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Citations For
U.S. Army 
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action During

The Vietnam War

 

Posted June 1, 2008 - Next Scheduled Update: July 2008

Vietnam War Army Silver Star Citations
A-L   M-Z

 


*ABERNETHY, WILLIAM FORMAN (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to William Forman Abernethy (0-5317216), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Abernethy distinguished himself by intrepid actions on while serving with Troop L, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Winter Haven, Florida


AGUIRRE, SANTIAGO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Santiago Aguirre, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Aguirre distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 July 1967, while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during combat operations near Tuy An, Republic of Vietnam. When two platoons of Private First Class Aguirre's company came under fire from a well entrenched enemy force, several casualties were suffered, including the company commander. Immediately racing to the fallen commander's side, Private First Class Aguirre did all he could for the officer before removing him to the rear for medical evacuation. Instantly, Private First Class Aguirre was forward again giving aid to the wounded while receiving a hail of enemy small arms fire. Constantly moving from one exposed position to another, he never stopped his work nor let his own safety take precedence over the welfare of the men in need of his services. His actions instilled confidence in all who observed him and saved countless lives. Private First Class Aguirre's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 5377 (September 10, 1967)


*ALAKULPPI, VESA JUHANI (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Vesa Juhani Alakulppi (0-98573), Captain, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 14 May 1968 while serving as Commanding Officer, Company C, 2d Battalion, 3d Infantry Regiment, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light), in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Captain Alakulppi was in command of a ready reaction force consisting of one rifle platoon and a mortar section providing security for a large two-company base camp when an unknown-size Viet Cong force attacked the perimeter with automatic weapons, small arms and rocket fire. Reacting immediately, Captain Alakulppi rallied his men to halt the enemy's advance. Realizing that, because of adverse weather conditions air support was not available, Captain Alakulppi repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to direct supporting artillery fire close to his company's position. During the savage battle, without regard for his personal safety, he continually moved about the perimeter, encouraging his men and directing their fire. Realizing that his unit was isolated from friendly reinforcements, Captain Alakulppi continued to provide dynamic and aggressive leadership in the valiant defense of the base camp until he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. By his courageous actions, he inspired his men to grater efforts and enabled them to bring maximum suppressive fire against the Viet Cong force and repel the enemy attack. Captain Alakulppi's exceptional heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 601 (June 30, 1968)
Born: April 23, 1941 at Rovaniemi, Finland
Home Town: Seattle, Washington


*ALESHIRE, KENNETH EDWARD (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Kenneth Edward Aleshire (52811053), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Aleshire distinguished himself by intrepid actions on while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


ALLEN, ALAN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Alan W. Allen (US-54508379), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 14 May 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Allen distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as team leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, Company A was given the mission of assaulting a company of North Vietnamese Regulars who were occupying well-fortified bunkers on a ridge line 17 miles west of Tam Ky. As the company began assaulting the hill, the insurgents opened fire with small arms, automatic weapons, heavy machineguns, rockets, and 60-mm. mortars. While moving up the slope, Sergeant Allen continuously exposed himself to the enemy fire. As he and another member of his fire team closed on the bunkers, the enemy began throwing hand grenades. Despite the exploding grenades, Sergeant Allen was one of the first men to breach the enemy perimeter. Once inside the enemy bunker line Sergeant Allen moved quickly and took several of the bunkers under fire. During the ensuing engagement, Sergeant Allen was personally credited with destroying five key enemy bunkers with hand grenades, killing 11 insurgents, and capturing 13 enemy weapons. Sergeant Allen's outstanding display of personal heroism and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 6385 (August 24, 1968)


*ALTHOFF, RODNEY EUGENE (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Rodney Eugene Althoff (RA-13858503), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Althoff distinguished himself by intrepid actions on while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: York, Pennsylvania


*AMOS, JOE (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Joe Amos, Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Platoon Sergeant Amos distinguished himself by intrepid actions on while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


*ANDERSON, JAMES HOWARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Howard Anderson (19646086), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 September 1968. Staff Sergeant Anderson distinguished himself near the village of Ap Duong Trau Nho, Republic of Vietnam, while serving as a platoon sergeant for Company A, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry. The Fourth Platoon of Company A was maintaining a cordon around the village when an enemy force broke through the center of the Company and flanking attacks were directed on the Fourth Platoon. The position to Staff Sergeant Anderson's right was hit by the enemy thrust. Although previously wounded himself, Staff Sergeant Anderson lead a relief party against the enemy thrust, stopped the first enemy flanking attack, and brought one of his wounded men to safety. Realizing how seriously he was wounded, he refused medical aid and propped himself against a rice paddy dike to continue firing upon the enemy until he succumbed to his wounds. Staff Sergeant Anderson's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 9228 (July 21, 1969)
Home Town: Anaheim, California


ANDERSON, JOHN THOMAS (POW)
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John Thomas Anderson (21903181), Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class], U.S. Army, for gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with Detachment Number 5, American Forces Television Station, Hue, South Vietnam, American Forces Radio-Television Network, South Vietnam, Military Advisory Command, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 February 1968, during the Communist "Tet Offensive." When the enemy (North Vietnamese Regulars) attempted a sneak armed attack upon the quarters housing Detachment Number 5 personnel at Number 6 Tran Duc Street, Hue, Master Sergeant Anderson, Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of the detachment, without hesitancy, courageously took an uncovered position in the quarters living room. Armed with a shotgun he defended this position for more than 16 hours against several enemy attempts to gain entry into the house. During this period he was severely wounded by enemy grenade fire and was under constant exposure to enemy small arms fire. Throughout the ensuing battle, Sergeant First Class Anderson was instrumental in warding off several enemy attempts to overrun the detachment's position. He personally was responsible for inflicting deadly fire on the attacking enemy forces, thereby rendering a demoralizing effect on the attacking enemy force. His position was later overrun and he was held as a Prisoner of War until his release on 5 March 1973. Master Sergeant Anderson's heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the services and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.

ANDERSON, JOHN THOMAS (POW)
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to John Thomas Anderson (21903181), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam in May 1971. Ignoring international agreements on treatment of prisoners of war, the enemy resorted to mental and physical cruelties to obtain information, confessions and propaganda materials. Master Sergeant Anderson resisted their demands by calling upon his deepest inner strengths in a manner which demonstrated great devotion to duty and country in accord with the finest traditions of the military services.
Born: December 8, 1930 at Torry, New York
Home Town: Torry, New York
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


*ANELLO, BRUCE FRANCIS (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Bruce Francis Anello (52808707), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Anello distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 21 May 1968 while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2848 (May 28, 1968)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


*ARVIN, CARL ROBERT (KIA)
(First Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Carl Robert Arvin (OF-104601), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Advisory Team 162, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, in action against the enemy on 5 September 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Captain Arvin was serving as Advisor to the 7th Vietnamese Airborne Battalion when it came under intense mortar and small arms fire. Though wounded, Captain Arvin disregarded the fierce fire and was leading his element forward to engage the enemy when his radio operator was also wounded. Captain Arvin dragged the soldier to safety and, undaunted by the perilous circumstances, returned to direct repeated helicopter gunship strikes. He refused his own medical evacuation until the objective was secure and the mission complete. Captain Arvin's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

*ARVIN, CARL ROBERT (KIA)
(Second Award)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Carl Robert Arvin (OF-104601), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Advisory Team 162, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, in action against the enemy on 8 October 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date Captain Arvin's unit was completing a sweep of a suspected enemy base when it encountered an entrenched enemy regiment. Intense enemy fire pinned down his battalion in an exposed, untenable position. In full view of the enemy Captain Arvin valiantly moved through the fire to a forward vantage point. There, as fighting raged about him, he directed extremely accurate, close-range gunship passes onto enemy positions. As he continually moved through fire-swept fields to position himself better to direct the supporting fire, Captain Arvin was mortally wounded. His unremitting attention to duty and superb direction of ground forces and supporting aircraft had enabled his battalion to defeat a strong and determined enemy three times its size. Captain Arvin's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ypsilanti, Michigan
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam)


*ASCHENBRENNER, DENNIS DALE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Dennis Dale Aschenbrenner (0-5326519), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. First Lieutenant Aschenbrenner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 July 1967, while serving as Commanding Officer of Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during combat operations near the hamlet of Binh Do, Republic of Vietnam. When his company came under intense enemy automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Aschenbrenner, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved from his position of safety to the center of the battle area. He exposed himself to the withering enemy fire as he placed a blazing barrage on the enemy positions, drawing the enemy fire to himself and allowing his men to reach safe positions. Even though his weapon jammed, he continued to expose himself to the insurgent fire, undoubtedly saving the lives of several men. While attempting to fix his malfunctioning weapons, Lieutenant Aschenbrenner was struck and mortally wounded by the enemy fire. His display of courageous leadership and concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: January 12, 1942 at Belle Fourche, South Dakota
Home Town: Lead, South Dakota


ASHLEY, MICHAEL H.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael H. Ashley, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Ashley distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 May 1968 while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 4934 (August 31, 1968)


AULT, JOHN W., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John W. Ault, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations on 13 April 1963, as a member of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Vietnam. Captain Ault was serving as an Advisor to a Vietnamese Airborne Battalion when a helicopter landed in an opening in a dense jungle to evacuate two soldiers who had been wounded by hostile forces. As the helicopter landed, the northern-most company of the Battalion came under a fierce attack, characterized by intense small arms fire, and suffered heavy casualties. Captain Ault quickly waved the helicopter off the ground, and then, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, crossed an area swept by heavy small arms fire to reach a radio, communicated with the helicopter personnel, and requested additional support. Despite a wound from a hand grenade, he remained with the unit to advise and encourage them, and by his inspiring leadership and courageous actions, rallied the Vietnamese soldiers to hold their position and pursue their defense efforts. Captain Ault's conspicuous gallantry and unselfish actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 49 (November 22, 1963)


BAHNSEN, JOHN C., JR.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John C. Bahnsen, Jr. (0-73597), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 2 February 1966 while serving as aircraft commander and fire team commander on an armed UH-1B helicopter near Vuc Lien, Republic of Vietnam. After making visual reconnaissance and providing overhead cover for the ground forces, Captain Bahnsen landed his fire team in a supposedly secure area. While being briefed by the ground commander, a Viet Cong force ambushed the unit. At this time Captain Bahnsen fearlessly led his fire team through intense automatic weapons fire to their aircraft, took off, daringly attacked the enemy forces, and saved the Marine force from having heavy casualties. When another company was ambushed, Captain Bahnsen aggressively made low level attacks on the Viet Cong positions and, while receiving intense hostile fire, evacuated three critically wounded Marines. Upon returning from the evacuation mission, intense hostile fire was received during a low level reconnaissance flight. Captain Bahnsen dauntlessly made three firing passes on the insurgent positions, called for artillery fire and, after exhausting his ordnance, rearmed and returned to support the Marine force. Captain Bahnsen's courage during ten hours of intense hostile fire was an inspiration to his men and the Marine ground force. Captain Bahnsen's unimpeachable valor in the face of intense fire was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

BAHNSEN, JOHN C., JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to John C. Bahnsen, Jr. (0-73597), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflicts with an armed hostile forces on 17 October 1968 while serving as the Commanding Officer of the Air Cavalry Troop of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date elements of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment engaged a company-sized North Vietnamese force within the Ba Da secret zone. During the firefight, the friendly force began receiving an intense concentration of automatic weapons fire from the numerically superior enemy force and immediately called for reinforcements. With the arrival of the friendly reinforcements, the hostile elements began withdrawing into the dense jungle terrain. One platoon from the 2d Mechanized Infantry Regiment and one aero rifle platoon pursued the enemy elements for two kilometers, until they were suddenly engaged by heavy automatic weapons fire from well-concealed positions. Observing the enemy force from the air, Major Bahnsen began directing highly-accurate suppressive fire into the North Vietnamese Army positions. After making a number of passes, landed Major Bahnsen positioned himself in front of the friendly forces, in full view of the enemy elements, and began directing his troop's advancement on the hostile positions. He was forced to seek cover when his position was raked by a barrage of automatic weapons fire, but after directing his gunship's fire onto the enemy force, he again exposed himself to the enemy fire and with shouts of encouragement to his men, led them on an all-out assault on the North Vietnamese positions, completely overrunning and destroying the hostile elements. Major Bahnsen's exceptional courage and aggressive leadership wore in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

BAHNSEN, JOHN C., JR.
(Third Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star Medal to John C. Bahnsen, Jr. (0-73597), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 3 February 1969 while serving as the Commanding Officer of the Air Cavalry Troop of the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while he was conducting a routine reconnaissance mission, his aircraft suddenly began receiving heavy automatic weapons fire from a well-concealed and heavily-fortified enemy base camp. Reacting instantly, Major Bahnsen returned to his base of operations, quickly assembled his Aero Rifle Platoon, and returned to the contact area. After beginning an assault upon the hostile position, he realized that the hostile fire was larger than he had anticipated. He therefore called his troops back and established a cordon around the hostile fortification. For the next three hours, Major Bahnsen, under constant enemy fire, directed air and artillery strikes against the enemy forces from his low flying aircraft. While directing the bombardment of the area, he requested that a tank company and an armored cavalry assault vehicles arrived, he directed them into an assault formation and, disregarding his personal safety, flew his aircraft at treetop level over the enemy positions in order to effectively direct the final assault on the enemy base camp. When the hostile fortifications had been overrun, Major Bahnsen observed a number of enemy troops attempting to flee from the friendly forces. He immediately landed his helicopter and directed an assaulted upon the retreating enemy soldiers, killing one and capturing another. Major Bahnsen's courage and dedication to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

BAHNSEN, JOHN C., JR.
(Fourth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star Medal to John C. Bahnsen, Jr. (0-73597), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action on 29 May 1969, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. When one of his troops was stopped by heavy enemy fire and dense jungle, Major Bahnsen directed the ground action as he made low passes over the contact area directing artillery, air strikes and helicopter gunships against an entrenched enemy bunker complex. Although his aircraft was repeatedly hit by ground fire, he refused to leave the area or fly at a higher altitude. After being forced to make an emergency landing at his base camp, he mounted a mechanized flame thrower and with his headquarters command group of cavalry assault vehicles moved under an air strike and through intense enemy fire to the point of heaviest contact. There he reorganized his ground teams by shouting instructions and encouragement to his troops. After expending his flame thrower against bunkers, Major Bahnsen led a dismounted attack against one bunker, clearing it with his rifle. Realizing the need for additional force, he then called in air strikes. As the enemy broke contact, Major Bahnsen then organized a hasty defensive position for the night among the enemy bunkers. Major Bahnsen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

BAHNSEN, JOHN C., JR.
(Fifth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Fourth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fifth Award of the Silver Star Medal to John C. Bahnsen, Jr. (0-73597), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 6 September 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Major Bahnsen was flying in his command and control helicopter when he was informed of contact involving one of the squadron's troops nearby. He made low-level flights over the area while helping to direct the ground forces. Learning that the troop commander had been seriously wounded, he directed his pilot to land. When he landed, he discovered five prisoners had been captured and he helped to load them on the ship with the commander. Major Bahnsen remained on the ground to direct the forces. Mounting an armored cavalry assault vehicle, he led his men, forcing the enemy to break contact and resulting in sixty-nine enemy killed in action. Major Bahnsen's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Personal Awards: DSC (Vietnam), 5@ SS (Vietnam)


BAIRD, WILLIAM A. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William A. Baird, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam during the period November 1970 through March 1973. Ignoring international agreements on treatment of prisoners of war, the enemy resorted to mental and physical cruelties to obtain information, confessions and propaganda materials. Staff Sergeant Baird resisted their demands by calling upon his deepest inner strengths in a manner which reflected his devotion to duty and great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Born: June 7, 1949 at Wooster, Ohio
Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


BARB, MANVILLE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Manville L. Barb, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, for heroic actions on 28 October 1967, while serving as a platoon leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry on a combat operation in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Barb's unit assaulted a strongly fortified Viet Cong base camp in the Boi Loi Woods and sustained numerous casualties during the assault. Lieutenant Barb led his men on a second assault in an attempt to eliminate a key enemy bunker which was inflicting heavy casualties upon the friendly forces. Although aware that the position was covered by enemy sniper fire, he personally led his platoon forward while skillfully deploying his men into an assault line. In the gathering dusk, Lieutenant Barb initiated the assault by firing his weapon and throwing hand grenades upon the hostile emplacements. Completely disregarding the intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Barb continued to move forward while encouraging his men and directing their fire. Having obtained a position within twenty feet of the enemy emplacements, Lieutenant Barb was mortally wounded by the intense hostile fire. Due to Lieutenant Barb's valorous actions and outstanding leadership, the enemy positions were overrun and the mission successfully completed. Lieutenant Barb's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


BARBER, BILLY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Billy J. Barber (RA-13433945), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Platoon Sergeant Barber distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 August 1968 while serving as the Aero rifle Platoon Sergeant of Troop A, 3rd Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade, on a reconnaissance in force mission. After his unit had been inserted to block a possible enemy escape route, they came into heavy contact with a Viet Cong force and Sergeant Barber courageously exposed himself to the hostile fire as he maneuvered his men in an assault on the enemy emplacements. After he had secured this area, another unit was inserted and he and his men were moved to another area where they again made contact. When the enemy tried to outflank them in their new position, Sergeant Barber again exposed himself to the hostile fire as he directed gunship strikes, which halted the enemy advance. Platoon Sergeant Barber's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.


BARTLEY, CLAUDE O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Claude O. Bartley (RA-11382054), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Bartley distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Squad Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company came under intense enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire from their front and right flank while conducting a search and clear mission south of DaNang. During the initial action, the lead platoon sustained heavy casualties and the rest of the company was pinned down by the devastating enemy fire. Sergeant Bartley immediately ordered his squad to withdraw to a more secure position. Realizing that their position was untenable, he then ordered his men to maneuver to the rear, as he assisted three wounded squad members over 200 meters amidst heavy enemy fire to reach a safe area. As soon as several of the hostile positions were knocked out, Sergeant Bartley expertly reorganized his remaining squad members and returned through the intense enemy small arms fire to rescue other members of his company who were wounded and lying in exposed locations. His courageous actions contributed significantly to the defeat of the enemy force in which 207 enemy soldiers were killed. Staff Sergeant Bartley's unquestionable valor and dauntless determination in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2448 (May 10, 1968)


BARTON, LESTER D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lester D. Barton (327326132), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Barton distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 11 November 1969 while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during an enemy attack on Landing Zone Jerri, Republic of Vietnam. When the landing zone came under intense rocket and mortar attack, Sergeant First Class Barton left the safety of his bunker and moved through the hail of hostile fire administering first aid to the wounded. Throughout the night he went from position to position with complete disregard for his own safety, assisting numerous casualties and evacuating them to safety. Sergeant First Class Barton's extraordinary heroism in close combat against an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No 14823 (November 22, 1969)
Home Town: Zion, Illinois
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Soldier's Medal, 2@ Air Medals, Bonze Star w/V, 2@ Army Commendation Medals


BAXLEY, WILLIAM J.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William J. Baxley, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Baxley distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 6 March 1968 while Commanding the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1699 (March 31, 1968)


BEAN, ROBERT W.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert W. Bean, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Bean distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 17 February 1968 while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 8829 (November 15, 1968)


*BEDNARZ, WILLIAM WALTER (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to William Walter Bednarz (54809573), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Bednarz distinguished himself by heroic actions on 16 May 1967 near Ap Rach Gau (2), Republic of Vietnam, while serving as a machine gunner when his company was engaged in a night assault against a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Immediately upon debarking the aircraft, Private Bednarz's platoon became separated from the rest of the company and came under heavy enemy machine gun and automatic weapons fire from the front and left flank. Private Bednarz demonstrated great personal courage as he assaulted the enemy positions and delivered a continuous and effective volume of fire. At one point, Private Bednarz engaged a sniper who had stopped the movement of the company and had the company commander and his radio operator pinned down in a open field. After killing the enemy sniper, Private Bednarz shifted his fire to an automatic weapon position threatening the company's left flank. He took up a position on a berm and fired his weapon from the shoulder to place more effective fire on the enemy. While performing this hazardous mission, Private Bednarz was mortally wounded. Private Bednarz acted with great courage and determination in the face of intense enemy fire. His heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois


*BEETS, RONNIE D. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ronnie D. Beets (442381894), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 13 August 1967, while serving as a member of Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Beets was serving as a machine gunner with his platoon when it came under extremely heavy attack while moving from Landing Zone White near Chu Lai. He manned a position on the perimeter, putting effective fire upon the enemy. During the night, the numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force mounted a full scale attack with mortars, rockets, grenades, automatic and small arms fire. Specialist Beets' position became a prime target, and he was seriously wounded in both legs by grenades and rockets. When the medic came forward to treat him, he refused treatment and told the medic to roll him over to this gun. Once in position, although in great pain, he again began to fire upon the enemy. He remained in position under the withering hail of enemy fire with complete disregard for his safety and injuries, until the enemy had been beaten back. Only then did he allow himself medical treatment. In the morning, six enemy bodies were found with twenty meters of his position. Specialist Beets' outstanding display of heroism in action and his devotion to duty were in the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, I Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 983 (December 23, 1967)
Home Town: Odessa, Texas


*BEST, HUGH ELROY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Hugh Elroy Best (0-5433360), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while assigned to Battery A, 2d Battalion, 4th Artillery, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Best distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 January 1969 while serving as a Forward Observer with Company C, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, on a reconnaissance in force mission northwest of Tan An. After the lead elements of the company became pinned down by a murderous barrage of hostile fire, Lieutenant Best courageously moved forward with the command group to rescue the beleaguered men. When the company commander was mortally wounded, he immediately took command and repeatedly exposed himself to the fusillade as he maneuvered against the enemy emplacements. Upon reaching the forward element, Lieutenant Best began to administer first aid to a stricken soldier, but was then gravely wounded himself. He later succumbed to the wound received during his valiant actions. First Lieutenant Best's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 1255 (February 5, 1969)
Home Town: Tarboro, North Carolina


BLACK, DONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald Black (US-52688035), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Black distinguished himself by intrepid actins while serving as a rifleman in the Reconnaissance Platoon, Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division during a combined infantry-armored cavalry sweep in Duy Xuyen District, Quang Nam Province. While searching the hamlet of Ap Bon (1), his platoon suddenly came under intense fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. As the enemy fire increased in intensity, it became necessary for his unit to move back to permit supporting fire to be placed on the enemy's fortified position; however, several of the elements were unable to move from their position. After locating four other en from the platoon who were also pinned down, Sergeant Black immediately took charge and began leading them to rejoin the main body and to continue their mission of closing with the enemy. As his element moved back, they were quickly joined by other elements until they reached the rest of the platoon. The initiative and indomitable courage displayed by Sergeant Black contributed immeasurably to the rapid regrouping of the platoon and to the ultimate defeat of a determined and numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant Black's unquestionable valor in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2424 (May 10, 1968)


BLAGG, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas E. Blagg, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Special Forces "A" Detachment Commander on 30 August 1965. On that date Captain Blagg was leading a 30-man combat patrol along the Song So Ha River which forms the border between Cambodia and South Vietnam. At a bend in the river, the patrol was ambushed by a battalion- size North Vietnamese Army (NVA) unit from dug-in positions on the Cambodian side. Most lead elements of the patrol were killed in initial contact. Captain Blagg's Vietnamese interpreter was badly wounded. Captain Blagg contacted his Special Forces camp by radio and directed that reinforcements from the camp deploy immediately to a linkup point near the ambush site. He then strapped his wounded interpreter to his back and began to disengage his patrol from the enemy force using fire and maneuver. As his patrol conducted a fighting withdrawal to the linkup point with reinforcements, the North Vietnamese force pursued across the river into South Vietnam. Soon, the fight became very close combat, hand to hand in some cases. During the fight, Captain Blagg was wounded in the face and his right arm was shattered by an enemy's bullet. Captain Blagg, although seriously wounded, continued to fight his patrol back to linkup with reinforcements. Once linkup was achieved, Captain Blagg reversed the tide of battle by launching an attack into the enemy force, killing many of them, and driving the remainder back into Cambodia. Based on the number of enemy bodies, blood trails, and captured enemy weapons, Captain Blagg's force killed or wounded the enemy at a rate of six to one, despite being, initially, the ambushed force. Not until the battle had been fought and won was Captain Blagg evacuated for medical treatment of his almost fatal wounds. Captain Blagg's heroic actions in battle were in keeping with the highest standards of the American soldier and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Home Town: Arkansas


BLISS, DAVID F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David F. Bliss (US-54958419), Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Bliss distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a rifleman in Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was moving to establish a blocking position near Lien Lac (2) when they suddenly came under intense fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. Immediately, his platoon leader and Sergeant Bliss' squad moved in an attempt to outflank the enemy who had another platoon pinned down. As they moved towards the pinned down element, several North Vietnamese Army soldiers were chased from cover and engaged with friendly fire. As they approached a hut in a small clearing, the enemy launched an attack on his squad, seriously wounding the platoon leader and squad leader. As Sergeant Bliss' squad pulled back, two enemy soldiers attacked the wounded squad leader. Disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Bliss ran to aid his comrade and successfully stopped the enemy with his accurate suppressive fire. He then joined a group that was providing cover for the withdrawal back across the open rice paddies. When all of the wounded were safely across, these brave men moved back to safety. Sergeant Bliss' personal bravery and unselfish concern for his fellow soldiers are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3559 (June 30, 1968)


BONNELYCKE, CLYDE L.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Clyde L. Bonnelycke (US-MC-1806071/USA-1806021), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Bonnelycke distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 13 July 1969, while serving as the Platoon Leader of the Second Platoon, Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. Moving down a trail the point element was ambushed with mines, machine- guns, and small arms fire. The initial contact inflicted numerous wounds upon the members of Sergeant Bonnelycke's platoon. Realizing that there was no base of fire from which a counter attack could be launched, he moved to his wounded machinegunner and picked up the weapon. Laying down an effective base of fire, he enabled his platoon to mount their attack. When Sergeant Bonnelycke had expended all his ammunition, he immediately seized several grenades and engaged an enemy bunker, silencing it with accurate throws. His valorous actions allowed five members of the platoon to be evacuated and caused the enemy ambush to be broken. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Military Service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 10412 (August 26, 1969)

BONNELYCKE, CLYDE L.
(Third Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star Medal to Clyde L. Bonnelycke (US-MC-1806071/USA-1806021), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Bonnelycke distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in 12 August 1969, while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. When the base came under an intense rocket, mortar, and ground attack, Staff Sergeant Bonnelycke left the safety of his bunker and went to a bunker which had suffered a direct hit. Pulling the wounded personnel to safety, he raced to the berm and placed suppressive fire on the enemy with a machine gun. When that ran out of ammunition, he made his way to another gun, where he continued his suppressive fire. Disregarding his wounds, he continually made his way back to the berm placing effective fire on the enemy, and helped carry the wounded personnel to safety. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 5044 (April 4, 1970)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii
Personal Awards: Silver Star-Navy Award (Vietnam), Silver Star-Army Award (Vietnam)


BOOK, FLOYD GORDON, JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Floyd Gordon Book, Jr. (US-MC-2130395), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Book distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 September 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) in the Republic of Vietnam. When his unit made heavy contact with a large enemy force, Specialist Fourth Class Book, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward to the point of most intense conflict and began assisting with return fire. When he noticed an enemy soldier about to throw a grenade into a concentration of friendly forces, he reacted quickly exposing himself to heavy fire in order to kill the enemy. On numerous occasions, Specialist Fourth Class Book assisted in knocking out enemy positions, using his knowledge of the enemy's language to encourage their surrender. His display of personal bravery and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Hammond, Indiana
Personal Awards: Silver Star-Navy Award (Vietnam)


*BOULWARE, GEORGE W. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to George W. Boulware, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Boulware distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 16 September 1971 while serving with Advisory Team 91, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan


BOWERS, ARNOLD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Arnold C. Bowers, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations on 2 January 1963, as a member of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Vietnam. While serving as an Advisor to a Vietnamese Infantry Company, Sergeant Bowers, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to intense small arms and automatic rifle fire to rescue an unconscious pilot of a downed helicopter, and to render first aid to a seriously wounded helicopter crew member. He then moved rapidly from position to position along the firing line, assisting and encouraging his Vietnamese comrades to hold their position and to pursue their defense efforts. His courageous action, personal example, and dedicated devotion to duty served to stabilize the defense actions of the Vietnamese unit he was advising. Sergeant Bower's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 52 (December 18, 1963)


BRADBURY, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas E. Bradbury (0-5340138), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Bradbury distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 21 March 1968 while serving as Platoon Leader for the Reconnaissance Platoon of the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his platoon was on a search and clear mission near the village of Ap Bon (1) when they came under intense automatic weapons fire from an enemy force estimated at company size. Since the company commander was wounded and evacuated during the initial action, Lieutenant Bradbury assumed command of the unit comprised of an infantry-cavalry team. Realizing his position was untenable, he immediately reorganized his forces by pulling the infantry back on line with the attacked tracks. Repeatedly exposing himself to hostile fire, Lieutenant Bradbury disregarded his own safety to effectively direct helicopter gunships, medevac helicopters, and his combined infantry and cavalry forces against the well-constructed enemy positions. Lieutenant Bradbury continually exposed himself to the withering hail of enemy fire as his forces counterattacked the numerically superior hostile force. As a result of his competent leadership and professionalism, Lieutenant Bradbury's men successfully overran the enemy, killing 17 of the insurgents. Second Lieutenant Bradbury's unquestionable valor in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2451 (May 11, 1968)


BRADLEY, MAX D.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Max D. Bradley, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Bradley distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1682 (March 30, 1968)


BRANDE, HARVEY GORDON (POW)
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harvey Gordon Brande (RA-19507308), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-101, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Brande distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 and 7 February 1968, as Platoon Leader of a Vietnamese strike force defending against an attack on the Lang Vei Special Forces camp. Enemy sappers and infantrymen initiated an assault on the perimeter under the cover of darkness, and they were quickly followed by communist tanks. Firing furiously, Sergeant Brande killed two of the sappers and his platoon dispersed the remainder. The hostile armor quickly broke through the outer perimeter, and he engaged them with grenades and anti-tank weapons. Braving withering machine gun and cannon fire, he and his men fought determinedly for over an hour before they were forced to pull back to secure the inner defensive perimeter. His accurate fire destroyed two enemy tanks before he withdrew. Sergeant First Class Brande's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1915 (April 25, 1968)
Born: November 13, 1936 at Long Beach, California
Home Town: Los Angeles, California
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), Soldiers Medal, 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, Air Medal, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


BRENNAN, FRANCIS X.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Francis X. Brennan (OF-110612), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Brennan distinguished himself by intrepid actions while directing his company on a search and clear mission south of DaNang. At approximately 1230 hours, elements of his unit came under heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire from an enemy force consisting of close to 300 soldiers. The company was immediately pinned down and sustained numerous casualties. Captain Brennan unhesitatingly crawled through the deadly fire to his radio operator, who had been wounded, and ordered the company to withdraw. Shortly thereafter, he was seriously wounded in the lower back, but he gallantly continued in his efforts to withdraw his element and reorganize them for a new assault on the enemy positions. Using only his elbows, Captain Brennan dragged himself 300 meters in order to set up his men in a defensive perimeter. Although suffering from a great loss of blood, he was determined to continue his mission as he exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to direct gunships and air strikes against the hostile emplacements. Captain Brennan refused to be evacuated until he was assured that his company was in a secure defensive position. Captain Brennan's competent leadership, professionalism, and outstanding dedication to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2447 (May 10, 1968)


BRIDGES, CLIFFORD E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Clifford E. Bridges, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Bridges distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967, as a Combat Medic of an Ambulance Helicopter of the 45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, on a rescue mission near Cu Chi. His helicopter received an urgent request to evacuate twelve seriously wounded men and immediately flew to the battle area. The mission was undertaken by the crew despite the knowledge that several rescue ships had previously been shot down in the area. The pilot made an unhampered landing and Specialist Fifth Class Bridges began loading the patients. Murderous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire suddenly erupted from a nearby tree line, riddling his helicopter. With four casualties loaded, the pilot ordered Specialist Fifth Class Bridges to climb aboard and took off to prevent further damage to the ship. The hostile barrage in the landing zone ceased, and the helicopter returned to rescue the remainder of the casualties. The enemy force launched a second fusillade on his ship, and he was wounded as rounds tore into the craft. Ignoring his wound and mounting damage to the helicopter, he remained on the ground until all of the injured were loaded. The pilot then took off and skillfully nursed the badly crippled ship to an airfield. Specialist Fifth Class Bridges' gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.


*BRILLO, ALBERT, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Albert Brillo, Jr. (13864068), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 1 November 1967 while serving as the squad leader of a weapons recovery team with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant Brillo led his squad into the woods four times to recover weapons that had been left by men who were wounded or killed earlier in the day. Although the enemy automatic weapons and rifle grenade fire was extremely heavy, Sergeant Brillo continued his mission until he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Brillo's courageous actions were of immeasurable value in the recovery of weapons and the successful completion of the mission. His personal bravery, aggressiveness, and disregard for his own safety in his quest to accomplish his mission are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4761 (December 10, 1967)
Home Town: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania


*BROWNING, GARY LEE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Gary Lee Browning, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 2nd platoon of Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade, in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 September 1968. On that date, Company D, was engaged on a combat operation near the village of Go Tro. When his platoon leader was wounded by machinegun fire from an enemy ambush, Specialist Browning immediately ran to his aid, heedless of the danger around him, he continued to apply first aid until he was struck and mortally wounded by an enemy .30 caliber machinegun bullet. Specialist Four Browning's personal heroism, unselfish concern for his fellow soldiers and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Hutchinson, Kansas


BUCKLEY, EUGENE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Eugene L. Buckley (US-67032574), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Company C, 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Infantry Division, in action on 17 April 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Specialist Fourth Class Buckley was serving with his Engineer Company when his unit was requested to provide assistance for a regiment of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam which desperately needed to have a landing zone cut in the thick jungle near its night defensive position to facilitate the evacuation of approximately 50 casualties. Specialist Buckley unhesitatingly volunteered for the mission, although he realized that it involved being airlifted in to hostile territory in the darkness. At approximately 0200 hours, he was lowered from a hovering helicopter by a 60 foot rope into the jungle near Tan Uyen. The South Vietnamese defensive position was receiving continuous small arms fire at this time, and he was an extremely vulnerable target during his descent into the unsecured area. Specialist Buckley contacted the friendly elements and worked through the night to clear the vital landing zone. During this time he was constantly endangered by hostile fire, but this did not deter him from completing his task. His courageous initiative and calm perseverance were major factors enabling the numerous casualties to be evacuated from the remote area. Specialist Fourth Class Buckley's unquestionable valor while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an insurgent force is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7769 (August 3, 1968)


*BURKE, EARL F. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Earl F. Burke (RA-13290409), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Burke distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 and 7 February 1968, while serving with Detachment A-101, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during an attack on the Lang Vei camp. Enemy forces launched a coordinated late night tank and ground attack on the compound. Sergeant Burke braved devastating fire to help deliver a highly effective mortar barrage on the attackers. North Vietnamese tanks placed fierce fire on the manned outer defensive positions and overran the perimeter. Seeing that his mortar was ineffective because of its close proximity to the hostile armor, he secured several anti-tank weapons, closed to point blank range with the tanks, and destroyed one with ravaging fire before expending his ammunition. He then withdrew to a preplanned defensive position and continued his fierce fight. Sergeant First Class Burke's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 2129 (May 8, 1968)
Home Town: Uniontown, Pennsylvania


BURKS, HOMER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Homer Burks (RA-18450851), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Platoon Sergeant Burks distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was conducting a search and clear operation of a reinforced Viet Cong battalion which threatened the vast military complex at DaNang. While crossing an open rice paddy to reach a small hamlet, the company suddenly came under heavy enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire from their front and right flank. During the initial action, several members of the lead platoon were killed or wounded and the rest of the company was pinned down. Sergeant Burks and his men immediately began crawling to the rear in search of cover and had moved only 50 meters when the company commander was seriously wounded. Sergeant Burks immediately took control of the men and expertly directed their movement. With complete disregard for his own safety, he went to the aid of his wounded commander and exposed himself to the intense fire while moving him to a safe position. After reorganizing his platoon and setting up a defensive perimeter, Sergeant Burks continued to inform the commander of the situation and redistributed the badly needed ammunition. Throughout the battle, he personally directed the fire of his men and marked targets for gunships while the last of the wounded men were being extracted from the killing zone. Platoon Sergeant Burks' unquestionable valor while in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force and unselfish concern for his fellow comrades are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2834 (May 28, 1968)


*BUSH, JOSEPH KERR, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Joseph Kerr Bush, Jr. (OF-109695), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Assistant Army Attaché in Muong Soui, Laos, on 10 February 1969. On the morning of that date, the quarters occupied by Captain Bush and his operations sergeant were attacked by an enemy force of 20 North Vietnamese Commandos using grenades, small arms, machine guns, B40 rockets and satchel charges. Captain Bush, realizing that only he and his sergeant were adequately armed to offer protection to the other Americans in the compound and who were without protective cover, quickly decided to establish a defensive position within the compound from which he could suppress enemy fire. Covering each other with protective fire and throwing grenades into the North Vietnamese positions, both attempted to reach the pre-selected position and to draw enemy fire and attention. The sergeant was seriously wounded short of reaching the new position. Captain Bush, without hesitation, attempted single-handedly to attack the enemy raiders, firing as he advanced and killing two of the enemy. It was during this assault that Captain Bush was mortally wounded. The heroism displayed by Captain Bush in giving his life while drawing enemy fire away from his fallen comrade and the other Americans enabled the sergeant to escape. Captain Bush's conspicuous gallantry, exceptional heroism and intrepidity at the cost of his own life are in the highest traditions of the military service, and his gallant actions reflect great credit upon him and upon the United States Army.
Home Town: Temple, Texas


CAGGIANO, ANTHONY F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Anthony F. Caggiano (OF-103237), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, on 22 January 1967. On this date, Lieutenant Caggiano was serving as Platoon Leader for the 2d Platoon of Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. While moving over dense, hilly terrain, the unit made contact with an estimated reinforced North Vietnamese company armed with automatic weapons. The 1st and 2d Platoons were deployed to the left flank to relieve the pressure on the lead platoon. The order came down from the Company Commander to withdraw because of an incoming air strike. Lieutenant Caggiano realized that he had to eliminate the enemy position to enable his platoon to pull back. Without hesitation, and with complete disregard for his own safety, he continuously exposed himself to the enemy fire, while placing effective fire on the enemy position. His unrelenting assault resulted in his silencing the guns long enough for his platoon to pull back. After the air strike, he brought his platoon on line and attacked the hostile position, and overran it. His calm leadership and personal courage were an inspiration to all the men in his platoon. First Lieutenant Caggiano's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty and personal bravery is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.


*CALLAHAN, MICHAEL PATRICK (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Michael Patrick Callahan (51984951), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 June 1969. Specialist Callahan distinguished himself while serving as a team leader in Company B, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, during the conduct of a search and clear operation near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. On the cited date, the lead element of Company B was attempting to capture a North Vietnamese Army soldier who gave the pretense of surrender. While capturing the insurgent, the company came under heavy enemy machine gun fire from a nearby position. Realizing that the hostile emplacement must be silenced, Specialist Callahan began to place suppressive fire on the insurgents. Encouraging his men to do likewise, he remained in the open while attempting to gain fire superiority as another element of the company was maneuvering to outflank the insurgents. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Callahan continued to divert the enemy fire, thus providing cover for the main maneuvering element. It was during this courageous act that he was mortally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. His outstanding leadership and courage were a major factor in saving many of his men from injury or possible death. Specialist Callahan's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Wildwood Crest, New Jersey


CAMACHO, ISAAC (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Isaac Camacho (RA--18468655), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action as a Prisoner of War, on 13 July 1965, in the Republic of Vietnam. After four days in the jungle and rivers of South Vietnam, avoiding numerous enemy patrols and fighting snakes and leeches, Sergeant First Class Camacho reached an allied outpost becoming the first American Prisoner of War to escape from enemy forces in Vietnam. All of this (was) following a period in excess of nineteen months held in captivity. Sergeant First Class Camacho's daring escape galvanized the spirit and resistance for both his fellow prisoners and for United States Forces in Southeast Asia. Sergeant First Class Camacho's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters: Department of the Army, General Orders 25 (8 June 2001)
Home Town: Fabens, Texas
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


CARLSON, ALBERT EDWIN (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Albert Edwin Carlson (0-99143), Major (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action during the period 5 to 7 April 1972, while serving as the Deputy Senior Advisor to the 9th Infantry Regiment, 5th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On 5 April 1972, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces launched a major offensive with the objective of capturing Binh Long Province in Military Region 3. The 5th Viet Cong Division was targeted against Loc Ninh, the capital of Loc Ninh District in Northern Binh Long Province. The 5th Viet Cong Division launched a massive ground attack against Loc Ninh beginning early in the morning of 5 April 1972. The attack was supported by artillery and tanks. Major Carlson skillfully directed tactical airstrikes and helicopter gunships in support of the 9th Infantry. Regimental and other South Vietnamese Forces in the area. During the battle Major Carlson fought magnificently. Time and again he directed the fighters, bombers, gunships and artillery fire on top of his own position to drive off the attacking enemy. The combination of Major Carlson's courage and professional skill coupled with all available firepower kept the numerically superior enemy at bay for more than two days. Despite the valiant efforts of the defenders, the city of Loc Ninh was completely overrun by the enemy on 7 April 1972, but Major Carlson through his courageous actions extracted a horrendous price from the enemy for their tactical accomplishment. Major Carlson's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Born: May 16, 1930 at San Lorenzo, California
Home Town: San Lorenzo, California
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, Air Medal, 2@ Army Commendation Medals, 3@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


*CARPENTER, FRED W. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Fred W. Carpenter (55885165), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, at Hoa Tan, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 March 1967. As Sergeant Carpenter and his company approached the village, heavy fire was received from Viet Cong positions. Realizing that his unit was in a precarious position, Sgt Carpenter immediately maneuvered his squad into position from which it could place effective fire on the enemy. Then with complete disregard for his personal safety, he charged forward and silenced a heavily fortified enemy bunker with two grenades. With this bunker eliminated, the platoon was able to maneuver once more. Throughout the entire encounter, Sgt Carpenter continued to direct his squad, personally positioning and directing the fire of individual members. His heroic actions and decisive leadership contributed to the accomplishment of the unit's mission. Sergeant Carpenter's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Hobart, Indiana


CARRIER, ERNIE L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ernie L. Carrier, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Carrier distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 19 April 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2336 (July 29, 1968)


*CAVANAUGH, EDWARD JOSEPH (KIA)
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Edward Joseph Cavanaugh (0-28499), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action on 29 July 1971, while serving with Advisory Team 4, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, as Senior Advisor, 1st Task Force, army of the Republic of Vietnam. Colonel Cavanaugh was visiting the 51st Infantry Regiment at Hill 55 in Quang Nam Province, when the enemy began a rocket attack on the location. Without hesitation, Colonel Cavanaugh secured a pair of binoculars and began observing the incoming rockets. At the same time, he continually sought out information concerning casualties, damage assessment and updating on the counter battery fire being placed on the enemy. After the first rounds had landed there was a brief lull and it was at this time that he ordered a Medevac Helicopter and appraised the damage caused. He immediately exposed himself and took up a position to better observe the area from where the attack was being launched. When the attack was resumed Colonel Cavanaugh maintained this position watching the flash and marking the rockets' points of origin. Critically wounded by an incoming rocket, he tenaciously continued to observe and report until over his own objections he was medevaced for treatment. Colonel Cavanaugh's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3587 (August 16, 1971)
Home Town: Worcester, Massachusetts
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea)


*CERIONE, JAMES S. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James S. Cerione, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Cerione distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 0971 (February 25, 1968)


CHRISTIANSEN, DAVID A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David A. Christiansen, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Christiansen distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 19 April 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 4246 (July 15, 1968)


*CLAGGETT, JOHN ALLEN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John Allen Claggett (490-54-6821), Corporal, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 20 May 1970. Private Claggett distinguished himself while serving as a rifleman in Company E, 2nd Battalion (Airmobile), 502d Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, during combat operations in Thua Thein Province, Republic of Vietnam. While approaching an enemy bunker complex, Private (promoted to Cpl posthumously) Claggett's platoon received intense hostile fire. Despite the heavy volume of hostile fire directed against him, Private Claggett maneuvered against the insurgents and returned fire. He moved to an open position and remained there, placing suppressive fire on the enemy until one of his comrades threw a hand grenade into an enemy bunker. Private Claggett then assaulted the bunker nearest him and was mortally wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire. Private Claggett's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: August 31, 1948 at Richmond Heights, Missouri
Home Town: Union, Missouri


CLARK, CHARLES T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles T. Clark (0-5320132), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force, while serving as Commanding Officer, Company D, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam, on 9 June 1968. On this date, Captain Clark was serving as Company Commander on an air assault reconnaissance in force operation in dense swampy jungle near Binh Nham. After leaving a landing zone, the point element of the company was suddenly subjected to intense machinegun and small arms fire from well-concealed and heavily fortified enemy positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Clark maneuvered forward through the hail of hostile rounds toward the point of contact to assess the situation. He began to skillfully move his elements through the treacherous area to gain fire superiority. Observing a casualty lying in front of his position, Captain Clark exposed himself to Viet Cong fire raking the area as he crawled to the man and dragged him to a more secure position. Captain Clark then put forth a suppressive barrage on the insurgents which enabled the soldiers in his position to move from contact to a more advantageous location. Through the ensuing battle, he remained in constant contact with his platoons, the battalion, and various supporting units. His exemplary courage, outstanding leadership and bold determination were instrumental in saving a comrade's life, and significantly contributed toward the successful outcome of the encounter. Captain Clark's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 8571 (August 17, 1968)
Born: June 13, 1946 at Cameron, Texas
Home Town: Rockdale, Texas


CLARK, WESLEY K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wesley K. Clark, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, on 19 February 1970. On this date, Captain Clark was serving as the platoon leader with his unit on a ground reconnaissance operation in an area of known enemy activity. As the friendly force maneuvered through the treacherous region, it was suddenly subjected to an intense small arms fire from a well-concealed insurgent element. Although painfully wounded in the initial volley, Captain Clark immediately directed his men on a counter-assault of the enemy positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Clark remained with his unit until the reactionary force arrived and the situation was well in hand. His courageous initiative and exemplary professionalism significantly contributed to the successful outcome of the engagement. Captain Clark's unquestionable valor in close combat against a hostile force is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 2586 (February 26, 1970)


CLELAND, JOSEPH MAXWELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph Maxwell Cleland, Captain (Signal Corps), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Cleland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 4 April 1968, while serving as Communications Officer of the 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during an enemy attack near Khe Sanh, Republic of Vietnam. When the battalion command post came under a heavy enemy rocket and mortar attack, Captain Cleland, disregarding his own safety, exposed himself to the rocket barrage as he left his covered position to administer first aid to his wounded comrades. He then assisted in moving the injured personnel to covered positions. Continuing to expose himself, Captain Cleland organized his men into a work party to repair the battalion communications equipment which had been damaged by enemy fire. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Georgia


COLBY, NATHANIEL P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Nathaniel P. Colby, Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam during the period 20 May 1968 through 21 May 1968. Major Colby distinguished himself while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Following the hard fought battle for Hue and the coastal lowlands after the North Vietnamese Army Tet Offensive, the 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, in conjunction with other United States and Vietnamese forces, continued the pursuit of one enemy regiment throughout the coastal plains east of Hue. On 20 May 1968, Major Colby was designated as Commander of Task Force Saber during the temporary absence of his Commanding Officer. The task force, based at Fire Base Forward, ten kilometers east of Hue, had been in heavy contact for several days. Despite the heavy contact, Major Colby immediately undertook to rally the forces at the fire base to reorganize their defenses and establish counter-mortar targets to prevent further friendly casualties. At 0345 hours on 21 May 1968, Fire Base Forward again came under attack and received numerous mortar rounds. Major Colby left the shelter of his fighting position to rally his men and direct the tank and one hundred six millimeter recoilless rifle fire against the enemy mortar positions. Throughout the battle, he moved from position to position to give encouragement to his men. Through his leadership and courage, his men were inspired to even greater efforts and the enemy attack was repulsed. Major Colby's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No 8319 (July 5, 1969)


COLLINS, DAVID M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David M. Collins (RA-14791183), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 444th Transpiration Company, 1st Logistical Command, while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force. Staff Sergeant Collins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 January 1970, while serving as a convoy commander for a re-supply convoy between Qui Nhon and An Khe, in the Republic of Vietnam. Reacting swiftly when the first incoming rounds hit, Sergeant Collins immediately radioed the security net informing them of the enemy ambush. Being unable to establish communications with his forward gun truck, Sergeant Collins deployed his rear gun truck into the kill zone to help clear it. Sergeant Collins then started moving through the kill zone for better control of his vehicles. Not being able to communicate verbally with his drivers because of a language barrier, Sergeant Collins deployed a 5-ton tractor as his lead vehicle and began clearing the kill zone of the vehicles and wounded personnel. Sergeant Collins remained in control of his vehicles and men always making the right decision in the face of enemy fire for the protection of his men and continuance of his mission. Sergeant Collins' extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior enemy force, and with total disregard for his own personal safety, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Logistical Command, General Orders No. 367, April 29, 1970


CONAWAY, LAWRENCE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence E. Conaway, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Conaway distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 2 March 1970 while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company D, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was conducting routine combat operations near Nhon Loc when it was assaulted by a large enemy force. During the initial exchange of rounds, several friendly soldiers were wounded and an element of the company was pinned down by enemy fire. Reacting immediately and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Conaway led his platoon to strategic firing positions. Repeatedly exposing himself to the enemy barrage, Lieutenant Conaway maneuvered among his men and directed their retaliatory fire. Disregarding the danger involved, he rushed 20 meters through a hail of hostile fire to assist several comrades in an exposed position. Through his timely and courageous actions. Lieutenant Conaway was instrumental in thwarting the enemy attack and in minimizing friendly casualties. His personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 5444 (June 3, 1970)


*CRUM, ROBERT H., JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert H. Crum, Jr. (0-5326386), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action: Second Lieutenant Crum distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 22 May 1966, while serving as Platoon Leader of the First Platoon on a sweep and clear mission near Binh Dinh Province, Republic of Vietnam. After being trapped in a deadly Viet Cong killing zone, defended by heavily fortified positions, Second Lieutenant Crum directed the platoon in an assault against the positions. Although having sustained a shoulder wound, he continued to direct his men to cover the personnel in the area who had become casualties, demonstrating his fearless and courageous leadership to his men. He rallied his troops a second time to try to extract the casualties from the killing zone. Again he was wounded by enemy fire and relinquishing command of the platoon gave orders to "Take control and get these men out". His unimpeachable gallantry in combat against a numerically superior enemy force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: April 20, 1941 at Essex Fells, New Jersey
Home Town: Houston, Texas


*CUMBERPATCH, JAMES R., JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James R. Cumberpatch, Jr. (RA-13819927), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 23 June 1966, while serving as a medical aid man attached to Company C, 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, Specialist Four Cumberpatch demonstrated courage, devotion to duty, and professional competence which contributed to the defeat of a platoon size force of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. When the heavily fortified and well concealed enemy opened fire upon the advancing unit automatic and small arms, Specialist Four Cumberpatch repeatedly exposed himself to intense and accurate hostile fire. During the height of the battle, when a wounded soldier was stranded on a rocky ledge, Specialist Four Cumberpatch volunteered to climb to him and render first aid. In the process, he was wounded in the leg, but proceeded to crawl to the wounded soldier's aid. Once having reached him, Specialist Four Cumberpatch then located an enemy sniper and directed machine gun fire upon him, disregarding a warning to remain silent. Having exposed himself to hostile fire once more, Specialist Four Cumberpatch was wounded again, this time mortally. Specialist Four Cumberpatch's conspicuous gallantry is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 2767 (August 11, 1966)
Home Town: Bethesda, Maryland


*CUNNINGHAM, WALTER WAYNE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Walter Wayne Cunningham, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Troop E, 17th Calvary, 173rd Airborne Brigade, as a point man of his platoon. At approximately 1000 hours, Specialist Cunningham's platoon was moving through high elephant grass in Tuy Hoa Province when it came upon a woodline and fell under heavy automatic weapons fire from an estimated North Vietnamese squad. Specialist Cunningham unhesitatingly rushed the enemy force, firing his weapon and throwing grenades. He had almost reached the enemy position when he was shot and killed. By exposing himself to heavy fire and rushing the enemy, he displayed an aggressive and professional attitude and caused the enemy to withdraw without inflicting heavy casualties to the rest of his platoon. Specialist Cunningham's personal courage materially contributed to the success of the platoon in discovering and routing an enemy ambush. Specialist Cunningham's extraordinary heroism in close combat was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Born: June 22, 1944 at Trenton, Michigan
Home Town: South Rockwood, Michigan


*CURTTRIGHT, LARRY BRENT (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Larry Brent Curttright (19814334), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action on 28 February 1969, while serving as a platoon sergeant with B Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a reconnaissance in force mission in a suspected stronghold, elements of B Troop came in contact with a large enemy force in well concealed positions. Immediately, Sergeant Curttright led his men in an assault of the hostile positions. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Curttright exposed himself to the hail of fire as he placed devastating fire on the aggressors. As he continued his assault on the enemy positions, Sergeant Curttright was fatally wounded by a rocket propelled grenade. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and the thwarting of a hostile force. Sergeant Curttright's bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7998 (June 20, 1969)
Home Town: San Bernardino, California


*DECELLE, ROBERT EUGENE (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert Eugene DeCelle (568-64-2399), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain DeCelle distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 15 February 1971 while serving with Troop A, 3d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Alameda, California


DEHART, MICHAEL LEWIS
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael Lewis Dehart (US-51800827), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Dehart distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 10 April 1969, while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company E, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a reconnaissance mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. While moving through dense vegetation, Staff Sergeant Dehart's unit came in contact with a large enemy force. During the initial attack Staff Sergeant Dehart moved forward of his now pinned down element to a vantage point where he could effectively engage the enemy positions. From his now precarious position, Staff Sergeant Dehart placed a heavy volume of machine-gun fire on the hostile emplacements enabling the remainder of his unit to withdraw and evacuate its casualties. Through Staff Sergeant Dehart's heroic actions his unit successfully broke contact and was extracted with minimum casualties. Staff Sergeant Dehart's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 8655 (July 14, 1969)

DEHART, MICHAEL LEWIS
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Michael Lewis Dehart (US-51800827), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Dehart distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 14 May 1969, while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company E, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during a reconnaissance mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became engaged with a large enemy force, Staff Sergeant Dehart immediately moved to a forward position in order to direct the fire of his men. When it became necessary to withdraw, Staff Sergeant Dehart remained in the forward position. While completely exposed to the hostile fire, he covered his men as they withdrew. Early the next morning Staff Sergeant Dehart led his men into the contact area again and because of Staff Sergeant Dehart's courageous effort on the previous evening, little resistance was given. Staff Sergeant Dehart's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 8655 (July 14, 1969)
Born: May 27, 1942 at Troy, Ohio
Home Town: Troy, Ohio
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, Purple Heart


*DELARA, FRANKLIN V. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Franklin V. Delara (0-5424508), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 23 May 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Second Lieutenant Delara distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a Forward Observer with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was on a combat sweep operation west of Tam Ky when they suddenly came under intense fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. Realizing that the enemy positions had to be pin-pointed for the supporting artillery fire, Lieutenant Delara left his covered position, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, sought high ground from which he could adjust the artillery fire. After he reached a good position, he courageously continued to expose himself to the intense hostile fire while expertly directing the artillery until he fell mortally wounded. Through his courageous act, the accurate artillery fire destroyed the hostile mortar positions and his company was able to repel the enemy, forcing them to retreat. Second Lieutenant Delara's unquestionable valor while in close combat with a numerically superior enemy force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3704 (July 5, 1968)


*DEWEY, LARRY RICHARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Larry Richard Dewey (0-86369431), Captain, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving as a Pilot with the 92d Assault Helicopter Squadron, 10th Combat Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade, on 24 May 1971. Captain Dewey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as aircraft commander of a lift helicopter while on an emergency resupply mission to Fire Base 5, northwest of Pleiku. Hundreds of enemy soldiers had started an offensive movement against the fire base during the early morning hours. The enemy, utilizing mortars, rockets, and heavy automatic weapons initiated an attack on the small hilltop. They were beaten back only after inflicting heavy casualties. The Allied troops defending the small base camp were running low on critically needed supplies. Captain Dewey was notified of the urgent need for a resupply mission and immediately volunteered to fly into the besieged base camp. Briefing his crew and taking all necessary precautions, Captain Dewey made his approach into the landing zone. Almost immediately, Captain Dewey's aircraft came under mortar and heavy automatic weapons fire from every quadrant. Only through fearless determination and expert flying ability was Captain Dewey able to direct his aircraft to the landing pad and off-load the urgently needed supplies. Calling upon his professional skill and knowledge, Captain Dewey departed Fire Base 5 and returned to the safety of Dak To. In the early afternoon the call for more ammunition and medical supplies was made. Captain Dewey, knowing the enemy situation and the impossible odds, again volunteered to fly the resupply mission. Captain Dewey carefully pinpointed the known enemy positions for gunship suppression during the insertion and devised a plan of attack. While on short final, 300 meters away and 20 feet above the ground, Captain Dewey's aircraft suddenly exploded. Upon the explosion, the aircraft rolled to the right and struck the ground in an inverted position. In the act of completing his last mission, Captain Dewey displayed exemplary concern for his fellow soldiers and extreme professionalism. His gallant actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Weedsport, New York


*DIAZ, GARY MICHAEL (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Gary Michael Diaz (56709074), Corporal, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Corporal Diaz distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 4 February 1968 while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Redondo Beach, California


DIERLING, EDWARD CHARLES (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edward Charles Dierling (RA-12748920), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving armed conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while assigned to the 135th Military Intelligence Group. Sergeant Dierling distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 30 January to 23 February 1968, during the communist Tet Offensive against the city of Hue. North Vietnamese Army forced infiltrated the city and directed a series of coordinated attacks against military housing and installations. Enemy elements surrounded the area he and his team occupied, and Sergeant Dierling immediately helped destroy vital intelligence documents in the team's possession. After moving to a more tenable position in a nearby house, he organized defenses and distributed weapons and ammunition. The enemy delivered ravaging machine gun, mortar and rifle fire on his small unit, and he fought furiously to repel the attacks. Firing deadly barrages into the advancing North Vietnamese troops, his team succeeded in repulsing several fanatical assaults which reached point-blank range. Reinforcements were unable to reach Sergeant Dierling and his men, and the North Vietnamese forces captured them after forty-eight hours of savage fighting. They were taken to an enemy camp outside the city and held captive there for nineteen days. Throughout the period, Sergeant Dierling remained alert for escape possibilities despite weariness from lack of food and sleep. On 19 February, he and twenty other prisoners began a march to another camp. When a guard became careless after four days of travel, he made a fearless dash into the jungle and fought through the dense vegetation to reach friendly lines with highly valuable intelligence information. Sergeant Dierling's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2343 (May 17, 1968)
Home Town: Newark, New Jersey
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Prisoner of War Medal


DIMARTINO, JOE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joe DiMartino (US-67141080), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class DiMartino distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 12 June 1968, while serving as a team leader with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a search and destroy mission in Quang Tri Province, Republic of Vietnam. As his unit became heavily engaged with a large enemy force, several men were wounded. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist DiMartino advanced toward the enemy positions. When a particular enemy bunker repeatedly placed heavy fire on rescue operations, he charged the position and successfully silenced it, allowing his unit to rescue the wounded men. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 7943 (July 11, 1968)
Born: December 15, 1942 at Italy Home Town: Chicago, Illinois
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Air Medal


DINSMORE, ROBERT M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert M. Dinsmore, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 29 May 1969 while serving as a loader and assistant tank commander with Company D, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while elements of the company were assaulting an enemy bunker complex, his tank was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade. The explosion wounded the three other crew members, started a small fire in the vehicle and detonated a grenade that filled the tank with irritating gas. Although suffering from the effects of the gas, Sergeant Dinsmore moved his wounded comrades to safety. After observing the loss of his tank had caused the attack to falter, he returned through the hostile fusillade to his vehicle and began firing on the enemy positions with the main gun and a mounted heavy machine gun. Although some of the gas lingered in the vehicle and he was forced to load and fire unaided, Sergeant Dinsmore continued to cover the hostile emplacements with accurate fire until two replacement crew members arrived. He then maneuvered his tank into the assault formation and pressed the attack until the enemy positions had been overrun and destroyed. Sergeant Dinsmore's outstanding courage, devotion to duty and concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, II Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2008 (August 13, 1969)


*DIXON, MARK HANNAY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Mark Hannay Dixon (RA-11806821), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Dixon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 April 1969 while serving as a Rifleman with Company C, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, during a reconnaissance in force mission in Long An Province. After a member of his unit was seriously wounded by enemy fire, Private Dixon courageously crawled, under intense hostile fire, to the fallen soldier, and began administering first aid. Then, as he started to carry the wounded man to a secure area for evacuation, Private Dixon was hit by enemy fire. Disregarding his own injuries, Private Dixon continued to move his wounded comrade toward the evacuation point, until mortally wounded by hostile fire. Private Dixon's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5948 (May 24, 1969)
Home Town: West Hartford, Connecticut


DOBBINS, RAYMOND H.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Raymond H. Dobbins (0-5325237), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Advisory Team 22, Second Regional Assistance Command, in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Dobbins distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 7 November 1971, while serving as Operations Advisor to the 42d Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Captain Dobbins was advising an extraction of units of the 2d and 4th Battalions of the 42d Regiment when the enemy started shelling the fire base in an apparent attempt to disrupt the extraction. Due to the fact that Captain Dobbins was the only United States Advisor on the fire base, he ignored his own personal safety and continued to move about the fire base as he advised the Regimental Operations Officer and Battalion Commanders concerning the situation. The enemy's fire caused many casualties on the fire base, some of which needed urgent medical evacuation. Captain Dobbins then volunteered to assist in organizing a medical evacuation of wounded personnel. While still exposing himself to small arms fire and also dodging the shelling, Captain Dobbins still managed to identify suspected enemy positions as targets for the gunships. His actions at this time assisted in silencing the enemy fire temporarily, thus allowing the medical evacuation to be a success. His personal display of gallantry under intense hostile fire and his sound and timely recommendations to the Senior Advisor and the Regimental S3 during this battle were singularly outstanding. Captain Dobbins' conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 556 (February 24, 1972)

DOBBINS, RAYMOND H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Raymond H. Dobbins (0-5325237), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Advisory Team 22, Second Regional Assistance Command, in the Republic of Vietnam, during the period 23 to 25 April 1972. Captain Dobbins, acting Senior Advisor to the 42d Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, distinguished himself by gallantry in action. During an enemy rocket, missile and artillery attack he repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to adjust friendly artillery, air strikes and gunships on nearby enemy positions. After darkness on 23 April, upon receiving notification of an enemy armor threat, Captain Dobbins assisted in organizing and deploying tank killer teams to engage the armor. At 0530 hours on 24 April, the enemy launched a coordinated attack from the South. During this period of intense fighting, Captain Dobbins was on the battlefield directing and assisting in encouraging the ARVN to fight. At 0830 hours, he lost all contact with friendly elements and relocated himself in a bunker. The enemy failed to find him during the day and he was instrumental in identifying enemy targets of tanks and anti-aircraft weapons which were destroyed by air strikes. After the hours of darkness, Captain Dobbins assisted in organizing the men into 3 to 4 man teams for an escape and evasion. Upon encountering friendly mechanical ambushes and a mine field, he assumed the point position and breached the friendly mine fields. His great acts of personal bravery inspired the ARVN to resist the enemy and when all means of resistance ended, he successfully assisted in the escape and evasion. Captain Dobbins' conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflects great credit upon himself as well as the military service.
Headquarters, Department of Army Second Regional Assistance Command General Orders No. 12 (July 7, 1972)
Born: at Smyrna, Georgia
Home Town: Smyrna, Georgia
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam)


DRAKE, LYLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lyle Drake, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Drake distinguished himself while serving as Senior American Advisor to an element of Vietnamese troops while assaulting enemy positions on Nui Khet Mountain. During the initial phase of the assault, Sergeant Drake and his comrades came under intense enemy small arms, rocket, and grenade fire. Ignoring the enemy fire, he immediately moved throughout his company encouraging his men and directing their fire on the enemy. At this time, the enemy increased the momentum of fighting, showering the friendly troops with grenades. Sergeant Drake again exposed himself to the fire as he moved toward the hostile forces in search of the enemy grenadier. When he reached the vicinity of the grenadier, he assaulted the area with twelve grenades. Although the concussion from the exploding grenades knocked him to the ground on several occasions, Sergeant Drake continued his assault until he reached the grenadier's position. He then fully exposed himself to both friendly and enemy fire as he crawled on top of a rock formation located five meters from the enemy grenadier and destroyed the position with his remaining grenades. Although suffering from two punctured eardrums, Sergeant Drake refused medical attention and rallied his men to continue the assault. On several occasions he was observed dragging wounded comrades from the line of enemy fire to covered positions. Sergeant Drake's determined actions so inspired his men to continue the attack, that the mission was successfully completed shortly thereafter.


*DUCE, ROGER L. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Roger L. Duce, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Duce distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 May 1968 while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 5131 (August 4, 1968)


*FAIRCLOTH, JOHNNIE WILLIAM (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Johnnie William Faircloth (RA-14608232), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Staff Sergeant Faircloth distinguished himself by heroic action on 18 September 1965 while serving as a rifle squad leader in an airborne infantry battalion on two heliborne search and destroy operations in the Republic of Vietnam. Almost immediately after landing, Sergeant Faircloth's element was pinned down by enemy small arms fire. The unit received instructions to move forth to link up with the main force approximately 800 meters away. With enemy sniper fire coming from the west, and knowing the small unit was completely surrounded by enemy forces, Sergeant Faircloth, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, led the first element of the unit north. After moving approximately 20 meters, the element came under a heavy volume of small arms and machine gun fire. Sergeant Faircloth was wounded and fell to the ground, signaling the other members of the element to return to the unit's positions. He refused to accept medical aid for himself knowing that it might result in another casualty. Sergeant Faircloth was wounded several more times by enemy machine gun fire and died on the battle field. His fearlessness and genuine concern for his subordinates in the face of his own peril was an inspiration to the entire unit. Staff Sergeant Faircloth's unimpeachable valor in close combat against numerically superior forces was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1537 (November 9, 1965)
Home Town: Cordele, Georgia


*FEGATELLI, PETER FRANK (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Peter Frank Fegatelli (52902778), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 10 May 1969 while serving with Company D (Ranger), 151st Infantry, II Field Force, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while deployed in an ambush position, the long range patrol team of which Specialist Fegatelli was a member spotted several enemy soldiers approaching. When the hostile troops were within range, the friendly element initiated contact with them. Although taken by surprise, the enemy reacted by placing intense small arms and rocket- propelled grenade fire upon the team. Seeing that the enemy was beginning to gain fire superiority with extremely effective fire, Specialist Fegatelli, disregarding his own safety, came to his knees in order to place more effective machine gun fire on the advancing enemy. His accurate fire and courage inspired his comrades to increase their volume of suppressive fire. While firing on the hostile force, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Fegatelli's outstanding courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders No. 1315 (May 27, 1969)
Home Town: Providence, Rhode Island


FLORA, CARROLL EDWARD, JR. (POW)
Blank: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Carroll Edward Flora, Jr. (RA-13664724), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for FOIA
Born: August 20, 1941 at Brunswick, Missouri
Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star w/V, 3@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


FOGARTY, JERRY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jerry M. Fogarty (US-54832575), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action on 1 December 1968, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a reconnaissance in force mission in Binh Duong Province, Company A came under an intense communist attack. During the initial contact, the lead platoon sustained several casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Fogarty exposed himself to a heavy volume of fire as he moved through the bullet swept area to the aid of his comrades. Nearing the injured soldiers' position, Private Fogarty came under devastating automatic weapons fire from a concealed hostile bunker. Returning fire, Private Fogarty succeeded in killing one Viet Cong before he was seriously wounded losing consciousness. Regaining consciousness, he, refusing to accept defeat, attempted to rescue his comrade but was turned back by the holocaust of exploding hostile projectiles. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and defeat of the hostile force. Private Fogarty's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 590 (January 18, 1969)
Born: October 20, 1947 at Chicago, Illinois
Home Town: Des Plaines, Illinois
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Purple Heart


FRANK, GORDON B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gordon B. Frank, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while engaged in military operations against an armed enemy on 29 June 1963. As an Advisor to a Vietnamese Battalion (Civil Guard), Captain Frank displayed a rare combination of professional knowledge, sound judgment, and devotion to duty, and rendered invaluable assistance, advice and encouragement to the Battalion in accomplishing its military objectives. When the operations of the Battalion were deterred by hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire, he disregarded his own personal safety and remained with the forward troops in an effort to rally them. Forced to defend himself against point-blank range hostile fire, and armed only with a pistol and hand grenades, he single-handedly annihilated three hostile positions. His courageous action, personal example, and dedication to duty served as an inspiration to his Vietnamese comrades and assured the success of the operations. Captain Frank's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 3 (January 28, 1964)


FRANK, MARTIN STANLEY (POW)
Blank: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Martin Stanley Frank (51603758), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for FOIA
Born: July 11, 1941 at Montclair, New Jersey
Home Town: Belleville, New Jersey
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


*FREEMAN, RUBE ALFRED (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Rube Alfred Freeman (34637852), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in Vietnam on 27 April 1963, as a member of Advisory Team 22, Military Assistance Advisory Group, Vietnam. Sergeant Freeman was serving as an Advisor to a Vietnamese infantry battalion which had the mission of defending an outpost against hostile forces. When the battalion was overrun and suffered heavy casualties from intense weapons fire, Sergeant Freeman displayed great courage and leadership by rallying the Vietnamese soldiers to hold their position and encouraging them to pursue their defense efforts. Although the unit was exposed to an overwhelming onslaught, he completely disregarded his own personal safety and remained with the forward unit to advise them until he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Freeman's conspicuous gallantry and unselfish actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 46 (October 23, 1963)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia


FRESCURA, JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John Frescura (RA-16825953), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Command and Control Detachment, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Frescura distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 January 1968 while serving with a Special Forces reconnaissance patrol on combat operations in the town of Khe Sanh. Shortly after noon, while moving through the town, his unit's point element was savagely attacked by a well-entrenched enemy force firing machine guns, automatic weapons and small arms. The vanguard was cut off from the main force and pinned down by the devastating fire. Specialist Frescura immediately directed his men to fighting positions along the road. Braving the withering enemy barrage, he repeatedly exposed himself to the insurgent emplacements to draw their fire and pinpoint their locations. When he learned that a soldier in the separated force was seriously wounded, he stood up and dashed through the murderous fusillade. Shielding the man with his own body, he treated his wounds and then aided another casualty. He next laid down a heavy base of fire on the enemy to cover the evacuation of the wounded. When he was sure that all the men of the point element were safe, he sprinted through a hail of bullets to reach the main force. The patrol then maneuvered to break contact, and Specialist Frescura remained behind and delivered intense suppressive fire on the North Vietnamese to prevent pursuit. As ambulance helicopters arrived to evacuate the casualties, he moved into the open and silenced enemy snipers firing from positions around the landing zone. Specialist Five Frescura's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2263 (May 15, 1968)


FRIER, JESSE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jesse W. Frier (RA--14474962), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Sergeant First Class Frier distinguished himself by heroic actions on 9 May 1968, while serving as Operations Sergeant of the 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, on a combat operation in the Republic of Vietnam. When the enemy attacked the perimeter of Fire Support Base Maury, Sergeant Frier left the Tactical Operations Center under intense enemy fire to locate and confer with the Infantry Force Commander who was being treated for wounds. Then, when the enemy broke through the perimeter, Sergeant Frier formed a counterattack force to repel the hostile force. When he saw a truck hit by a rocket propelled grenade, he crawled through a pool of gasoline which had leaked from the truck tanks, to dig a man out from under it. During all the above acts, he constantly exposed himself to the heavy volume of enemy fire. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives and the successful completion of the mission. Sergeant First Class Frier's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5134 (July 15, 1968)
Home Town: Lakeland, Florida


*FRY, GEORGE HAROLD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to George Harold Fry (US-130-34-0945), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a radio-telephone operator in Company D, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, during combat operations in the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam, on 11 July 1969. At approximately 1230 hours on the cited date, Company D was advancing along a trail when it encountered a heavy volume of enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket propelled grenade fire from an unknown size enemy force in well-fortified positions. During the ensuing battle two battalion radio- telephone operators were killed and their radios destroyed. Then Company D lost contact with one of its platoons because of the uneven terrain. Realizing that control was impossible without effective communication, Specialist Fry climbed a nearby ridge in an attempt to make communication with all the company's platoons. He remained fully unprotected from the enemy fire and effectively established radio contact within the company and to the Battalion Command Post, allowing the Company Commander to maneuver his elements and to coordinate with the Battalion S-3 element. Disregarding the hostile fire, Specialist Fry held his ground in order to relay messages. It was while relaying one of Company D's messages that he was mortally wounded by the intense enemy fire. Specialist Fry's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 13633 (November 12, 1969)
Home Town: Pavilion, New York


*FRY, ROLLAND KEITH (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Rolland Keith Fry, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a rifleman in Company A, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, in the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 May 1969. At approximately 1400 hours, Company A, was moving along the side of Fire Support Base Airborne when the lead platoon's movement was checked by a heavy barrage of automatic weapons, rocket propelled grenade, and small arms fire. Specialist Fry was at the very front position, moving toward the well-placed enemy fortifications. With complete disregard for his own safety, he laid down a heavy volume of fire with his M-16 rifle, providing cover for the other members of his platoon. At this time, a rocket propelled grenade exploded near his position, seriously wounding him. Refusing medical aid, Specialist Fry continued retaliatory fire until another rocket propelled grenade exploded near his position, mortally wounding him. His courageous action contributed highly to the success of the mission and to the defeat of the enemy force. Specialist Fry's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Hutchinson, Kansas


FUNDERBURK, RAYMOND E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Raymond E. Funderburk (0-5403048), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Major Funderburk distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the afternoon of 31 January 1968, while serving as Information Officer, 9th Infantry Division, accompanying the Reconnaissance Platoon, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. The armored personnel carriers of the patrol had just finished a sweep of Widow's village and were en route to aid a besieged company in the village of No Nai when the Viet Cong attack began. The enemy, entrenched in a two-story house, let the column enter the ambush zone, then hit the third, fourth and fifth tracks with recoilless rifle rounds. The seventh track slammed to a halt just outside the ambush site and all occupants ran to the shelter of the side of a building fronting the street. Major Funderburk, along as an observer to obtain first-hand combat photographs, immediately took command of the 16 men and began directing their fire in a counter-offensive. Braving machine gun and recoilless rifle rounds, Major Funderburk collected all available M79 ammunition from the track out in the street. Then, seizing an M79 grenade launcher, he climbed to the roof of the building and began lobbing grenades onto the roof of the Viet Cong stronghold, demolishing the roof and trying to penetrate the second floor and destroy the enemy. When helicopter gunships arrived, Major Funderburk called in a devastatingly accurate rocket strike on the ground floor of the enemy stronghold, a mere 20 meters from his own position, without incurring any friendly casualties. Major Funderburk's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 1088 (February 28, 1968)


GALLION, RICHARD L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard L. Gallion, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Gallion distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 May 1968 while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7305 (September 19, 1968)


GARLAND, CHRISTOPHER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Christopher J. Garland (RA-12307319), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while conducting military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Garland distinguished himself while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 6 February 1968, Sergeant Garland's platoon was conducting a reconnaissance in force mission near Plei Gao Gen when it encountered a reinforced North Vietnamese Company in fortified bunkers. The armored platoon was taken under fire by an extremely intense volume of small arms and automatic weapons fire coupled with the enemy's intense use of B-40 antitank rockets and mortars. After Insuring the Platoon had initiated appropriate counter-action, Sergeant Garland dismounted and, under extremely intense fire, moved to a second, temporarily disabled armored personnel carrier. Upon reaching the second vehicle he immediately reorganized the squad members and directed the moving of the wounded Personnel to the carrier. Still under heavy enemy fire, he calmly and efficiently repaired the vehicle's exposed and disabled .50 caliber machine gun. He then moved the personnel carrier through a heavy brush fire and again dismounted to recover two more wounded comrades. During the entire encounter, Sergeant Garland was under direct, extremely voluminous enemy fire. Because of his professional and courageous acts, the enemy company was destroyed and numerous friendly lives were saved. Sergeant Garland's extraordinary heroism, superb leadership and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4603 (August 19, 1968)


*GASSMAN, FRED ALLEN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Fred Allen Gassman (RA-266-80-9751), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with RT Fer De Lance, Command and Control Detachment, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, in the Republic of Vietnam, Sergeant Gassman distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action on 24 September 1970 while serving on a long- range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy-held territory. The team was preparing to move out of their night defensive position on the morning of 24 September 1970 when they were compromised by an enemy force of undetermined size. In the ensuing firefight, Sergeant Gassman moved without hesitation to an area of intense enemy fire to aid two commandos. A grenade thrown into their position by the enemy killed on commando and wounded the other, but miraculously Sergeant Gassman escaped injury. He ignored the enemy fire to aid the wounded commando in safely withdrawing to a more secure position. Finding the man not seriously injured, he returned to find the other commando beyond medical help. Sergeant Gassman, realizing the value of the equipment left behind during the team's withdrawal, returned to gather all remaining equipment before returning on the last trip with the body of the dead commando. The team leader then called in air strikes on the enemy positions so the team could be safely extracted. Sergeant Gassman's actions during this period were instrumental in saving one commando's life and in recovering equipment of value to the enemy if left behind. Sergeant Gassman's conspicuous gallantry was in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflects great credit on him, the Special Forces, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Fort Walton Beach, Florida


*GENTRY, DAVID ANTHONY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to David Anthony Gentry (RA-18767298), Corporal, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, on 29 September 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date Private First Class Gentry was moving with his platoon to reinforce another platoon of his company when his element was ambushed by an estimated North Vietnamese Army squad. Even though he was in the ambush killing zone and was the target of extremely heavy hostile fire, Private Gentry displayed resolute courage as he immediately assaulted the closest enemy bunker. Running through intense fire and exploding grenades, with no concern for his own safety, he engaged the enemy position with accurate volleys of fire as he moved closer to the insurgent element. Private Gentry was fatally wounded just before reaching the bunker, yet his fearless actions enabled the other paratroopers in his platoon to seek cover before the enemy could engage them with effective fire. Private First Class Gentry demonstrated unquestionable valor and his courage in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 9228 (October 16, 1967)
Home Town: Knox City, Texas


GIRLING, VICTOR D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Victor D. Girling (RA-17683333), Corporal, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Corporal, then Private First Class, Girling distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a forward observer with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was conducting a search and clear mission south of DaNang when they suddenly came under heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire from a reinforced battalion of North Vietnamese regulars. During the initial burst of fire, several members of the lead platoon were killed and the complete company became pinned down. When Corporal Girling, who was with the command group, saw one of the radio operators become seriously wounded and the other one badly shaken, he courageously crawled to the wounded man and began dragging him to the defensive perimeter while urging the other man to keep crawling. After insuring that the wounded man was safe, he quickly re-established radio contact with higher headquarters, allowing the company commander to request gunships and air strikes. This courageous act greatly contributed to the success of the company's mission which resulted in 207 enemy killed. Corporal Girling's unselfish concern for his fellow soldiers and unquestionable valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2648 (May 20, 1968)


*GOMEZ, LUIS G. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Luis G. Gomez, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Gomez distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 1 September 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7223 (September 17, 1968)


*GONZALEZ, RAMON E. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ramon E. Gonzalez (RA-12572425), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Gonzalez distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a Squad Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was going to the aid of a Marine unit when they became pinned down in an open rice paddy by a barrage of mortar, rocket, and automatic weapons fire from an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese regulars. When the company commander gave the command to withdraw to a more secure area, the machinegunner attached to Sergeant Gonzalez' squad was wounded and unable to provide effective fire cover. Realizing the importance of the machinegun fire, Sergeant Gonzalez, with complete disregard for his own safety, rushed to the unmanned weapon and started laying down a suppressive base of fire. After killing several of the insurgents and enabling the wounded personnel to withdraw, he then picked up the wounded machinegunner and started back to rejoin his squad. After moving several meters, Sergeant Gonzalez was mortally wounded by an enemy mortar round. Staff Sergeant Gonzalez' unquestionable valor in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1862 (April 10, 1968)


GONZALEZ, WILLIAM
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William Gonzalez, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Gonzalez distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 1 September 1968 while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7804 (October 6, 1968)


*GOOD, KENNETH NEWLON (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Kenneth Newlon Good (0-66384), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations at Ap Tan Tho, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 January 1963, as a member of the Military Assistance Advisory Group, Vietnam. Captain Good was assigned as the Advisor to a Vietnamese infantry battalion which had the mission of securing a series of objectives, including the hamlet of Ap Tan Tho. While approaching the final objective, the battalion received intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from a determined and entrenched hostile force. At the risk of his life, Captain Good unhesitatingly moved from the Battalion Command Post to the forward elements to apprise himself of the situation and to assist the Vietnamese commanders. Although the unit was receiving casualties and he was exposed to constant gunfire, he completely ignored the danger to assist in the selection of a route into the hostile lines. His heroic and brave action stabilized the Vietnamese units and served as an example to those around him. Shortly after, while occupying a vantage point with the forward unit, he was struck by a sniper's bullet. Although seriously wounded, he directed the aidmen to administer to the Vietnamese casualties and continued to encourage the friendly forces to pursue their defense efforts. Captain Good's conspicuous gallantry and unselfish actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (September 27, 1963)
Born: November 30, 1930 at Hollywood, California
Home Town: San Marino, California


GOUIN, DONAT J. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donat J. Gouin (11174609), Master Sergeant [then Sergeant First Class], U.S. Army, for gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Chief Engineer with Detachment Number 5, American Forces Television Station, Hue, South Vietnam, American Forces Radio-Television Network, South Vietnam, Military Advisory Command, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 February 1968, during the Communist "Tet Offensive." At approximately 1900 hours on 2 February 1968, Detachment Number 5 was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force while detachment personnel were positioned inside their quarters at Number 6 Tran Duc Street, Hue. Without hesitancy and with total disregard to his personal safety, Master Sergeant Gouin took a position outside the quarters where he faced part of the attacking enemy force alone. Exposing himself to deadly enemy fire he remained in that position throughout the 16-hour ordeal and single-handedly stopped all enemy attempts to attack and gain entry into said quarters from this otherwise exposed flank. He was continuously subjected to enemy grenade fire which stunned and deafened him, but never deterred his determination to stay in that position. His aggressiveness and initiative of action was instrumental not only in saving the lives of Detachment Number 5 personnel but was a decidingly important factor in deterring the enemy's attempts to overrun their position. His position was later overrun and he was held as a Prisoner of War until his release on 5 March 1973. Master Sergeant Gouin's heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the services and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.
Born: 1929 at Central Falls, Rhode Island
Home Town: Central Falls, Rhode Island
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


*GRAHAM, ROGER LEE (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Roger Lee Graham (0-4075401), Major (Air Defense Artillery), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Advisory Team 15, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, in action against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 June 1969.
Home Town: Aliceville, Alabama


*HACKER, RONALD VENTION (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ronald Vention Hacker (US-51835645), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Hacker distinguished himself while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. On 3 April 1969, the battalion was involved in counterinsurgency operations in the Cu Don Valley complex west of Kontum City. Upon leaving their night position they were immediately taken under heavy enemy fire. At the initial contact, four men in the point squad were wounded. Sergeant Hacker, with complete disregard for his own safety, volunteered to lead reinforcements into the battle area. Using his own initiative, he instructed his men to carry enough ammunition to re-supply the forward element. Then, through the effective use of tactical fire and movement, he successfully joined the embattled point squad. Exhibiting exceptional ability and coolness while under heavy fire he then maneuvered his men to positions from which they engaged the enemy with accurate and effective cover fire, allowing the wounded to be evacuated from the area. Seeing one of his men wounded by the intense hostile fire, Sergeant Hacker rushed to his side. As he attempted to carry his wounded comrade from the battle field, he himself was mortally wounded. Sergeant Hacker's personal bravery, determination and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 1759 (May 17, 1969)
Home Town: Massillon, Ohio


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Tenth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Fourth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of a Tenth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 May 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance in force mission in Dinh Tuong Province. After elements of his battalion came in contact with a large enemy force, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth braved intense hostile fire to fly over the hostile positions and direct artillery supporting fires onto them. Then, realizing that the enemy element was, in actuality, a main force battalion, he skillfully directed the insertion of reinforcements in blocking positions around the enemy. After surrounding the enemy, he repeatedly exposed himself to the murderous fusillade of hostile fire to direct his forces and mark targets for gunship strikes. His valiant actions resulted in the decimation of the large and important enemy unit. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5933, (May 24, 1969)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Fourth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fourth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Major Hackworth distinguished himself on 4 March 1966 while serving as executive officer during a combat operation in the vicinity of My Phu, Republic of Vietnam. Upon entering the operational area, Major Hackworth's unit made contact with a numerically superior Viet Cong force. During the early stages of the battle, Major Hackworth was airborne in a command and control helicopter. Later, he dauntlessly landed in the operation area amidst intense hostile fire to personally direct his men. Undaunted by intense machine gun fire, Major Hackworth remained with his men, exposed himself to hostile fire, and effected an assault on the hostile emplacements. After the platoon seized its objective, Major Hackworth joined another rifle platoon which had sustained heavy battle casualties among its officer personnel and was virtually ineffective. Major Hackworth went from squad to squad in the most forward positions and rallied the disorganized platoon. He rendered first aid, directed evacuation of the wounded, and insured that ammunition was redistributed while continuously subjecting himself to an intense volume of Viet Cong fire. Later, as the platoon was inadvertently strafed by friendly aircraft, Major Hackworth braved the heavy machine gun and rocket fire while moving to a radio to call the aviation units to cease their attack on the friendly force. He then arranged for medical evacuation of the seriously wounded. Again he exposed himself to intense hostile fire while running through a rice paddy to give visual landing guidance to the incoming aircraft. Due to the intensity of the hostile fire, the evacuation attempt was aborted. When darkness fell, reinforcements were brought in while Major Hackworth stood in the middle of an insecure landing zone with a flashlight guiding the landing of ten aircraft. He then supervised the evacuation of the wounded. His unimpeachable valor in the face of a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters United States Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 3645, (June 11, 1966)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Fifth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Fourth Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Fifth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Major Hackworth distinguished himself on 11 June 1966 while serving as a battalion commander during a combat operation near Dak To, Republic of Vietnam. When a friendly company was assaulted by a Viet Cong force, Major Hackworth immediately proceeded to their assistance in his command and control helicopter. Unable to see the ground below, Major Hackworth ordered the pilot to land him in a hastily prepared landing zone. As the aircraft hovered fifteen feet above the ground and received intense hostile fire, Major Hackworth jumped from the helicopter and moved to the company command post. After a quick briefing, Major Hackworth sped to the defensive perimeter. Ignoring the intense Viet Cong fire raking the ground around him, he moved from position to position, directing his men and giving them words of encouragement. After observing the fanatical insurgents penetrate a section of the perimeter, Major Hackworth personally charged the breached position, killed three Viet Cong and wounded another. He then successfully reorganized the defenses which held throughout repeated insurgent attacks. Through his courage and outstanding leadership, he contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the Viet Cong force. Major Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters United States Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 5321, (August 12, 1966)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Sixth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Silver Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Sixth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 February 1969 while serving as Battalion Commander, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance mission near Fire Support Base Moore. Disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth exposed himself to intense enemy fire as he had his helicopter land in an insecure area where 16 men of an eighteen man unit lay wounded. He maneuvered throughout the embattled area setting up a defensive perimeter with the men who were still able to fight. He then called in a support element and led them in a sweep of the area, routing the enemy. As a result of his courageous actions the lives of several men were saved. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat against an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3290, (March 18, 1969)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Seventh Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of a Seventh Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 March 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance in force mission near My An. Upon learning that one of his companies was pinned down in a heavily mined area by intense hostile fire, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth courageously directed his pilot to land in the area. After landing he received word that the company commander had been seriously wounded and immediately went into the minefield, picked up the wounded man and carried him to a relatively safe position. He then reorganized the company and led them through a fusillade of fire to a point where they could be extracted by helicopter. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4192, (April 8, 1969)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Eighth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of an Eighth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF- 103837), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 March 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance mission near Fire Support Base Danger. After gunships had engaged an enemy element, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth directed his pilot to land in the isolated area in order to recover the enemy weapons. Upon landing, he detected movement in a nearby bunker and braved intense hostile fire to maneuver to the emplacement and destroy it. He then provided covering fire as his operations officer engaged and silenced a second enemy bunker and, after recovering the weapons, provided suppressive fire as the helicopter lifted off. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4498, (April 14, 1969)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HACKWORTH, DAVID HASKELL
(Ninth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Third Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in addition to a previously awarded Silver Oak Leaf Cluster lieu of an Ninth Award of the Silver Star Medal to David Haskell Hackworth (OF-103837), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 May 1969 while serving as Commanding Officer, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance in force mission. During the late afternoon, elements of the 4th Battalion encountered stiff enemy fire. From his light observation helicopter, which was under continual ground fire, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth directed effective artillery strikes. He then rapidly gathered all available intelligence and initiated a vigorous offensive against the large enemy forces. As the battle progressed, Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth ignoring the fire his helicopter was receiving, directed the gunships and ground elements towards enemy targets, at one time throwing smoke to mark an enemy position. The net effect of his tactical decisions and personal gallantry was a complete rout of the enemy force. Lieutenant Colonel Hackworth's extraordinary heroism in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 6340, (June 4, 1969)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam), 10@ Silver Stars, 8@ Purple Hearts


HAMANN, RENE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Rene Hamann, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Hamann distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 25 May 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 5252 (August 7, 1968)


HARDY, WILLIAM HENRY (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William Henry Hardy (0-4024213), Major, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy, while serving as a Prisoner of War in South Vietnam, during August 1967. Major Hardy distinguished himself by escaping from a prisoner of war camp. Recognizing that the odds for success were slight and if he were re-captured he would receive severe torture and periods of solitary confinement, and possible death, he continued with his escape plan. The plan had to be carefully planned, memorized and executed at the approximate time in August 1967. Major Hardy successfully carried out his plan. The success of his escape was short-lived and he was recaptured. Although he was re-captured, he continued strong resistance and adherence to the Code of Conduct. The extreme gallantry exhibited by Major Hardy was aptly illustrated by the fact that so few prisoners had ever tried to escape, primarily due to the rigid security measures employed by the enemy. His courageous and gallant escape were more than an attempt to get him out of the prison camp. More guards were required to try to stop Americans from escaping, enemy troops were diverted from battle duties to search for the escapees, and prisoner morale soared. By his heroic deed, Major Hardy demonstrated great devotion to duty and country, disregarding concern for his own safety, which demonstrated the highest traditions of the military service.
Born: March 6, 1932 at Winterville, North Carolina
Home Town: Winterville, North Carolina
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Bronze Stars, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


*HARRIS, ROBERT E. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert E. Harris (US-67183724), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 9 May 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Harris distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as a machinegunner with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his company was conducting a combat mission near the village of Phu Vinh Dong (3) when they suddenly came under intense rocket, mortar, and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior enemy force located in well-entrenched bunkers. During the initial contact, Private Harris' platoon sergeant was seriously wounded and unable to move to a position of safety. Immediately, Private Harris volunteered to assist four of his fellow soldiers in trying to assist the wounded man. With complete disregard for his own safety, he courageously raced through the bullet-swept area while providing accurate protective fire to cover the advance of the other men. In the final sprint to the wounded soldier's position, Private Harris was seriously wounded by a burst from an enemy machinegun. In spite of his critical condition, he contrived to provide covering fire for his comrades which greatly aided in the successful evacuation of his wounded platoon sergeant. Private First Class Harris' unquestionable valor while in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3712 (July 5, 1968)


*HARTMAN, THOMAS J. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas J. Hartman (190-40-7500), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Hartman distinguished himself while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. On 18 November 1969, Sergeant Hartman's unit was conducting a sweep operation north of Plei Mrong when they were engaged by a large enemy force. Reacting immediately, Sergeant Hartman directed his armored personnel carrier to an advantageous fighting position. He then manned his vehicle's 50 caliber machine gun and placed a heavy volume of fire on the enemy positions. He continued to fire on the enemy until he was mortally wounded by an enemy B-40 rocket. Sergeant Hartman's courageous action, professionalism and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 7530 (December 3, 1969)


*HAUGH, JAMES CURTIS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Curtis Haugh (RA-55653230), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 5 March 1968. Staff Sergeant Haugh distinguished himself when the reconnaissance platoon (Tiger Force) of 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division was conducting a combat operation in the vicinity of Phu Loc, Republic of Vietnam. They were moving down a well used trail, and were suddenly taken under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. The hostile fire was so intense that it rendered the Tiger Force unable to effectively maneuver on the enemy positions. Realizing the situation, platoon sergeant Haugh informed his men that he was going forward in an attempt to eliminate an enemy machine gun position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he dashed forward about fifty meters, roving from bush to bush while his men laid down a base of fire in an attempt to cover his maneuver. From his forward most position Staff Sergeant Haugh threw two K-26 hand grenades into the machine gun trench. Oblivious to the tremendous volume of hostile fire now directed at him, Staff Sergeant Haugh, without hesitation, leaped forward and sprayed the trench with automatic weapons fire. Through his actions the machine gun position was silenced, giving the Tiger Force the fire superiority and allowing them to completely rout the hostile force. Staff Sergeant Haugh's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 3417 (July 14, 1968)
Home Town: Terre Haute, Indiana


HAYES, MICHAEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael J. Hayes, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 6 October 1969. When his platoon was ambushed by heavy rocket and small arms fire from an unknown size enemy force and was unable to maneuver, Specialist Fourth Class Hayes exposed himself to mark his platoon's position with smoke for the aerial rocket artillery. When a section of his platoon moved forward of its defensive line and was immediately pinned down by intense fire, he exposed himself to the fire as he moved to a hazardous position and placed down a heavy base of fire until the enemy fire abated and the other men could maneuver. Specialist Four Hayes also personally evacuated two wounded men to the rear then returned to his position and continued to deliver accurate fire on the enemy until severely wounded by enemy rocket fire. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 1953 (February 7, 1970)


HAYHURST, ROBERT EDWARD (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert Edward Hayhurst (RA16972350), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with the 1st Battalion, 525th Military Intelligence Group, in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Hayhurst distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 30 January to 23 February 1968, while defending against the communist Tet Offensive in the city of Hue. North Vietnamese Army forces launched a coordinated series of devastating attacks throughout the city on 30 January, and Sergeant Hayhurst and his team were trapped in a house isolated from other friendly forces. After destroying vital intelligence materials in the team's possession, Sergeant Hayhurst distributed ammunition and weapons to other members and deployed them in defensive positions. Sniper fire severely wounded one of his men outside the house. Braving blazing machine gun and mortar fire, he dashed to his fallen comrade and dragged him to safety. Several fanatical enemy assaults reached point-blank range. He and his men successfully repulsed them with murderous fire until their ammunition was expended and they were captured. The team was taken to an enemy camp outside the city. For nineteen days, Sergeant Hayhurst searched for the opportunity to escape. On 19 February, he and twenty other prisoners began a march to another camp. After four days of travel, one of the guards became careless. Seizing the opportunity, Sergeant Hayhurst dashed into the jungle and fought through densely vegetated terrain to his own lines. Intelligence materials he provided proved highly valuable in tracing the activities of enemy units in the area. Sergeant Hayhurst's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2345 (May 17, 1968)
Born: February 2, 1941 at New Richmond, Wisconsin
Home Town: New Richmond, Wisconsin


HENDRICKS, RONALD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ronald R. Hendricks, Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for heroism, not involving aerial flight, in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 8 February 1968, Captain Hendricks, while with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, came under heavy enemy fire. Captain Hendricks was wounded while he personally assaulted fortified enemy positions in an attempt to retrieve a wounded lieutenant. Although wounded Captain Hendricks refused to be evacuated and continued to attack the enemy. Time after time he exposed himself to intense enemy fire, thinking only of his mission and the welfare of his men. Only after the enemy had been destroyed, their positions taken and his men cared for did Captain Hendricks allow himself to be evacuated. Captain Hendricks' personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, his Unit, and the United States army.
Home Town: Delta, Colorado


HENRY, NATHAN BARNEY (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Nathan Barney Henry (53447988), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry and intrepidity in action as a Prisoner of War, in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force in Southeast Asia on 6 November 1967. With profound courage and strong conviction in the Code of Conduct, Sergeant Henry escaped from an enemy prisoner of war camp, knowing that the odds for success were slight and that if re-captured he would receive torture and long periods of solitary confinement. The success of his escape was short lived, and he was re-captured and punished. Staff Sergeant Henry's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military services and reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Born: May 13, 1947 at Franklin, North Carolina
Home Town: Franklin, North Carolina
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Bronze Stars, Prisoner of War Medal


*HERINGHAUSEN, ARTHUR J., JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Arthur J. Heringhausen, Jr. (RA-11707118), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company F (LRRP), 58th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in action against enemy forces on on 20 November 1968. Specialist Four Heringhausen distinguished himself while serving as a member of a Long Range Patrol on combat operations in the Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 1130 hours, the twelve man team heard voices of an approaching North Vietnamese unit and immediately set up an ambush. As the enemy moved into the kill zone the ambush was sprung, and Specialist Heringhausen poured a steady volume of M-16 fire into the area. The result of this action by the team was a body count of nine enemy killed with no friendly casualties. After this action the team moved 110 meters away for concealment, and the decision was made to extract the team. As the first man moved toward the pick-up zone he was seriously wounded by enemy automatic weapons fire. Specialist Heringhausen immediately laid down a heavy volume of suppressive fire, so that the injured man could be pulled back into the hastily established perimeter. In doing so, Specialist Heringhausen continuously exposed himself to the enemy fire by firing from a kneeling position in order to make his fire more effective. As a medical evacuation helicopter arrived and was pulling the wounded man through the thick jungle canopy on a jungle penetrator, the enemy attacked with an estimated platoon sized element. Again with complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Heringhausen knelt in an exposed position to deliver automatic fire until the enemy assault was broken. Just as the enemy was retreating, a large Chinese Communist Claymore Mine exploded sending fragments into his body, killing him instantly. Through his valorous efforts the lives of many of his fellow soldiers were saved, and heavy casualties were inflicted upon the enemy. Specialist Four Heringhausen's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No 1345 (February 7, 1969)
Born: December 19, 1949 at Oregon, Ohio
Home Town: Oregon, Ohio


HERLIK, QUERIN EDWARD (POW)
Blank: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Querin Edward Herlik (0-84084), Colonel, U.S. Army, for FOIA
Born: November 15, 1932 at Green Bay, Wisconsin
Home Town: Green Bay, Wisconsin
Personal Awards: Silver Star, 2@ Bronze Stars, 2@ Army Commendation Medals, Air Medal w/V, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


HILL, BURL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Burl E. Hill (US-54438770), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Hill distinguished himself by valiant actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a team leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was heavily engaged with a reinforced battalion of North Vietnamese Army Regulars and was under heavy, accurate mortar and small arms fire which inflicted numerous casualties. Sergeant Hill was on the far left flank of the company, and when they were given the command to withdraw, he discovered that the enemy had cut off his route of withdrawal. Observing that the 2d Platoon had suffered severe casualties, Sergeant Hill went to their aid, moving from position to position to administer first aid and engage several of the hostile emplacements. Sergeant Hill courageously directed a withering hail of fire upon the insurgents who at times advanced to within 10 meters of his position. During the three-hour battle, he was credited with numerous enemy kills and was responsible for saving many lives. Sergeant Hill's unquestionable valor in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2739 (May 24, 1968)


HOLBROOK, DARRELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Darrell Holbrook, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in Cambodia. Staff Sergeant Holbrook distinguished himself while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 6 May 1970, Company C was inserted into an unsecured landing zone inside the Cambodian border. Staff Sergeant Holbrook continually exposed himself to intense hostile fire as he moved from position to position directing his men in establishing a secure perimeter. When gunships arrived on station, Sergeant Holbrook adjusted their fire on the entrenched enemy force. Assuming command when the Company Commander was killed, Sergeant Holbrook organized a night defensive perimeter and maintained security throughout the night. Staff Sergeant Holbrook's personal bravery, outstanding leadership and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4510 (September 2, 1970)


HOLMAN, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard J. Holman (RA-18916093), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Holman distinguished himself by heroic actions on 30 June 1968, while serving with Company B, 65th Engineer Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a mine sweeping operation, a friendly convoy was ambushed. During the ensuing action, Private Holman from his exposed position, placed effective fire on the hostile forces stopping their assault and allowing his comrades to deploy. Seeing that his company commander was wounded, Private Holman, with complete disregard for his own safety, ran through withering enemy fire to a friendly APC telling the driver to evacuate the wounded commander. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and defeat of the enemy force. Private Holman's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 6381 (September 13, 1968)


*HOLSINGER, GARY OLSON (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Gary Olson Holsinger (US-51645354), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Corporal Holsinger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action 4 February 1968, while serving as a rifleman with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, during a combat mission near Hue, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became heavily engaged with a large enemy force, Private First Class Holsinger exposed himself to the hostile fire as he placed effective suppressive fire on the assaulting enemy force. While engaging the enemy, Private First Class Holsinger was mortally wounded, but his action inflicted numerous hostile casualties and contributed greatly to the successful repulsion of the enemy attack. Private First Class Holsinger's gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 3484 (May 17, 1968)
Home Town: New Boston, Ohio


*HORNER, CARL NICHOLAS MAPES (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Carl Nicholas Mapes Horner (US-56712312), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division on 7 September 1968. Corporal Horner was serving as lead rifleman with a reconnaissance platoon on a heliborne operation near Trung Lap, Republic of Vietnam. Landing in an area of open rice paddies, the reconnaissance platoon immediately came under small arms fire from what was later estimated to be a battalion sized force of North Vietnamese Army Regulars hidden in a nearby woodline. Using fire and maneuver tactics, the platoon began moving across two hundred meters of open rice paddies toward a small mound about seventy-five meters from, and running parallel to, the woodline. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private First Class Horner repeatedly left positions of cover behind rice paddy dikes and crossed open terrain as he led the first squad. When the platoon reached the mound, Private First Class Horner fearlessly stood up and led the platoon in an aggressive assault on the woodline. Seven concealed enemy machine guns suddenly initiated fire. Surprised by this barrage of small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket propelled grenade fire, the platoon was forced to make maximum use of the limited available cover in the rice paddies. To draw the enemy's attention and fire to himself, Private First Class Horner repeatedly stood up and fired quick bursts at the enemy with his M-16 rifle. As a result, several of his comrades were able to pull back to more secure positions. Private First Class Horner then noticed a wounded comrade lying in an unprotected position near an enemy machine gun. He immediately charged into the open in an assault on the position. Although he was mortally wounded in the attempt, others were able to take advantage of the diversion to move the wounded man to safety. Private First Class Horner's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 2383 (March 17, 1969)
Home Town: San Bernardino, California


*HORST, ROBERT LOUIS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert Louis Horst (486542114), Warrant Officer (WO-1), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the 159th Medical Detachment. Warrant Officer Horst distinguished himself on 27 December 1971 while serving as an Aircraft Commander of an aero-medical evacuation helicopter on a mission to evacuate the crew of a downed United States Army helicopter ten miles to the northwest of the city of Trang Bang, Republic of Vietnam. An insertion of the Republic of Vietnam forces took place in the area of XT 4020. A subsequent insertion drew heavy enemy fire, badly damaging one of the lift aircraft, heavy casualties were sustained and a request was made by the ARVN ground commander for a medical evacuation helicopter. Tomahawk 13 made an approach to the landing zone to attempt a pick up of wounded ARVNs. The fusillade of fire directed upon him caused him to abort the approach and attempt to climb out. At this time a rocket hit the aircraft and caused the ship to crash and burn. The crew managed to escape. Dust Off 107 piloted by Mr. Horst entered the landing zone and remained on the ground amidst intense enemy fire and not until all of the Americans and ten of the Vietnamese soldiers had been loaded did he depart the landing zone. Warrant Officer Horst's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1227 (October 27, 1972)
Born: June 20, 1950 at St. Louis, Missouri
Home Town: Springfield, Missouri
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)


*HOSEY, TOMMY BRYAN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Tommy Bryan Hosey (US-53671087), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Hosey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 June 1968 while serving as a rifleman on a reconnaissance in force mission in Plain Reeds, Republic of Vietnam. Immediately after landing, the company came under intense automatic weapons fire from a battalion of Viet Cong in an adjacent enemy bunker complex. The Company commander and several squad leaders were wounded during the first few moments of contact. Completely disregarding his own safety, Private Hosey attempted to reorganize his squad for an assault on the enemy bunkers. Jumping up from his concealed position, Private Hosey aggressively charged the fortifications and although he received several wounds in the process, continued his assault. Private Hosey maintained contact with the enemy until he was wounded by hostile fire. His extraordinary heroism in close combat against Viet Cong forces was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Stringer, Mississippi


HUDSON, EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Eugene Hudson, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in Vietnam on 22 July 1963. As an Advisor to a Vietnamese Ranger Battalion, Sergeant Hudson rendered invaluable assistance, advice, and encouragement to the 2d Platoon, 1st Company, 33d Ranger Battalion, Army of Vietnam, during an encounter with hostile forces. While the Platoon was maneuvering across an open valley, it was suddenly swept by hostile forces which greatly outnumbered them and received an onslaught of heavy automatic rifle and machine gun fire. Sergeant Hudson then displayed fortitude, professional skill, and determination by occupying an exposed position to assist his counterparts. During the entire operation, he remained cool and calculating, bravely making seven trips under intense gun fire to carry wounded Vietnamese soldiers across a small creek to a covered position. Through his strategy, perseverance, and valorous conduct, he inspired his Vietnamese comrades to emulate his actions, which resulted in a pause in the intensity of hostile gun fire and enabled the Platoon to move to a more advantageous position and continue their operations effectively. Sergeant Hudson's conspicuous gallantry and unselfish actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 15 (April 23, 1964)


*HUNSLEY, DENNIS ROGER (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Dennis Roger Hunsley (0-5347868), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 8 December 1968, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While in a night laager position Company C came under intense enemy fire. When Lieutenant Hunsley observed an enemy rocket propelled grenade crew preparing to destroy several vehicles, he secured a 90-mm. recoilless rifle and neutralized the hostile insurgents. Lieutenant Hunsley then aided in the evacuation of the wounded, even though the area was being heavily mortared. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the thwarting of the enemy force and the success of the mission. Lieutenant Hunsley's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Hannibal, Missouri
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)


HURWITZ, RONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ronald L. Hurwitz, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Hurwitz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 May 1969, while serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company B, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, on a reconnaissance in force mission in Giao Duc District. As the platoon was moving through a heavily-mined area, one of the mines exploded, wounding a man. Sergeant First Class Hurwitz unhesitatingly advanced through the hazardous area to his fallen comrade's side. After applying first aid, he moved the casualty to a relatively safe position from which he could be evacuated. Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant First Class Hurwitz selflessly volunteered to walk point and cleared a path for the rest of the company through the mined area. Later that night, when his platoon came under sudden attack by hostile rocket fire, Sergeant First Class Hurwitz boldly exposed himself to the enemy fire as he moved from position to position, directing the fire of his men. It was through his outstanding leadership and inspiring example that the enemy was overcome without the incurrence of any friendly casualties. Sergeant Hurwitz's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Department of the Army, General Orders No. 9683 (July 10, 1969)
Home Town: Bronx, New York


*JACKSON, RAY L. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ray L. Jackson, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Jackson distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 25 August 1968 while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 6934 (September 6, 1968)


JENSEN, KENNETH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Kenneth W. Jensen (0-533927), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 14 February 1968, Lieutenant Jensen was serving as a Platoon Leader with Company D, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, during a reconnaissance in force operation approximately three kilometers southwest of the village of Thu Duc. As the unit proceeded through an area of rice fields and coconut groves, part of his platoon was forced to take cover from sudden hostile rocket, automatic weapons, and machine gun fire. He immediately moved through the hail of enemy rounds to deploy his remaining squad into advantageous positions from which they brought accurate retaliatory fire upon the insurgents. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Jensen began crawling beneath the hostile fire toward a wounded man on the enemy side of a berm. As he attempted to rescue the individual, he became hit in the chest by enemy fire and was unable to help the man. Lieutenant Jensen then placed rapid and accurate fire on the insurgents from his location while others moved the casualty to relative safety. He was again hit by the intense fire, but refused medical attention until he had led his men in a withdrawal so that artillery fire could be employed. The extraordinary courage and dynamic leadership displayed by Lieutenant Jensen despite his wounds were instrumental in limiting friendly casualties, and significantly contributed toward the defeat of the Viet Cong. First Lieutenant Jensen's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest tradition of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 2268 (March 15, 1968)


*JENSEN, TERANCE KAY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Terance Kay Jensen (17276985), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 35th Air Police Squadron, 28th Air Base Group, 13th Air Force, at DaNang Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, on 1 July 1965. On that date, at approximately 0130 hours, Sergeant Jensen was on routine security patrol when he observed approximately 15 men of a hostile force infiltrating the area. He directed a subordinate air policeman who was on duty in the area to take cover in a nearby bunker and alert Central Security Control of the situation. He dismounted from his vehicle and was immediately wounded by small arms fire. He crawled to the rear of the vehicle, drew his weapon and returned fire. The prompt action of Sergeant Jensen was a dominant factor in causing the enemy to withdraw from the immediate area where approximately 25 unarmed fellow airmen had taken cover. By his gallantry and devotion to duty, Sergeant Jensen has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Detroit Lakes, Minnesota


*JOHNSON, CHARLES LEO (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Charles Leo Johnson (0-5536778), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Johnson distinguished himself by heroic actions on 23 June 1967, in the Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 0930 hours while the first platoon was on a reconnaissance mission, the platoon was attacked by a Viet Cong force of unknown size firing anti-tank and automatic weapons. The fire came from well concealed firing positions in a densely vegetated woods on the platoon's right flank. As soon as his platoon came under attack Lieutenant Johnson, the first platoon leader, directed his platoon into a flanking movement and charged the Viet Cong positions. While he was leading the assault, his armored personnel carrier received a direct hit from an anti-tank weapon and came under intense fire from automatic weapons and hand grenades. With his vehicle thus disabled and several members of his crew wounded, Lieutenant Johnson attempted to dismount his vehicle so that he could continue the assault when he was mortally wounded by an enemy hand grenade. Still responding to Lieutenant Johnson's aggressive leadership, the first platoon continued its assault on the position until the enemy positions were silenced. Lieutenant Johnson's aggressive reaction and outstanding leadership inspired his men and enabled them to rout a well entrenched enemy force. Lieutenant Johnson's gallantry in action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects, great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Marshfield, Wisconsin


JOHNSON, FORREST L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Forrest L. Johnson, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Johnson distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 May 1968 while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7312 (September 19, 1968)


*JOHNSON, GARY LEE (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Gary Lee Johnson (RA-505663434), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On 18 June 1971, Specialist Fourth Class Johnson's platoon was conducting a search and clear mission in the Long Khanh providence of the Republic of Vietnam. During the mission, the platoon came under rocket and small arms fire from approximately seven enemy bunkers. Specialist Fourth Class Johnson realized the danger to his fellow soldiers, moved close to the enemy bunkers, and placed suppressive fire on the enemy. His actions permitted his platoon to withdraw, with their wounded, to a more secure area. At the cost of his own life, Specialist Fourth Class Johnson saved his platoon from incurring additional casualties. Specialist Fourth Class Johnson's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Omaha, Nebraska


JOHNSON, LAWRENCE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence E. Johnson (W-3157822), Warrant Officer (W1), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with the 189th Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Brigade, on 12 June 1968, in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Johnson distinguished himself by valorous actions while serving as the Aircraft Commander of a troop carrying helicopter that was called to rescue a friendly ground unit in heavy contact with the enemy west of Dak To. He boldly approached the landing zone under heavy enemy fire and proceeded to hover adeptly to lower ropes for the extraction of four personnel. Enemy fire concentration was so heavy that strikes by Air Force "Skyraiders" failed to greatly decrease it previous to Warrant Officer Johnson's approach. The supporting helicopter gunships then made firing passes which failed to suppress enemy fire or to cover his approach. Nevertheless, he courageously made his sorties into the landing zone in support of the marooned unit. Without Warrant Officer Johnson's fearless determination to rescue the surrounded unit, they would have been annihilated. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Aviation Brigade, General Orders No. 5942 (August 28, 1968)


*JOJOLA, HARRY DANIEL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Harry Daniel Jojola (US-572664794), Staff Sergeant [then Sergeant], U.S. Army, for gallantry in action. Sergeant Jojola distinguished himself by heroic actions on 7 April 1970, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On 7 April 1970, Company C was acting as a blocking force on the edge of a jungled area when they came in contact with a large enemy force. Upon receiving fire, Sergeant Jojola organized his squad and engaged the enemy. Sergeant Jojola then maneuvered his men into strategic fighting positions where they placed maximum effective suppressive fire on the insurgents. When one of his advance elements came under fire and received several injuries, Sergeant Jojola, with complete disregard for his own safety, began moving into the woodline to evacuate the fallen men. During this attempt, he was fatally wounded. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the action and the thwarting of the hostile force. Sergeant Jojola's bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4752 (April 28, 1970)
Home Town: Santa Clara, California


*KAMP, THOMAS KEITH (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas Keith Kamp (US-024340380), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 17 November 1969 while serving as a squad leader with Company B, 2nd Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, near Fire Support Base Jamie (Tay Ninh Province). When the point squad was taken under fire by an entrenched enemy platoon and several casualties resulted, Sergeant Kamp rushed forward into the contact area and began delivering a heavy volume of fire. Efforts to rescue the wounded were drawing enemy fire from a position to his front. Realizing the enemy position would have to be eliminated in order to extract the wounded, Sergeant Kamp assaulted the well fortified bunker, knocking it out with a fragmentation grenade. As he attempted to move back and help with the evacuation of the wounded, he was mortally wounded by enemy fire.
Home Town: Longmeadow, Massachusetts


*KARNES, LESLIE LEROY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Leslie Leroy Karnes (RA-499387945), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 16 February 1971 while serving as Operations/Intelligence Advisor on Mobile Advisory Team IV-102, Kien An District, Kien Giang Province, Republic of Vietnam. On that date Sergeant Karnes was operating a Boston Whaler in which the Province Senior Advisor, Kien An District Advisor, and the Team 55 First Sergeant were passengers. The party had been inspecting the construction of outposts in the U-Minh Forrest and were returning by canal to the Kien An District Headquarters when they were ambushed by a North Vietnamese reconnaissance unit. So intense was the small arms and B-40 rocket fire that it was impossible to return immediate fire. Though mortally wounded and completely exposed to enemy fire, Sergeant Karnes continued to maneuver the boat and swung it directly into the ambush site, thereby providing his comrades with their only chance for survival. Due to Sergeant Karnes' singularly heroic actions, his decisive and professional bearing, and complete dedication to his responsibilities in the heat of battle, the Kien An District Senior Advisor and Team First Sergeant were able to stay the Viet Cong until rescued by a hastily formed rescue squad. Sergeant First Class Karnes' conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1107 (March 6, 1971)
Home Town: Sikeston, Missouri


*KAUPP, CURTIS JAMES (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Curtis James Kaupp, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Kaupp distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 21 November 1968 while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. When his unit's forward operational base came under an intense enemy attack, Specialist Kaupp continuously held his position against the repeated attacks, enabling the remainder of his unit to reorganize and repel the attack. His valiant efforts prevented the enemy from overrunning the forward operational base, but in doing so, Specialist Kaupp was mortally wounded. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, First Cavalry Division, General Orders No 14687 (1968)
Born: July 5, 1947 at Gregory, South Dakota
Home Town: Gregory, South Dakota


KELLEY, WILLIAM D.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William D. Kelley, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Kelley distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 30 April 1968 while serving as Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 7812 (October 6, 1968)


KELLY, BILLY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Billy R. Kelly (US-54819252), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Sergeant Kelly distinguished himself by heroic actions on 19 December 1967, while serving as a Squad Leader with Company D, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, on a squad operation at Bo Tuc, Republic of Vietnam. Serving forward on a listening post, Sergeant Kelly was in command of six men. When a heavy Viet Cong mortar attack was launched upon the battalion perimeter, Sergeant Kelly provided an initial report on the source of the mortar rounds, thus enabling immediate counter mortar fire. Realizing that a huge enemy force was approaching the perimeter, Sergeant Kelly professionally directed artillery, air strikes, and gunship fire on the enemy locations. At times he called the bombardment in so close that his listening post received heavy amounts of fragments, repeatedly endangering his own life. Due to Sergeant Kelly's valorous actions, the main force of the enemy was eliminated prior to its arrival at the perimeter. He and his squad were credited with the destruction of the major part of the Viet Cong attack. Sergeant Kelly and his men were also responsible for silencing the enemy mortar tubes which were pounding the perimeter. Sergeant Kelly's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3978 (May 29, 1968)
Born: September 24, 1947 at Tiptonville, Tennessee
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


KEPHART, TIMOTHY G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Timothy G. Kephart, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for exceptionally valorous actions on 24 March 1967 while serving as team leader of a six man Special Forces reconnaissance team on a combat mission near Dak To. While deployed near a trail to observe enemy activity in the area, Sergeant Kephart detected two North Vietnamese soldiers moving toward his position. He calmly waited until they came within two meters of his position and jumped onto the trail. With his weapon aimed at the enemy soldiers, he ordered them both to stop. They attempted to shoot him, and one of his men, but he quickly killed one insurgent while a comrade shot the other. Sergeant Kephart moved to search the body for intelligence material but was forced to take cover under a savage barrage from a numerically superior hostile force advancing on his position. He saw one of his men wounded by the intense fire and completely ignored his own safety to move to his aid. With bullets striking all around him, he treated the casualty and carried him to safety. He called for rescue aircraft and personally carried the wounded man through a hail of automatic weapons fire to a landing zone. His fearless leadership enabled the team to escape the overwhelming enemy force in the face of grave danger.
RV, General Orders No: 6081 - (November 24, 1967)


KING, JACK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jack L. King, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 35th Artillery Regiment, 54th Field Artillery Group. Private First Class King distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during an attack on the American base camp at Xuan Loc, on 18 May 1969. Shortly after the compound came under intense mortar and rocket attack, the commander of an adjacent battery unit came to Private King's unit and requested volunteers to help evacuate wounded personnel a the other end of the compound. Without hesitation, Private King proceeded to the sector under heaviest attack and helped to transport injured personnel to the safety of a centrally located aid station. He then returned to his assigned sector which was under fire from hostile forces who had penetrated the perimeter, and attempted to aid a wounded vehicle driver. While in this attempt he was struck in the shoulder by small arms fire, but continued his effort to return the casualty to safety. Private First Class King's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2849 (July 25, 1969)


KNIGHT, MARION W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marion W. Knight (RA-25731229), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Staff Sergeant Knight distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 January 1968, while serving as Section Leader conducting night escort duties with his truck mounted M55 "quad fifty" machine gun, with Battery A, 4th Battalion, 60th Artillery. At 2255 hours the convoy control jeep hit a command detonated mine, injuring three men. Instantly, another mine was detonated, riddling the M55 machine gun and injuring Sergeant Knight. A Viet Cong reinforced squad simultaneously saturated the area with automatic weapons fire. Unhesitatingly, Sergeant Knight directed 8,500 rounds of .50 caliber retaliatory fire and, while still under intense hostile fire, quickly evacuated two of the three wounded men from the destroyed jeep. Upon returning to the jeep, he realized that the third man was gravely wounded and could not be moved. Sergeant Knight then removed his own protective vest and shirt, placed them on the wounded man for protection and immediately administered first aid. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he radioed for reinforcements and then directed a medical evacuation helicopter to a landing area by use of a flashlight. After the evacuation of the wounded personnel, Sergeant Knight quickly stripped all sensitive and useful materials from the jeep. Upon the arrival of reinforcements, Sergeant Knight rallied his men and continued his mission. Only after arrival at his destination did he report to the hospital for treatment of his wounded leg. Sergeant Knight's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, I Field Force, Vietnam, General Orders No. 246 (March 16, 1968)


KOBASHIGAWA, TOM YOSHIHISA (POW)
Blank: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Tom Yoshihisa Kobashigawa (RA-68076332), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for FOIA
Born: April 6, 1948 at Honolulu, Hawaii
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii
Personal Awards: Silver Star, Bronze Star, 2@ Army Commendation Medals, Prisoner of War Medal


*KOLKA, EDWARD LOUIS (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Edward Louis Kolka (US-56455755), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry division, in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 March 1968. On this date, Sergeant Kolka was serving as a squad leader for the point element of a company size reconnaissance in force operation south of Lai Khe. While moving through a dense vegetation they discovered a large enemy base camp. Suddenly, they were subjected to intensive small arms and automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Kolka unhesitatingly deployed his men and began directing devastating fire on the insurgents. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he ignored the hostile fire as he moved from position to position directing his men's fire. While moving toward a friendly position he noticed a wounded soldier lying in an exposed position. He continued to ignore the enemy rounds as he ran to his wounded comrade and dragged him to a position of safety. Returning to his squad, Sergeant Kolka discovered the heaviest fire was coming from a nearby enemy bunker. He crawled to within 20 meters of the bunker, threw two grenades inside and silenced the position. While moving toward a second bunker he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. His dauntless courage as demonstrated by his selfless sacrifice inspired his comrades who went on to rout the enemy force. Sergeant Kolka's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3317 (April 9, 1968)
Home Town: Hancock, Michigan


*KUBE, JOSEPH BERNARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Joseph Bernard Kube (0-5322552), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Kube distinguished himself by heroic actions on 2 April 1968, while serving as Company Commander for Company B, on a search and destroy operation in Binh Duong Province, Republic of Vietnam. When the company began receiving intense enemy sniper fire Captain Kube deployed his troops and called for helicopter gunships to strafe the area. He then maneuvered his platoons to engage the enemy positions and positioned himself at the front of his unit. Spotting a group of enemy troops fleeing the battle he directed his men against the insurgents and, although seriously wounded, succeeded in killing several of the Viet Cong. While still directing his men Captain Kube succumbed from his wounds. His valorous actions were responsible for the successful completion of the mission and the defeat of the enemy force. Captain Kube's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3603 (May 14, 1968)
Home Town: Warrens, Wisconsin


KUSHNER, FLOYD HAROLD (POW)
Blank: The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Floyd Harold Kushner, Lieutenant Colonel (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for FOIA
Born: June 30, 1941 at Danville, Virginia
Home Town: Richmond, Virginia
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, 3@ air Medals, Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


LACOMIS, JOHN S.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John S. Lacomis, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Lacomis distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2168 (May 10, 1968)


LAMBERT, NORMAN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Norman H. Lambert, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 September 1970. Sergeant Lambert distinguished himself while serving as Operations Sergeant of the 1st Battalion, 502 Infantry, Thua Thein Province, Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant was accompanying a rifle platoon when the forward element came under intense fire. The platoon medic stepped on a mine as he moved to the aid of the wounded pointman. Sergeant Lambert, with conspicuous disregard for his own life, he began maneuvering through the heavy volume of enemy fire to the aid of the wounded medic. He administered first aid under fire and began carrying the medic back through the mined area until he had the wounded man to cover. He then unhesitatingly returned through the mined area and enemy fire to recover the pointman. After applying first aid under direct fire from the enemy he carried the man to cover and safety. After he was satisfied that the wounded men were being taken care of he picked up his weapon and assisted in routing the enemy force and then called in the medevac helicopter. Sergeant Lambert's unselfish acts resulted in the saving the lives of the two men who would have otherwise died from their wounds. Sergeant Lambert's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


*LANDERS, EDMOND JOHN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Edmond John Landers (0-5320185), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division on 15 May 1968. On this date, Captain Landers was serving as the Commander of his unit on a reconnaissance in force mission near the village of Thu Duc. While moving through an area of thick vegetation, the friendly force was suddenly subjected to intense machine gun and automatic weapons fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force. The insurgents occupied a series of well-concealed and strongly fortified bunkers and all approaches to the hostile positions were covered by integrated patterns of fire. At the time of the initial contact, Captain Landers courageously led his men forward through the intense hostile fire. He ignored the enemy rounds hitting all around him as he moved from position to position checking for casualties and adjusting friendly artillery fire upon the well-entrenched insurgents. Captain Landers then led an assault across an open rice paddy and from this forward position he was able to direct effective fire on four enemy bunkers. He directed evacuation helicopters into the area to insure that t he wounded would be promptly extracted. Once again he reorganized his men and had them continue their assault. Moving through the area, destroying numerous enemy bunkers, Captain Landers suddenly spotted several Viet Cong about to fire from a pagoda. He shouted for his men to take cover but before he himself could reach safety, he was hit and mortally wounded. His selfless concern for the welfare of his men and gallant efforts undoubtedly saved numerous friendly lives and contributed significantly to the defeat of the large Viet Cong force. Captain Landers' unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5133 (May 30, 1968)
Born: July 7, 1937 at Ireland Home Town: Vacaville, California


*LARRABEE, STEVEN MICHAEL (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Steven Michael Larrabee (557725118), Warrant Officer (WO-1), U.S. Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Troop F, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Larrabee distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 24 March 1971 in the Republic of Vietnam. While on an aerial reconnaissance mission in heavily infested enemy territory, Warrant Officer Larrabee spotted an enemy bunker complex well-concealed by the jungle canopy. Disregarding the extreme danger of the hostile environment, Warrant Officer Larrabee descended into the area to collect valuable intelligence data for the accomplishment of the mission. Despite immediate enemy fire, Warrant Officer Larrabee, with complete disregard for his own safety, continued into the area and reported vital information to his headquarters. While performing his perilous duties in the face of extreme danger, Warrant Officer Larrabee's aircraft came under intense hostile fire from enemy rockets which caused the aircraft to crash. His gallantry in action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 8125 (April 25, 1971)
Home Town: Irvine, California


LAURICK, JOHN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John P. Laurick, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 24 June 1966. On this date, while on a search and destroy mission, Specialist Laurick's platoon moved past another element which had been hit with two claymore mines. In doing so, the platoon hoped to keep in contact with the Viet Cong snipers. As they moved about 100 meters past the stricken platoon, several Viet Cong claymore mines exploded. Specialist Laurick's platoon sustained three immediate casualties. At the same time the claymores were detonated, the men received automatic weapons as well as several small arms fire from the Viet Cong snipers in the area. Specialist Laurick, acting as squad leader of the third squad, moved his men on line and started to advance towards the Viet Cong position. The hostile fire intensified, forcing his squad to crawl forward. Displaying outstanding leadership at all times, he kept complete control over his men. Upon seeing one of the members of his platoon critically wounded, Specialist Laurick ran to his aid and carried him back to the rear for medical treatment. After returning to his squad, Specialist Laurick located a well entrenched Viet Cong machine gun position. With complete disregard for his own safety, he charged the position and successfully destroyed it with hand grenades. He then turned his attention to snipers concealed in the trees, killing two of them. After this he ran into the open, yelled to his squad to follow him, and spearheaded an assault into the insurgent positions. Specialist Four Laurick's unquestionable valor in close combat against superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


*LAWRENCE, JOHN WINSLOW, JR. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John Winslow Lawrence, Jr. (003-26-6246), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Major (Infantry) Lawrence distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 16 September 1971 while serving with Advisory Team 91, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Farmington, New Hampshire


LAWSON, WARREN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Warren L. Lawson, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action on 14 June 1967 during Operation Billings, Private First Class Lawson was serving as a Mortarman on a search and destroy operation in a Viet Cong infested jungle of War Zone D. When his unit became heavily engaged in battle with an insurgent force, air strikes were called onto the enemy position. During the battle, the forward element was in danger of being hit by the friendly air strikes because of a shortage of smoke grenades to mark their position. Private First Class Lawson volunteered to supply the vital grenades although a restrictive volume of machine-gun fire was being directed on his position by a Viet Cong who had broken through the friendly lines. Crawling toward the insurgent, he fired an accurate burst with his rifle, killing the enemy machine-gunner. Undeterred by the intensifying hostile fire, Private First Class Lawson ran to the lead element's position and marked its location. His display of courageous determination and devotion to duty saved numerous American lives and contributed to his unit's victory over the Viet Cong. Private First Class Lawson's unquestionable valor in close combat against hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Home Town: Ohio


LEWIS, FREDDIE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Freddie Lewis (RA-54344112), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Lewis distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as a Squad Leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, company A was on a mission to sweep through the village of Lo Giang and clear it of a reinforced Viet Cong battalion which threatened the vast military complex at DaNang. As the company maneuvered through an exposed rice paddy en route to the village, they came under intense mortar and small arms fire from an enemy force of undetermined size. Sergeant Lewis was close to the command group during this initial burst of fire, and by displaying professional competence he was able to maintain excellent control of his squad. With complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to the enemy fire as he helped assist the seriously wounded men back to the safety of the weapons platoon position. After deploying his men in a defensive perimeter, Sergeant Lewis made repeated trips into the open rice paddy to aid the wounded personnel. On one of these trips, he was severely wounded in the wrist. Refusing medical evacuation, he disregarded his painful wound to continue on with his mission. Sergeant Lewis was instrumental in saving many lives, and his encouragement contributed greatly to the morale of the men on the battlefield. Staff Sergeant Lewis' personal bravery, aggressiveness and determination, and deep dedication to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2737 (May 24, 1968)


LEWIS, MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Michael Lewis (RA-12771915), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for gallantry in actions. Sergeant Lewis distinguished himself by heroic actions on 11 March 1969, while serving with the 25th Military Police Company, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. The 25th Infantry Division Logistical Convoy came under an intense hostile attack. Spotting several enemy positions, Sergeant Lewis dauntlessly directed several armored personnel carriers against them. Seeing a wounded soldier stranded in the bullet-swept area, Sergeant Lewis, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to a heavy volume of hostile fire as he evacuated the wounded soldier to safety. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and the defeat of the hostile force. Sergeant Lewis' personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5558 (April 18, 1969)


*LIBBEY, MALCOM PIERCE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Malcom Pierce Libbey (RA-51293594), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while assigned to Advisory Team 86, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Libbey distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 12 October 1967 while serving as Light Weapons Infantry Advisor to the 4th Battalion, 50th Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, the battalion headquarters, Long An Province, came under attack from an estimated reinforced Vietcong company. At the onset, he moved to the advisory bunker with other members of the team. The bunker was the target of two accurately thrown hand grenades which exploded within the bunker causing serious wounds to Sergeant Libbey. Thinking that the other men in the bunker had all been killed, Sergeant Libbey, ignoring the extreme danger, moved from the bunker through the fireswept areas to the Assistant Battalion Advisor who was located in the team's quarters. Although seriously wounded, Sergeant Libbey assumed a position inside the house and provided covering fire as his comrade operated the only remaining radio. An enemy grenade detonated a short distance from his position causing even more severe wounds. Ignoring his multiple injuries, Sergeant Libbey continued to offer protective fire until a second grenade mortally wounded him. As a result of his extraordinary valor and absolute dedication to duty, the other team members were able to prepare a defensive perimeter and remove the wounded to a secure area. Sergeant Libbey's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflected great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 228 (January 28, 1968)
Home Town: Rockland, Maine


*LOOS, THOMAS W. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas W. Loos, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Loos distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 4 February 1968 while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Perryville, Missouri


*LOOS, THOMAS W. (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas W. Loos, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in Hue, Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Loos distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 4 February 1968 while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Cavalry Division, and the United States Army.
Home Town: Perryville, Missouri


*LOPP, JAMES LEONARD (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James Leonard Lopp (US-54808850), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Lopp distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, while on a search and destroy mission south of DaNang. At approximately 1230 hours, they came under intense enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire from a hostile force of estimated battalion size. Specialist Lopp immediately marked his position on the right flank of the element with a smoke grenade for their approaching gunships. He then proceeded to assist his gunner by supplying ammunition and by pointing out enemy positions for him. During this action, Specialist Lopp was wounded by small arms fire, but disregarding his injury and refusing evacuation, he fearlessly continued with his mission. When his platoon was ordered to pull back, Specialist Lopp took charge of the machinegun to provide fire cover for his comrades' withdrawal. While gallantly delivering accurate fire upon the enemy, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Lopp's personal bravery and avid devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 1285 (March 12, 1968)
Home Town: Scales Mound, Illinois


*LUTGE, THOMAS ALBERT (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Thomas Albert Lutge (RA-28179489), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 25 July 1968. Platoon Sergeant Lutge distinguished himself what serving as a Platoon Sergeant with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, on a combat operation in Hau Nghia Province, Republic of Vietnam. His company was transported by helicopters into a suspected enemy held area. As they moved out on the ground they made contact with an unknown size element of a North Vietnamese Battalion. Throughout the ensuing battle, Platoon Sergeant Lutge fearlessly moved among his men to direct their fire while repeatedly exposed to the intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. During the fire fight he personally saw to it that his men were constantly resupplied with ammunition. Then, seeing his platoon leader wounded, Platoon Sergeant Lutge moved forward to extract the injured man. As he moved forward he was mortally wounded by the enemy fire. Platoon Sergeant Lutge's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division, General Orders No. 8442 (October 28, 1968)
Born: July 2, 1937 at San Francisco, California
Home Town: San Francisco, California


*LUTZE, JOHN EDWIN (KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to John Edwin Lutze (US-54981165), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Lutze distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 November 1968 while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Born: September 6, 1948 at Flint, Michigan
Home Town: Flint, Michigan

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