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Citations For
U.S. Air Force
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action During

The Korean War

Posted May 2007 - Next Scheduled Update: July 2007

Korean War Air Force Silver Star Citations
A-Z

 

 

BOGGS, EDWARD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Edward H. Boggs, Technical Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action and heroism against an enemy near Munsan, Korea, on 31 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Boggs, an Aero Medical crew member on a rescue helicopter with Detachment 1, Third Air Rescue Squadron, flew to an area where critically wounded United Nations troops were cut off by enemy forces. The helicopter landed amidst enemy small arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. When he realized there were too many wounded men to evacuate before dark, Sergeant Boggs volunteered to remain on the ground with the trapped men in order that one additional wounded man could be evacuated on each flight to a nearby aid station. Sergeant Boggs was well aware that by remaining behind he would risk his own life. While the helicopter shuttled back and forth, Sergeant Boggs took full charge of the disorganized and weary group. He directed survivors to defensive positions in order to repulse enemy infiltration. Constantly exposing himself to enemy fire, Sergeant Boggs established a system of priority for evacuation and gave all first-aid possible. Not until the last wounded man was evacuated did Sergeant Boggs consider leaving the area. By his expert leadership and exceptional bravery under fire, Sergeant Boggs brought about the rescue of a large number of seriously wounded men. Sergeant Boggs' heroism and selflessness were in keeping with the highest tradition of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 30 (January 15, 1952)

BRYSON, JAMES K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James K. Bryson, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 23 November 1950 by assisting in the rescue of an injured American fighter pilot deep in enemy territory, five miles south of Kanggye, Korea. Sergeant Bryson, assigned as medical technician crew member of a rescue helicopter, volunteered for a pilot pick-up mission with full knowledge that the immediate area of the pick-up contained numerous enemy troops, and that the fuel supply of the helicopter might not be sufficient for the return flight to friendly territory. After flying eighty miles behind enemy lines, the helicopter landed near the injured pilot who had fired a flare to expose his position. Enemy troops immediately opened fire with automatic weapons and rifles. With complete disregard for his own life, Staff Sergeant Bryson jumped from the helicopter and ran to the aid of the injured pilot. With enemy fire striking dangerously near, often as close as two feet, Sergeant Bryson assisted the injured pilot to the helicopter. While taking off, the helicopter was hit in the tail cone, but succeeded in returning to Sinanju. Sergeant Bryson's courage in the face of enemy fire was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

CAGE, PHIL B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Phil B. Cage, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 8 December 1950. Landing his C-47 transport airplane on a 1900 foot landing strip that had been hastily scraped from frozen sod at Koto-Ri, Korea, he effected the evacuation of 19 casualties who were doomed to perish from exposure or enemy capture. The peculiar location of the landing strip, which was the only level spot in the vicinity of the battlefront, made it necessary for Colonel Cage to fly his C-47 down a narrow valley which was flanked on both sides by thousands of enemy troops. As he let down on his approach to the landing strip, ridges, 2000 feet high, formed a physical hazard on each side. This hazard was further increased by intense napalm smoke, burning of abandoned supplies, and a light falling snow. As a follow-up to his daring flight, 312 additional wounded troops were swiftly evacuated by other C-47 pilots who emulated his example. Colonel Cage accomplished his mission literally within range of overwhelming enemy forces who surged to within 200 yards of Koto-Ri airstrip. His heroism, courageous devotion to duty, and superior leadership reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 22 (30 January 1951)

CARLTON, MERRILL H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Merrill H. Carlton, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for meritorious achievement and conspicuous gallantry in aerial flight on 20 July 1950 in support of the United Nations Forces as pilot of and unarmed T-6 aircraft in the vicinity of Tanyang, Korea. While on a visual reconnaissance flight over mountainous terrain, deep in enemy territory, with enemy air opposition probable and expected, Lieutenant Colonel (then Major) Carlton observed several gun positions, three vehicles, and five hay stacks which later proved to be camouflaged enemy medium tanks waiting to attack friendly forces. Realizing the military value of the targets and the damage that could be inflicted on friendly troops, Colonel Carlton immediately vectored friendly fighter aircraft to the area. With complete disregard for personal safety he dove his aircraft to within a few feet of the ground to pinpoint the targets for the fighters. Although enemy ground fire had damaged his aircraft and the enemy attacks continued, Colonel Carlton remained in the area and directed the fighter strike which resulted in total destruction of three gun positions, three vehicles, three tanks, and rendered the remainder ineffective in battle. The aggressiveness, courage under fire, and intense devotion to duty displayed by Colonel Carlton reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 48 ( February 11, 1951)

CHASE, LEVI R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Levi R. Chase, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations as Commanding Officer, 8th Fighter Bomber Group, on 11 July 1952. Knowing that the defense of the target area consisted of fifty-two heavy guns, sixteen of which were radar controlled, sixteen four-gun batteries of automatic weapons and an undetermined amount of intense small arms fire, Colonel Chase led the 8th Fighter bomber Group on three highly successful missions into this heavily defended area at Pyongyang, Korea. Colonel Chase so effectively planned the attack and employed evasive tactics that he led one hundred and eighty-one effective combat sorties through the intense enemy barrage without major damage or the loss of a single aircraft. This series of devastating attacks completely destroyed a vital communications and ordnance manufacturing plant, and inflicted major damage on a roundhouse and a locomotive repair plant. Through his outstanding courage, leadership, and professional skill, Colonel Chase was instrumental in reducing the war potential of the enemy, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.

CONATSER, MAX C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Max C. Conatser, Major, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Korea, while commanding a Signal Construction Detachment in advance support of the Fifth Air Force. When evacuation was necessary, Major Conatser voluntarily remained at Pyongyang to destroy communication facilities in order to prevent their use by the enemy. On 3 December 1950, while preparing to evacuate his detachment, his convoy was bombed and strafed by the enemy and eight of ten trucks were immobilized. When a nearby ambulance caught fire and was knocked into a gasoline dump, Major Conatser, realizing the danger of explosion, and with total disregard for personal safety, rushed to the vehicle and removed it from the area. Major Conatser further exposed himself to danger by entering an abandoned ordnance depot and removing parts from bobby-trapped vehicles, enabling his men to quickly repair six vehicles and safely evacuate themselves. The exceptional courage and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Major Conatser were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 228 (May 10,1952)

COREY, JOHNNY F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Johnny F. Corey, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for himself by gallantry in action on 26 November 1950 while flying on a pre-briefed mission over enemy territory in Korea. While flying as an observer on an unarmed T-6 type aircraft, Lieutenant Corey heard a plea for assistance from an injured forward ground controller who was completely surrounded by a large number of enemy troops. Lieutenant Corey immediately proceeded to the area from which the signal had emanated. However, due to excessive smoke and haze, visibility was greatly restricted and only through exceptional alertness did he succeed in locating the injured man near an unfinished airstrip. When the aircraft landed, Lieutenant Corey, in the face of intense enemy fire, quickly helped the wounded man aboard the aircraft. By the time the rescue was completed, enemy forces were rapidly closing in from all directions, concentrating their fire on the aircraft and its occupants. By his decisive and valorous action, Lieutenant Corey saved the life of a member of the United Nations Forces. His unfailing courage under fire, conspicuous gallantry and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the United Nations Forces and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 127 (March 28,1951)

ENYART, JOHN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John W. Enyart, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 26 November 1950. While piloting an unarmed T-6 type aircraft on reconnaissance over enemy territory in the vicinity of Tokchon, Korea, Lieutenant Enyart received an emergency call for air evacuation of a United Nations Ground Controller and his party who were completely surrounded by a superior number of enemy troops. Though visibility was greatly restricted by haze and smoke, and identification was difficult, Lieutenant Enyart skillfully directed a number of fighter type aircraft to the spot. These planes succeeded in temporarily halting the enemy's advance. In response to a plea from the Ground Controller that an Air Evacuation Rescue Team be sent immediately to the area, Lieutenant Enyart, with complete disregard for his personal safety, landed his aircraft on a hazardous dirt strip located at the bottom of a steep valley. Exposed to heavy ground fire from the enemy, he successfully evacuated one member of the United Nations Forces, and immediately prepared to return for another. Despite almost zero visibility, and at great risk of his own life, Lieutenant Enyart approached the strip a second time but was prevented from landing by the enemy who had occupied it. The courage displayed by Lieutenant Enyart in the face of great danger was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 105 (March 12, 1951)

FORMAN, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert D. Forman, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 6 December 1950. When the fate of a small airstrip was uncertain, Colonel Forman, disregarding his personal safety, flew a C-47 to the strip and landed in the midst of a fierce fight between American troops and the numerically superior enemy. With only a few hours of daylight left, Colonel Forman personally directed the aerial evacuation which successfully removed all battle casualties from the strip. When it became clear that the field was no longer tenable, Colonel Forman dispatched all other C-47s and prepared to leave in his own. At this moment, with darkness fast approaching, Colonel Forman received a message from a radio jeep that there was one more critically wounded United States Marine in desperate need of aerial evacuation. Colonel Forman waited an hour, while the enemy closed in on the field. The battle casualty was finally placed aboard his plane and he made an after dark take-off in the face of strong enemy fire. The leadership, courage, and outstanding heroism displayed by Colonel Forman on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

JAMES, CARROLL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Carroll L. James, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for exceptional gallantry in action on 26 November 1950. While piloting an unarmed T-6 type aircraft on a pre-briefed mission over enemy territory, Lieutenant James heard a plea for help from an injure forward ground controller who was surrounded by a large number of enemy troops. Because of the intense smoke and haze, the ground was barely visible, and only through exceptional alertness did he and his observer succeed in locating the man near an unfinished airstrip. Displaying remarkable courage, and completely disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant James landed the plane despite continuous enemy rifle fire. By the time he had rescued the wounded controller, enemy forces were pouring in from all directions, concentrating their fire on the aircraft. As the plane became airborne, the enemy was in complete control of the field. By his superior flying skill and decisive action, Lieutenant James saved the life of a member of the United Nations forces. His unfailing courage under fire, his conspicuous gallantry and his unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflect great credit upon Lieutenant James, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 80 (March 1, 1951)

KING, WALTER S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Walter S. King, Major, U.S. Air Force, for exceptional gallantry in action on 15 October 1950 while piloting a B-26 attack bomber on a night intruder mission over enemy-held territory in Korea. On that night, Major King exhibited superb courage in demolishing a convoy which was heavily defended by small arms, automatic weapons and antiaircraft fire. In his initial attack, Major King destroyed five vehicles, despite the fact that the tail section of his plane was severely damaged by enemy action. In the face of continued intense enemy fire, Major King again attacked the convoy, destroying two more vehicles. As a result of damage sustained to his plane on this second attack, gasoline was sprayed over Major King's aircraft, and a serious fire hazard was created. Regardless of the dangers involved, Major King attacked the convoy a third time, demolishing the remaining vehicles. As he was leaving this scene of destruction, Major King observed a locomotive on a railroad track. Although his seriously damaged bomber was difficult to control, and the fuel supply was dangerously low, Major King destroyed the train was a direct bomb hit before proceeding to an air base for an emergency landing. The magnificent courage, relentless determination, and unswerving devotion to duty displayed by Major King on this occasion were in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 80 (March 1, 1951)

MATTES, GEORGE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George J. Mattes, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy on 30 August 1950 while flying as pilot of an unarmed T-6 type aircraft over enemy territory in the vicinity of Chukchon-ni, Korea. Captain (then First Lieutenant) Mattes, while on a visual reconnaissance flight deep in enemy territory, observed 22 camouflaged enemy vehicles, two of which were tanks, situated in patches of foliage in a dry river bed, and numerous supplies hidden in an orchard. Although he was being fired upon by an enemy 20 millimeter anti- aircraft battery and 50 caliber machine guns, Captain Mattes, with complete disregard for his own safety, personally directed three friendly fighter strikes against these targets which resulted in the destruction of the anti-aircraft battery. By his professional skill, aggressiveness, courage under fire, and devotion to duty, Captain Mattes upheld the highest traditions of the military service, thus reflecting great credit upon himself, the United Nations' Forces, and the United States Air Force.

MOORE, HAROLD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harold W. Moore, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action on 2 February 1951 for rescuing a pilot and observer from behind enemy-held positions near Sangch'angbong-ni, Korea. Piloting an unarmed, highly vulnerable H-5 type aircraft, First Lieutenant Moore flew thirty miles behind enemy lines to rescue the two airmen who were hemmed in by cross fire from machine guns and small arms. While friendly fighter strafed the area to minimize enemy ground attack, Lieutenant Moore landed the helicopter. Demonstrating complete disregard for his safety, he remained at the controls despite the heavy fire which was being directed at him. As the downed airmen crawled toward the helicopter, four bullets struck the aircraft and missed Lieutenant Moore's head by inches. Immediately after the airmen boarded the helicopter, Lieutenant Moore took off. At this time the aircraft was again hit by enemy fire, and after striking the rotor blade, the bullet penetrated the pylon going into the fan assembly. By his heroic act, Lieutenant Moore saved the lives of two Air Force personnel. His remarkable courage while under enemy attack was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 146 (April 8, 1951)

PARK, PAUL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Paul L. Park, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 24 January 1951. On this date, Captain Park displayed conspicuous courage by rescuing a downed pilot and observer from behind enemy-held lines near Anyang-ni, Korea. Piloting an unarmed helicopter, Captain Park flew twenty-five miles behind enemy- held lines fully aware of the fact that a company of enemy troops had the trapped pilot and observer pinned down by small arms fire. When he arrived at the pick-up point, Captain Park directed fighter aircraft to strafe the area, then proceeded to land the helicopter despite intense enemy small arms fire. As the downed pilot and observer ran toward the waiting helicopter, Captain Park was under constant enemy fire. The barrage increased during the take-off, whereupon Captain Park reported the positions of the enemy troops to the fighter aircraft permitting then to close in and inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. Captain Park's outstanding performance was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service. His bravery saved the lives of two United States Air Force men, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 139 (April 7, 1951)

ROGERS, JOSEPH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Joseph W. Rogers, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 8 October 1950 while flying a combat mission in support of United Nations forces in the Myongad-dong area, Korea. Volunteering to aid British troops hemmed in by numerically superior enemy forces in that location, Captain (then First Lieutenant) Rogers led a formation of F-51 fighter aircraft to the target under a ragged 700 foot ceiling. Flying in and out of clouds, below the level of surrounding terrain and employing exceptional navigational and instrument flying ability, he performed a series of 360 degree turns to make repeated attacks. Despite heavy antiaircraft fire, he continued striking the enemy with napalm, rockets and 50 caliber machine gun fire with such remarkable success that the encircled United Nations troops were able to withdraw intact. The conspicuous gallantry displayed by Captain Rogers in the performance of an extremely hazardous mission was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 146 (April 8, 1951)

SHAWE, HAMILTON B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Hamilton B. Shawe, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. On 1 October 1950, while serving as a pilot of the 8th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, First Lieutenant Shawe displayed an exceptional degree of flying skill, courage and competence. Alone in an unarmed reconnaissance aircraft, he flew 425 miles to his target, the port of Wonsan in Korea. Upon reaching his objective he made repeated photographic runs at a dangerously low altitude over the strongly defended beach and port area. In spite of his aircraft being repeatedly hit by enemy ground fire, Lieutenant Shawe continued making passes until his mission of nine runs was completed. Information gained from the excellent photographs taken by Lieutenant Shawe proved invaluable to the United Nations forces in their subsequent planning for the landing at Wonsan. Lieutenant Shawe's conspicuous gallantry and outstanding skill were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 73 (February 25, 1951)

VAN BOVEN, PAUL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Paul W. Van Boven, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against the enemy on 4 September 1950 while he was performing duty in Korea as a member of the THIRD Rescue Squadron. Although fully aware of the dangers involved, Lieutenant Van Boven departed in an unarmed helicopter to rescue a pilot who had bailed out of a damaged aircraft in enemy territory. Demonstrating remarkable courage, Lieutenant Van Boven flew his helicopter several miles behind enemy lines and exposed himself to intense ground fire to accomplish his mission. He located the downed officer in an open rice paddy surrounded by attacking enemy forces, but unfavorable ground conditions did not permit a landing. Despite continuous enemy fire, Lieutenant Van Boven maneuvered the helicopter close to the ground until the rescue was completed. In performing this heroic deed, Lieutenant Van Boven voluntarily risked his life to save an American pilot. His valorous action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 129 (March 29, 1951)

WOLFE, CHARLES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles F. Wolfe, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States as Pilot of a B-26 attack bomber, 13th Bombardment Squadron, 3d Bombardment Group, on the night of 15 February 1952. Captain Wolfe's primary mission was to employ and evaluate new tactics designed to increase the effectiveness of night interdiction. Between Namsi-dong and Sonch'on, Korea, he pressed repeated bombing and strafing attacks under flares dropped to illuminate a moving train. Despite accurate anti-aircraft fire which inflicted thirty-five holes in his aircraft, he continued his attacks at extremely low altitude in order to accurately evaluate his tactics. Disregarding personal safety, and extremely heavy battle damage, Captain Wolfe capably demonstrated the destructive power of his aircraft's armament by destroying a live locomotive, nine boxcars and two anti-aircraft batteries. Captain Wolfe's gallant action and skillful airmanship were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters, Far East Air Forces, General Orders No. 214 (May 1, 1952)

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