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Citations For
U.S. Navy 
Awards of the Silver Star

for 
Conspicuous Gallantry
in Action During

WORLD WAR II

Posted May 2007 - Next Scheduled Update: July 2007

World War II Navy Silver Star Citations
A-Z

 

 

ABASTA, FRANK PATRICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Frank Patrick Abasta (3828290), Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of the Armed Guard on board the S.S. Warrior when his ship was attacked on 1 July 1942. Apprentice Seaman Abasta remained at the side of his Commanding Officer after the rest of the crew had abandoned the vessel following a torpedoing, despite the fact that the ship began settling by the stern immediately after the first explosion. From a precarious position on the sloping deck Apprentice Seaman Abasta continued to man a 3-inch gun with utter disregard for his own personal safety. Too intent upon directing fire at the threatening submarine to consider his own plight, Apprentice Seaman Abasta waited until the ship had completely upended before putting on a life belt, then lost his footing, fell from the platform, and slid into the sea. By his unyielding loyalty in the face of imminent, ever-increasing danger he helped prevent the full surfacing of the attacking submarine and subsequent possibility of further casualties.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Home of Record: Los Angeles, California

ASCHENBRENNER, CLARENCE JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Clarence John Aschenbrenner, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in action during the attack on the U.S.S. MARBLEHEAD (CL-12) by Japanese forces on 10 February 1942. Seaman Second Class Aschenbrenner performed tremendous feats of lifting and moving heavy wreckage ceaselessly for forty-eight hours.
Born: May 30, 1918 at New Ulm, Minnesota

ASHFORD, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William H. Ashford, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: August 1, 1903 at Carson City, Nevada

BARR, CHARLES JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Charles James Barr, Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

BENCH, WILLIE GUY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Willie Guy Bench, Chief Electrician's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

*BLAIR, EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Eugene Blair (2655751), Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in combat and courageous devotion to duty as a member of the After Repair Party attached to the U.S.S. WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7), during a surprise aerial bombing attack by enemy Japanese forces at Darwin, Australia, on 19 February 1942. Despite the rapidity with which the attack developed and the very obvious danger of being trapped by an explosion, Chief Machinist's Mate Blair in company with a shipmate, went immediately below decks and had just completed closing all doors and hatches when a bomb hitting within a few feet of him caused his death. Because of his courage and efficiency in the performance of this hazardous task, the flooding of the ship following the bombing attack was confined to two compartments.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Home of Record: Rhode Island

BORAGO, FRANK COLON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Frank Colon Borago, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

BROCKMAN, ROBERT JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Robert John Brockman, Torpedoman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

BROWNING, MILES RUTHERFORD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Miles Rutherford Browning, Captain, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: April 10, 1897 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey

BULKELEY, JOHN DUNCAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John Duncan Bulkeley, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary action and retrograde maneuver involving General Douglas MacArthur. Lieutenant Bulkeley made detailed plans involving exacting preparations for a movement of major strategic importance and of the most hazardous nature, then executed the mission with marked skill and coolness in the face of greatly superior enemy forces.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)

BURACKER, WILLIAM HOUCK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William Houck Buracker, Captain, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: July 25, 1897 at Luray, Virginia
Home of Record: Winchester, Massachusetts

BURAKER, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William H. Buraker, Captain, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: April 10, 1897 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey

BURROUGHS, SHERMAN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Sherman E. Burroughs, Jr., Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: February 22, 1903 at Manchester, New Hampshire

BURWELL, WALTER B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Walter B. Burwell, Lieutenant (MC), U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry and intrepidity in his profession as a Medical Officer on his ship the U.S.S. Suwannee (CVE-27) from 25 to 28 October 1944. While operating off Japanese-held Leyte Island, Philippine Islands, against nearby Japanese surface task forces his ship was struck three times by Japanese aircraft attacks on 25 and 26 October 1944. These three attacks not only so damaged the ship it was unable further to carry on air operations but also caused extremely heavy casualties. While he was tending the wounded of 25 October in the forward battle dressing station, aft and below the catapult machinery spaces the attack of 26 October extinguished the lights, shattered the bulkheads and caused water from a ruptured main to pour in on the wounded. He immediately evacuated them, moving them to the after-hatch of the compartment, going into the next compartment alone, and after dogging down the door, exploring it to make sure it was safe for the wounded. He repeated this process through several compartments leading his party of wounded to safety. He later made his way through smoke and flame to the forecastle isolated from the rest of the ship by the flight deck fire of great intensity to tend the wounded there. For four days he labored over the dying and wounded without sleep, with skill and devotion and with a calming demeanor. His use of the talents of his profession, his personal courage and devotion are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Navy of the United States.

*CALCATERRA, HERBERT ANDREW
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Herbert Andrew Calcaterra (03760059), Motor Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as member of a 3-inch gun crew aboard the U.S.S. POMPANO (SS-181) during action against an armed enemy patrol ship on 4 September 1942. Remaining at his exposed station in the face of hostile machine-gun fire, Motor Machinist's Mate First Class Calcaterra, with cool courage and utter disregard for his own personal safety, manned his gun until, after the first thirteen minutes of action, he was fatally wounded. His heroic devotion to duty, maintained at great risk in the face of grave danger, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Board Serial 25 (January 16, 1943
Born: April 7, 1920 at Escalon, California
Home of Record: Escalon, California

*CARR, PAUL HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Paul Henry Carr, Gunner's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Gun Captain of a 5"/38 Mount on the U.S.S. SAMUEL B. ROBERTS, in action against enemy Japanese forces off Samar Island during the Second Battle of the Philippine Sea, 25 October 1944. With the power of the rammer lost and mechanical failures in the ammunition hoist, Carr manned his station steadfastly in the face of continuous close-range fire of enemy guns during an attack by a numerically superior Japanese surface force on the Samuel B. Roberts. By his outstanding technical skill and courageous initiative, Carr was instrumental in causing rapid and heavy fire from the gun to inflict damage upon an enemy heavy cruiser. Although mortally wounded by the premature detonation of a powder charge, fired by hand, Carr tried unassisted to load and ram the only projectile available to that mount after order to abandon ship had been given. His aggressive determination of duty reflected the highest credit upon Carr and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

CASTENGERA, WILLIAM JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to William Joseph Castengera, Torpedoman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

CLARK, ALBERT HOBBS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Albert Hobbs Clark, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

CORBISIERE, DOMINICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Dominick Corbisiere, Ship's Cook Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

COTE, RAYMOND CONRAD JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Raymond Conrad Joseph Cote, Firecontrolman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

CRAIG, JACK CECIL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Jack Cecil Craig, Torpedoman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

CUCINELLO, NICHOLAS GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Nicholas George Cucinello, Chief Watertender, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving on board the U.S.S. Quail (AM-15), after that vessel was ordered scuttled in the Philippine Islands on 6 May 1942. After it became apparent that the fall of Corregidor was imminent, Chief Watertender Cucinello volunteered with others to assist their commanding officer in performing this task, left the shelter of Fort Hughes and raced through exposed areas of the Fort Hughes dock while that place was under heavy artillery barrage. Upon their arrival at the dock they found their ship's small boat sunk and, accordingly, had to swim 200 yards to another boat anchored at the dock. While in the water Chief Watertender Cucinello and his comrades swam through Japanese artillery fire and numerous airplane strafing attacks, but reached the small boat nevertheless. He then proceeded with his comrades to the QUAIL, continuing to dodge artillery and airplane machine gun fire en route, until the minesweeper was reached and scuttled. By his great effort, Chief Watertender Cucinello materially assisted in accomplishing this difficult and dangerous task. His conduct throughout reflects great credit upon himself, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)
Born: June 19, 1914 at Ryegate, Montana
Home of Record: Bloomington, California

DECKER, FRANCIS JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Francis Joseph Decker, Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

DEHOSNERY, STEWART ALEXANDER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Stewart Alexander DeHosnery, Mess Attendant First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

DEVITT, JOHN ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John Albert Devitt, Chief Electrician's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

DOW, LEONARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Leonard J. Dow, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: July 26, 1902 at Bowling Green, Ohio

DOWNS, JAMES THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to James Thomas Downs, Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FESTIN, STANLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Stanley Festin, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FISH, HAROLD ROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Harold Roy Fish, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FRAZER, JENNINGS BRYAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Jennings Bryan Frazer, Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FRITSCH, WILLIAM HAROLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to William Harold Fritsch, Electrician's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FROGNER, GORDON INGVALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Gordon Ingvald Frogner, Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

FRYMAN, GLENN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Glenn A. Fryman, Motor Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. PEARY (DD-226) in the Pacific War Area on 28 December 1941. When a fragment of a bomb miss penetrated a 4-inch powder cartridge and set it afire, Motor Machinist's Mate Second Class Fryman un-strapped the cartridge from its stowage and threw it overboard.
Born: January 15, 1922 at Brooksville, Ohio

GARNER, RALPH J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Ralph J. Garner, Coxswain, U.S. Navy, for gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of the Armed Guard on board a merchant vessel during an enemy aerial attack. Following the explosion of a bomb which struck the No. 6 hatch and started fires in all sections of the hold, Coxswain Garner manned a machine gun and maintained constant fire on the enemy bomber during the attack. Tracer bullets were seen to enter the fuselage of the low-flying bomber, which dropped, swerved, and was driven off, and later, when beached, was discovered to contain 1,200 rounds of ammunition and a crew of seven dead aviators.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

GONYER, ALVIN LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Alvin Leroy Gonyer, Signalman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

GOODHUE, THEODORE LESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Theodore Lester Goodhue, Torpedoman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

GRIGGS, GALE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gale E. Griggs, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: November 6, 1904 at Lincoln, Nebraska

GUNN, FREDERICK ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Frederick Albert Gunn, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

GUTTERMUTH, JOHN GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John George Guttermuth, Fireman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HAGOPAN, JACOB
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Jacob Hagopan, Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HARLFINGER, FREDERICK JOSEPH, II
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Frederick Joseph Harlfinger, II, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HARRISON, DONALD WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Donald William Harrison, Electrician's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HAUFFMAN, PERCY H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Percy H. Hauffman, Master, U.S. Merchant Marines, for extraordinary heroism and outstanding devotion to duty in the line of his profession as Commanding Officer of the S.S. HILLARY A. HERBERT during the landings of Allied Forces at Anzio, Italy, on 22 January 1943. Master Hauffman showed extraordinary ability and courageous action under fire in landing the S.S. HILLARY A. HERBERT at the beachhead and discharging her cargo of ammunition, gasoline and other vital supplies during a terrific aerial and shore bombardment.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)

HAWN, RICHARD GATLING
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Richard Gatling Hawn, Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HEAD, GEORGE WILLIAM
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to George William Head, Pharmacist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving on board the U.S.S. Quail (AM-15), during the period 8 December 1941 to 6 May 1942. Throughout this period Pharmacist's Mate First Class Head kept the crew of the U.S.S. Quail in excellent health, mostly in an independent duty status as there was no regular medical officer assigned to the unit to which that vessel was attached. Pharmacist's Mate First Class Head contributed greatly to their morale, encouraging the brave to perform their duties efficiently under severe enemy air and artillery attacks. In the final stages of the siege of Corregidor, he was many times called upon for additional duties ashore, aiding the medical officers in the forts in caring for the wounded. On one occasion at Fort Hughes, near the last hours before surrender, he took complete charge of the first-aid and preliminary treatment of badly injured men, due to the medical officers themselves being injured. When about to be captured by the enemy, he voluntarily chose to attempt to escape, even though it was explained to him that it was extremely dangerous for him to do so. In attendance upon the 15 other men and two officers in a small boat on a 2,000-mile journey over a period of 31 days, he not only kept all members in good health, without a single instance of serious illness, but he also acted as dietician, inspected and treated all fresh water and food, and was at all times an asset to morale. By his own foresight, he brought a plentiful supply of medical equipment and supplies on this trip. He frequently and successfully administered first-aid treatment to natives of islands visited and by this means and by means of his personality, invariably effected friendly relations with suspicious natives, thereby greatly contributing to the successful outcome of the voyage.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)

HEYMAN, HARRY
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Harry Heyman, Coxswain, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commander of the No. 1 gun on board a United States warship. While under attack by enemy Japanese forces, Coxswain Heyman fired his gun promptly and accurately, thereby contributing materially to the success of the mission to which his ship was assigned.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

HOATSON, CLINTON LYLE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Clinton Lyle Hoatson, Jr., Pharmacist's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Corpsman serving with the SECOND Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces at Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, on 21 November 1943. When the LVT on which he was embarked was destroyed by an enemy mine during landing operations, Pharmacist's Mate Third Class Hoatson although suffering severe pain from a broken leg received when the boat capsized, valiantly attempted to extricate other occupants from the wreckage. By his daring initiative, great personal valor and grave concern for the safety of his comrades at great risk to his own life, Pharmacist's Mate Third Class Hoatson was an inspiration to all with whom he served and his self-sacrificing devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
PacFlt, Board Serial 47 (February 23, 1944)

HOY, JAMES ELTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to James Elton Hoy, Fireman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HUGHES, ROBERT LUTHER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Robert Luther Hughes, Electrician's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HUGHES, WALTER ROBERT, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Walter Robert Hughes, Jr., Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

HYATT, LARSON JUNIOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Larson Junior Hyatt, Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

JACKSON, LONNIE DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Lonnie David Jackson, Mess Attendant First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

JACKSON, ROBERT FRANKLIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Robert Franklin Jackson, Fireman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

JOHNSON, LYNDON BAINES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Lyndon Baines Johnson, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action in the vicinity of Port Moresby and Salamaua, New Guinea while attached to a B-26 bomber of the 22d Bombardment Group, Far East Air Forces, U.S. Army Air Force, on 9 June 1942. While on a mission of obtaining information in the Southwest Pacific area, Lieutenant Commander Johnson, in order to obtain personal knowledge of combat conditions, volunteered as an observer on a hazardous aerial combat mission over hostile positions in New Guinea. As our planes neared the target area they were intercepted by eight hostile fighters. When, at this time, the plane in which Lieutenant Commander Johnson was an observer, developed mechanical trouble and was forced to turn back alone, presenting a favorable target to the enemy fighters, he evidenced marked coolness in spite of the hazards involved. His gallant action enabled him to obtain and return with valuable information.
Headquarters, U.S. Forces, Southwest Pacific Area, General Orders Number 12 (1942)

JOINER, THURMAN LOUIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Thurman Louis Joiner, Torpedoman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KAIL, KENNETH KARLYLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Kenneth Karlyle Kail, Seaman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KEIFER, EDWIN ARNOLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Edwin Arnold Keifer, Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KEISELBACH, ARTHUR EDWIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Arthur Edwin Keiselbach, Radioman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KELTNER, MORRIS HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Morris Henry Keltner, Chief Quartermaster, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KIEFER, EDWIN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Edwin H. Kiefer, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action during the Japanese aerial attack on Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, on 7 December 1941. Lieutenant (j.g.) Kiefer helped maintain by hand, ammunition supply to antiaircraft guns until he was overcome by smoke and fire.
Born: December 13, 1916 at Freeport, Illinois

KING, HOMER LYMON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Homer Lymon King, Torpedoman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

KUMP, GLEN DIEVER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Glen Diever Kump, Seaman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

LEIGHTLEY, ALBERT LEWIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Albert Lewis Leightley, Signalman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

LEON, ANTHONY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Anthony Leon, Fireman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

LEWEY, ERNEST B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Ernest B. Lewey (K-100031), Commander, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, for gallantry in action while serving with the U.S. Cost and Geodetic Survey in Manila Harbor, Philippine Islands, from 22 February 1945 to 24 February 1945. As Commanding Officer of selected Engineer Boat and Shore specialist troops, Commander (then Lieutenant Commander) Lewey conducted the initial hydrographic survey of Manila Harbor prior to opening this important port for military operations. Despite extreme personal risk from rifle, mortar, and machine gun fire directed by enemy troops from concealed positions on shore, and on piers, jetties, and partly submerged vessels in the harbor, he led this hazardous survey for three days and nights until the objective area was explored and mapped for the safe anchorage and servicing of ocean-going cargo vessels. Commander Lewey's courage, tenacity, and leadership constitute gallantry in the highest traditions of the service.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces Western Pacific, General Orders Number 53 (July 3, 1945)
Home of Record: Pulaski, Virginia

LIGGETT, CLABE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Clabe Liggett, Jr., Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

MARSHALL, THEODORE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Theodore W. Marshall, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action while serving with the Patrol Squadron TWENTY-ONE (VP-21), during the Japanese aerial attack on Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, on 7 December 1941. Lieutenant Marshall commandeered a truck and ferried personnel to battle stations. Later, he pursued a torpedo bomber and attacked the enemy craft for 150 miles.
Born: October 26, 1917 at Kansas City, Missouri

MARSTERS, JOHN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John William Marsters, Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

MARTAUZ, STANLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Stanley Martauz, Ensign, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in the performance of his duties in a United States Submarine during a war patrol of that vessel. As Assistant Diving Officer, his careful and precise control of depth were of invaluable assistance to his Commanding Officer in conducting successful attacks which resulted in the sinking of numerous enemy ships and small craft totaling some 16,000 tons. His coolness and high devotion to duty contributed directly to the success of his vessel in evading enemy countermeasures. His conduct throughout was an inspiration to the officers and men in his ship, and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Home of Record: Ohio

MCCAIN, LINDELL H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Lindell H. McCain, Radioman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. PIGEON (AM-47) during a Japanese aerial attack on the Navy Yard at Cavite, Philippine Islands, on 10 December 1941. Despite frequent explosions of air flasks and torpedo warheads, danger from burning docks, and in the face of continued enemy bombing attacks, Radioman Third Class McCain and two comrades courageously and ably assisted in the work of towing a United States submarine to safety and in clearing the docks of the Cavite Navy Yard of naval vessels and yard craft.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

MCCONNELL, MAURICE LEONARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Maurice Leonard McConnell, Pharmacist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

MCCOY, CHARLES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Charles H. McCoy, Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

MCLEOD, JOHN N., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John N. McLeod, Jr., Gunner's Mate Third Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a member of the Armed Guard on board a vessel during an attack. As a result of Gunner's Mate Third Class McLeod's alert and aggressive action in promptly manning an anti-aircraft gun when that vessel was subjected to a low-level dive-bombing attack while lying at anchor, one of a formation of ten enemy planes was shot down. His effective fire, maintained throughout the attack, was instrumental in preventing damage to the ship.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

MEEKER, JACK FOREST, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jack Forest Meeker, Jr., Watertender First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving on board the U.S.S. Quail (AM-15), after that vessel was ordered scuttled in the Philippine Islands on 6 May 1942. After it became apparent that the fall of Corregidor was imminent, Watertender First Class Meeker volunteered with others to assist their commanding officer in performing this task, left the shelter of Fort Hughes and raced through exposed areas of the Fort Hughes dock while that place was under heavy artillery barrage. Upon their arrival at the dock they found their ship's small boat sunk and, accordingly, had to swim 200 yards to another boat anchored at the dock. While in the water Watertender First Class Meeker and his comrades swam through Japanese artillery fire and numerous airplane strafing attacks, but reached the small boat nevertheless. He then proceeded with his comrades to the QUAIL, continuing to dodge artillery and airplane machine gun fire en route, until the minesweeper was reached and scuttled. By his great effort, Watertender First Class Meeker materially assisted in accomplishing this difficult and dangerous task. His conduct throughout reflects great credit upon himself, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)
Born: June 19, 1914 at Ryegate, Montana
Home of Record: Bloomington, California

MILLER, ROBERT CARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Robert Carl Miller, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

MOULTON, HORACE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Horace D. Moulton, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: September 29, 1909 at Sabetha, Kansas

NEARMAN, KENNETH EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Kenneth Eugene Nearman, Seaman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

NICHOL, BROMFIELD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Bromfield B. Nichol, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on the Staff of the Task Force Commander during the period 6 December 1941 through 14 June 1942, in the Marshall and Gilbert Islands.
Born: January 18, 1904 at New Orleans, Louisiana

*OSWALD, HARVEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Harvey E. Oswald (4103330), Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in combat and courageous devotion to duty as a member of the Ammunition Party attached to the U.S.S. WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7), during a surprise aerial bombing attack by enemy Japanese forces at Darwin, Australia, on 19 February 1942. Within a few minutes after the sounding of general quarters, Machinist's Mate Second Class Oswald and a comrade ran on their own initiative, manned a machine gun and opened fire on the enemy. They lost their lives a short time later when a bomb struck in that vicinity.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Home of Record: Columbus, Ohio

OWEN, GEORGE THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to George Thomas Owen, Commander, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action as acting Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. CURTIS (AV-4), during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, on 7 December 1941. Commander Owen organized his command in a spirited and effective defense.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 302 (May 1942)

*PARKS, FLOYD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Floyd D. Parks (2234356), Fireman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in combat and courageous devotion to duty as a member of the Ammunition Party attached to the U.S.S. WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7), during a surprise aerial bombing attack by enemy Japanese forces at Darwin, Australia, on 19 February 1942. Within a few minutes after the sounding of general quarters, Fireman First Class Parks and a comrade ran on their own initiative, manned a machine gun and opened fire on the enemy. They lost their lives a short time later when a bomb struck in that vicinity.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Home of Record: Dover, New Jersey

PAROLINI, GEACOMO ARTURO G
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Geacomo Arturo G Parolini, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as Machine Gun Control Officer on board the U.S.S. LAFFEY (DD-459), in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Okinawa Area on 16 April 1945. When the machine guns under his command were put out of action after shooting down one enemy plane, and hazardous fires were started as result of enemy air attacks, Lieutenant (j.g.) Parolini directed fire fighting efforts until the flames were under control and, despite a painful leg injury, strafing and exploding ammunition, directed the evacuation of the wounded to battle dressing stations. By his leadership and gallant devotion to duty, Lieutenant (j.g.) Parolini upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

PARSONS, WILLIAM STERLING
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to William Sterling Parsons, Commodore, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action while participating in aerial flight against the Japanese Empire, while attached to the 509th Composite Group, TWENTIETH Air Force. Commodore (then Captain) Parsons was Senior Military Technical Observer on a B-29 aircraft of the 393d Bombardment Group which flew from a base in the Marianas Islands 6 August 1945 to drop on the city of Hiroshima, Japan, the first atomic bomb to be used in warfare. After takeoff in the very early morning hours, the plane set course as planned. Captain Parsons then climbed into the bomb bay to load the powder charge, which had been postponed until well after takeoff to assure the safety of the island from which departure had been made. The job was completed without incident in forty minutes. As the airplane approached Japan, the risks grew greater, for the element of hazard from the unknown was ever present, since this was the first time this bomb, much more destructive than any in existence, had been released from an airplane. The possibilities of damage from anti-aircraft fire, enemy fighters, and unforeseen failures added to the risk, nor was it certain what effect the detonation would have upon the bomber and its occupants. Accompanying the mission to insure the bomb's correct use, Captain Parsons kept careful watch until the plane was in its briefed position, and then approved release. At 0915 the switch was pressed, the bomb cleared safely, and fell towards it planned objective. They then departed with speed from the target area, traveling a safe distance before the blast occurred. By his high degree of skill in directing work with the atomic bomb, and great personal risk in placing the powder charge in the bomb during flight, Captain Parsons distinguished himself, reflecting the highest credit on himself and the United States Navy.
Headquarters, 20th Air Force, General Orders Number 68 (September 19, 1945)

PEARCE, HEPBURN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Hepburn A. Pearce, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism in action during the attack on the U.S.S. MARBLEHEAD (CL-12) by Japanese forces on 10 February 1942. Lieutenant Pearce voluntarily took charge of Forward Repair Party and assisted in bringing fires under control, checking spread of water in the ship and in rescue of the wounded.
Born: January 3, 1908 at Dorchester, Massachusetts

PERKOWSKY, FELIX
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Felix Perkowsky, Chief Torpedoman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

PERRY, RALPH RAYMOND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Ralph Raymond Perry, Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

PESEK, GUSTAV
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gustav Pesek, Ship's Cook First Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Crewman of the U.S.S. SEA DEVIL, during the Second War Patrol of that vessel in enemy Japanese-controlled waters, from November 19, 1944 to January 11, 1945. Skilled in the performance of duty, Ship's Cook First Class Pesek rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer in conducting attacks to sink two hostile vessels totaling over 17,000 tons and damaged another of approximately 30,000 tones, despite severe enemy countermeasures. His devotion to his duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

PING, FRED EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Fred Eugene Ping, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

PITTS, RAYMOND LESLIE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Raymond Leslie Pitts, Ensign, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

POGREBA, PAUL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Paul R. Pogreba, Boatswain's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. PIGEON (AM-47) during a Japanese aerial attack on the Navy Yard at Cavite, Philippine Islands, on 10 December 1941. Despite frequent explosions of air flasks and torpedo warheads, danger from burning docks, and in the face of continued enemy bombing attacks, Boatswain's Mate First Class Pogreba and two comrades courageously and ably assisted in the work of towing a United States submarine to safety and in clearing the docks of the Cavite Navy Yard of naval vessels and yard craft.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

POPPER, FRANCIS X.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Francis X. Popper (K-100024), Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Cost and Geodetic Survey, for gallantry in action while serving with the U.S. Cost and Geodetic Survey on Palawan, Philippine Islands from 8 February 1945 to 13 February 1945. During this period Lieutenant Commander Popper voluntarily participated in an extremely hazardous reconnaissance of enemy-held beaches at Palawan to determine areas suitable for a forthcoming assault landing by American troops. With a small party he departed from Mindoro in a PT boat, ingeniously contacted Filipino guerillas and planned an examination of the beaches. After an unsuccessful initial attempt to land, due to surf and coral reefs, Lieutenant Commander Popper, disregarding the close proximity of approximately 1800 Japanese, reconnoitered several units on the shore and obtained information which proved invaluable to the success of the Palawan invasion. His gallantry, poise, leadership and devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds were conspicuous and exemplify the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, 8th Army, General Orders Number 46 (May 25, 1946)
Home of Record: Washington, D.C.

REECE, JOHN DANIEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John Daniel Reece, Electrician's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to William Henry Richardson, Radioman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

RICKS, ROBERT BYRON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert Byron Ricks, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy (Reserve), for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Commanding Officer of the Navy Armed Guard aboard a merchant vessel during action against enemy forces in alien waters on 2 May 1942. Lieutenant (j.g.) Ricks Armed Guard crew stood by their battle stations for two consecutive days and nights without sleep or rest and effectively repelled persistent raids upon the convoy, under his alter vigilance. By his efficient leadership and his intensive training of the Armed Guard and the ship's crew under adverse conditions, Lieutenant (j.g.) Ricks enabled his ship to survive a series of perilous encounters and reach her port of destination with an important war cargo.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

ROBERTS, HENRY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Henry Lee Roberts, Ship's Cook First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

ROBINSON, FOREST GORDON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Forest Gordon Robinson, Chief Electrician's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

ROSEN, JACOB
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Jacob Rosen, Yeoman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

SAUNDERS, CLIFFORD HARRISON, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Clifford Harrison Saunders, Jr., Torpedoman First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

SCHINDLER, WALTER GABRIEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Walter Gabriel Schindler, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Gunnery Officer on the Staff of Task Force Commander for the first ten months of the war.
Born: December 10, 1897 at New Glarus, Wisconsin
Home of Record: New Glarus, Wisconsin
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII)

SCHOTTLER, GEORGE HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to George Henry Schottler, Ensign, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

*SCHULER, RALPH EDWARD (MIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Ralph Edward Schuler (3372066), Fireman First Class, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. Pecos during the sinking of that vessel by Japanese air forces off Christmas Island on 1 March 1942. Fireman First Class Schuler volunteered to man the cargo pumps and continued to man them throughout the action, inspte of the necessity of exposing himself to additional danger above his assigned duties.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 308 (November 1942)
Home of Record: St. Clair, Missouri

SCOTT, KENNETH IRWIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Kenneth Irwin Scott, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

SCOTT, ROY JIM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Roy Jim Scott, Jr., Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

SEIFERT, PAUL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Paul R. Seifert, Machinist, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. STEWART (DD-224) in action against a greatly superior Japanese Naval force in the Badoeng Strait, off the Island of Bali, Netherlands East Indies, on the night of 19 - 20 February 1942. Machinist Seifert, with great skill and daring, handled the pumping to enable the ship to keep station as flagship during the enemy action.

SHIELDS, JOHN FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to John Francis Shields, Gunner's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy (Reserve), for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

SMILEY, CLARE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Clare B. Smiley, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Executive Officer on board the U.S.S. STEWART (DD-224) in action against a greatly superior Japanese Naval force in the Badoeng Strait, off the Island of Bali, Netherlands East Indies, on the night of 19 - 20 February 1942. Though wounded, Lieutenant Commander Smiley persisted in carrying on his duties.
Born: January 30, 1912 at Birmingham, Alabama

SOUTHERN, JESSE PHILLIP
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Jesse Phillip Southern, Chief Signalman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

STANFORD, WILLIAM WILSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to William Wilson Stanford, Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

STEELE, JAMES HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to James Howard Steele, Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving on board the U.S.S. Quail (AM-15), after that vessel was ordered scuttled in the Philippine Islands on 6 May 1942. After it became apparent that the fall of Corregidor was imminent, Chief Machinist's Mate Steele volunteered with others to assist their commanding officer in performing this task, left the shelter of Fort Hughes and raced through exposed areas of the Fort Hughes dock while that place was under heavy artillery barrage. Upon their arrival at the dock they found their ship's small boat sunk and, accordingly, had to swim 200 yards to another boat anchored at the dock. While in the water Chief Machinist's Mate Steele and his comrades swam through Japanese artillery fire and numerous airplane strafing attacks, but reached the small boat nevertheless. He then proceeded with his comrades to the QUAIL, continuing to dodge artillery and airplane machine gun fire en route, until the minesweeper was reached and scuttled. By his great effort, Chief Machinist's Mate Steele materially assisted in accomplishing this difficult and dangerous task. His conduct throughout reflects great credit upon himself, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)
Born: June 19, 1914 at Ryegate, Montana
Home of Record: Bloomington, California

STUART, DANIEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Daniel A. Stuart, Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. MADISON (DD-425) during frequent shore bombardments and engagements with sub-surface craft in the Menton Area on the France-Italian Riviera during September 1944. Under the capable and inspiring leadership of Commander Stuart, the U.S.S. MADISON conducted repeated and effective firing missions against hostile shore batteries and troop concentrations which ranged themselves against the allied ground advance towards and beyond the Italian border. With excellent accuracy and volume of fire, his ship assisted in breaking up enemy counter-attacks against our ground forces and in the neutralization and destruction of many vital targets opposing the Allied occupation of the coastal areas. On 18 September 1944 when a large number of hostile submarines were sent out to attack the U.S.S. MADISON and an accompanying destroyer, ten of these craft were positively and one possibly sunk in the ensuing action. By his skillful maneuvering and intrepid prosecution of this action, Commander Stuart avoided all attacks on his ship and was responsible for at least four of the sinkings. The exceptional courage, fearless leadership under fire and outstanding devotion to duty displayed by Commander Stuart were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.

TAYLOR, VICTOR LARUE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Victor LaRue Taylor, Radioman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

TEBO, KENNETH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Kenneth M. Tebo, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action and meritorious devotion to duty while serving as Officer-of-the-Deck on a United States destroyer during a successful offensive engagement with an enemy vessel. Lieutenant Tebo's accurate conning of the ship undoubtedly prevented loss or damage to his ship and its personnel and aided materially in the complete destruction of the enemy vessel.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

THOMPSON, ROBERT MOODY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Robert Moody Thompson, Apprentice Seaman, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

VAN HOOSIER, JOSEPH J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Joseph J. Van Hoosier, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for meritorious conduct at the peril of his own life during the attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet in Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, by Japanese forces on 7 December 1941. After having saved his own life by swimming from the capsized U.S.S. UTAH (AG-16) to the shore of Ford Island, Seaman Second Class Van Hoosier heard cries of distress from his shipmates in the water. In spite of enemy strafing and bombing and while in full uniform, he immediately swam back towards the ship and succeeded in rescuing Harold H. Ray, Seaman Second Class, USN, bringing him to the shore. Immediately thereafter he made at least four more trips to the ship's side, assisting a shipmate in distress each time. His initiative, courage, presence of mind and unselfishness were in keeping with the best traditions of the United States Naval Service.

WALLER, JOHN JEFFERSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John Jefferson Waller, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallant and intrepid conduct as a member of the United States Armed Guard aboard the U.S.A.T. MERIMACK, on the occasion of the torpedoing of that vessel by an enemy submarine on 9 June 1942. Immediately following the explosion, Seaman Second Class Waller promptly manned his gun and despite the hazards of further torpedo attacks remained at his battle station until the forward part of the ship was awash and the order "Abandon Ship" was given. Because of his loyal and determined fighting spirit, Seaman Second Class Waller was one of the last to leave the ship. His courageous devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)
Home of Record: Savannah, Georgia

WEINMANN, CHARLES ERNEST
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Charles Ernest Weinmann, Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving on board the U.S.S. Quail (AM-15), after that vessel was ordered scuttled in the Philippine Islands on 6 May 1942. After it became apparent that the fall of Corregidor was imminent, Chief Machinist's Mate Weinmann volunteered with others to assist their commanding officer in performing this task, left the shelter of Fort Hughes and raced through exposed areas of the Fort Hughes dock while that place was under heavy artillery barrage. Upon their arrival at the dock they found their ship's small boat sunk and, accordingly, had to swim 200 yards to another boat anchored at the dock. While in the water Chief Machinist's Mate Weinmann and his comrades swam through Japanese artillery fire and numerous airplane strafing attacks, but reached the small boat nevertheless. He then proceeded with his comrades to the QUAIL, continuing to dodge artillery and airplane machine gun fire en route, until the minesweeper was reached and scuttled. By his great effort, Chief Machinist's Mate Weinmann materially assisted in accomplishing this difficult and dangerous task. His conduct throughout reflects great credit upon himself, and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 306 (September 1942)
Born: June 19, 1914 at Ryegate, Montana
Home of Record: Bloomington, California

WHITE, DAVID CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to David Charles White, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. PLUNGER (SS-179) during a successful and aggressive submarine patrol in enemy Japanese controlled waters during the period 13 December 1941 to 3 February 1942. Skillfully and courageously pressing home his attacks against the enemy, Lieutenant Commander White enabled his ship to sink one enemy destroyer of 1,315 tons and to damage another of approximately the same size. Despite enemy counter efforts, he dauntlessly brought the PLUNGER through without damage and his crew home without loss or injury. His expert seamanship and heroic devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: November 13, 1903 at Detroit, Michigan
Home of Record: Detroit, Michigan

WILLIS, EVERETT BRYANT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Everett Bryant Willis, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

WILSON, JOHN V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to John V. Wilson, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Gunnery Officer on board the U.S.S. Parrott (DD-218) in action against enemy Japanese naval forces at Badoeng Straits off the Island of Bali, Netherlands East Indies, on the night of 19 - 20 February 1942. Lieutenant Wilson, though wounded, remained at his battle station to fulfill his duties.
Born: March 2, 1918 at Sumter, South Carolina

*WILSON, LERAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to LeRay Wilson, Metalsmith Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in combat and courageous devotion to duty as a member of the After Repair Party attached to the U.S.S. WILLIAM B. PRESTON (AVD-7), during a surprise aerial bombing attack by enemy Japanese forces at Darwin, Australia, on 19 February 1942. Despite the rapidity with which the attack developed and the very obvious danger of being trapped by an explosion, Metalsmith Second Class Wilson in company with a shipmate, went immediately below decks and had just completed closing all doors and hatches when a bomb hitting within a few feet of him caused his death. Because of his courage and efficiency in the performance of this hazardous task, the flooding of the ship following the bombing attack was confined to two compartments.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)
Born: February 4, 1920 at Cove, Oregon
Home of Record: Cove, Oregon

WOOD, SAMUEL H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Samuel H. Wood, Chief Shipfitter, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving on board the U.S.S. PIGEON (AM-47) during a Japanese aerial attack on the Navy Yard at Cavite, Philippine Islands, on 10 December 1941. Despite frequent explosions of air flasks and torpedo warheads, danger from burning docks, and in the face of continued enemy bombing attacks, Chief Shipfitter Wood and two comrades courageously and ably assisted in the work of towing a United States submarine to safety and in clearing the docks of the Cavite Navy Yard of naval vessels and yard craft.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

WOODWORTH, HARRY EADES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Harry Eades Woodworth, Lieutenant (j.g.), U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

WRIGHT, JACK E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Jack E. Wright, Chief Boatswain's Mate, U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a spotter for the Captain of the No. 1 gun on board a United States warship. While under attack by enemy Japanese forces, Chief Boatswain's Mate Wright spotted the shots on the target, although inexperienced at his station as gun captain. His actions contributed materially to the success of the mission to which his ship was assigned.
Bureau of Naval Personnel Information Bulletin No. 309 (December 1942)

ZARZECKI, HENRY JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Henry Joseph Zarzecki, Fireman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

ZEEMAN, CHESTER BERNARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Chester Bernard Zeeman, Machinist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

ZUBIK, ALBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Army Award) to Albert Zubik, Seaman Second Class, U.S. Navy, for gallantry in action and participation in the accomplishment of an unusual and hazardous mission for the War Department in enemy-controlled waters during January - March 1942, while a member of the crew of the U.S.S. TROUT (SS-202). Carrying a heavy load of antiaircraft ammunition urgently needed by the beleaguered forces of General Douglas MacArthur in the Philippine Islands, the U.S.S. TROUT departed from Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, for Corregidor Island, Manila Bay, at 0900 on 12 January 1942, refueling at Midway Island on 16 January 1942. The U.S.S. TROUT proceeded on the surface until 21 January, traveling submerged thereafter during daylight hours. At 0230 on 27 January 1942, an unsuccessful night attack was made on a lighted vessel, resulting in the U.S.S. TROUT being chased by the vessel at such speed as to for the TROUT to dive in order to escape. On 3 February 1942, after dark, the TROUT made rendezvous off Corregidor with an escort motor torpedo boat. The TROUT then followed the escort at high speed through a winding passage in a mine field to South Dock, Corregidor Island, where she unloaded 3500 rounds of antiaircraft artillery ammunition for the Army Forces defending Bataan Peninsula and Corregidor. Twenty tons of gold and silver, securities, diplomatic and United States mail and two additional torpedoes were loaded on the TROUT for the return voyage. The TROUT cleared the Corregidor dock at 0300, 4 February and bottomed in Manila Bay during daylight on 4 February. Surfacing that night, additional securities and mail were loaded before the TROUT departed from Manila Bay through the mine field. On the return trip one enemy merchant vessel and one patrol vessel were attacked and sunk. The U.S.S. TROUT arrived at Pearl Harbor on 3 March 1942, after 51 days at sea.
Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, U.S. Army, General Orders Number 39 (1942)

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Looking for a Hero or trying to verify awards? We have posted the names of more than 120,000 recipients of the highest awards in a BRAND NEW FREE SECTION
DECORATIONS 1862 - Present
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  How to Obtain Military Records of a Family Member 

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DSC 


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