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Citations For
U.S. Marine Corps 
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action During

The Korean War

 

Posted June 2008 - Next Scheduled Update: August 2008

Korean War Marine Corps Silver Star Citations
A-Z

 

 



ARKADIS, NICKOLAS DANIEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Nickolas Daniel Arkadis (0-49915), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in the Naktong River sector of Korea on 17 August 1950. On this date, while aggressively leading a rifle platoon in an attack against the enemy, Lieutenant Arkadis was struck in the arm by fragments from an enemy shell. Although painfully wounded he continued to lead his platoon until forced to stop due to loss of blood. His heroic actions, courageous leadership and devotion to duty contributed materially to the success of the attack. The gallantry displayed by Lieutenant Arkadis reflects great credit on himself and the United States Naval Service.
Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950)
Home Town: California
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Bronze Star w/V, Purple Heart


ARNOLD, MARION D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marion D. Arnold (668026), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea, on 26 September 1950. Private First Class Arnold was serving as a Squad Leader of a machine gun squad attached to a rifle platoon engaged in bitter house-to-house street fighting in the assault through the city of Seoul, Korea. He had his machine gun set up at a road block, and was delivering covering fire for the rifle platoon which was receiving heavy small arms and anti-tank gun fire. Unable to give the maximum effective fire from his position, he, upon his own initiative moved his gun across the street in the open, and in the zone of enemy fire from which he could deliver more effective fire on the enemy. An enemy anti-tank shell knocked him and his assistant gunner from their gun, seriously wounding the assistant gunner. Undaunted, and although still under heavy enemy small arms and anti-tank gun fire, Private First Class Arnold crawled back to his gun, placed it back in action and brought its fire to bear on the enemy, silencing the anti-tank gun and delivering such accurate fire that his supporting rifle platoon was enabled to successfully continue its advance. Private First Class Arnold's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


BENNETT, VERNON A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Vernon A. Bennett (657094), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, FMF, by firing on an enemy bunker in order that other landing craft could safely land. On the evening of 15 September 1950, on RED BEACH 1, Inchon, Korea, the landing boat in which Private First Class Bennett came ashore landing next to an enemy bunker, and all personnel were wounded with the exception of three men. Private First Class Bennett, an assistant machine gunner, came ashore regardless of the personal danger involved and set up his machine gun, without tripod, and began to fire on the bunker, pinning the enemy down. Due to his conspicuous gallantry, another boat was able to land troops who in turn destroyed the bunker. Private First Class Bennett performed the above action after having been painfully wounded by enemy gun fire. His display of alertness and gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the Naval Service.
Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950)
Home Town: South Bend, Washington
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


BENSON, KENNETH R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Kenneth R. Benson, Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with operations against the enemy while serving as Rifleman, Company F, Second Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in Korea on 28 November 1950. The company was tasked with securing the Tokong Pass and providing security along the road between Hagaru and Yudam- ni. Private First Class Benson was manning a listening post during the early morning hours with another Marine forward to the main line of defense when Chinese soldiers attacked the company's hill position in regimental strength. Private First Class Benson and the other Marine were returning to the company's defense perimeter when an enemy hand grenade landed near them. He picked it up and threw it back towards the enemy, but it exploded wounding and temporarily blinding him. Unable to locate the main line of defense, hand grenades, and mortar fire, he and the other Marine manned a dangerously exposed position at the head of the ravine, which led to the company's left flank and engaged the enemy. Although unable to use his weapon because of temporary blindness, he continuously reloaded the weapons of the other Marine to ensure accurate and effective fire at the attacking enemy, ultimately stopping the seizure of the top of Fox Hill. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, Private First Class Benson reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


BRENNAN, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James J. Brennan (1116751), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea, on 30 November 1950. Private First Class Brennan, serving as a Squad Leader, was assigned the mission of deploying his squad along a prominent terrain feature in hasty defensive positions. While moving his squad into position, he was subjected to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, from enemy positions approximately one hundred yards to the front of his defensive sector. Fearlessly exposing himself to direct enemy fire, he successfully positioned his squad and moved among them, directing their effective return fire and successfully repelled several attempted enemy attacks throughout the remainder of the night. In the early morning hours, when ordered to break contact and rejoin his company, he withdrew his squad, while under heavy enemy fire, to cover offered by terrain. While en route to his objective, a member of his squad was wounded by enemy fire and fell in an exposed position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he ran, in the face of enemy fire, to the wounded Marine, picked him up and carried him to a covered position. His leadership, initiative and actions were an inspiration to all members of his squad and undoubtedly saved the wounded Marine from receiving additional wounds. Private First Class Brennan's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


BRUMAGEN, ARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Arthur Brumagen (669182), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 7 November 1952. Although painfully wounded during the initial phase of an assault against an enemy hill, Corporal Brumagen unhesitatingly assumed command of the unit when the platoon commander was critically wounded and fearlessly led his men through devastating hostile small-arms and grenade fire to the crest of the hill. When ordered to withdraw, he skillfully organized the remaining members of his group, supervised the evacuation of the wounded and covered their withdrawal. Remaining in the area to assure that none of his men had been unknowingly left behind, he searched the entire sector before rejoining the platoon and refused medical treatment until he reached the aid station. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Brumagen served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 3908
Born: at Richmond, Kentucky
Home Town: Richmond, Kentucky


BULGER, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas E. Bulger (0-50747), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in Korea, on 31 January 1953. Serving as Platoon Commander of a reinforced unit during a raid against a strongly defended enemy position, First Lieutenant Bulger displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. During the advance, he fearlessly directed the assault in the face of heavy enemy resistance and expressed complete disregard for his personal safety in order to maintain the forward momentum. Advancing with the forward elements of the assault force, he moved through the intense fire of enemy machine guns, small arms and grenades. As he neared the crest of the objective, he was blown back by the detonation of a satchel charge thrown at him from the hostile trenches. Despite this and the intensified enemy fire, he continued the assault and maintained contact with the enemy for approximately fifty-five minutes. Having inflicted heavy casualties on the entrenched enemy he skillfully disengaged his unit and withdrew to friendly lines. First Lieutenant Bulger's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Staten Island, New York
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


CASTLEBERRY, WARREN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Warren E. Castleberry (1190604), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 October 1952. Serving as an anti-tank assault Squad Leader, Corporal Castleberry displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during an enemy attack on the company position. Upon seeing a group of wounded Marines, under direct enemy machine gun fire, he voluntarily led a three-man rescue team to their aid. After advancing through devastating hostile fire to the position, he found it impossible to evacuate the casualties because of the concentrated enemy fire in the area. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he positioned himself in an exposed area to draw the enemy fire and enabled the rescue team to remove the wounded Marines. He remained in his position, delivering rifle fire on the enemy machine gun emplacements, until the casualties had been evacuated. Corporal Castleberry's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CLARK, ALBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Albert L. Clark (0-11852), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Night Fighter Squadron during the withdrawal from Hagaru-ri, on 7 November 1950. As a Flight Leader of a night fighter flight in the vicinity of Hagaru-ri, in the early morning of 7 December 1950, Major Clark reported into the close air support control center, which was operating from radio jeeps in the 1st Marine Division convoy. At the time he reported into the control center, the convoy had been stopped by a well developed enemy roadblock. This roadblock was covered by mortar and machine gun fire interdicting the vehicles of the convoy. When acquainted with the extremely hazardous terrain conditions existing in the area, he executed four night close air support attacks, which successfully interdicted enemy troops moving up on the convoy. These troops moved to within thirty yards of the vehicles on the road. The extremely high degree of professional skill, determination, and courage possessed by Major Clark permitted him to press these night air attacks to within a distance of fifty yards of the friendly convoy. His personal courage, determination, outstanding leadership, and heroic actions throughout were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CONLIN, HENRY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Henry J. Conlin (0-53541), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 5 July 1952. Second Lieutenant Conlin was in command of approximately thirty men occupying an outpost forward of the main line of resistance. During the night the outpost was assaulted by a reinforced enemy company supported by artillery, mortar and heavy machine gun fire. As the enemy troops penetrated the position he led his men in repelling the assault with small arms fire and hand grenades at close range. He personally accounted for two of the twenty-eight enemy killed during the action, and directed mortar and artillery fire in close support of the surrounded outpost, preventing the enemy from reorganizing for a second assault. At one point during the night's action he received word that a portion of his position had been overrun. Without regard for personal safety he immediately moved to that part of the position, exposing himself all the way to enemy fire, and reorganized his force. When this had been accomplished he led his corpsman back over the same ground to care for the casualties. His expert leadership and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all the men under his command. Second Lieutenant Conlin's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CONSTANTINE, EDWARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Edward L. Constantine (0-44992), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Headquarters, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea. On 29 November 1950, the enemy attacked in battalion strength with one company in the assault against his platoon. Lieutenant Constantine's adjacent platoon was partially overrun. The enemy was actually in physical contact with the forward positions of his plat one. Lieutenant Constantine, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, moved among his fire teams and squads to supervise and direct their fire. By his own heroic efforts, the attack against his position was repulsed with terrific loss to the enemy in men and material. The gallantry displayed on this occasion by Lieutenant Constantine reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 73 (April 13, 1951)


COOPER, CHARLES G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles G. Cooper (0-50749), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 17 June 1951. Participating in an assault against an enemy hill position when his platoon was pinned down by devastating small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from a strongly entrenched hostile position, Second Lieutenant Cooper, after calling for and receiving a friendly air strike and artillery fire support, attempted to move his platoon forward but was again pinned down by fire from the same enemy position. With the advance of the entire company halted, he unhesitatingly charged through the hail of bullets and grenades with one other Marine and, upon reaching the enemy emplacement, hurled grenades through the embrasure, killing the occupants and silencing the fire. Severely wounded while engaged in this hazardous undertaking, Second Lieutenant Cooper, by his outstanding bravery and daring initiative, was directly instrumental in the seizure of the company's objective and served to inspire all who observed him. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


COOPER, LEON H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Leon H. Cooper (617603), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea, on 30 October 1951. Serving as Leader of a Rifle Squad, Sergeant Cooper displayed exceptional courage and initiative in leading his men on a daring patrol raid deep into enemy territory. Expertly maneuvering his squad in among strong enemy entrenchments, he exposed himself fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety to devastating enemy automatic weapons, small arms, and hand grenade fire, to skillfully position his men to isolate a sector of the enemy's fortifications, and then led the annihilation of the enemy troops in his trap. During the vicious engagement he personally killed ten of the enemy and wounded four with accurate rifle and hand grenade fire, and then expertly disengaged and returned to friendly lines, having killed sixty-five enemy, wounded thirteen, and destroyed twenty-five enemy bunkers, sustaining only one minor casualty among his men. His outstanding tactical ability and aggressive bravery were an inspiration to all who observed him. Sergeant Cooper's heroic leadership was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


COWIE, WILLIAM H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William H. Cowie, Jr. (0-57121), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 July 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Cowie displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When he was ordered to reinforce friendly elements on the main line of resistance, he exhibited exceptional qualities of leadership as he skillfully led his platoon forward and deployed it in the reinforcing position during an intense hostile mortar and artillery barrage. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously moved around the position demonstrating remarkable resourcefulness under the murderous enemy fire. His disregard for the hostile fire inspired his men to expose themselves in order to expedite the occupation of the new positions. On three separate occasions, he gallantly led a squad of men into enemy-held trenches in order to evacuate wounded Marines. On each occasion it was necessary to clear the enemy force from the position before the evacuation could be effected. During these evacuation missions, he killed at least six of the enemy in the extremely close fighting. Although he suffered painful wounds during the last attack, he refused evacuation and accepted only first aid treatment. Later in the night, he skillfully called friendly mortar fire upon the enemy which resulted in many casualties among the hostile force. Second Lieutenant Cowie's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CRAVEN, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William A. Craven (0-41500), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 4 December 1950. First Lieutenant Craven, serving as a Rifle Platoon Leader, was assigned the mission of rescuing a platoon of Marine engineers who were surrounded and cut off by the enemy in Sudong, Korea. He skillfully deployed his platoon and personally led an assault on a commanding hill infested with more than forty entrenched enemy troops. In the ensuing action, at least six enemy troops were killed and the remainder routed in disorder. This action enabled him to bring more effective fire to bear on the enemy entrenched on adjacent hills. While the engineers were clearing the area, he redeployed his platoon and repelled an enemy counter-attack. His initiative and coolness under fire served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were directly instrumental in enabling the isolated Engineer platoon to move to safety with a minimum of casualties. First Lieutenant Craven's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CULLUM, BILLY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Billy R. Cullum (1297201), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 18 April 1953. Serving as a rifleman, Private First Class Cullum displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was point man in a five-man rescue party in search of a casualty-ridden patrol that had been operating far forward of the main line of resistance. Despite conflicting reports as to the whereabouts of the stricken patrol, he demonstrated remarkable skill in finding the stricken unit. Noticing that nearly all of the members of the patrol were casualties, he immediately began administering first aid to the wounded men. When he discovered that several Marines of the patrol were missing, he courageously searched out the surrounding area despite the risk of possible capture or death. After learning that the missing men were on their way back to the main line of resistance, he volunteered to search for a second rescue party that was unable to locate the stricken patrol. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he gallantly moved alone through the darkness of no man's land, located the rescue party and guided them to the patrol. During the evacuation of the injured men, he assisted in carrying the wounded and their weapons. Private First Class Cullum's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


CURLEY, JOHN T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John T. Curley (1331353), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 - 27 March 1953. Serving as an automatic rifleman, Private First Class Curley displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. The unit of which he was a member was pinned down by devastating hostile fire during a counterattack on a vital enemy-held outpost position. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously raced to the forward elements of the unit to assist in gaining fire superiority over the enemy. Several times when he exhausted his ammunition, he obtained more from his injured comrades and continued firing. For a period of five and a half hours, he fearlessly exposed himself to intense enemy fire in order to bring his weapon to bear with deadly accuracy. When his unit was relieved from the action, he remained to assist in the evacuation of the wounded and refused to leave the area until he was assured that all of his comrades had been removed to safety. He withdrew from the scene of action in the rear guard in order to cover the unit with his weapon. Private First Class Curley's gallant and courageously actions together with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


DALEY, RICHARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard F. Daley (0-56483), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 24 to 27 July 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Daley displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched vicious attacks on friendly positions, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety by moving from one position to another in order to check the condition and welfare of his men. Despite devastating hostile mortar and artillery barrages, he gallantly continued to shout words of encouragement to his men and aid in the evacuation of the wounded. One night, he courageously led his men in a daring counterattack on a portion of friendly lines held by hostile troops. Exhibiting remarkable resourcefulness during the fierce encounter, he personally killed ten enemy and inflicted considerable damage on hostile equipment. When wire communications were severed by murderous enemy mortar and artillery barrages, he skillfully directed friendly mortar fire upon enemy installations and troop concentrations by using radio communications. The extremely well directed fire caused severe casualties and damage to hostile positions. His intrepid efforts aided immeasurably in repelling the large-scale enemy attacks against the position. Second Lieutenant Daley's indomitable spirit combined with his gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


DAVIS, WILLIAM J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William J. Davis (0-49480), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving a 60-mm. Mortar Section Commander of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), during operations against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 2 and 3 November 1950. Quick to act when his company was subjected to a strong hostile counterattack, First Lieutenant Davis immediately advanced to a forward position under intense enemy machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire and, remaining in his exposed position, called and adjusted accurate and effective mortar fire until the aggressors were repulsed thirty hours later. By his aggressive and determined leadership, fortitude and cool courage in the face of heavy odds, First Lieutenant Davis served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and his steadfast devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 10643
Home Town: Lynn, Massachusetts
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


DEEDS, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert D. Deeds (670763), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 23 September 1950. While his company was advancing in the attack on Seoul, Korea, the right flank platoon was pinned down by intense enemy small arms and machine gun fire from strong enemy positions. Corporal Deeds, serving as a Fire Team Leader, observing that his platoon could not move forward far enough to return effective fire without suffering excessive casualties, fearlessly and courageously moved forward alone and with his rifle fire and hand grenades personally destroyed two emplacements. This action allowed his fire team to advance and with well-directed fire and grenades, the fire team destroyed the remaining enemy right flank positions, and materially assisted the platoon in regaining the fire superiority and successfully continuing the attack. Corporal Deeds' display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


DOOLEY, ORIN W., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Orin W. Dooley, Jr. (1168653), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 March 1953. Serving as a Squad Leader in a platoon that was defending an outpost position forward of the main lines, Sergeant Dooley displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the outpost was subjected to intensive artillery and mortar fire, followed immediately by a savage enemy attack, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and moved about the position organizing the left flank after a partial breakthrough by the enemy. Although constantly exposed to the heavy enemy fire, he skillfully positioned additional men to reinforce the flank area. When the Platoon Commander became a casualty, he unhesitatingly assumed command of the supporting fire and directed it on key enemy targets. He called for artillery on the position and again jeopardized his own safety by moving through the area, warning and positioning the Marines for the forth coming artillery fire. When the friendly artillery fire had ceased, he fearlessly led his men in an attack on the overrun center positions of the outpost and completely routed the hostile forces. Sergeant Dooley's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


DRAPER, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard Draper (1118501), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Rifle Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 23 April 1951. Private First Class Draper displayed outstanding qualities of courage and skill in the performance of his duties. During repeated attacks by fanatical enemy forces, he repeatedly exposed himself to small arms and machine gun fire to carry ammunition up steep and mountainous terrain to the front line platoons. Arriving in the platoon area on one such trip, he observed that the platoon had been so depleted by casualties that no one was available to provide covering fire necessary to move a number of seriously wounded Marines through an exposed fire-swept area for evacuation to the rear. Unhesitatingly, he took charge of the men who were with him, and, moving three unmanned machine guns into a position vulnerable to enemy small arms and grenade fire, put them in action and delivered such a heavy and accurate volume of fire his wounded comrades were able to be successfully evacuated. Private First Class Draper's courageous actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


*DUNNE, CHARLES SHELBY (KIA)
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Charles Shelby Dunne (0-43895), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, attached to a Marine Infantry Company in Korea, on 27 June 1951. Serving as an Artillery Forward Observer, First Lieutenant Dunne displayed exceptional courage and initiative when the company was subjected to devastating enemy mortar fire. Although he was painfully wounded early in the barrage, he courageously refused to seek medical attention, advancing fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own safety through the heavy enemy fire to an exposed observation post in order to ascertain the enemy's mortar locations. He then remained in his exposed position and called in intense artillery fire which was so accurately adjusted that the enemy mortars were silenced, and the company was enabled to continue on its mission. His great personal bravery and unswerving devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. First Lieutenant Dunne's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea), 2@ Purple Hearts


*DUNNE, CHARLES SHELBY (KIA)
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Charles Shelby Dunne (0-43895), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, attached to a Marine Infantry Company in Korea, on 14 September 1951. While serving as an Artillery Forward Observer, First Lieutenant Dunne exhibited exceptional initiative and outstanding devotion to duty during an enemy counterattack. Noticing that an adjacent platoon, whose leader had been wounded and evacuated, was becoming disorganized and hard pressed, he immediately and fearlessly left his position of relative safety to assume command of the platoon. Quickly reorganizing the group and resupplying them with ammunition, he actively led a successful defense of the position while continuing to skillfully and calmly call in supporting fires. While thus engaged he was hit by enemy fire, and fell mortally wounded, gallantly giving his life for his country. His fearless leadership had so inspired the men of the platoon that all subsequent attempts by the enemy to retake the ground were hurled back. First Lieutenant Dunne's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea), 2@ Purple Hearts


DURHAM, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert S. Durham (1324098), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 - 27 March 1953. Serving as an automatic rifleman, Private First Class Durham displayed outstanding courage, initiative, and devotion to duty. While advancing in a counterattack against a vital enemy-held outpost, the unit was subjected to intense hostile small arms, mortar and artillery fire. He was the first man to reach the intermediate objective and when the foe charged under the barrage, he courageously stood up and brought devastating fire to bear on them, accounting for ten enemy killed. As the action became more intense, he fearlessly continued to expose himself in order to deliver accurate fire and hurl grenades. When given the order to withdraw, he took up a position at the rear of the unit so as to cover the evacuation of the many casualties. Private First Class Durham's gallant and courageous actions together with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


EASTMAN, THEODORE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Theodore Eastman (1241810), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 9 April 1953. Serving as a machine gun squad leader, Private First Class Eastman displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit defending a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance when it was subjected to a savage enemy assault. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously assisted his section leader in delivering a deadly hail of fire on the hostile troops. Although suffering intense pain as a result of wounds, he gallantly remained at his position despite the devastating enemy mortar, artillery and small arms fire falling around him. When the enemy penetrated the outpost perimeter and began to move in on the position, he dauntlessly removed the weapon from its tripod and fired from t he hip, delivering such a large volume of murderous fire that the enemy was driven from his position. Private First Class Eastman's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


ELLIOTT, BERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Bert L. Elliott (291533), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Weapons Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 28 and 29 November 1950. Technical Sergeant Elliott, regularly a heavy machine gun platoon sergeant, was in command of 28 men forming the right flank of a defensive line on a ridge, composed in whole of hastily assembled segments of various Army and Marine units. Strong enemy forces fiercely attacked the entire sector of this unit. Under pressure from enemy mortars, small arms fire, and grenades, all the units withdrew down the steep hill to his left flank, leaving this flank exposed. Realizing the vital necessity of holding the remaining key feature, which commanded a main part of the entire defense perimeter, Technical Sergeant Elliott was determined to hold his position despite the exposed flank caused by the withdrawal and the violent enemy fire. Without regard for his own personal safety, he went up and down his lines, rallying his men with encouraging words and urging the faltering ones to maintain their positions. Technical Sergeant Elliott further supervised and personally conducted the wounded from the hill and returned to his own position while under intense mortar and artillery fire. He further exposed himself to enemy fire and displayed a high degree of professional skill by calmly calling for, and observing artillery and mortar fire, which inflicted numerous casualties upon the enemy. The following morning the defense perimeter was shortened and his left flank was secured with a unit of fifty men. During the night his left flank was again exposed, due to extremely heavy enemy fire which forced members of that flank to withdraw to new positions. With his left flank exposed, he continued to expose himself without regard for his personal safety as he skillfully called for mortar and artillery fire and threw numerous hand grenades to prevent enemy from occupying high ground to the front. His brilliant leadership and undaunted devotion to duty were a great inspiration to his command and were directly responsible for their remaining in position. Technical Sergeant Elliott's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


EWERS, NORMAN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Norman G. Ewers (0-28152), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy, while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron at Hongchon, Korea, on 18 May 1951. As pilot of an unarmed helicopter, Captain Ewers flew into the midst of heavy front line concentrations of enemy troops to rescue a downed American pilot. When Captain Ewers was informed of the location of the downed airman, he knew he was taking a great personal risk in attempting to save him. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he volunteered his services for this mission of mercy. Upon approaching the area of the downed pilot, Captain Ewers received intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, which damaged his radio. With no means of communications, Captain Ewers continued the search for the downed pilot and located him with the assistance of friendly fighter cover. The enemy, by this time, were within a hundred yards of the downed airman. Unhesitantly, Captain Ewers flew his unarmed aircraft into the midst of the enemy, under continuous fire, and rescued the downed airman. Captain Ewers' conspicuous gallantry, initiative, and tenacious desire to save the life of the downed pilot is exemplary and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Tujungai, California
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


FICHTER, JOHN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John A. Fichter (355501), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 21 September 1950. During the attack by his company a fire fight developed with a strong enemy force who were occupying well dug in and camouflaged positions. Staff Sergeant Fichter, serving as a Platoon Sergeant, fearlessly and courageously led a fire team in an assault on the enemy positions but was driven back by numerically superior enemy forces. As the fire increased the company sought cover and called for friendly tank support. Staff Sergeant Fichter without regard for his own personal safety, courageously exposed himself and personally led the tanks forward, and by means of the tank-infantry telephone, directed effective tank fire on the enemy positions. By his courageous actions his company was materially aided in being able to move to higher ground and regain the fire superiority and continue the attack. Staff Sergeant Fichter's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FILE, FRED L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Fred L. File (1138535), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as a member of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, while serving with the FIRST Korean Marine Corps Regiment, in Korea, on 8 July 1951. Private First Class File displayed outstanding qualities of skill and courage in the performance of his duties as chief of an artillery forward observer team. When his unit, which was advancing against a heavily fortified enemy position, was hit by a savage counter-attack, it was forced to withdraw. As he moved to the rear with his team, he noticed that the field telephone used to contact the supporting artillery had been left behind. Completely ignoring the savage enemy fire, he ran forward to within 100 yards of the advancing enemy, retrieved the instrument, and returned unscathed to the new position. Through his courageous efforts, communication with the artillery was re-established, resulting in such a heavy volume of fire against the enemy that their advance was halted and a counter-attack mounted that completely routed them. Private First Class File's bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FINNESSEY, JAMES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James F. Finnessey (1132612), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 17 August 1952. Serving as a Tank Platoon Sergeant, Staff Sergeant Finnessey displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during a reinforcing action far forward of the main line of resistance. When a group of Marines on an outpost position was ambushed by an enemy force, he was assigned the mission of aiding in the relief. After driving the enemy soldiers off the forward slope, he maneuvered his tank to within one hundred and fifty yards of the entrenched enemy on the covered side and reverse slope of the outpost. To increase maximum fire power, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to employ his turret mounted anti-aircraft machine gun. During the action, he personally killed nine of the enemy soldiers and through his aggressive spirit, he served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Staff Sergeant Finnessey's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FLOOD, GEORGE G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George G. Flood (0-50214), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Rifle Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 11 March 1951. Second Lieutenant Flood was leading his platoon up a steep and narrow approach leading to a high heavily fortified ridge defended by a strong enemy force, when the company was pinned down by a devastating hail of fire. Unhesitatingly, he moved forward of the lines to reconnoiter, and, placing his attached machine guns to give maximum supporting fires, led his men in a charge against the enemy positions. As they neared the emplacements, they were met by withering machine gun and grenade fire and forced to take cover. Then, completely disregarding his own safety, he charged the enemy bunkers alone, hurling a volley of hand grenades which temporarily silenced their fire and enabled his platoon to renew the assault and overrun the positions. Second Lieutenant Flood's courageous actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FOLMAR, JESSE G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jesse G. Folmar (0-26438), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in aerial combat against the enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in Korea. On 10 September 1952, Captain Folmar led a two-plane flight of Marine attack aircraft that had been directed to strike a concentration of enemy troops near the town of Ch'Innamp'O, North Korea. As the flight approached the target area the conventional propeller type aircraft were suddenly attacked by eight hostile jet interceptors. Captain Folmar immediately initiated effective defensive measures so that he and his wingman could bring fire to bear on the enemy aircraft. Aggressively turning inside one of the superior hostile jets, Captain Folmar skillfully fired a burst from his guns that ripped into the side of the jet, causing it to burst into flames. The enemy pilot, his clothing ablaze, abandoned the flaming jet, which crashed into the Taedong estuary. As Captain Folmar turned to ward off another attack his aircraft was struck and critically damaged by enemy fire and he was forced to parachute. The hostile jets continued to make firing runs as he descended and landed in the water from which he was rescued by friendly forces. Captain Folmar's courageous conduct in the face of the enemy resulted in the complete destruction of a vastly superior hostile aircraft and contributed substantially to the safe return of his wingman. His heroic actions, outstanding airmanship and selfless devotion to duty throughout reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FORD, JETT T., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jett T. Ford, Jr. (0-53246), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea, on 24 November 1952. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Ford displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. Upon learning that a patrol of his unit was under attack by enemy forces, he voluntarily led a reinforcing and evacuation group tot heir aid. After arriving at the position, he went from man to man, moving the more seriously wounded to the center of the perimeter and giving encouragement and aid to the Marines. He directed and supervised the evacuation of the casualties as rapidly as possible and called and adjusted friendly artillery and mortar fire to protect the position. During this time, he was informed of two Marines who were still unaccounted for and refused to return to the outpost until he had conducted a thorough search for the missing men. During the search, one enemy soldier was killed while attempting to drag one of the Marine bodies away. After the successful completion of the search, he held the patrol intact to remove all friendly and enemy equipment and weapons. Only when daylight made his location untenable, did he consent to return to the combat outpost. Second Lieutenant Ford's inspiring leadership and aggressive spirit contributed materially to the success achieved by the patrol and his gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FOSTER, JOHN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John P. Foster (1151912), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 12 - 13 August 1952. Serving as a Company Clerk, Corporal Foster displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While attacking an outpost position far forward of the main line of resistance, a friendly unit was pinned down and isolated by devastating enemy mortar and artillery fire. He volunteered to organize teams of indigenous personnel and convey vitally needed supplies to the stricken unit. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he dauntlessly advanced through the intense hostile fire to deliver the sorely needed supplies. Throughout the night, he continued to make trips on the average of one every twenty minutes in order to make it possible for the friendly force he was supplying to conduct operations for at least twenty-four hours. On return trips he carried casualties to a point from which they could be safely evacuated. After several of these trips, he was seriously and painfully wounded and rendered temporarily deaf and blind. Upon recovery, he refused evacuation and resumed his mission of supplying the isolated friendly company. His initiative and determination in delivering supplies undoubtedly saved the stricken unit and was instrumental in repulsing the attacking hostile forces. Corporal Foster's gallant and courageous actions together with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


FREITAS, JOSEPH L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph L. Freitas, Jr. (0-20266), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron, in Korea, on 14 September 1952. Serving as a Helicopter Pilot, Major Freitas displayed outstanding courage, initiative and professional skill. Upon receiving an urgent request for a helicopter evacuation for a critically wounded Marine, he unhesitatingly left the main squadron base and flew through total darkness and intense fog to a position directly over the helicopter strip at the battalion command post. Despite the lack of communications and the increasing density of the fog, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and guided the helicopter to the invisible strip with only two ordinary flashlights as beacons. After receiving the casualty, he again took off in the fog and successfully evacuated the near-dead Marine. Major Freitas' gallant and courageous actions were instrumental in saving the man's life and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GARCIA, RUDY G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Rudy G. Garcia (659652), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in the Haktong River sector in Korea, on 3 September 1950. On this date, Private First Class Garcia, a Browning Automatic Rifleman, noticed a fire burning upon the forward part of a friendly tank. With complete disregard for his personal safety Private First Class Garcia exposed himself to heavy enemy sniper, machinegun, and anti-tank fire to warn the crew of the tank. While contacting the crew on the infantry phone in the rear of the tank, he was hit by enemy fire and wounded in the arm and hand. As a result of his heroic action the tank crew was able to extinguish the fire and the tank remained in action. The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Garcia reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950)
Home Town: Missouri


GARCIA-MORALES, RUBEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ruben Garcia-Morales (1259946), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 11 January 1953. Serving as a rifleman, Private First Class Garcia-Morales displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during an assault on a strongly defended enemy hill position. Before the squad reached the enemy trenchline, it was pinned down by intense automatic weapons and hand grenade fire. In order to prevent complete annihilation of his comrades, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and single-handedly advanced up the fire-swept slope. Although he was repeatedly forced back by the grenade fire, he eventually reached the trenchline and silence the enemy machine gun with two grenades. Despite the continued enemy fire, he remained in his hazardous position until he had covered the squad's withdrawal from the hill. Private First Class Garcia-Morales' gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GARST, MARSHALL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marshall L. Garst (1101836), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 20 to 24 July 1953. Serving as a Tank Commander, Sergeant Garst displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was assigned the difficult and hazardous mission of firing supporting fire for two Infantry Companies that were attacking two vital outpost positions located far forward of the main line of resistance. His tank firing position was located on the forward slope of a hill and was subjected to extremely heavy hostile fire from close range. While delivering fire at point-blank range, the tank suffered a power failure due to run down batteries. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he gallantly climbed out of his vehicle ignoring the murderous enemy artillery fire in order to hand-crank the tank's auxiliary generator which enabled him to charge the vehicle's batteries, start the engine and maintain communication and mobility. On another occasion, he was moving his tank into firing position when one of several direct hits knocked one of the tank's tracks partially off. Demonstrating remarkable resourcefulness under the deadly hostile fire and aware that the enemy had zeroed in on his vehicle, he courageously dismounted from his tank and guided the vehicle back on its track. During his exposure to the intense enemy fire, he was painfully wounded. As the tank was proceeding, it again became disabled and had to request aid. When two retriever tanks arrived, he refused to be evacuated and insisted on taking one of the vehicles into the firing position where he was able to deliver a large volume of devastating fire upon the attacking enemy. Throughout the fierce action, he was instrumental in inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy that was entrenched on the outpost positions. Sergeant Garst's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GASS, GEORGE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George H. Gass (1256257), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 26 - 27 March 1953. Serving as a fire team leader, Corporal Gass displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When his fire team reached the intermediate trenches en route to counterattack a vital enemy held outpost, the unit became pinned down by devastating enemy small arms, mortar and artillery fire. Although his helmet and weapon were blown from him during the initial barrage, he courageously moved about the area evacuating his wounded comrades. As he raced about the devastated area throwing grenades at the foe, he shouted words of encouragement to the men and skillfully directed their fire. Although painfully wounded, he continued to direct the evacuation of his injured comrades until he himself was finally taken from the position. Corporal Gass' gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GATZ, FRANK A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frank A. Gatz (11501121), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 24 to 27 July 1953. Serving as a Tank Commander, Staff Sergeant Gatz displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched a vicious attack against a friendly position, his vehicle was surrounded and physically assaulted by hostile troops. Ignoring the dangers involved, he unhesitatingly called fire upon his own position in an attempt to halt the savage assault. He gallantly held his isolated position and continued to deliver deadly accurate fire upon the onrushing enemy troops. His efforts aided immeasurably in repelling the tenacious enemy. Later, despite full knowledge that an enemy attack was impending, he fearlessly volunteered to take his vehicle to the aid of two disabled tanks located on the same strategic position where his vehicle had been assaulted two nights before. Upon arrival at the position, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and courageously dismounted from his tank under a murderous hail of hostile mortar and artillery fire in order to attach towing cables to the disabled vehicles. After he had ground guided the disabled tanks to a position of safety, he moved his tank into firing position and proceeded to deliver devastating fire upon the attacking enemy. When the enemy again surrounded his tank, he regained complete control of the situation and dauntlessly directed friendly artillery and mortar fire as well as flares and other tank fire upon his own position. When the savagely assaulting enemy attempted to climb inside his tank, he exhibited remarkable courage as he opened one of the tank's hatches and hurled grenades at the hostile troops, thereby dispersing them. Staff Sergeant Gatz' gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GEREVICS, EDWARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edward J. Gerevics (1136720), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 29 May 1951. Serving as a rifleman in a rifle platoon, Private First Class Gerevics was moving with the company in the assault of a series of heavily defended enemy positions when the unit was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage, causing many casualties. Courageously volunteering to man a machine gun when he learned that its crew had all been wounded, he fearlessly exposed himself to devastating enemy fire during the ensuing action to pour a large volume of accurate fire on enemy positions. Although he suffered a painful wound in the hand, he refused medical attention, continuing to give heavy supporting fire to the assaulting elements, pinning the enemy down an enabling his comrades to seize their objectives with a minimum of casualties. Only after the successful completion of his mission did he seek medical treatment for his wound. Private First Class Gerevicks' outstanding devotion to duty and heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GILLILAND, HAROLD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harold H. Gilliland (1117207), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Amphibian Tractor Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 24 December 1950. Serving as a crew chief of an amphibian tractor, Corporal Gilliland was assigned the mission of evacuating military personnel and material from Pink Beach at Hungnam, Korea. Upon the explosion of a nearby ammunition dump which severely wounded Corporal Gilliland, he courageously and with complete disregard for his own safety removed from several disabled tractors four wounded Marines. He then evacuated the wounded to the hospital ship refusing treatment for his own wounds until returning to his own organization. Corporal Gilliland's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


GILWEE, WILLIAM J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William J. Gilwee, Jr. (0-53548), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 23 December 1952. Serving as a Platoon Commander, First Lieutenant Gilwee displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While leading a combat patrol forward of the main line of resistance, he established contact with the enemy and was subjected to a devastating barrage of mortar and small arms fire. Although painfully wounded almost immediately he refused treatment and attempted to call friendly supporting fires on the enemy weapons. Again he was wounded and as a result of the action, several of his men had also become casualties. Despite the extreme pain resulting from his wounds, he ordered and directed the tactical withdrawal under fire and personally remained behind until he had assured himself that all of his men were on their way to the main lines. When the patrol reached the main line of resistance, he made certain that t he wounded men were given immediate treatment before he would accept personal aid. First Lieutenant Gilwee's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GLADU, JOHN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John A. Gladu (1224687), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea, on 4 - 5 September 1952. Serving as a Squad Leader on a combat outpost, Private First Class Gladu displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the position was subjected to intense enemy artillery and mortar fire followed by two ruthless enemy ground attacks, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and moved about the position firing on the enemy and throwing hand grenades. He shouted words of encouragement to his comrades and fearlessly exposed himself to the assaulting troops, in order to deliver covering fire to enable a friendly listening post, cut off by the attack, to return to the perimeter of defense. As the enemy artillery and mortar fire increased in intensity, he unhesitatingly crawled through the blanketing fire to help a critically wounded Marine. Private First Class Gladu's selfless act was instrumental in saving his comrade's life and his gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GLATZ, GEORGE J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George J. Glatz, Jr. (557470), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Rifle Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Northeastern Korea, on 9 December 1950. As a Squad Leader in a Rifle Platoon, Sergeant Glatz was assigned the mission of assaulting and seizing a sector of commanding ground overlooking the Main Supply Route near Koto-ri, Korea, which was defended in strength by well-entrenched Chinese Communist enemy forces. With a high degree of courage and skill, he led his men up the face of the treacherous, snow-covered approaches against fierce enemy grenade, rifle and machine gun fire. Although suffering ill effects of extreme cold and prolonged exposure under extremely adverse combat conditions and greatly out numbered by enemy forces, Sergeant Glatz with his depleted squad of only six men repeatedly assaulted, seized and destroyed four heavy machine gun emplacements, killing or capturing more than twenty-five of the enemy. He personally led each assault, skillfully maneuvering his men over the precipitous snow-covered approaches, reorganizing and rallying his men after each assault. The success of his mission contributed materially to the safe withdrawal of the Division elements from the Koto-ri area. Sergeant Glatz's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GOLDSBY, JAMES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James A. Goldsby (566673), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 6 June 1951. Serving as Platoon Sergeant of a Rifle Platoon, Sergeant Goldsby was moving with the platoon in the attack of a heavily fortified enemy hill position when the unit was subjected to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, causing several casualties, including the Platoon Commander. Unhesitatingly assuming command, and despite the fact that he himself had been painfully wounded, he skillfully reorganized the platoon and led it aggressively forward through the heavy fire and routed the entrenched enemy. His initiative and courageous leadership were an inspiration to all who observed him, and aided materially in the success achieved by the company. Sergeant Goldsby's inspiring and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


GOODWIN, DORRIS L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Dorris L. Goodwin (1172347), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 6 October 1952. Serving as an automatic rifleman, Private First Class Goodwin displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of the defending force on an outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, when the enemy launched a determined assault accompanied by a devastating barrage of mortar and artillery fire. As the enemy troops neared the position, he found that only he and one other Marine were left to defend the left flank, but with complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved forward to an exposed position from which he delivered deadly fire on the advancing foe. As the attackers entered the friendly trenches and attempted to move through the position, he unhesitatingly moved to more exposed areas and continued to sweep the enemy with killing fire until he forced them to abandon their assault. Private First Class Goodwin's stamina and aggressiveness served as an inspiration to all who observed him and his gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


GRAY, HAROLD Z.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harold Z. Gray (0-38165), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while participating in aerial flight against the enemy as a member of a carrier-based Marine attack squadron in Korea. On 24 February 1953, Captain Gray participated in the rescue of a downed Marine aviator who was surrounded by enemy troops deep in hostile territory. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Gray conducted numerous daring minimum altitude strafing assaults, intentionally drawing the heavy hostile fire away from the downed pilot. Although his own aircraft was severely damaged by enemy fire, he continued to skillfully maneuver his aircraft at low level through the intense and accurate barrages of anti-aircraft fire, and succeeded, on several occasions, in completely suppressing all ground fire directed at the downed aviator. After expending his remaining ordnance, Captain Gray, ignoring the battle damage to his aircraft, conducted repeated dummy strafing runs at the enemy positions despite the increasingly accurate fire that was bursting all around his aircraft. Dangerously low on fuel, he remained in the area until relieved by another flight of Marine attack aircraft. His heroic actions in subjecting himself repeatedly to hostile fire and his exemplary initiative were responsible for the success of a mission that saved the life of a fellow Marine and inflicted heavy enemy casualties. Captain Gray's courageous conduct, superb airmanship and steadfast devotion to duty throughout reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HAFFEY, EUGENE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Eugene H. Haffey (0-17254), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from 18 January to 2 June 1951. With his company assigned the mission of attacking and seizing a heavily defended and well-fortified enemy position in the vicinity of Hwachon on 28 May, Captain Haffey expertly directed a brilliantly executed attack to overcome all hostile resistance despite constant small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire. After seizing the assigned objective, he promptly reorganized his company and continued to hold the position against numerically superior counterattacks throughout the night and early morning. By his determined and inspiring leadership, bold tactics and superb courage in the face of heavy odds, Captain Haffey contributed materially to the rapid and successful accomplishment of his company's missions throughout this period of intensive combat and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD, 1st Marine Division, Serial 23888


HAKALA, EDWIN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edwin W. Hakala (0-49700), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 10 June 1951. First Lieutenant Hakala, serving as a forward observer attached to a Marine Infantry Company, displayed outstanding skill, courage and initiative in the performance of his duties. The company to which he was attached was halted momentarily by rigid resistance from a fanatically determined enemy during an assault. Moving with the forward elements of the company, he was painfully wounded by enemy mortar fragments, but steadfastly refusing evacuation, he continued in the attack. He fearlessly called artillery fire on the enemy strong points so effectively that the attacking company was able to seize its objective despite the fact it was fiercely defended by an estimated enemy battalion. His aggressiveness and high professional skill served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by the company. First Lieutenant Hakala's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


HALL, EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Eugene Hall (1295044), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 28 March 1953. Serving as an ammunition carrier, Private First Class Hall displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. Although the mortar section with which he was serving had not been committed to action, he assisted in treating and evacuating the wounded Marines. Seriously wounded, he courageously continued to administer aid to his injured comrades. Weakened as a result of his wounds, he personally carried an unconscious and wounded man from an outpost position located far forward of the main line of resistance back to the safety of the front lines. When the relief of the company was finally effected, his wounds required immediate attention and he was evacuated. Private First Class Hall's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HANLON, EDMUND W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edmund W. Hanlon (0-49703), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 28 November 1950. Second Lieutenant Hanlon was serving as a rifle platoon commander when his sector of the defense line was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force employing small arms, machine guns, grenades and mortars. During the entire engagement, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire to move among his men directing and supervising their accurate and effective fire. When the exchange of fire became point blank and the enemy had penetrated a portion of his position, with complete disregard for his own personal safety and in the face of enemy fire, he moved among his platoon's front, to its flanks and along its rear encouraging his men to greater efforts. On one occasion, he personally engaged the enemy with his sub-machine gun and killed seventeen and wounded many others. His display of leadership and initiative were an inspiration to all members of his platoon and materially contributed to the successful repelling of the enemy attack. Second Lieutenant Hanlon's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HARTER, GEORGE F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George F. Harter (1095182), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 17 May 1951. Corporal Harter, a rifleman, was manning a position in the company defensive perimeter when the enemy launched a fanatical attack with overwhelming numbers. Completely ignoring the withering hail of small arms and machine gun fire, he repeatedly exposed himself to fire accurate volleys with his rifle, killing or wounding many of the enemy who were attempting to overrun his sector. When his squad was taken under heavy fire by an enemy machine gun, he and another member of the squad left their foxholes and fiercely assaulted it, killing the crew and capturing the weapon. Corporal Harter's courageous actions contributed materially to the successful repulse of the enemy attack, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HELGESON, WILLIAM A., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to William A. Helgeson, Jr. (1117913), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, near Taebong-ni, Korea, on 17 August 1950. On this date, during the course of an attack, Private First Class Helgeson's platoon leader became a casualty and he, upon his own initiative, secured the platoon commander's radio and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, proceeded to request and direct mortar fire upon enemy machinegun positions. He continuously relayed messages to other units of his company from higher authority. During this time Private First Class Helgeson also directed the evacuation of the wounded men in his area. Although he was in an exposed position under direct enemy machinegun and mortar fire he did not leave his post until ordered to do so. The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Helgeson reflects credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950)
Home Town: Texas


HENDERSON, CURTIS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Curtis R. Henderson (661679), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for gallantry in action while serving with Company F, FIRST Marine Division, FMF, by carrying ammunition through heavy gun fire to a gun position. On 21 September 1950, Private First Class Henderson, under extreme fire, carried ammunition to a BAR gun position, exposing himself to heavy enemy fire. Upon reaching the BAR's position Private First Class Henderson found the gunner wounded and manned the BAR himself to assist in destroying of an enemy machine gun unit on the extreme right front of his battalion. Private First Class Henderson received shrapnel wounds in the hand. His display of gallantry reflects great credit on himself and the Naval Service.
Headquarters, X Corps, General Orders No. 5 (September 27, 1950)
Home Town: Wilmington, Delaware
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


HENRY, JOHN O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John O. Henry (1043046), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 27 November 1950. Serving as leader of a machine gun section, Sergeant Henry displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the performance of his duties when the company was attacked during hours of darkness by a large enemy force. Exposing himself without regard for his personal safety to devastating enemy automatic weapons, hand grenade, and small arms fire, he fearlessly moved through the position during the vicious attack to encourage his men and direct their fires. When the enemy managed to reach to within a few yards of his guns, he courageously remained in exposed positions to beat them back, employing hand grenades and his rifle with telling effect. Throughout the night-long attack he refused to seek safety for himself, continuing steadfastly to direct the defense of his sector, and ultimately routing the enemy with heavy losses. His inspiring leadership and outstanding devotion to duty aided immeasurably in the successful defense of the strategic ground. Sergeant Henry's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HEPLER, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert D. Hepler (647176), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 6 December 1950. Sergeant Hepler, serving as a machine gun squad leader, had his squad positioned on an icy snow-covered ridge when the company's position was assaulted by approximately a battalion of enemy forces near his position. The enemy placed two 60-mm. mortars and one light machine gun into support of their attack and began firing. Due to a small rise in ground in front of his machine gun, the enemy was masked from the fire of his gun. On his own initiative, he crawled through the snow under heavy automatic and small arms fire to the rise of ground in enemy territory. Reaching this vantage point, he stood up and sprayed the enemy mortar and machine gun positions with his sub-machine gun, thus neutralizing the enemy positions. Returning to his squad through constant enemy small arms fire to replenish his ammunition and displace the machine gun, he enemy machine gun once again commenced firing. He returned over the same enemy fire-swept area and single-handedly put the enemy machine gun completely out of action. His outstanding display of initiative and courageous leadership, without regard for his own personal safety, inspired all who observed him and materially aided in the defense of his company's position. Sergeant Hepler's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HORGAN, RAYMOND M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Raymond M. Horgan (1116447), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 29 November 1950. Private First Class Horgan was a member of a provisional infantry platoon which had been ordered to reinforce a Marine Infantry Company in assaulting and securing Hill 1449 near Hagaru-ri, Korea. When a machine gun on the enemy side of the crest of the hill was captured and being used to place accurate fire on the enemy, the gun developed a stoppage and seven of the nine Marines protecting the gun were wounded. Despite the fact that the machine gun was subjected to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire and he had no previous experience as a machine gunner, Private First Class Horgan voluntarily exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and assumed the duties as gunner. After clearing the stoppage in the gun, he remained in the exposed position and placed accurate and effective fire on the numerically superior enemy throughout four coordinated enemy attacks, inflicting many casualties among the enemy. Despite the sub-zero temperatures and the heavy enemy fire, his actions were an inspiration to all who observed him and were directly instrumental in denying the enemy the highest portion of the hill thereby preventing the enemy from penetrating the defense perimeter. Private First Class Horgan's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HOUGH, BRUCE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Bruce B. Hough (563481), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 3 November 1950. Private First Class Hough was acting as a mortar crewman when his position was attacked by a large enemy force which was able to place a machine gun within 25 yards of his position. Without regard for his own personal safety and despite the intense enemy machine gun, small arms, and hand grenade fire, he courageously charged the enemy position and succeeded in destroying the enemy emplacement with hand grenades. He then fearlessly took up an exposed position and placed such accurate and devastating fire that his squad was able to regain fire superiority and force the enemy to withdraw. His courageous and aggressive actions were an inspiration to all men of his squad. Private First Class Hough's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


HRUSCHANKO, JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John Hruschanko (1071270), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Weapons Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 7 December 1950. Private First Class Hruschanko, serving as an ammunition carrier in the assault platoon of Weapons Company and while under concentrated enemy mortar and small arms fire, although wounded, left his covered position to carry a wounded Marine to his foxhole where he administered first aid. With complete disregard for his own personal safety he refused medical attention for himself, and upon learning that a machine gunner had become a casualty, he courageously manned the machine gun and delivered such accurate fire that the enemy was forced to seek cover, thereby enabling his company to successfully withdraw to a more favorable position. His actions throughout were an inspiration to all who observed him, and materially aided his company in repulsing the enemy attack. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


*HURSEY, JANS F. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Jans F. Hursey (1072029), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Rifleman in Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 23 September 1950. During his platoon's assault on a heavily-fortified enemy position, Private First Class Hursey repeatedly subjected himself to hostile fire in order to deliver more accurate and effective fire upon an enemy machine-gun nest. Diverting the fire of the hostile machine gun to his own exposed position to facilitate his platoon's advance, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. By his courageous actions, he materially aided his platoon in maintaining fire superiority and in successfully completing its assigned mission. His fortitude, initiative and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Hursey and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Born: at Slidell, Louisiana
Home Town: Slidell, Louisiana


HUTCHINSON, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William E. Hutchinson (0-51945), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 24 May 1952. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Hutchinson displayed exceptional courage and professional skill while participating in a combat patrol While leading his platoon up the forward slope of the enemy position he was wounded in the arm and leg by an exploding mine. Disregarding his painful wounds and refusing medical attention, he continued to expose himself to enemy fire in order to direct his platoon in the attack. After the enemy had been routed he allowed a corpsman to treat his wounds, but refused evacuation until he had directed the withdrawal of his platoon to friendly lines. His leadership and selfless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Second Lieutenant Hutchinson's courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


IVERS, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John J. Ivers (654965), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 3 November 1950. As a Radio Operator attached to a Rifle Company, Corporal Ivers has consistently performed his duties in an outstanding manner, displaying at all times a high degree of professional skill and courage. During darkness on 3 November 1950, Corporal Ivers was in position at the Company Command Post when it was brought under heavy attack by enemy forces using small arms, automatic weapons, grenades and mortars. Corporal Ivers turned his radio over to another qualified operator and joined in the defense of the Command Post. With absolute disregard for his safety, he continually exposed himself to enemy fire in order to bring accurate fire to bear on enemy positions. When a group of the enemy was discovered moving up a covered route leading to high ground which overlooked the Command Post, Corporal Ivers voluntarily and on his own initiative, collected all available hand grenades and moved alone to the high ground in order to intercept the enemy. During the battle he personally killed sixteen of the enemy and destroyed one enemy machine gun. His daring and aggressive action aided materially in the successful defense of the Command Post and were a source of inspiration to all members of the Command Post. Corporal Ivers' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


JENKINS, DAVID C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to David C. Jenkins (331749), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 25 September 1950. Corporal Jenkins was serving with a rifle platoon which was proceeding forward for the attack as the advance guard of his company. Suddenly the platoon received heavy enemy small arms and machine gun fire and was forced to take cover. During the time the order was passed to withdraw, Corporal Jenkins and a hospital corpsman were administering aid to two seriously wounded Marines. Disregarding the order to withdraw, he and the hospital corpsman fearlessly remained at the side of the two wounded Marines and continued administering aid. They then protected them by firing their own weapons until members of their platoon came forward and laid down a smoke screen so that Corporal Jenkins and the hospital corpsman could successfully evacuate the two wounded Marines. By this action, the wounded Marines were materially aided in receiving medical attention much earlier than would have otherwise been possible. Corporal Jenkins' display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


JOHANSEN, PETER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Peter J. Johansen (1099344), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Tank Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 17 August 1952. Serving as a Tank Section Leader, Staff Sergeant Johansen displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty during a reinforcing action far forward of the main line of resistance. When a group of Marines on an outpost position was ambushed by an enemy force, he was assigned the mission of delivering close fire support for the infantry aiding in the relief. When he saw the enemy reinforcing their positions, he maneuvered his tank to within one hundred and fifty yards of the hostile troops. In this area, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and unhesitatingly exposed himself to the intense enemy artillery, mortar and small arms fire in order to employ his turret mounted anti-aircraft machine gun. During the action, he personally killed thirteen of the enemy soldiers and through his aggressive spirit, he served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Staff Sergeant Johansen's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


JOHNSON, EDMUND E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edmund E. Johnson, Jr. (0-56939), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 24 July 1953. Serving as a Platoon commander, Second Lieutenant Johnson displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While his platoon was supporting by direct fire an outpost position that was being assaulted by the enemy, his main battery position was subjected to murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he gallantly exposed himself to the deadly hostile fire in order to insure the expeditious evacuation of the platoon's casualties and to check on the welfare of his men. Despite having been twice thrown to the ground by the dangerously close explosions of hostile shells, he courageously continued to tour his position in order to keep close contact with his men, insure that the automatic weapons were continuously manned, and that communications were rapidly restored when disrupted. When a machine gunner became a casualty and there was no replacement immediately available, he skillfully manned the weapon and fired at targets of opportunity that were delivering fire upon friendly positions. His intrepid efforts, indomitable spirit and remarkable resourcefulness under fire served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Second Lieutenant Johnson's gallant and courageous actions combined with his determined aggressiveness were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


JOHNSON, HOMER E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Homer E. Johnson (0-52082), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 July 1952. Serving as a leader of a combat patrol, Second Lieutenant Johnson exhibited exceptional heroism and devotion to duty. After directing an assault upon a strongly fortified enemy position, he learned that a member of the patrol was missing. With no concern for his personal safety, he exposed himself to enemy small-arms, grenade and mortar fire in an effort to locate the man. Arriving back at the main line of resistance, he immediately sought permission to lead a patrol back to the scene to find the body. He fearlessly led the patrol to the area and located the body. Before being able to carry the body back to friendly lines, the patrol was subjected to intense enemy fire and forced to place the body in a position which enabled another patrol to remove it the following day. Second Lieutenant Johnson's selfless devotion to duty and intrepid leadership were an inspiration to all who observed him. His heroic and gallant actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


JOHNSON, VICTOR E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Victor E. Johnson (0-34367), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Service Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Hagaru-ri, Korea, on the night of 29 to 30 November 1950. First Lieutenant Johnson, with his Division Salvage Section, was occupying a hastily organized and lightly defended sector of the Hagaru-ri perimeter which was being subjected to intense enemy mortar fire. As the main enemy efforts developed, overrunning an outpost a few yards in front of his lines, friendly troops came running down the steep slopes leading to his position followed at a few feet by enemy soldiers armed with automatic weapons and grenades. Despite the heavy fire and darkness, First Lieutenant Johnson, completely disregarding his own safety, stood by one of his sand-bagged gun emplacements and identified the Marines until the last one had entered the perimeter. Then, with skilled accuracy, he threw several grenades into a closely following group of the enemy, silencing their automatic weapons and averting a break-through. For a period of several hours, he continued to direct the defense of his sub-sector. His constant circulation among his men and inspiring display of outstanding courage contributed materially toward enabling his platoon to successfully defend their sub-sector of the perimeter. First Lieutenant Johnson's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


KRAUS, GERALD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gerald A. Kraus (669302), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, during the period 1 November 1950 to 1 December 1950. As a fire team leader of a rifle squad, Private First Class Kraus continually performed his duties in an outstanding and aggressive manner under conditions of extreme hardship. On 26 November 1950, when his platoon, in the assault against a numerically superior enemy force, was counterattacked fiercely from the front and left flank, Private first Class Kraus, with utter disregard for his personal safety, voluntarily and fearlessly charged forward in the face of intense enemy fire and well into the enemy lines to rescue a wounded Marine. In so doing, Private First Class Kraus, was painfully wounded in the face. In spite of the fact that he was temporarily blinded, he found his way back to his platoon, and brought the wounded Marine back to safety. His courage, coolness, and fortitude was a great inspiration to the officers and men of his entire company, and undoubtedly saved the wounded Marine's life. Private First Class Kraus' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


LEE, CALVIN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Calvin E. Lee (511010), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 8 December 1950. Staff Sergeant Lee was the Platoon Sergeant of a rifle platoon which was spearheading a drive along the road south of Koto-ri, Korea, when the forward elements of his platoon were hit from three directions by heavy and accurate enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire and were pinned down. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he left his covered position and moved forward under heavy fire with his platoon leader to reconnoiter an avenue of approach to the enemy position. Upon encountering an enemy machine gun nest, he assisted his platoon leader in knocking out the gun with hand grenades. Later in reconnaissance, the platoon leader was killed and Staff Sergeant Lee was wounded. Despite his wounds, he refused treatment and evacuation until the platoon was reorganized and placed in charge of the adjacent platoon leader. His coolness and courage under fire, stamina and fortitude, even though wounded, were an inspiration to all members of his platoon. Staff Sergeant Lee's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


LEISTER, ROBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert J. Leister (0-55820), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 26 to 30 March 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Leister displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When assigned the mission of reconnoitering and determining the enemy strength of a friendly combat outpost that had been overrun by hostile troops a few hours earlier, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and skillfully maneuvered his platoon to within fifty yards of the position. He proceeded to harass the enemy with grenades and sniper fire and when he received no further instructions from the main line of resistance, he, on his own initiative, decided to continue the harassment until daybreak. Throughout the remaining hours of darkness, he personally led small groups to within grenade range of the hostile position and directed such effective fire that the enemy could not prepare adequate defensive position. As daybreak approached, he skillfully withdrew the platoon to the main lines. Later in the morning, he was assigned the mission of counterattacking the same outpost, this time as an integral part of his company. Brought under murderous enemy fire during the advance, he fearlessly continued to move forward until relieved by another unit. Throughout the entire period, he exposed himself in order to offer advice and encouragement to the Marines. Second Lieutenant Leister's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


LEVESQUE, JOSEPHAT N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Josephat N. Levesque (129429), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 - 27 March 1953. Serving as a machine gun ammunition carrier, Private First Class Levesque displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. While participating in a counterattack on a vital enemy-held outpost, the unit of which he was a member was pinned down by a devastating hostile mortar and artillery barrage. When one of his comrades was severely wounded, he courageously removed his helmet and put it on the head of the injured man. In order to shield his comrade from further injuries, he fearlessly covered the man with his body until he himself was wounded and rendered unconscious. His intrepid deed and willingness to sacrifice his life for that of a comrade served as an inspiration to all who observed him. Private First Class Levesque's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


LUBKA, BASILE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Basile Lubka (0-50285), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against the enemy near Wonju, Korea, on 11 June 1951. Serving as a rifle platoon leader, First Lieutenant Lubka was given the mission of assaulting Hill 721, then occupied by a large enemy force which had successfully repulsed several previous attacks. Skillfully deploying his platoon, Lieutenant Lubka led his men through an intense hail of enemy fire, until the accurate fire from a hidden enemy machine gun forced his unit to seek cover. Without regard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Lubka exposed himself in order to locate the gun emplacement, and quickly destroyed it. This action enabled the platoon to continue the assault and seize the objective. The gallantry and courageous leadership displayed by Lieutenant Lubka on this occasion contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission, and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters: X Corps, General Orders No. 175 (August 16, 1951)
Home Town: Ohio


LUEDDEKE, GUSTAVE F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gustave F. Lueddeke, Jr. (0-29711), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron in Korea on 27 and 28 September 1950. As the pilot of an unarmed helicopter, First Lieutenant Lueddeke made seven flights over enemy held territory to evacuate fourteen United States Army personnel that were isolated from friendly forces by an enemy ambush. Upon learning that a unit of the First Army Cavalry Division had been ambushed and sustained several serious casualties, he volunteered to fly to the area and aid in their evacuation. Although the area was forty-five air miles from his base, and regardless of his own personal safety, he successfully completed his voluntary mission, thereby saving the lives of the wounded United States Army personnel. His actions and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all members of his squadron. First Lieutenant Lueddeke's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MARTIN, W. L.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to W. L. Martin (298134), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Section Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 28 May 1951. With his company assaulting a heavily fortified and numerically superior hostile force deeply entrenched on Hill 659 near Inje, Sergeant Martin unhesitatingly maneuvered his section forward and joined the point platoon. Braving intense small-arms, grenade, and automatic-weapons fire, he skillfully deployed his men and supervised their attack against the outnumbering force and, in addition, voluntarily undertook the observation and direction of the 60-mm. mortar platoon's fire. By his decisive and aggressive actions, courageous leadership and heroic efforts, Sergeant Martin was in large measure responsible for the success of his company in the infliction of many casualties upon the aggressors, and his staunch devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 23888
Home Town: Dallas, Texas
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


MCDURMIN, RICHARD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard E. McDurmin (587456), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, near Seoul, Korea, on 2 October 1950. Private First Class McDurmin serving as a Platoon Runner, voluntarily and courageously went through enemy small arms and machine gun fire to help remove wounded Marines of an adjacent platoon to covered positions. Upon the successful evacuation of all the wounded Marines he personally reorganized the remaining members of the adjacent platoon and fearlessly led them in the assault against well-entrenched enemy forces. His display of initiative and leadership materially aided in successfully accomplishing its assigned mission. Private First Class McDurmin's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MCELREA, LAWRENCE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence W. McElrea (1070084), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company, of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 6 June 1951. Serving as a Fire Team Leader in a Rifle Platoon, Corporal McElrea was moving with the platoon in the attack of an enemy hill position defended by a large enemy force in strong emplacements, when the unit was subjected to devastating enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. When he observed that a member of his fire team had been wounded and was lying in an exposed position, and realizing that a corpsman was not nearby, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own safety rushed to his comrade's side and dragged him to a covered position, administering first aid to him although exposed constantly to heavy enemy fire. Then seizing the man's automatic rifle, he assigned it to another rifleman, and moved forward in the attack, materially assisting in the final seizure of the objective. His unselfish devotion to duty and great personal bravery aided materially in the saving of his comrade's life, and were an inspiration to all who observed him. Corporal McElrea's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MCMINN, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James L. McMinn (665737), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against enemy aggressor forces while serving with a Marine Engineer Platoon employed by an Infantry unit of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 2 December 1950. Serving as a machine gunner with the outpost line of resistance in the vicinity of the strategically important military base at Hagaru-ri, Corporal McMinn displayed exceptional courage and devotion to duty as he covered the withdrawal of the platoon to the main line of resistance. After many hours of repeated vicious enemy attacks the platoon had suffered heavy casualties before the numerically superior foe finally overran the right flank of the outpost. When the Company Commander ordered a withdrawal, Corporal McMinn had the only machine gun still in operation and, bravely remaining in position he successfully covered the platoon's withdrawal, delivering a devastating volume of accurate fire enabling the platoon to reach safety without receiving further casualties. Without any assistance or covering fire he made his way back to friendly lines repeatedly turning to fire at the oncoming enemy. Upon reaching the main line of resistance he set up his gun and continued to fire until the attack was stopped. By his exceptional courage and lack of fear in the face of intense hostile fire, Corporal McMinn contributed directly to the success of the company in holding its section of the defensive line. His unfaltering devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MCNUTT, RUSSELL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Russell W. McNutt (0-51611), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Attack Squadron of the FIRST Marine Air Wing, in Korea, on 27 March 1952. First Lieutenant McNutt, member of a flight dispatched to bomb a railroad by-pass bridge and to effect a rail cut near Hasangsan, skillfully scored a direct hit on the railroad. During this action the flight leader was forced to bail out of his aircraft when it was hit by enemy fire. First Lieutenant McNutt, undeterred by multiple small arms fire, lowered his landing gear and flaps and followed the parachuting pilot in order to effectively mark his downed position. Subsequently, the downed pilot was captured by two enemy troops and First Lieutenant McNutt's aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire, causing excessive oil leaks and restricted visibility. Regardless, he persisted in low firing passes over the scene to discourage the enemy from leaving the area with their prisoner. When the rescue helicopter arrived, First Lieutenant McNutt directed it to the downed pilot. His skilful airmanship and courageous actions in the face of grave personal risk contributed greatly to the liberation of the downed pilot and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MENZIES, HENRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Henry D. Menzies (0-23941), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Air Wing, in Korea, from 1 December 1950 to 7 December 1950. Captain Menzies, as Command Pilot of an R-4D transport aircraft, made numerous landings and take-offs from extremely small and hastily constructed airstrips located at Koto-ri and Hagaru-ri, Korea. A concentration of enemy troops, estimated to number seventy-thousand, completely surrounded these airstrips and at Koto-ri strip, enemy troops were entrenched within two hundred yards. Take-offs and landings were made directly into enemy small arms fire and the possibility of attacks from enemy aircraft was always present. Despite these hazards, Captain Menzies successfully landed twelve loads of urgently needed ammunition, food and medical supplies to the FIRST Marine Division and other elements of the TENTH Army Corps who were surrounded in the Chosin Reservoir area of Korea. He also made twelve take-offs, with his plane dangerously overloaded with sick, wounded, and frost-bitten comrades and delivered them safely to a rear area. The outstanding pilot ability and exceptional judgment exhibited during this period of grave danger was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MINER, ROSS R.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Ross R. Miner (0-35874), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer, Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, in action against the enemy on 29 May 1951. On that date, First Lieutenant Miner's company was given the mission of assaulting an enemy position near Panjang-ni, Korea. The position was situated on commanding terrain dominating the regimental zone of action, and was defended by an estimated battalion of enemy forces, well entrenched and fighting a determined rear guard action. After employing all available supporting fire, Lieutenant Miner skillfully led his company in an assault on the position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire in order to observe and control the actions of his men. As a result of his outstanding leadership, the objective was secured with a minimum of casualties, and the enemy forces to withdraw. The gallantry and high devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Miner on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters: X Corps, General Orders No. 225 (October 7, 19512)
Home Town: California
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


MINTON, FRANK A., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frank A. Minton, Jr. (0-43592), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron, in Korea, on 4 December 1950. First Lieutenant Minton, serving as a Pilot of an unarmed observation plane, displayed outstanding skill, courage and confidence in the performance of his duties. On one occasion, while flying his plane over enemy lines, he observed signs of activity near two houses located in a valley deep in enemy territory. He immediately made a very low pass over the area, where he noticed that a distress message was written in the snow and that friendly troops were signaling to him via flashing rays of a mirror. Realizing that he would betray the position of the friendly troops if he circled their position, he continued the low pass through the valley, at the mouth of which his plane was struck by enemy fire. After informing units of the location of the trapped men, he then, despite the great personal danger involved, made successive flights over the friendly unit's position, dropping food and ammunition to them. His aggressive actions and complete disregard for his own personal safety served as an inspiration for all who observed him and were directly instrumental in the rescue of the friendly troops. First Lieutenant Minton's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MOCK, ROY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Roy J. Mock (289369), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Amphibian Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 20 September 1950. As a Section Commander in charge of an amphibian tractor section, Technical Sergeant Mock observed many wounded Marines near the front lines. Technical Sergeant Mock ordered his tractor driven as near to the front lines as possible, then he disembarked and fearlessly and courageously proceeded on foot to the front lines making five trips under intense enemy mortar and small arms fire returning each time with a wounded Marine. During these trips he killed four of the enemy and captured two. Technical Sergeant Mock's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MOOTS, LAWRENCE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence R. Moots (1057664), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 28 November 1950. When two Marines were seriously wounded and laying in an enemy fire swept area, two attempts were made to remove the wounded Marines to safety. On each attempt, the would-be rescuers were wounded themselves and failed to reach the wounded Marines. Corporal Moots, with complete disregard for enemy mortar, automatic and small arms fire, and well aware that the two previous attempts to rescue the wounded had failed, fearlessly made his way to the wounded Marines, carried one of them to safety, and returned through the enemy fire and rescued the second Marine. His outstanding bravery and devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire was an inspiration to all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of the two wounded Marines. Corporal Moots' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


MUELLER, CHARLES E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles E. Mueller (1096342), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 15 March 1951. Although painfully wounded in the head when his unit was subjected to intense fire from concealed enemy positions during a company assault against a hostile strong point located on commanding terrain, Corporal Mueller bravely continued to make his way forward toward the objective. Crawling through the heavy enemy fire to a hostile bunker which was impeding the advance of the company, he hurled two grenades through the aperture of the emplacement, killing the occupants and silencing the enemy fire. By his marked courage, daring initiative and gallant devotion to duty, Corporal Mueller served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 60174
Home Town: Locust Grove, Virginia
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


MULLINS, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles L. Mullins (0-44184), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a carrier based Marine Attack Squadron of the FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in Korea. On 27 December 1952, Captain Mullins participated in an aerial assault against a major enemy supply installation on the Northwest coast of Korea. During repeated bombing runs on the target one of the attacking planes was struck by anti-aircraft fire and the pilot was forced to parachute into the icy waters of the Taedong estuary. While the other elements of the flight took covering stations above the downed pilot, Captain Mullins conducted low strafing runs against the enemy batteries firing from the nearby shore. Upon receiving information that friendly helicopter and surface vessels were approaching the estuary, he rendezvoused with them to act as guide and protective cover for the defenseless craft, through an intense barrage of hostile fire. At this stage of the rescue operation a flight of enemy jet interceptors pressed a diving assault against the rescue facilities and were immediately engaged by the covering propeller driven aircraft. Whenever the intruding fighters broke through the defensive screen, Captain Mullins successively met them with head-on firing runs that thwarted their attacks on the rescue facilities. When the enemy aircraft finally disengaged, he momentarily resumed his strafing assaults on the hostile shore and then escorted the withdrawal of a rescue boat that had been severely damaged by enemy shore fire. Although his fuel reserve had reached a dangerously low level, he bravely remained on station until other aircraft arrived. Only then did he return to his carrier where he landed with almost empty fuel tanks. Captain Mullins' heroic actions in behalf of a fellow airman reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


NEWTON, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George R. Newton (0-5786), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 23 September 1950. Lieutenant Colonel Newton, acting as Battalion Commander, was ordered to attack and seize a hill on the outskirts of Seoul, Korea. The battalion attacked and seized the assigned objective against fierce resistance, and in so doing, the left flank of the battalion became exposed to heavy enemy small arms, mortar, and artillery fire. Lieutenant Colonel Newton, fearlessly and courageously with complete disregard for his own safety, remained in exposed positions from which he could direct the activities of his unit and inspire them to hold the ground they had gained in spite of severe casualties. His heroic actions and initiative were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


NEWTON, MINARD P., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Minard P. Newton, Jr. (0-49755), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, near Yudam-ni, Korea, on 27 November 1950. Second Lieutenant Newton, serving as a Platoon Commander, displayed outstanding professional skill, aggressiveness and perseverance when his company was subjected to an attack by an enemy force employing small arms, automatic weapons and mortars. Due to the numerical superiority of the enemy force, his platoon's position was partly overrun during the fanatical enemy night attack. He, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, quickly reorganized his platoon and led them up a steep hill in the counterattack against the enemy. When the company was ordered to move to a new position, he volunteered to remain as the rear guard. By successfully holding his exposed position against two enemy attacks, he thereby enabled his company to move to the newly assigned position with a minimum of casualties. His timely actions and coolness under fire served as an inspiration for all who observed him and inspired the men of his command to greater efforts. Second Lieutenant Newton's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


NOLAN, JACK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jack L. Nolan (0-49869), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 27 November 1950. boldly moving among the positions of his platoon during a heavy enemy attack on his battalion's right flank, Second Lieutenant Nolan repeatedly braved the hostile barrage to direct effective fire and encourage his men in vigorously defending their sector. Despite sub-zero temperatures and damaging enemy small-arms, machine-gun, mortar and grenade fire, he continued to conduct his platoon in resisting the numerically superior hostile attack and, by his inspiring and cool leadership, was responsible in great measure for the destruction of over 200 of the enemy in his sector and for the repulse of the fierce assault. His indomitable courage, fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty reflect great credit upon Second Lieutenant Nolan and the United States Naval Service.


OLIVER, SCOTIA D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Scotia D. Oliver (530387), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 21 September 1950. Sergeant Oliver was serving as a platoon guide when his platoon was attacking strongly entrenched enemy positions that were supported by mortars, machine guns, and small arms. During the attack the fire from enemy positions increased in intensity and forced the platoon to take cover and call for friendly artillery and mortar fire. Observing numerous Marine casualties lying in exposed, enemy fire swept areas, he fearlessly and with utter disregard for his own personal safety, ran through the enemy fire to aid and evacuate the casualties. Although during this action he was painfully wounded, he courageously continued on his voluntary mission, refusing medical treatment or evacuation. Observing that his platoon sergeant became a casualty, he immediately assumed those duties, reorganized the platoon and boldly moved among the members to point out targets, direct their effective fire and move them in position for the continuation of the attack when the friendly supporting fires lifted. Only after the enemy positions were neutralized and his platoon had successfully seized the objective did he submit to medical treatment and evacuation. Sergeant Oliver's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


O'NEIL, LAWRENCE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lawrence A. O'Neil (0-54868), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 15 August 1952. Serving as leader of a machine gun platoon, Second Lieutenant O'Neil exposed himself continually to intense artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire during an attack on his position. When the Marines manning one machine gun were wounded and evacuated, he personally operated the weapon, delivering effective fire on the enemy and causing an estimated fifteen enemy casualties. Sighting an enemy mortar that was delivering fire on the friendly position, he carried the machine gun to another position on the defense line, set up the gun and put the enemy mortar out of action. When his machine gun was destroyed by enemy fire he left his position, exposing himself to heavy artillery fire to carry three wounded Marines to cover. Upon hearing that a Marine had been killed on the forward slope, he volunteered to lead a detail which went forward under heavy enemy fire to recover the body. Second Lieutenant O'Neil's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


OROZCO, PETE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Pete Orozco (1056541), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 2 December 1950. South of Yudam-ni, the rifle platoon to which Private First Class Orozco was assigned was pinned down by heavy enemy small arms fire while attempting to seize a well dug-in enemy position. Private First Class Orozco voluntarily moved alone to the flank of the enemy position and, in the face of the heavy enemy fire, fearlessly assaulted the position with hand grenades, killing eight of the enemy and driving back the remainder. His initiative and complete disregard for his own personal safety allowed the platoon to complete the seizure of their objective without further casualties. Private First Class Orozco's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


PARRY, FRANCIS F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Francis F. Parry (0-7187), Lieutenant Colonel [then Major], U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Artillery Regiment of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 2 - 3 December 1950. Serving as a Battalion Commander, Lieutenant Colonel Parry displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. Despite the sub- Zero weather, rocky and mountainous terrain, critical ammunition shortages, personnel and equipment casualties and almost constant displacements, he skillfully kept every one of his weapons in action and rendered continuous and highly effective artillery support to the infantry operations. In one instance, he dauntlessly proceeded with the point of the leading infantry unit in order to make a timely reconnaissance for artillery positions in terrain where suitable positions were almost impossible to find. Realizing that he must get his leading battery into position immediately to prevent the interruption of artillery support, he courageously made a personal reconnaissance of an area that was still being fought for by infantry units. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he gallantly brought the battery into the area in the face of murderous hostile fire and directed its emplacement. After establishing a defensive perimeter, he successfully defended the position against constant efforts by the enemy to dislodge him and capture his guns. He displaced his weapons only after the rear guard of the infantry approached his position and artillery support was assumed by another of his batteries. Lieutenant Colonel Parry's outstanding leadership and gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


PELOSI, LOUIS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Louis M. Pelosi (0-55938), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 25 February 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander during a raid against a heavily fortified enemy hill position, Second Lieutenant Pelosi displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the unit was pinned down by enemy mortar, grenade, machine gun and small arms fire and had received numerous casualties, he immediately reorganized and continued his advance. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he fearlessly moved from position to position, encouraging the men and directing their fire and maneuver. Despite poor visibility and although painfully wounded himself, he succeeded in killing twenty-five of the enemy, knocking out several bunkers and automatic weapons and destroying enemy trench lines. When ordered to withdraw, he overcame the adversities of enemy fire and difficult terrain features and skillfully returned his platoon and their casualties to the friendly lines. Second Lieutenant Pelosi's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


PERKINS, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James Perkins (1016689), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Regiment of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 2 November 1950. Serving as a member of the Division postal section attached to the regiment, Corporal Perkins volunteered to deliver mail to a battalion on outpost duty. When the convoy with which he was traveling was ambushed by a large enemy force, he courageously and with complete disregard for his personal safety, remained in a position exposed to withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire in order to deliver effective fire on the enemy. Twice wounded during the engagement, he fearlessly continued to rain fire on the enemy, until he was wounded a third time, and could not operate his own weapon. Refusing to seek medical attention for his painful wounds, he maintained his position under intense enemy fire, loading magazines for his comrades so they could continue the engagement. When the enemy was finally repulsed, he assisted in aiding the wounded, refusing medical attention until all other casualties had been treated. Throughout the entire engagement, he maintained personal control of the mail in his charge, and ultimately delivered it intact to proper authority. His great personal bravery and courageous devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him. Corporal Perkins' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


PERRY, JOHN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John E. Perry, Jr. (1186729), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 8 July 1953. Serving as a wireman, Sergeant Perry displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched heavy attacks against friendly positions, devastating hostile barrages of artillery and mortar fire completely destroyed the communications net within the company sector and two friendly outposts located far forward of the main line of resistance. Despite the murderous enemy fire, he exposed himself to the hostile fire while attempting to restore the vital wire system from the command post to the platoons and to the outposts. Through his fearless and tireless efforts, wire communications were maintained within the sector. Although exhausted from lack of sleep and working under extremely adverse weather conditions, he exhibited intrepid resourcefulness under fire and outstanding devotion to duty. Sergeant Perry's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


PIRTLE, WILBURN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wilburn D. Pirtle (1015353), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Engineer Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 15 March 1951. Private First Class Pirtle, serving as a member of a demolition tam attached to an Infantry Company, displayed outstanding skill, courage and confidence in the performance of his duties. On one occasion during an engagement with numerically superior enemy forces, a fellow Marine was mortally wounded while attempting to throw a demolition charge in an enemy emplacement. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he volunteered to take the prepared demolition charge in an attempt to destroy the enemy position. Though subjected to direct enemy small arms and machine gun fire, he fearlessly moved to an exposed position from which he could accurately place the demolition charge on the enemy emplacement, thereby killing the occupying enemy forces and completely neutralizing their position. His courageous actions and devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and materially contributed to the success achieved by his company. Private First Class Pirtle's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


PIZZI, HERMAN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Herman J. Pizzi (1214155), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company in the FIRST Marine Division, in Korea on 6 October 1952. Serving as a fire team leader, Private First Class Pizzi displayed outstanding courage and devotion to duty during the defense of a forward outpost. Under cover of darkness, the enemy delivered an intense artillery and mortar barrage followed by an assault of infantry troops. Throughout the action, he fearlessly exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire in order to check his men and administer aid to the wounded. Despite his determined efforts, the men of his fire team were killed by the enemy fire and he was severely shaken by concussion. Although his weapon had been destroyed and he was armed with only a knife, he moved from position to position, aiding the wounded Marines. After organizing the few left, he directed the evacuation of the critically wounded Marines to the main line of resistance. While en route to the main lines, he was painfully wounded but with grim determination, he continued to the friendly lines where he collapsed from shock and concussion. When he recovered consciousness, he volunteered to lead a rescue party to evacuate the rest of the casualties. Private First Class Pizzi's gallant and courageous actions inspired all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


POPE, EUGENE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Eugene J. Pope (0-24778), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Observation Squadron in Korea, on 11 August 1950. Captain Pope, as Pilot of a helicopter, attempted the rescue of a Marine carrier-based pilot who had been shot down in the Kesong area. He proceeded immediately to the area in which the pilot was reported down and although this area was behind the enemy lines, Captain Pope landed his helicopter near the wreckage of the fighter plane and went to the assistance of its pilot, whom he found dead. He placed the body of the pilot in the helicopter and returned it to a rear area. Captain Pope's heroic action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home Town: Michigan


POPE, LEROY T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Leroy T. Pope (1278442), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 24 July 1953. Serving as a gunner in the company mortar section, Private First Class Pope displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the enemy launched vicious attacks against the sector that the company occupied, he was engaged in a fire mission delivering devastating mortar fire upon the hostile forces. During this fire mission, an illuminating mortar shell was accidentally dropped in one of the gun pits and the ignition cartridge of the missile was ignited by the impact of the projectile striking the ground. The deadly missile rolled into the ammunition pit where it threatened to explode all of the ammunition in the pit. Upon noticing this, Private First Class Pope expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and gallantly seized the dangerous projectile and hurled it clear of the ammunition pit and personnel in the area. The fused shell exploded in the air about ten feet from him without causing any damage or casualties. His courageous actions saved at least four people in the immediate area from serious injury and possible death. Private First Class Pope's gallant and courageous actions combined with his remarkable resourcefulness during the hazardous encounter served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


POWERS, GEORGE N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George N. Powers (1151291), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Engineer Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 22 November 1951. While the company was acting in support of an infantry regiment, the detail of which Corporal Powers was a member was subjected to an intense concentration of enemy mortar fire. Although wounded by the first bursting shell, and bleeding profusely from his wounds, he left a place of comparative safety and fearlessly moved through the heavy enemy fire to a point at which it was most intense in order to carry a wounded Marine to cover. Despite his wounds he remained on the scene, refusing medical aid for himself, to assist in the evacuation of his comrades. Corporal Powers' gallant conduct and courageous loyalty to his fellow Marines were an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


PROCTOR, LOUIS G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Louis G. Proctor (0-56992), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 25 July 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Proctor displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the company's sector of the main line of resistance was subjected to murderous enemy mortar and artillery fire, he received a call for aid from the extreme right flank of his position. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he courageously exposed himself to the devastating hostile fire and while moving through the trenchline, he was twice knocked down by blasts of enemy mortar and artillery rounds. Although painfully wounded he dauntlessly reached the right flank and found a seriously wounded comrade. When attempts to evacuate the wounded Marine through the trenchline failed, he called for volunteers and carrying one end of the stretcher he gallantly aided in carrying the stricken man over the crest of a hill that was under direct enemy observation to the aid station approximately four hundred yards away. After assuring that the wounded man was being properly cared for, he returned to his platoon, consolidated his badly depleted forces and defended his position against numerous vicious enemy attacks. When the hostile troops succeeded in driving back the flanks of his position, he gallantly led his men in a counterattack and restored his line. Only after his line was fully regained and all his men cared for did he allow his own wounds to be treated. Second Lieutenant Proctor's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


PURCELL, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert D. Purcell (0-55350), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 31 January 1953. Serving as a Platoon Commander, Second Lieutenant Purcell displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He commanded the base of fire during a platoon raid on an enemy hill position. As the assault proceeded, he opened his base of fire and directed it at the enemy positions resisting the advance. Although subjected to intense enemy fire throughout the action, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and maintained radio contact with the company in order to call accurate supporting arms fire. When the assault commander called for aid to evacuate a seriously wounded Marine, he unhesitatingly went to the advance element of the assault force where he dragged the casualty back to a defiladed position. After returning to his unit, he continued to direct accurate fire of all supporting arms and his own base of fire. He covered the return of the raiding force and was the last man to leave the objective area. Because of several stretcher cases and twenty walking casualties, the pace was extremely slow but he expertly controlled the rear guard throughout the entire withdrawal. Second Lieutenant Purcell's gallant and courageous actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


QUESENBERRY, CHARLES P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles P. Quesenberry (649379), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 26 July 1952. Staff Sergeant Quesenberry displayed exceptional courage while participating in three separate patrols during one day. After the initial patrol, it was discovered that one member was missing. With no concern for his personal safety, Staff Sergeant Quesenberry exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to join a rescue party attempting to locate the Marine. Upon reaching the base of the hill he provided the necessary covering fire which enabled the remainder of the patrol to advance up the hill and carry the body to an area lower on the hill. Forced to withdraw due to intense enemy fire, they placed the body in a position where it could be recovered by another patrol. Returning to the main line of resistance, he volunteered to lead another patrol forward to retrieve the body. He fearlessly led the patrol to the position and directed supporting fire in such manner that they were able to remove the body with no further casualties. Staff Sergeant Quesenberry's selfless devotion to duty and coolness under fire were inspirational to all who observed him. His gallant and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


QUINN, FRANCIS X.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Francis X. Quinn (0-55941), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 5 - 6 April 1953. Voluntarily leading a patrol in the difficult and extremely hazardous mission of aiding another friendly unit which had been ambushed by the enemy over 2,000 meters forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Quinn led his men through intense hostile small-arms and hand-grenade fire and skillfully maneuvered them to a position between the stricken friendly patrol and the enemy. Although painfully wounded during this action, he dauntlessly continued to move among his men, successfully covering the withdrawal of the friendly unit and directing the evacuation of the wounded. Discovering that the ambushed patrol was unable to account for all its members, he reorganized his unit and returned to the point of initial contact where he remained until daylight to make every possible effort to locate the missing men. By his courageous leadership, resolute determination and gallant devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Quinn served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 20739
Home Town: Williamsburg, Virginia
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


RANKIN, MARCUS V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marcus V. Rankin (1182035), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 14 July 1953. Serving as a Squad Leader, Sergeant Rankin displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. During the early morning hours a friendly listening post unit proceeding forward of a company outpost position inadvertently entered a minefield and detonated a mine which killed one Marine and wounded three others. Realizing that immediate evacuation of the wounded was essential, he and one of his comrades carried one injured Marine to the comparative safety of the outpost. After removing the injured man to the outpost, he courageously returned over the treacherous area to aid the other stricken men. Upon reaching the stricken unit, he again adeptly directed and assisted in carrying the wounded Marines to the safety of friendly lines. Although physically exhausted, he exhibited remarkable courage as he ignored his personal safety and proceeded forward through the hazardous minefield in complete darkness in an attempt to retrieve the body of the mortally wounded Marine. Demonstrating sincere loyalty for his fallen comrade, Sergeant Rankin diligently traversed the entire area until daylight searching for the body. Sergeant Rankin's gallant and courageous actions combined with his highly competent leadership and indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


RAYBURN, EARL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Earl J. Rayburn (651323), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 16 and 17 September 1951. Sergeant Rayburn displayed exceptional initiative, skill, and leadership as Platoon Sergeant of a machine gun platoon during a fierce two-day action near Sintan-ni. When the company headquarters group came under sudden and intense enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire while the rifle platoons were in the attack, he moved fearlessly from position to position, exposing himself continually to enemy fire to direct counterfire. Later that night as the rifle platoons withdrew into a company defense perimeter, he displayed the same complete disregard for his personal safety as he rushed from unit to unit in the face of intense enemy fire, setting up his guns and assisting the platoon leaders in deploying theirs. The next morning he courageously moved with the attacking element, and when it neared its objective while under intense fire, he dashed from gun to gun, directing fire, eliminating stoppages, and shouting words of encouragement to his men. Though seriously wounded by enemy fire, he remained steadfastly with one gun and continued designating targets until ordered to be evacuated. Sergeant Rayburn's heroic actions served as an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


REGAS, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William Regas (0-26574), Major [then Captain], U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 18 July 1952. As a Forward Air Controller, Major Regas volunteered to fly an artillery spotting mission with a Marine Observation Squadron. Assigned the mission of locating a downed friendly aircraft, he courageously flew his plane at a dangerously low altitude and made two passes over the area to make a positive identification and search for signs of life. When the observer accompanying him was unable to identify the downed aircraft, he, although subjected to intense enemy anti-aircraft fire, unhesitatingly took his plane down even lower. Receiving fire from all directions, Major Regas held the plane at this low altitude, enabling the observer to thoroughly search for signs of life. He then continued to circle the area and called for artillery fire which would encompass the downed plane and protect the occupants, if still there, from the enemy. Only after friendly fighter aircraft arrived did he return to his base. Major Regas' fearless actions and indomitable spirit were an inspiration to all who observed him. His courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


REINBURG, JOSEPH H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph H. Reinburg (0-7464), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy as Pilot of a Fighter Plane and Squadron Commander of a Marine All-Weather Fighter Squadron, operating from a base in Japan, on the night of 21 August 1950, against enemy heavy artillery positions in Korea. This enemy artillery had pinned down and was inflicting heavy casualties on friendly forces. Flying at extremely low altitudes in absolute darkness and in mountainous terrain Major Reinburg was able to locate the enemy guns by their flashes. Completely ignoring his personal safety he made repeated bombing, rocketing, and strafing attacks on the enemy positions which were reported destroyed by ground controllers. After all armament was expended he remained in the area making repeated passes over enemy positions until friendly troops could move out. Major Reinburg's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


REMINGTON, EDGAR F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edgar F. Remington (0-37430), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy in Korea. On 17 October 1952, Captain Remington led a flight of three Marine attack aircraft to escort an unarmed rescue helicopter deep into enemy territory. Braving intense heavy anti-aircraft fire, Captain Remington skillfully led his flight over the enemy's main line of resistance in order to effect an expeditious rendezvous with the rescue aircraft. Upon joining with the helicopter and its escort of naval aircraft, he assumed leadership of the rescue mission and established a protective circle around the vulnerable helicopter. In the face of intense and accurate automatic weapons fire, he initiated a series of daring low-level strafing sweeps which effectively silenced the weapons. Because of low fuel the Naval aircraft were forced to leave the formation and return to their base, and the helicopter was forced to retire because of fuel shortage and impending darkness. As the rescue aircraft reversed its course, Captain Remington's wingman lost contact and could not locate the helicopter. Despite the danger imposed by mountainous terrain and intensive hostile fire, Captain Remington remained below the slow moving helicopter in order to maintain visual contact. Remaining in this hazardous position in total darkness he continued to provide protective escort by intermittently turning on his own external lights to draw enemy ground fire away from the unarmed helicopter. This heroic action at great risk to his own life was responsible for the safe and successful retirement of the rescue aircraft. The courageous conduct in behalf of his fellow airman, exceptional professional skill and selfless devotion to duty shown throughout by Captain Remington reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


*REYNOLDS, PHILIP A. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Philip A. Reynolds (1078521), , U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a machine gunner of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 29 November 1950. With his company under attack by a vastly outnumbering hostile force, Corporal Reynolds repeatedly exposed himself to a devastating barrage of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire to deliver a large volume of accurate fire on the attackers. Mortally wounded while attempting to clear his gun and put it back in operation after it had jammed during the furious action, Corporal Reynolds served to inspire his comrades to heroic efforts and contributed immeasurably to the successful repulse of the enemy attack. His outstanding courage and loyal devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Home Town: Freehold, New Jersey


RICE, THOMAS K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Thomas K. Rice (1210808), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 6 June 1952. Serving as a member of a combat patrol deep in enemy territory, Private First Class Rice displayed outstanding courage and initiative in the face of grave danger. When the patrol was engaged by a numerically superior enemy force, he was responsible for the security of the left flank and rear of the patrol. Withstanding the tremendous preparatory artillery fire, he refused to give ground when four consecutive enemy attacks were hurled against his sector. Although stunned by the concussion of mortar shells and hand grenades and exposed to intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire, he defiantly repelled fierce enemy onslaughts which came within six feet of his position. In the course of the action he personally killed eight enemy and put the rest to flight. Private First Class Rice's courage and fearless devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


ROACH, MAURICE E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Maurice E. Roach (0-8492), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Regiment in Korea, from 26 September to 4 October 1950. Major Roach constantly demonstrated outstanding qualities of leadership, skill and courage while serving as Commanding Officer of an Infantry Battalion. Leading his battalion in its first action against enemy forces, he, by his competence and professional knowledge of infantry tactics, conducted the operations of his battalion in a most expeditious and efficient manner. In the battalion's first assault on 26 September 1950, by his direction and supervision, the battalion overcame an elaborate enemy defense on a hill guarding the northwest approaches to Seoul, Korea. On 2 October, the battalion was stopped by a strongly fortified enemy position near Uijong-Bu, Korea. By his complete knowledge of the situation, the enemy position were overrun in a minimum amount of time. During this period he constantly operated in the forward areas, where he, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, maintained close contact with the front lines so as to keep abreast of the situation in order to best direct the tactical employment of his battalion. His timely actions, complete knowledge of infantry tactics and aggressiveness, inspired all members of his command and were directly instrumental in the success achieved by his battalion. Major Roach's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


RODRIGUEZ-GONZALEZ, RAFAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Rafael Rodriguez-Gonzalez (1240178), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 19 to 20 March 1953. Serving as a fire team leader, Private First Class Rodriguez-Gonzalez displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty while participating in the defense of an outpost forward of the main line of resistance. When the enemy launched a savage assault, he unhesitatingly manned a fighting position and although knocked to the ground on several occasions by the concussion of hostile grenades and mortar rounds, he fearlessly resumed his position and delivered accurate, killing fire on the attackers. When he learned that the communications between the outpost and the machine gun positions had been destroyed by the intense enemy fire, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and exposed himself in order to relay wire to the machine gun emplacements. After re-establishing the vital communications, he courageously placed himself in a position where the enemy had directed heavy fire. Through his savage fighting and indomitable spirit, he prevented the enemy from gaining access to the trench and outpost. Private First Class Rodriguez-Gonzalez's gallant and courageous actions and aggressive leadership served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


ROSSNER, RICHARD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard B. Rossner (1180424), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 16 November 1951. Private First Class Rossner displayed unusual courage, resourcefulness and initiative while a member of a patrol dispatched to return wounded Marines to friendly lines. The unit was brought under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire, and the patrol leader, while attempting to maneuver it to cover, detonated a land mine which killed or wounded every man in the patrol. Despite the fact that he had himself been painfully wounded, he led his comrades to shelter and administered first aid. He then returned to friendly lines and guided to the scene another patrol which carried the wounded Marines to safety. His fortitude and devotion to duty were largely responsible for the safety of his comrades. Private First Class Rossner's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


ROUNDTREE, LOUIS
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Louis Roundtree (662089), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 10 June 1951. Although his weapon was rendered inoperative by hostile bullets and he suffered a painful wound in the hand during an attack against a strongly defended enemy position, Corporal Roundtree picked up the rifle of a wounded comrade and bravely charged forward up the fire-swept hill in an assault on a hostile bunker. Upon nearing the bunker, he was literally swept from his feet by a hostile satchel charge and, although rolled back down the steep slope, bruised and bleeding, refused medical attention, rendering assistance to other casualties until the serious nature of his wounds compelled his evacuation. By his aggressive fighting spirit, outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Roundtree served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Division, Serial 60174
Born: at Kathwood, South Carolina
Home Town: Kathwood, South Carolina
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Silver Star (Vietnam)


ROWLAND, HAROLD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harold W. Rowland (617245), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 21 September 1950. During the advance of his company, the platoon in which Sergeant Rowland was serving as a Squad Leader, was pinned down by intense enemy small arms and machine gun fire. Without regard for his own personal safety, he fearlessly jumped up and assaulted an enemy machine gun nest with hand grenades and fire from his carbine, and succeeded in destroying the machine gun and killing the crew. He then began dressing the wounds suffered by five members of his squad. His courageous actions and display of initiative were an inspiration to all members of his company and materially aided in the successful continuation of the advance. Sergeant Rowland's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SAGER, WAYNE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Wayne B. Sager (617397), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 10 February 1951. Serving as a 60-mm. mortar squad leader attached to a rifle platoon on an independent mission near Chigadong, Sergeant Sager displayed outstanding courage and initiative when the unit, while proceeding along a narrow, exposed trail which dropped off sherry on both sides, was subjected to intense enemy fire from entrenched positions on commanding ground. Disregarding completely his own safety in the face of the heavy enemy fire, which had already wounded many of his comrades, he quickly set up his mortar and delivered accurate fire on the enemy. Although he was temporarily blinded by flying rock fragments, he continued to fire his mortar, locating the tube by sense of touch, until he was painfully wounded in the face and chest. His great personal bravery and fearless devotion to duty enabled the rifle platoon to deploy in the attack and were an inspiration to all who observed him. Sergeant Sager's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SALAZAR, AUGUSTINE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Augustine E. Salazar (1208286), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 21 June 1952. Serving as an automatic rifleman, Private First Class Salazar displayed exceptional heroism and devotion to duty when the patrol to which he was attached was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. With no concern for his personal safety, and although previously wounded, he remained at his post until ordered to withdraw. Despite his own painful wounds, he administered first aid to another wounded Marine and began to carry him back to friendly lines. Private First Class Salazar's concern for a fellow Marine and coolness under fire were an inspiration to all who observed him. His gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SCHAEDEL, RICHARD T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Richard T. Schaedel (1062410), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 18 August 1950. Corporal Schaedel, as a communications non-commissioned officer assigned to a tank platoon, efficiently restored communications that were necessary to coordinate the action of the infantry and supporting tanks. Observing that communications in three tanks had become inoperative, Corporal Schaedel voluntarily moved from tank to tank repairing the radio sets. In order to accomplish this task, it was necessary for Corporal Schaedel to climb upon each tank and enter through the turret, thereby exposing himself to further observation and fire by the enemy. Corporal Schaedel's heroic actions, his efficiency and devotion to duty contributed greatly to the success of the operation. The gallantry displayed by Corporal Schaedel reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Headquarters, 8th Army, Korea, General Orders No. 200 (December 18, 1950)


SCHMUCK, DONALD M.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald M. Schmuck (0-5914), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 26 November to 11 December 1950. With complete disregard for his own personal safety and exposed to heavy enemy small arms, machine gun and mortar fire, Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck, serving as Commanding Officer, personally led elements of his battalion in a daring tactical series of combat patrols which completely destroyed an enemy force estimated to be of battalion strength that was operating against the Division's Main Supply Route and rail-head. When ordered to attack north to seize and occupy a vitally important terrain feature in order to cover the movement of the Division, he fearlessly and courageously led his battalion in an aggressive attack up six miles of tortuous and precipitous ice-covered slopes to assault and overcome strongly-defended positions that were defended to the last man by an enemy battalion. His courageous actions, inspiring leadership, and brilliant tactical directions enabled the battalion to successfully accomplish its assigned mission. Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


SCHMUCK, DONALD M.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Donald M. Schmuck (0-5914), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as Commander of a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 23 February 1951. Assigned the mission of seizing strategic Hill 168, which dominated the approaches to Hoengeong, Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck disregarded completely his own personal safety in moving close behind his assaulting rifle companies to direct and control the attack. Although constantly exposed to devastating enemy automatic weapons, small arms, and hand grenade fire, he courageously directed the assault and seizure of the heavily-defended crest of the vital hill, and then personally reorganized his companies for the continuation of the attack. His presence with the assaulting elements and his great personal bravery so inspired his men that they swept forward irresistibly and completed the rout of the entrenched enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Lieutenant Colonel Schmuck's inspiring leadership and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


SCHWINDT, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William A. Schwindt (1171518), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Reconnaissance Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 20 December 1951. An automatic rifleman, Private First Class Schwindt was a member of a fire team assigned to a rear guard mission on an ambush patrol. When the unit was brought under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire, he manned his weapon with courage and skill, and continued to fire it even after having been wounded in the left hand, by propping the weapon on his knee. Again he was struck by the enemy fire, yet continued to fire until unable to do so because of paralysis of his right hand. At this point he would allow no one to expose himself to give him aid. After lying in his exposed position for an hour, he crawled to one which afforded cover where he allowed one of the two survivors of the fire team to render temporary first aid. For a period of two and a half hours he maintained a watch until relieved by the main ambush group. During the return of the patrol to friendly lines he refused all assistance despite his wounds, the rugged terrain and constant enemy harassment, in order that the trip might be as expeditious and safe as possible, for the entire unit. His fortitude and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him and an important contribution to the success of the patrol. Private First Class Schwindt's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SCIUTI, ROSCOE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Roscoe J. Sciuti (1178077), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 19 - 20 September 1952. Serving as an automatic rifleman, Private First Class Sciuti displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When the combat patrol of which he was a member was ambushed forward of the main line of resistance, many casualties were inflicted by the intense enemy fire. The patrol leader was hit and a white phosphorus grenade which he was carrying was set off by the enemy fire, covering his body with the burning material. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety and despite the heavy enemy fire falling in the immediate area, Private First Class Sciuti unhesitatingly ran to the aid of his wounded comrade, covering the burning body with his own in an attempt to extinguish the flames. This attempt failing, he tore off the burning clothing, threw dirt on him and rolled him over and over on the ground. During the entire period, he picked up and threw back several enemy grenades that landed near the wounded Marine. By his gallant and courageous actions and selfless devotion to his fellow man, Private First Class Sciuti served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SIMS, LEWIS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lewis M. Sims (1172900), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 28 March 1953. Serving as a machine gun section leader, Corporal Sims displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. He was a member of a unit that was engaged in the initial assault on a strongly fortified hostile position when the unit was subjected to a murderous barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire which inflicted many casualties. Although painfully wounded, he expressed complete disregard for his personal safety and refused medical aid for himself while he assisted in administering treatment to his seriously injured comrades. Ignoring his own condition, he courageously moved from man to man directing the rescue teams and giving words of encouragement to the wounded men. In one instance, he gallantly rose to his full height under the devastating enemy fire in order to carry a helpless Marine to the comparative safety of the trenchline. Shortly after, as a result of his critical wounds, he fell unconscious and was evacuated. Corporal Sims' gallant and courageous actions combined with his selfless devotion to duty served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SINDLINGER, JACK W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jack W. Sindlinger (919816), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Seoul, Korea, during the period 24 September 1950 to 2 October 1950. Corporal Sindlinger acting as a Rifle Squad Leader continuously displayed outstanding courage and leadership against enemy forces. On one occasion while participating in an attack on strong enemy emplacements on the crest of Hill 228 and as elements of the attacking forces reached the top of the hill, he led his squad through intense enemy machine gun fire to a position at the top of the hill within 25 yards of the enemy. Here Corporal Sindlinger reorganized many scattered elements of the attacking forces with his squad and deployed them to repel repeated close-in counterattacks. Without regard for his personal safety he fearlessly exposed himself continually to control the defense of his position and by example to inspire his unit until seriously wounded in the head by enemy fire. His initiative, courageous leadership and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


SKELT, ERNEST P., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ernest P. Skelt, Jr. (0-42317), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Engineer Battalion of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 7 December 1950. First Lieutenant Skelt, serving as officer-in-charge of a four-man demolition team, courageously led his team in the destruction of a large concrete bridge, many buildings and other facilities which could by used by the enemy in the town of Hagaru-ri, Korea, after all friendly forces had left the town. Although large groups of enemy were entering the town from the opposite end, he repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself to enemy fire in order that the rear guard might gain a distance of several hundred yards before he detonated the last of the explosive charges. While working far to the rear and, on occasion, out of sight of the friendly rear guard, he led his men for a period of sixteen hours, six of which were during darkness, in carrying out his demolition mission. With enemy elements frequently within sight of the rear guard, he repeatedly disregarded enemy small arms and mortar fire and the possibility of imminent contact with a numerically superior enemy force to delay the advance of the enemy. Despite the many difficulties confronting him and although usually beyond effective range of friendly covering forces, he aggressively led his team in the successful completion of his vital mission. First Lieutenant Skelt's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SLUDOCK, JOSEPH C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph C. Sludock (1221079), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 27 October 1952. Serving as a fire team leader with a small unit established far forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Sludock displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. When an overwhelming enemy force attacked the position, he immediately positioned his fire team and brought deadly fire to bear on the enemy. A sudden barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire struck the outpost and many of the defenders were wounded. After moving the casualties to a sheltered tunnel, he remained at one of the entrances and delivered intense fire with his submachine gun. He was instrumental in killing five of the attackers and wounding at least five others. When the enemy withdrew, he moved through the trenchline to insure that all of the wounded had been placed in covered positions. When the second assault was launched, he and several other Marines engaged the enemy in hand to hand combat until it was impossible to repel the overwhelming force. Again he assumed a position to protect the casualties and when an artillery barrage forced the enemy to withdraw, he returned to the tunnel and offered words of encouragement to the wounded and assisted wherever possible. Private First Class Sludock's gallant and courageous actions served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and his indomitable spirit was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SMITH, BURNEAL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Burneal E. Smith (0-37856), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while attached to Marine Aircraft Group TWELVE (MAG 12), FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea, on 26 March 1953. Suddenly attacked by a flight of hostile jet interceptors while voluntarily escorting the tactical air co-ordinator of a massed aerial assault on a mission against enemy supply installations in the vicinity of Chinnampo, Captain Smith immediately countered the attack with aggressive firing runs on the vastly superior enemy and succeeded in disrupting their flight, skillfully maneuvering his aircraft to successively engage the swept-wing fighters as they conducted individual dives against the flight leader. As the last of the attackers dived past the nose of his aircraft, he gave momentary pursuit and shattered the nose of his aircraft, he gave momentary pursuit and shattered the right wing of the enemy plane with a burst of machine-gun fire, resulting in the immediate disengaging and retiring f the hostile flight from the area. By his exceptional courage, professional skill and unyielding devotion to duty in the face of extreme peril, Captain Smith successfully defended the tactical air co-ordinator, who subsequently directed the diverse elements of the striking force in a highly successful bombing strike against the primary objective, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD: 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, Serial 7158
Born: at Springfield, Ohio
Home Town: Springfield, Ohio


SMITH, CHARLES F., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles F. Smith, Jr. (1137771), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 17 July 1953. Serving as a rifleman, Private First Class Smith displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. The patrol while operating far forward of the main line of resistance, was preparing to establish a base of fire when the group was suddenly attacked from the front and flanks by a numerically superior enemy force. In the ensuing action the patrol leader, assistant patrol leader and radioman were seriously injured leaving the patrol temporarily without a leader or communications. Private First Class Smith exhibited remarkable resourcefulness, as he picked up the radio, hastily repaired the aerial and informed the company commander of the situation. With exceptional skill, he accurately called in friendly mortar fire on the enemy enabling the patrol to reorganize. Observing that a proper defense was still needed, he completely organized the patrol in a perimeter defense and then assigned members of the squad to evacuation teams. When the patrol was finally ready to disengage, he was in complete control and skillfully led them back to friendly lines. Upon returning, he discovered that four members of the patrol were missing and unhesitatingly volunteered to take a detail back to the endangered area. His determined aggressiveness and courageous actions were directly responsible for bringing the missing man back to the main line of resistance. Private First Class Smith's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


SMITH, RUSSELL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Russell J. Smith (1190228), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 27 March 1953. Serving as a Platoon Guide, Sergeant Smith displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty in the absence of his superiors. While engaged in combat with the enemy on an outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, he skillfully maneuvered the platoon through intense hostile mortar and artillery fire. Although painfully wounded, he refused evacuation and courageously led the assault on an enemy objective. Upon reaching the strategic position, the platoon was pinned down by devastating small arms fire. Expressing complete disregard for his personal safety, he dauntlessly advanced and found a position from which he delivered deadly fire on an enemy machine gun bunker, putting it out of action and enabling the unit to move forward. Again refusing medical attention, he directed tank fire on another hostile installation. He reached the objective with the unit and moved about, caring for his injured comrades and directing the evacuation. Only after the hostile position had been fully secured would he allow himself to be evacuated. Sergeant Smith's gallant and courageous actions combined with his determination and indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


SPAFFORD, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard L. Spafford (1160036), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, in Korea, on 26 July 1952. After returning from a combat patrol, Private First Class Spafford volunteered to join a rescue party attempting to locate a missing man. Upon reaching t he foot of the hill, he proceeded up until he was extremely close to enemy positions. With no concern for his personal safety, he fearlessly exposed himself to the enemy small arms, grenade and mortar fire to locate the dead Marine. Upon finding the body, he carried it down the hill while subjected to heavy enemy fire. The intensity of the fire made it necessary for him to place the body in a position where a subsequent patrol would locate it. Private First Class Spafford's steadfast devotion to duty, initiative and coolness under fire were an inspiration to all who observed him. His gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


ST. JOHN, ROSCOE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Roscoe R. St. John (0-29619), , U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in a Marine All Weather Fighter Squadron serving with the FIRST Marine Aircraft Wing, while acting as escort for a Navy Rescue Helicopter in enemy-controlled territory approximately forty-five miles southwest of Wonsan, Korea, on 22 October 1951. Captain St. John upon seeing the helicopter taken under intense enemy anti-aircraft fire deliberately and with disregard for his own personal safety, piloted his F7F fighter plane to an altitude approximately two thousand feet below the helicopter and repeatedly flew back and forth across the firing batteries successfully drawing the fire away from the helicopter, permitting it to proceed safely to a successful completion of the rescue mission assigned. By his superb airmanship, daring tactics and cool courage in the face of tremendous odds, Captain St. John contributed materially to the success of an extremely difficult rescue mission. His zealous devotion to duty throughout reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.


SURBER, RALPH E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ralph E. Surber (326338), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, from 13 to 15 August 1952. Serving as a Platoon Sergeant, Staff Sergeant Surber displayed exceptional heroism and leadership in the performance of his duties. While moving his platoon into position under intense enemy mortar and artillery fire, he calmly deployed his men over the platoon's sector. Fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy fire, he personally supervised his men in setting up positions and encouraged those who were suffering from exhaustion and heat. During the enemy assault, he picked up an automatic rifle and delivered devastating fire into the group and forced them to retreat with many casualties. Although wounded shortly afterward, he dauntlessly continued to aid his platoon in many ways. At different times, he exposed himself with no concern for his personal safety to carry critically needed ammunition and water to his men. Staff Sergeant Surber's gallant and courageous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


TEVERBAUGH, JESSE W., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jesse W. Teverbaugh, Jr. (1125999), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with a Marine Infantry Regiment, in Korea, on 6 and 7 December 1950. Corporal Teverbaugh, a member of the graves registration team, was driving a weapons carrier in a vehicle convoy, moving from Yudam-ni to Koto-ri, Korea, when the convoy was ambushed by a strong enemy force in the hours of darkness. The members of the convoy took firing positions along the side of the road. He observed an unidentified man crawl under a truck and, without regard for his own personal safety, he crawled under the enemy fire to the vehicle. Finding that the man was an enemy soldier, he fearlessly crawled under the vehicle and killed the enemy with his knife. Later, when the convoy was again halted by accurate machine gun fire, he obtained three grenades and while exposed to the direct enemy fire, succeeded in destroying the enemy position. His aggressive actions were an inspiration to all who observed him and materially contributed to the successful advance of the convoy. Corporal Teverbaugh's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


THOMAS, ALFRED I.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star Medal to Alfred I. Thomas (0-45440), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Battalion in Korea, from 1 to 18 March 1951. First Lieutenant Thomas, serving as Company Commander of an Infantry Company, displayed outstanding skill, courage and confidence in the performance of his duties. Throughout this period, he, by his outstanding professional knowledge of infantry tactics, aggressiveness and initiative, was directly instrumental in the successful accomplishment of all missions assigned his Company. On one occasions, his company was assigned the mission of seizing a hill west of Hoengsong, Korea, that had been taken and lost by friendly forces on four different occasions. After thorough planning and a detailed briefing of his four platoon commanders, he accompanied the leading elements of his company in the assault on the heavily defended enemy position. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he continually exposed himself to heavy enemy small arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire while directing the attack. Inspired by his courageous actions, his company culminated the attack with a bayonet charge, which resulted in the complete annihilation of the enemy forces and the capture of numerous rifles, machine guns, grenades and other enemy material. His aggressive actions and devotion to duty served as an inspiration for all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company. First Lieutenant Thomas' heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: 2@ Silver Stars (Korea)


THOMPSON, BILLY B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Billy B. Thompson (599421), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 23 April 1951. With his squad leader killed and another comrade seriously wounded during a night attack on his sector when a large hostile force, supported by withering automatic-weapons, mortar and small-arms fire, advanced to within a few feet of his position, Corporal Thompson bravely carried the wounded man to safety in the face of heavy fire and immediately returned to his post. Finding the squad badly depleted, disorganized and short of ammunition, he promptly assumed command, established a new firing line and, personally obtaining ammunition from an adjacent unit, directed a devastating volume of fire upon the attackers which completely halted the assault and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile troops. By his outstanding courage, exceptional leadership and aggressive fighting spirit, Corporal Thompson served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


TIPTON, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William R. Tipton (668058), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Reconnaissance Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 4 November 1950. While participating in a motorized reconnaissance patrol of enemy terrain, Private First Class Tipton, serving as an automatic rifleman, and other members of the patrol were subjected to heavy enemy small arms and mortar fire and all but one of his squad were wounded. Although seriously wounded in the leg, and suffering from pain and loss of blood, Private First Class Tipton repeatedly and fearlessly exposed himself to the enemy fire and covered the withdrawal of the wounded patrol members with his automatic rifle until he received a second wound and could no longer operate his weapon. His courageous actions materially aided the wounded members of the patrol to withdraw to friendly lines and report the results of their assigned mission. Private First Class Tipton's display of initiative and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


TITTERSON, RICHARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard F. Titterson (654544), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein), FMF, in Korea, on 22 February 1953. Serving as a platoon runner, Private First Class Titterson displayed outstanding courage, initiative and devotion to duty. During a raid on a strongly fortified hostile position, he volunteered to be the point man. Upon nearing the objective, he again fearlessly volunteered to lead a two-man team to seize a known enemy listening post located inside a burned out tank. Although realizing that the tank was undoubtedly mined and covered by enemy fire, he unhesitatingly crawled to within a few yards of the hulk and threw grenades into the open hatch. Later, he courageously led the assault element over seven hundred yards of open terrain to reach the enemy position. Although painfully wounded, he delivered devastating small arms fire at point-blank range into the enemy. He dauntlessly covered the advance of the flame throwers and supporting units as they seized the objective. Private First Class Titterson's gallant and courageous actions combined with his indomitable spirit served as an inspiration to all who observed him and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Personal Awards: Silver Star (Korea), Purple Heart


TREADWELL, MARVIN T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Marvin T. Treadwell, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Fire Team Leader, Company B, First Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division in action against enemy forces in Korea on 29 May 1951. While moving to cover the flank of the 2d platoon which was advancing on enemy positions on a hill mass south of Yang Gu, Korea, Corporal Treadwell's fire team observed an enemy force preparing to attack the column. Realizing the threat, he moved quickly to reinforce the lead element of the threatened platoon by skillfully maneuvering his team while under hostile fire to a position 30 feet in front of two enemy positions. The enemy intensified its fire with grenades and automatic weapons, wounding several Marines. Corporal Treadwell moved fearlessly into the open and initiated a flanking movement through a breach in the enemy defensive line. Without regard for his personal safety, he took an exposed position to cover his team as they entered an enemy bunker and trench complex. Noticing an enemy bunker located at the top of the objective, he charged the enemy position, jumping on the roof of the bunker and firing into it. His actions allowed his team to engage and kill the enemy soldiers. By his extraordinary heroism in the face of extreme danger, unrelenting perseverance, and steadfast devotion to duty, Corporal Treadwell reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.


TWOHEY, RICHARD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Richard B. Twohey (577327), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea on 4 November 1950. Suddenly confronted by four enemy tanks while leading a machine-gun section at the point of a motorized patrol, Staff Sergeant Twohey bravely mounted one of the tanks in company with his platoon commander and another Marine in an attempt to open the hatch and drop a grenade within. Unable to open the cover, he knocked down the periscope and deposited the grenade inside the aperture. When the tank moved a few yards and stopped, he again climbed upon it and dropped another grenade inside before being thrown from the vehicle during its final lurch. By his marked courage, daring initiative and devotion to duty, Staff Sergeant Twohey contributed materially to the successful completion of the patrol's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
SPOT AWARD, 1st Marine Division, Serial 44173
Born: at New Rochelle, New York
Home Town: New York, New York


VARELA, JOE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joe R. Varela (625211), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Infantry Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 8 March 1951. Serving as a fire team leader in a rifle platoon, Corporal Varela displayed outstanding courage and initiative during the attack of a fortified hill position defended by a determined enemy force. Advancing in the face of withering enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire, he skillfully maneuvered his fire team as the leading element, overrunning successive enemy bunkers. As the assault progressed, his unit was suddenly subjected to an accurate barrage of enemy hand grenades thrown from a strategically located bunker on commanding ground. Realizing that the success of the attack depended on the rapid neutralization of the bunker, he fearlessly and with complete disregard for his own safety, charged forward through the deadly barrage in a single-handed assault, accurately throwing hand grenades into the apertures. His great personal bravery and courageous devotion to duty resulted in the neutralization of the strategic ground. Corporal Varela's heroic actions were an inspiration to all who observed him, and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


WALDROP, OTIS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Otis R. Waldrop (0-33686), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with a Marine Rifle Company of the FIRST Marine Division (Rein.), FMF, in Korea, on 13 June 1951. Captain Waldrop was assigned the mission of attacking and seizing a high ridge well-defended by a series of fortified enemy emplacements. Leading his men up a narrow, exposed spine in the face of fierce automatic weapons and mortar fire, he repeatedly exposed himself to deploy his platoons, and on more than one occasion, went forward of the assault echelons in order to select a better route of approach for his platoons. By such courageous leadership, and the expert employment of supporting arms, he was able to press the attack so vigorously that the position was overrun and the enemy completely routed. Captain Waldrop's bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


WALZ, FRED L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Fred L. Walz (666583), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against an armed enemy while serving with the FIRST Marine Division, FMF, near Chingdong-ni, Korea, on 7 August 1950. On this date, Private First Class Walz, a rifleman, with complete disregard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy. The gallantry displayed by Private First Class Walz reflects credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Headquarters, EUSAK, General Orders 162 (November 8, 1950)

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