets striking all around him, he continued his valiant efforts until he was again hit and mortally wounded. Private First Class Young's unwavering courage and concern for the welfare of his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: Millbury, Massachusetts


*ZERANGUE, ALTON JOSEPH, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Alton Joseph Zerangue, Jr., Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Zerangue distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 16 February 1967 while serving as the point Squad Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. During a search and destroy mission west of Pleiku, the company made contact with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Staff Sergeant Zerangue's squad received intense enemy automatic weapons fire and was subsequently cut off from the remainder of the company. He immediately organized his men into a defensive perimeter, and they countered the attack with a heavy volume of fire. Although the enemy inflicted many casualties among his squad, he utilized the forces remaining and delayed the enemy attack giving the rest of the company time to regroup and form a defensive perimeter. During the attack, Staff Sergeant Zerangue was twice wounded, but refused to be evacuated. Instead, he remained in the heat of the battle, guiding and positioning his squad in order to counter t he enemy's attack. He was subsequently wounded a third time, but remained with his squad to lead them against the enemy until he was mortally wounded. Staff Sergeant Zerangue's prominent display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty and personal bravery was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Born: October 10, 1936 at Arnaudale, Louisiana
Home Town: Arnaudale, Louisiana


ZUMBRUN, JAMES HENRY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James Henry Zumbrun, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions March 13, 1968, as Special Forces adviser to a Vietnamese reconnaissance team. When moving through dense jungle, his patrol came in contact with an enemy platoon. He quickly placed fire on the enemy force. Outnumbered and drawing fire from three sides, he directed the withdrawal of the patrol, remaining behind to cover his comrades. Joining the other patrol members, he directed them to an extraction landing zone. With the enemy within 20 meters, he braved fire to protect the recovery helicopter and to direct gunships and airstrikes on enemy positions. As the last three patrol members were being hoisted into the recovery aircraft, the landing zone began receiving intense enemy fire. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun, realizing the aircraft and remaining patrol members were in grave danger, dropped 30 feet to the ground, enabling the aircraft to withdraw undamaged. A second recovery helicopter arrived and he was successfully extracted. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Manchester, Maryland

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