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Full Text Citations For Award of
The Navy Cross

 
 To U.S. Marine Corps Personnel
Korean War 1950-1953
(224 Awards)

A-D    E-L   M-R   S-Z

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pleasure in Presenting


THE NAVY CROSS
to

MALLETTE, PERRY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Perry A. Mallette (1171176), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of Battery D, Second Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 6 July 1952. When the forward observer team he was accompanying came under intense hostile mortar and small-arms fire while in the assault against an enemy hill position, forcing the unit to abandon wire communications and continue with only a radio, Sergeant Mallette, acting as a wireman, voluntarily remained with his team and continued to move forward with the assault elements of the attack, repeatedly exposing himself to the devastating enemy barrage to assist in adjusting fire on the hostile positions. While he was engaged in this hazardous undertaking, he was seriously wounded and was removed to a sheltered area for medical treatment. Observing machine-gun fire emanating from an enemy bunker and raking the advancing infantry, he refused further medical assistance, arose from his stretcher and, although extremely weak and bleeding profusely, proceeded to assault the bunker with hand grenades, reaching a point within twenty-five feet of the emplacement before he was wounded again and forced to submit to evacuation. By his outstanding courage and valiant fighting spirit in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Mallette served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 445 (June 11, 1953)
Born: at Clymer, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

MARKLAND, FREDERICK J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Frederick J. Markland (665284), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Railroad Train Guard, attached to Company C, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 November 1950. During an enemy ambush of his train while stopped in Kowon, Private Markland volunteered to try to start he train moving despite the intense hostile fire. Discovering a wounded Marine lying on the ground near the engine, he carried the casualty to a protected area, returned to the train and, with the assistance of the engineer, started to back the train after failing to move the engine forward. When a heavy concentration of enemy small-arms fire and grenades killed the engineer and wounded himself, he withdrew from the cab and killed two of the enemy who were attempting to board the train. Returning to his platoon commander, he assisted in defending a small group of wounded Marines isolated in a coach. After enemy troops forced their way into the car and fired at point-blank range into the bodies of those so badly wounded that they were unable to defend themselves, he feigned death during a brutal attack on his face and remained in the car until daylight when he escaped with one other wounded survivor. Traveling on foot a distance of ten miles to a place of safety with friendly forces, he refused medical attention until he had completed a full report of the ambush to the executive officer of his company. His outstanding courage, daring initiative and gallant devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Private Markland and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 627 (July 6, 1951)
Born: at Santa Anna Township, Illinois
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

MATHENEY, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Richard Matheney (1095417), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of an Artillery Forward Observer Team attached to the Eleventh Company, Third Battalion, First Korean Marine Corps Regiment, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the early morning of 24 April 1951. When the adjacent unit was overrun and his outpost threatened by the rapidly approaching enemy during a violent attack by a numerically superior hostile force, Private First Class Matheney braved intense fire to man an abandoned machine-gun position and engage the enemy in a vigorous fire fight. Shouting words of encouragement to the defenders while moving continually through the position to meet the hostile charges, he skillfully employed an automatic rifle and successive abandoned machine guns, personally accounting for thirty enemy dead during the furious action and agreeing to withdraw only after he had expended all available ammunition. His indomitable fighting spirit, intrepidity and gallant devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds were contributing factors in prolonging the defense and in obtaining sufficient time to permit an orderly withdrawal of attached elements, thereby reflecting great credit upon Private First Class Matheney and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 178 (March 27, 1952)
Born: at Detroit, Michigan
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

*MATHEWSON, BRUCE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Bruce Mathewson, Jr. (254123), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a Light Machine Gun Section in Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Koto-ri, Korea, on 29 November 1950. When a determined hostile force attacked his sector of the company defense line with automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenades during the hours of darkness, Staff Sergeant Mathewson quickly ordered his guns into action and, risking his life in the face of heavy enemy fire, boldly moved from gun to gun in order to control effective fire and to encourage his men in resisting the fierce assault. Skillfully adjusting his guns, he succeeded in limiting the penetration of hostile troops who had forced their way into his sector and, armed only with a pistol, charged forward over the fire-swept ground to engage five of the enemy who had gained strategic positions between the guns of his section. After killing two of the invaders, he was struck by a burst of hostile fire and fell mortally wounded. His aggressive leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty were contributing factors in the ultimate repulse of the enemy and reflect the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Mathewson and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 214 (March 31, 1952)
Born: November 14, 1917 at Lansdale, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

McCLOSKEY, PAUL NORTON, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Paul Norton McCloskey, Jr. (0-50232), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander of a Rifle Platoon in Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 29 May 1951. Assigned the difficult mission of assaulting a strongly defended enemy hill position from the flank, Second Lieutenant McCloskey skillfully led his platoon through a vicious hail of automatic-weapons, small-arms and grenade fire into the heart of the hostile position. Although painfully wounded in the initial charge, he resolutely continued to spearhead the assault, coolly directing and encouraging his men and personally moving into the enemy-held bunkers to seek out and destroy their occupants. By his daring initiative, aggressive determination and inspiring leadership, he was responsible for the success of the attack which left forty of the enemy dead and twenty-two captured, and for the seizing of a strategic position from a numerically superior hostile force. His unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds reflects the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant McCloskey and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 9 (January 12, 1952)
Born: September 29, 1927 at San Marino, California
Home Town: Loma Linda, California

McCLUNG, WILLIAM J. III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William J. III McClung (245685), Master Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge of Advanced Elements of Headquarters Company, Headquarters Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), during action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 7 December 1950. When his unit was attacked by a numerically superior and well-entrenched enemy force employing automatic weapons, machine guns, mortars and rocket launchers, Master Sergeant McClung repeatedly exposed himself to short- range enemy fire in order to deploy and direct the fire of his party to better advantage. Although the lead truck of his convoy was afire, which made him easily visible to the enemy, he moved from man to man over a period of three hours, lending words of encouragement and controlling their fire. When two burning vehicles brightly illuminated the defensive area, making his unit's position untenable, he calmly directed his men to new positions in an area offering better concealment and improved firing conditions. Returning to the illuminated area, he was mortally wounded while removing wounded Marines to concealed positions in the face of enemy fire. By his outstanding leadership, cool courage and selfless devotion to duty throughout, Master Sergeant McClung served to inspire others of his group toward the successful repulse of the enemy attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 640 (July 6, 1951)
Born: March 26, 1917 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Fallbrook, California

McGAHN, PATRICK T., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Patrick T. McGahn, Jr. (0-51014), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 22 - 23 April 1951. When the enemy launched a strong offensive and seized a key terrain feature which dominated the approaches to his company's position and provided the enemy with a direct observation of friendly units and routes, Second Lieutenant McGahn gallantly led his platoon through heavy enemy fire in a counterattack. Although seriously wounded, he spearheaded a daring bayonet charge up the rocky terrain and succeeded in capturing one strategic position, personally killing several of the enemy. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he courageously assisted in leading a successful attack on a second objective and steadfastly refused medical aid or evacuation until assured that all other casualties had been given medical treatment. By his indomitable fighting spirit, exceptional fortitude and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, Second Lieutenant McGahn served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the successful accomplishment of the regiment's mission. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1107 (December 18, 1953)
Born: at Pleasantville, New Jersey
Home Town: Atlantic City, New Jersey

McGUIRE, THOMAS P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Thomas P. McGuire (1187571), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 January 1953. Leading his group in the assault against the right flank of a numerically superior enemy force occupying strongly entrenched positions on the crest of Hill 134, Sergeant McGuire exhibited exceptional leadership and repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile small-arms, grenade and automatic-weapons fire to rally and encourage his battered unit in the advance up the slope to reach the objective. With enemy resistance becoming increasingly severe as he approached his destination, he personally leaped into the trenches and fought at extremely close quarters, accounting for several enemy dead and silencing a concealed gun position which was halting the advance of his unit. Upon learning that the platoon commander on the left flank was severely wounded, Sergeant McGuire quickly reorganized his own squad and led his men to the opposite side o the hill where he assumed command of the remainder of the force. In the face of fierce hostile fire, he commenced his withdrawal and supervised the orderly evacuation of the dead and the wounded, assuring himself that all his men had withdrawn before ha rejoined them and returned to friendly lines. By his daring initiative, great personal bravery and inspiring leadership, Sergeant McGuire contributed in large measure to the success of the assaulting group in destroying and demoralizing the enemy and in obtaining invaluable intelligence. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 215 (March 30, 1955)
Born: December 19, 1930 at East Norwalk, Connecticut
Home Town: New York, New York

McNAUGHTON, GEORGE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George C. McNaughton (0-48131), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Rifle Platoon Leader in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 24 September 1950. When his company commander was fatally wounded a few moments after the beginning of an attack, First Lieutenant McNaughton immediately assumed command of the assault group which was composed of the remaining members of his own platoon and those of Company D and, although suffering from a painful shoulder wound, fearlessly led the charge against 500 to 700 of the enemy located in well-camouflaged fox-holes almost completely surrounding his position. An officer of outstanding courage and indomitable fighting spirit, he continued the attack against overwhelming odds and, with twenty-five Marines, reached and seized the objective. Hastily reorganizing his men, he deployed them in strategic defense positions to resist a possible counterattack. His cool leadership, strategic ability and unwavering devotion to duty in the assault and capture of this vital objective made possible the entrance of our forces into Seoul from the northwest and reflect the highest credit on First Lieutenant McNaughton and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 311 (March 28, 1951)
Born: at Sullivan, Indiana
Home Town: Hammond, Indiana

MEADE, JOHN F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John F. Meade (1095193), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Runner in the First Platoon of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces west of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 27 November 1950. During a fierce small-arms, machine-gun, grenade and mortar fire attack by a numerically superior hostile force which broke through the defensive perimeter, threatening to overrun the platoon and company sectors, Private First Class Meade quickly assembled several Marines, placed them in tactical positions to defend the gap in the lines and directed accurate and effective fire, thereby contributing materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attack. Although wounded by an enemy grenade while carrying vitally needed ammunition over the hazardous icy terrain to front line units, he fearlessly returned to the supply dump on three different occasions, repeatedly braving intense and accurate hostile small-arms and grenade fire. Skillfully manning his weapon after each trip, he personally killed fifteen and wounded an unknown number of the enemy during vigorous fire fights, courageously remaining at his post until he was wounded a second time and evacuated to the rear. His courageous initiative, quick- wittedness and indomitable fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Meade and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 660 (July 14, 1951)
Born: at Hudson Falls, New York
Home Town: Hudson Falls, New York

MELVIN, JOHN B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John B. Melvin (0-47899), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 26 to 29 March 1953. Participating in a counterattack against a firmly entrenched and well-concealed enemy force which had previously overrun a vital outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Captain Melvin repeatedly exposed himself to devastating hostile mortar, artillery and small- arms fire to direct and encourage his men in their gallant attack. As the number of casualties mounted, he courageously moved his depleted forces up the fire-swept slopes until, at the furthest point of advance, his effective fighting strength was reduced to twelve men. Although painfully wounded, he tenaciously directed his shattered garrison of Marines in holding the bitterly contested position until the next company could pass through his valiant line of defense and continue the assault on the final heights. Skillfully reorganizing his company, he moved to an exposed and heavily interdicted area to protect he flank of the newly-won position from hostile envelopment. Despite murderous enemy fire and repeated attempts to outflank or overrun his unit, Captain Melvin inspired his men to heroic endeavor in defending their vulnerable positions throughout the four-day battle. When an enemy mortar fragment shattered the radio in his hands and disrupted communications with the battalion command post, he unhesitatingly proceeded alone in the face of heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire across an estimated eight hundred yards of terrain infested by enemy suicide patrols attempting to cut the line of supply to the company holding the outpost. Reaching the friendly trench line, he secured new radios and returned over the same hazardous route to his embattled company. By his indomitable fighting spirit, dauntless leadership and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, Captain Melvin served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the successful recapture of the strategic objective. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 979 (November 9, 1953)
Born: at Annapolis, Maryland
Home Town: Annapolis, Maryland

MIDKIFF, EARL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Earl D. Midkiff (667911), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 3 November 1950. When an enemy hand grenade landed in the foxhole he and a fellow Marine were occupying in mountainous terrain during a heavy enemy attack just at daybreak, Private First Class Midkiff immediately picked u the grenade and attempted to hurl it back toward the enemy. Before he could release the grenade, it exploded, severely wounding him in the face and hands. By his alert and courageous action at the risk of his own life, Private First Class Midkiff undoubtedly saved his comrade from serious injury and possible death. His outstanding courage and selfless devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 57 (February 12, 1964)
Born: at Mount Airy, North Carolina
Home Town: Mount Airy, North Carolina

MIZE, CHARLES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles D. Mize (0-38729), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 23 to 27 September 1950. When the Company Commander was wounded and evacuated from Hill 216 in the vicinity of Seoul, First Lieutenant Mize immediately assumed command of the company and, by his alert and efficient leadership, successfully assisted the Battalion in carrying out its mission of protecting the FIRST Marine Division's left flank from counterattack and enemy infiltration. During a coordinated attack against heavy hostile resistance at the approaches to Seoul from 24 to 27 September, he repeatedly exposed himself to accurate and intensive hostile small-arms, automatic and mortar fire in order t o direct the fire of his company and to encourage his men. Refusing to be evacuated when wounded in action, he continued to lead his company in overrunning enemy positions and seizing the desired objectives. In a later attack against the enemy through the streets of Seoul, he led his company in capturing the Government General Palace in the face of heavy resistance and hoisted the United States flag over the building. His courage, outstanding leadership and loyal devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Mize and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 364 (April 16, 1951)
Born: at Cave Spring, Georgia
Home Town: Cave Spring, Georgia

MONROE, CHARLES H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Charles H. Monroe, Jr. (1042603), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Rifleman in Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 28 and 29 November 1950. Severely wounded and blown from his foxhole by a hostile grenade when a numerically superior enemy force attacked and penetrated his company's positions, Private First Class Monroe repeatedly refused evacuation and medical attention and fearlessly remained directly in the line of the hostile assault. Although his squad was pinned down by heavy enemy opposition, he continued to deliver accurate and effective fire until he lost consciousness. By his daring initiative, outstanding courage and skilled marksmanship, he personally destroyed eleven of the enemy, thereby inspiring the remaining members of his squad to more determined efforts in successfully repulsing the hostile attack. His indomitable fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty in the face of enemy fire reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Monroe and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 663 (July 14, 1951)
Born: at Savannah, Georgia
Home Town: Savannah, Georgia

MOODY, CLARENCE G., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Clarence G. Moody, Jr. (0-44925), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 12 - 13 August 1952. When his company's outpost was surrounded by a strong enemy force during a fierce night attack and the main line of resistance was subjected to an intense mortar and artillery barrage, wounding three rifle platoon leaders, Captain Moody fearlessly moved forward from his observation post to the main line of resistance in the face of heavy fire. Moving rapidly along the company front, he quickly restored the integrity of the line and rallied the two engaged platoons, remaining in command until friendly forces gained fire superiority. Organizing a reinforced squad, he courageously led the unit forward through heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small-arms fire to the surrounded outpost. Finding the entire defending force to be casualties, he skillfully directed their evacuation and maintained effective supporting-arms fire to halt the advance of the hostile force, re-establishing a strong defense of the position before returning to the main line. By his exemplary leadership, intrepid fighting spirit and outstanding tactical ability in successfully defending his assigned sector, Captain Moody served to inspire the men under his command and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 409 (May 22, 1953)
Born: at Woodville, Georgia
Home Town: Woodville, Georgia

*MORRISON, ANTHONY GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Anthony George Morrison (0-51372), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 11 November 1952. During a night raid on a strongly defended enemy position, First Lieutenant Morrison volunteered to move to an exposed vantage point more than one mile forward of the main line of resistance to more effectively call in supporting fire. When the first squad of the attack platoon contacted the enemy and suffered heavy casualties, he personally led the two remaining squads in an assault to aid the stricken unit in recovering their wounded and in disengaging in an orderly manner. Regrouping his forces, he skillfully adjusted supporting arms fire which greatly reduced long range enemy weapons, and again spearheaded the attack through devastating hostile fire in a valiant attempt to envelop the objective. Throughout the fierce engagement, he repeatedly exposed himself to the withering barrage of enemy fire in order to encourage and exhort his men to heroic endeavor in accomplishing the mission. When the unit sustained several casualties and it became necessary to withdraw, he directed his forces to the main line of resistance, remaining with the rear guard to insure that all his men were accounted for. While helping to carry a casualty back to friendly lines, he was mortally wounded by an incoming enemy mortar shell. By his exceptional valor, outstanding leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great odds, First Lieutenant Morrison served to inspire all who observed him and enhanced the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 935 (October 23, 1953)
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

MURPHY, DANIEL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Daniel M. Murphy (276795), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant in Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 27 and 28 November 1950. With an overwhelming hostile force of approximately two battalions making a fierce and sustained night attack on his company in sub-zero weather north of Yudam-ni, and with the company command post surrounded and overrun, Staff Sergeant Murphy daringly exposed himself to intense machine-gun, mortar, grenade and small-arms fire to lead a group of twelve in a self-imposed attempt to reach the post and aid its personnel. When the enemy detected his right-flanking attack and subjected his group to heavy concentrated fire, he boldly rallied his men and, firing his weapon and throwing grenades, continued to spearhead the uphill assault until the hostile forces were driven from the action and his objective attained. Finding the company command post stricken by severe casualties and without a leader, Staff Sergeant Murphy immediately assumed command and, calling the remaining thirty-five men together, reorganized them in readiness to defend the position. With high combat efficiency, he redeployed the machine-gun crews and directed effective fire on the main body of the enemy by personally spotting all the hostile strong points. Throughout the long hours of darkness, he encouraged his troops as they fought to hold the line and continued to brave the hail of hostile fire from all directions as he moved among the men to distribute the waning supply of ammunition and comfort the wounded. By his gallant leadership and superb tactical ability, he was directly responsible for denying the key position to the enemy. His outstanding courage and unswerving devotion to duty were an inspiration to all who observed him, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Murphy and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 968 (October 8, 1951)
Born: at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

MURRAY, BENJAMIN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Benjamin H. Murray (0-55934), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a forward Outpost Commander while attached to Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 26 March 1953. With the outpost subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire and savagely attacked by enemy troops who secured the forward portion of the trench lines, Second Lieutenant Murray unhesitatingly moved from one position to another in the face of heavy mortar, artillery and small-arms fire to organize the defense and resist the enemy penetration. When an automatic rifleman, occupying a key position, became a casualty, Second Lieutenant Murray quickly manned the rifle and delivered accurate and devastating fire on the enemy until another member of the platoon could be moved into the position. Although seriously wounded by an enemy grenade, he refused medical aid and moved through the trenches to encourage his men and strengthen their position. Threatened with a shortage of ammunition on the critical right flank, he braved deadly small-arms and grenade fire to re-supply his men and, on several occasions, picked up and hurled the grenades back at the attackers. Following a friendly artillery barrage on the outpost sector that had been overrun by hostile troops, he gallantly led a fire team over the crest of the position and routed the enemy. By his inspiring leadership, marked fortitude and exceptional courage, Second Lieutenant Murray contributed in large measure to the successful defense of the outpost. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 938 (October 23, 1953)
Born: at Baltimore, Maryland
Home Town: Glydon, Maryland

MURRAY, RAYMOND LEROY
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Raymond Leroy Murray (0-5127), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. Charged with the tremendous responsibility of taking over the perimeter defense of Hagaru-ri, and subsequently pressing the attack to Koto-ri in conjunction with another Marine regiment, (the then) Lieutenant Colonel Murray, with his ranks depleted by casualties and all his officers and men exhausted from several days of fierce fighting in sub-zero temperatures, launched vigorous attacks to the eastward to seize a vital enemy-held ridge and consolidate his positions. Affording protection for the airstrip where approximately one thousand vehicles containing division supplies, ammunition and equipment were assembled, he remained until all the wounded had been evacuated. Before directing his regiment in forming a rear guard for the entire column. Throughout the night, he beat of vicious onslaughts continuously launched by the enemy and, on the following morning, carried out a brilliantly executed counterattack, taking two hundred prisoners and leaving an ineffective and decimated enemy in his wake as he continued on to his destination, arriving that evening with units intact and ready to continue the attack to the south. By his great personal valor, daring combat tactics and superb leadership throughout this bitter offensive and defensive action, Lieutenant Colonel Murray served as a constant inspiration to his regiment in completing this extremely hazardous mission against tremendous odds, and his courageous devotion to duty reflects the highest credit upon himself, his gallant officers and men, and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1135 (November 19, 1951)
Born: January 30, 1913 at Los Angeles, California
Home Town: San Diego, California
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII), Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

NIHART, FRANKLIN BROOKE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Franklin Brooke Nihart (0-6606), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the area of Hwanggi, Korea, on 15 and 16 September 1951. With the advance of the forward assaulting echelons virtually halted by a well-entrenched and numerically superior enemy force employing artillery, mortars, grenades and automatic weapons during an attempt by the battalion to seize and defend the key terrain in the vicinity of Hill 749, Lieutenant Colonel Nihart boldly made his way through the volume of hostile fire to the exposed positions of the leading elements and personally coordinated all the available supporting arms and aircraft in successfully furthering the attack. Constantly in the thick of the fighting when the enemy launched a furious, night-long counterattack, he skillfully maneuvered his units to meet the continued thrusts by waves of opposing troops and, although exposed to intense hostile fire from a distance of less than 200 meters, maintained an effective defense perimeter despite severe casualties within his battalion. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and unswerving devotion to duty throughout this period of intensive action, Lieutenant Colonel Nihart was directly instrumental in securing and holding the vitally strategic position and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 532 (July 2, 1952)
Born: March 16, 1919 at Los Angeles, California
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

NOLAN, HARVEY W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Harvey W. Nolan (0-50159), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 23 April 1951. When numerically superior hostile forces penetrated an adjacent unit and threatened the security of the Battalion, Second Lieutenant Nolan boldly led his platoon up a steep slope during the hours of darkness in an attempt to dislodge the enemy from their well-entrenched hill positions dominating the city of Hwach'on. Although painfully wounded when the unit was subjected to a sudden hail of hostile automatic weapons and grenade fire near the summit of the slope, he bravely refused to be evacuated, seized an automatic rifle from one of the casualties, put it into action and, at the same time, directed his leading elements in delivering effective fire on the enemy, thereby gaining the initiative. After successfully evacuating the dead and wounded, he skillfully reorganized the remainder of his unit and led a vigorous fixed-bayonet assault on the objective in the face of intense hostile fire. Unable to dislodge the enemy, he led his platoon to an adjacent hill and, throughout the night, moved among his unit, encouraging his men and directing heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire on the hostile positions in an effort to deny the enemy the use of the vital ground. At dawn, he gallantly spearheaded the remaining fifteen men of his platoon in a second determined attack, completely routing the enemy and driving them from the hill. By his brilliant leadership and sound tactical ability, he served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the security of friendly forces within the area. His outstanding courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Nolan and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 48 (February 6, 1952)
Born: at New Bedford, Massachusetts
Home Town: North Smithfield, Rhode Island

NOONKESTER, HENRY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Henry E. Noonkester (594808), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koto-ri, Korea, on 9 December 1950. Participating in an attack against three strong hostile positions located on successive precipitous mountain peaks, Sergeant Noonkester courageously led his squad in a very difficult enveloping maneuver against a well-fortified and vigorously defended enemy emplacement from which friendly assault units, including his own squad, were receiving heavy, accurate machine-gun and grenade fire. Undeterred by the barrage of direct hostile automatic weapons, mortar and grenade fire during the final assault up the face of a snow- covered precipice, he fearlessly closed with the hostile troops and, in the ensuing hand-to-hand fighting, succeeded in killing eight of the enemy and in seizing the strategic positions. By his cool leadership and outstanding tactical ability, he contributed materially to the success of the Battalion in seizing enemy-held terrain from which to cover the Division's advance through the pass. His indomitable fighting spirit and gallant devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile opposition reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Noonkester and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 718 (July 24, 1951)
Born: at Wallace, Virginia
Home Town: Bristol, Virginia

NUNEZ-JUAREZ, RAMON (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Ramon Nunez-Juarez (1240152), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company E, Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 9 august 1952. With his squad's position on a vitally important hill encircled and attacked from three sides by a numerically superior enemy force following an intense hostile artillery and mortar barrage, Private First Class Nunez-Juarez fearlessly remained in his forward position and delivered effective rifle fire which greatly aided in halting the attackers. When his supply of ammunition was expended, he unhesitatingly left his fighting position and crawled down the slope to acquire a re-supply from one of his comrades. Unable to return to his original position, he quickly set up his weapon at an alternate point near the crest of the hill and continued to deliver devastating fire upon the enemy. Aware that his squad was unable to evacuate its casualties without covering fire, he gallantly held his commanding ground when the order to withdraw was given and poured accurate fire on the hostile force to enable his unit to withdraw to a safe position. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous initiative and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, Private First Class Nunez-Juarez served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the successful withdrawal of his entire squad. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1022 (December 1, 1953)
Born: May 25, 1931 at San Sebastian, Puerto Rico
Home Town: San Sebastian, Puerto Rico

*OGDEN, JAMES WALLINGTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Wallington Ogden (586381), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of Company B, First Engineer Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 30 November 1950. When an adjacent company was forced to call for reinforcements during a vicious enemy attack, Private First Class Ogden volunteered to set up and man a machine gun to defend a key position. Although exposed to intense hostile small-arms, machine-gun and grenade fire, he steadfastly remained at his gun, firing directly into the face of the enemy and shouting words of encouragement to the friendly troops around him. Refusing to leave his position even when wounded, he continued firing for three hours, personally inflicting heavy casualties and inspiring others to heroic efforts in defense of their position until he was struck a second time by a hostile bullet and fatally wounded. By his superb courage, aggressive determination and staunch devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds, Private First Class Ogden contributed directly to the success of the Battalion in the repulse of the hostile attack, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 1048 (October 15, 1951)
Born: June 16, 1928 at St. Francesville, Illinois
Home Town: Bridgeport, Illinois

ORSULAK, EDMOND T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edmond T. Orsulak (556600), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Runner in Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Korea, from 30 November to 1 December 1950. Immediately assuming command when the platoon officers and two squad leaders were killed or severely wounded during a vigorous hostile automatic weapons and grenade attack on his company, Private First Class Orsulak skillfully reorganized the right flank of the platoon and, placing his men in tactical defense positions, led them in repulsing the assault. Carrying out the duties of a platoon sergeant throughout the remainder of the day and night, he supplied the platoon with necessary rations and vitally needed ammunition and, in addition, redeployed the men to furnish more effective support, leading them in delivering accurate, direct fire on the enemy. When the platoon came under intense hostile attack again on the morning of 1 December, he repeatedly braved heavy hostile fire to observe and adjust 60-mm. mortar fire on enemy targets thereby contributing materially to the successful repelling of the attack. His quick initiative, courageous leadership and gallant devotion to duty during a serious crisis reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Orsulak and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 687 (July 11, 1951)
Born: at Holyoke, Massachusetts
Home Town: Holyoke, Massachusetts

*O'TOOLE, JAMES WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James William O'Toole (566207), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Machine Gunner in Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 24 September 1950. Participating in an attack against 500 to 700 of the enemy heavily entrenched in well-camouflaged foxholes, Private First Class O'Toole courageously manned his gun until he was severely wounded in the back and removed for first aid treatment. Fully aware of the overwhelming opposition and the shortage of men in his company, he refused to be evacuated and, despite attempts to relieve him, gallantly returned to his gun and continued to fire until fatally wounded. His unselfish and determined actions and loyal devotion to duty were contributing factors in the successful attainment of his company's objective, thereby reflecting the highest credit on Private First Class O'Toole and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 356 (April 9, 1951)
Born: February 22, 1928 at Chicago, Illinois
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

*PARKS, DONALD LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Lawrence Parks (0-51848), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of a Fighter-Bomber Aircraft in Marine Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-ONE (VMA-121) in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 May 1952. When his plane was hit by heavy enemy anti-aircraft, causing the aircraft to lose its power and catch fire while he was participating in a combat air patrol covering a friendly pilot downed in hostile territory close to friendly lines, Second Lieutenant Parks, cognizant of the dangers of the full ordnance load he carried, bravely maneuvered the burning plane clear of the position occupied by the downed airman and jettisoned his wing bombs unarmed. Keenly award of the proximity of friendly lines, he unhesitatingly elected to remain in the blazing aircraft rather than jettison his napalm bombs in the area and, maintaining superb control of the plane, courageously effected a crash landing without inflicting casualties upon the friendly troops. Upon impact with the ground, the napalm bombs burst into a sheet of flames, causing the plane to explode and burn. By his indomitable courage, outstanding airmanship and selfless efforts on behalf of others in the face of almost certain death, Second Lieutenant Parks served to inspire all who observed him. His exceptional bravery and valiant self-command reflect the highest credit upon himself and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 002 (May 26, 1953)
Born: May 24, 1929 at Henning, Minnesota
Home Town: Grand Rapids, New York

*PEACH, EARL FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Francis Peach (537449), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Runner in Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area during the early morning hours of 3 November 1950. When his company was attacked and almost completely surrounded by a strong hostile force employing rifles, grenades, and automatic weapons, Sergeant Peach stormed the enemy gun emplacements with hand grenades and succeeded in neutralizing two machineguns and in destroying twelve of the enemy. During the ensuing fire fight which severely wounded a mortar crewman, he exposed himself to the fierce enemy barrage to carry medical supplies to the casualty who was lying bout fifty feet away and, while administering first aid treatment was himself fatally wounded. His intrepidity, indomitable fighting spirit and daring initiative in risking his life to aid another reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Peach and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 746 (July 24, 1951)
Born: April 3, 1926 at Pickering, Missouri
Home Town: Hamburg, Iowa

*PENNEY, CHESTER OSGOOD, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Chester Osgood Penney, Jr. (0-44929), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of an Infantry Platoon of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 2 to 11 November 1950. With his company pinned down by intense automatic weapons and small-arms fire emanating from a well-entrenched hostile strongpoint on commanding ground to the direct front of his position on 11 November, First Lieutenant Penney voluntarily risked his life to reconnoiter the approaches to the ridgeline. Continually exposing himself to shattering hostile machine-gun and small-arms fire as he advanced, he determined the key features and disposition of the enemy before returning to his own lines to prepare for attack. Spearheading the assault, he led his platoon directly into the heart of the position under blistering fire, plunging into the emplacement and personally killing at least seven of the enemy during the furious encounter. Coordinating and leading his platoon with superb skill until he was fatally struck down by a bursting hostile grenade, First Lieutenant Penney, by his aggressive leadership, valiant fighting spirit and grim determination, was directly instrumental in neutralizing the enemy force and in enabling his company to continue its advance. His fortitude and unrelenting devotion to duty throughout this period of intensive combat action served as a constant inspiration to all who observed him and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 1203 (December 4, 1951)
Born: October 18, 1924 at San Fernando, California
Home Town: Long Beach, California

PETERS, UEL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Uel D. Peters (0-25202), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, Second Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Chosin Reservoir Area, Korea, during the period from 27 November to 6 December 1950. When a strong enemy attack penetrated the right flank of his company on the night of 27 November, Captain Peters skillfully deployed his command group to prevent a further roll-back of the flank and succeeded in containing the enemy penetration throughout the night. With his company battling to provide flank protection for the rear guard and with one platoon position overrun and the combined command posts of the Marine forces in imminent danger during the critical days and nights that followed, Captain Peters led his men in the face of devastating hostile grenade, rifle and automatic-weapons fire to repel repeated determined attacks by a vastly outnumbering enemy force attempting to break through the line. Despite sub-zero weather, heavy casualties and the extremely critical military situation, he personally rallied his men and directed the heroic effort to drive off the savage attackers and maintain the position. Gravely wounded by mortar fragments in both legs and suffering burns on face and body when hit by a white phosphorous shell on the afternoon of 6 December, Captain Peters, by his inspiring leadership and daring combat tactics, contributed materially to the successful accomplishment of a vital mission. His exceptional courage, perseverance and valiant devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 998 (December 22, 1952)
Born: at Springerton, Illinois
Home Town: Piggott, Arkansas

PETRO, GEORGE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to George E. Petro (0-27805), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of an Anti-Tank Company of the First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces en route to Hamhung, Korea, on 10 December 1950. When a strong, well-organized hostile force ambushed the regimental motor convoy at Sudong-ni, Captain Petro immediately assumed command and, building up fire power with additional machine guns, organized the effective defense of the convoy. Repeatedly braving heavy, accurate enemy small-arms fire, he deployed his men in strategic locations and, undeterred by the difficulty of spotting the well-concealed hostile positions in the darkness, personally directed damaging fire which routed the enemy. At the height of the action, he advanced alone to rescue a severely wounded Marine and subsequently led a patrol in front of the lines to evacuate two casualties and personally captured a prisoner of war. His quick initiative, tactical ability and cool leadership during a serious crisis were contributing factors in the successful repulse of the enemy and in the continued safe passage of the convoy, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Captain Petro and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 657 (July 14, 1951)
Born: at Mount Clare, West Virginia
Home Town: Clarksburg, West Virginia

*PHILLIPS, WALTER DIXON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Dixon Phillips (0-31052), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 27 November 1950. When an estimated two-battalion hostile force launched a sudden, vicious attack against his company's position, penetrating the command post and surrounding his defense area on the frozen, snow-covered hillside north of Yudam-ni, Captain Phillips boldly charged to the forward platoon where the fighting was heaviest and, under blistering small-arms, grenade and mortar fire, personally directed the efforts of his units in fighting off the fanatic attackers. Undaunted by painful wounds sustained in the initial stages of the action and tremendous losses suffered in dead and wounded along the line of battle, he quickly moved from man to man in the forward areas, effectively redeploying his remaining troops and instilling in every man the will and determination to hold his position at all costs. Fighting furiously throughout four hours of intense action before he was mortally wounded in a grenade assault, Captain Phillips, by his forceful leadership, superb combat tactics and valiant efforts, was directly instrumental in the success of his company in repelling the enemy and in holding a vital objective despite overwhelming odds. His fortitude and devotion to duty throughout reflect the highest credit upon Captain Phillips and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 975 (October 24, 1951)
Born: October 29, 1917 at Americus, Georgia
Home Town: Americus, Georgia

PUCKETT, CLINTON A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Clinton A. Puckett (560129), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 21 June 1952. With his patrol unit occupying positions well forward of a friendly outpost when a vastly outnumbering enemy force suddenly pinned down the patrol by enveloping both flanks with small-arms and grenade fire, Staff Sergeant Puckett repeatedly exposed himself to the devastating fire in order to cover the withdrawal of his men. Employing a submachine gun to harass and throw the enemy off balance, he accounted for four enemy dead and, although wounded in the left hand by grenade fragments, continued to deliver accurate fire until the rear of the patrol had left the area. Upon returning to the outpost and discovering that three of his men were missing, Staff Sergeant Puckett organized a small rescue party and went back into hostile territory to search for his comrades. After a brief skirmish with the enemy, he located the three missing men, two of whom were seriously wounded in the legs, and assisted in returning them to the outpost. By his valiant leadership, inspiring fighting spirit and determined efforts in the face of heavy odds, Staff Sergeant Puckett was instrumental in saving several lives. His gallant actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 715
Born: March 6, 1926 at Waurika, Oklahoma
Home Town: Roswell, New Mexico

PULLER, LEWIS B.
(Fifth Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Silver Star in lieu of a Fifth Award of the Navy Cross to Lewis B. Puller (0-3158), Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koto-ri, Korea, from 5 to 10 December 1950. Fighting continuously in sub-zero weather against a vastly outnumbering hostile force, Colonel Puller drove off repeated and fanatical enemy attacks upon his Regimental defense sector and supply points. Although the area was frequently covered by grazing machine-gun fire and intense artillery and mortar fire, he coolly moved along his troops to insure their correct tactical employment, reinforced the lines as the situation demanded, and successfully defended the perimeter, keeping open the main supply routes for the movement of the Division. During the attack from Koto-ri to Hungnam, he expertly utilized his Regiment as the Division rear guard, repelling two fierce enemy assaults which severely threatened the security of the unit, and personally supervised the care and prompt evacuation of all casualties. By his unflagging determination, he served to inspire his men to heroic efforts in defense of their positions and assured the safety of much valuable equipment which would otherwise have been lost to the enemy. His skilled leadership, superb courage and valiant devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon Colonel Puller and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1186 (November 19, 1951)
Born: June 26, 1898 at West Point, Virginia
Home Town: Saluda, Virginia
Other Award: Navy Cross and Gold Star (2nd Nicaragua), 2d Gold Star (WWII), 3d Gold Star (WWII), Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

*RAMSAY, ARLIS W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Arlis W. Ramsay (1166541), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Weapons Company, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 March 1953. When the company was pinned down by an intense enemy mortar and artillery barrage while advancing far forward of the main line of resistance to occupy and hold a vitally important outpost, Sergeant Ramsay constantly exposed himself to the heavy fire, moving among his men to insure that they were taking advantage of available cover, and skillfully directed the expeditious evacuation of casualties. Later, when the company gained the outpost, he gallantly continued to move about the area in the face of a devastating enemy artillery barrage to check the positions of his men and to maintain the integrity of the defense. Although seriously wounded when struck by enemy shell fragments, he unhesitatingly assisted in administering aid to other casualties and directed their evacuation. Wounded a second time by the continuing hail of enemy fire, he steadfastly refused medical aid and requested a corpsman to use the life saving serum for other critically wounded Marines. Subsequently succumbing to his wounds, Sergeant Ramsay, by his marked fortitude, heroic leadership and self-sacrificing efforts, served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the success of his squad's mission. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 1050 (December 7, 1953)
Born: January 14, 1934 at Lamesa, Texas
Home Town: Odessa, Texas

*RAYMOND, ROBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert J. Raymond (610344), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Guide of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 26 July 1953. Participating in the defense of a vital outpost position when the enemy launched a mortar and artillery barrage upon that sector, followed by an attack by infantry troops, Sergeant Raymond unhesitatingly exposed himself to the hail of hostile fire and raced across an open area to a tank position where he utilized the tank's telephone to direct fire on the onrushing enemy forces although subjected to point-blank fire from the attackers. Despite painful wounds sustained when the telephone was shot from his hand, he refused medical aid and returned to the trench-line to engage the enemy troops who were swarming over all positions. Unable to manipulate a weapon, he used his one good hand to hurl grenades directly at the enemy and to repair weapons for his comrades. When a new phone was attached to the tank, he proceeded again toward the vehicle to help direct its fire upon the enemy, but was mortally wounded by an incoming hostile shell. By his indomitable fighting spirit and outstanding courage, Sergeant Raymond served to inspire his comrades to heroic endeavor in routing the enemy and in regaining the vital position. His personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 431 (June 28, 1954)
Born: August 15, 1926 at LaCrosse, Wisconsin
Home Town: Park Ridge, Illinois

READ, BENJAMIN S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Benjamin S. Read (0-19550), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Battery H, Third Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 7 December 1950. After the convoy of which his battery was a part had been subjected to an intense barrage of hostile fire just before daylight, Captain Read promptly reconnoitered the area in anticipation of a heavy assault, determined the probable point of enemy attack, drew his howitzers off the road and maneuvered them by hand into direct firing positions to protect the column against an estimated 800 of the enemy who had massed during the night less than two hundred yards distant. Throughout the ensuing battle, he repeatedly exposed himself to a blistering hail of hostile mortar, automatic weapons and small-arms fire, rallying his men, reorganizing depleted gun crews, supervising the evacuation of the wounded, spotting targets, brilliantly directing the fire of his battery and steadfastly refusing any aid for himself although he had been seriously wounded during the assault. Relentlessly pursuing the attack, he continued to shatter the enemy with point-blank fire until the fanatical assault had been repulsed and the hostile troops had suffer ed approximately ninety-five per cent casualties. His superb courage, valiant leadership and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon Captain Read and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1056 (October 15, 1951)
Born: at Palmer Springs, Virginia
Home Town: Palmer Springs, Virginia

REUSSER, KENNETH L.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Kenneth L. Reusser (0-11066), Major, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of a Fighter Plane in Marine Fighter Squadron TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN (VMF-214), attached to the U.S.S. SICILY (CVE-118), during an aerial attack on enemy targets in the Inch'on Area of Korea, on 5 August 1950. As Flight Leader of a Combat Air Patrol assigned the mission of seeking targets of opportunity, Major Reusser led his flight in a strafing attack against a hostile factory, destroying several vehicles and 30 of the enemy in a truck despite intense and accurate hostile antiaircraft fire. Suspecting that the strong defenses protected vehicles of war, he ordered his flight to orbit the target at 3000 feet while he investigated the factory at window-level and, on his second pass made in the face of automatic fire coming from the windows, discovered that the factory was a vehicle and tank assembly plant. With both wings of his plane damaged by antiaircraft fire, he flew back to the U.S.S. SICILY and returned to the target with napalm and rockets, destroying the plant with napalm and blasting six completed enemy tanks and four trucks in the factory courtyard in spite of accurate antiaircraft fire. This mission completed, he led his flight into the heavily fortified Inch'on Harbor and destroyed a large oil storage tank. Determined to inflict the greatest possible damage on the enemy even though his heavy ordinance was expended, he dived to within ten feet of a camouflaged oil tanker and raked the hull with his 20-mm guns, causing an explosion which not only destroyed the enemy ship, but also damaged his own craft and blew it out of control. Successful in returning his crippled plane to carrier base, Major Reusser, by his gallant fighting spirit, courage and devotion to duty, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 124 (March 5, 1951)
Born: at Cloverdale, Oregon
Home Town: Cloverdale, Oregon
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII)

*ROBERTS, CLAYTON LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Clayton Leroy Roberts (402518), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a Light Machine Gun Squad in Company B, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 27 October 1950. When a sudden devastating night assault by a numerically superior and well-concealed enemy force was launched on the right squad position of his platoon, necessitating the shifting of the remainder of the platoon to avoid encirclement, Sergeant Roberts voluntarily remained in position with his machine gun in order to cover the movement of the platoon and to protect several casualties in the vicinity of his gun. Despite the tremendous danger from hostile small arms and automatic weapons firing at close range, he steadfastly held his position, continuing to fire into the face of the massed enemy while his platoon took up new positions on the main line of defense without further losses. When his position was finally overrun, he still refused to give up the fight, engaging the first swarm of the enemy in hand-to-hand combat until, overcome by sheer strength of numbers, he fell mortally wounded. By his superb courage and indomitable fighting spirit, he saved the lives of many members of his platoon and contributed materially to the successful repulse of the hostile attack. His staunch devotion to duty in the face of insurmountable odds reflects the highest credit upon Sergeant Roberts and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 976 (October 8, 1951)
Born: April 7, 1925 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

ROBINSON, STANLEY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Stanley S. Robinson (1082138), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sudong, Korea, from 2 to 4 November 1950. With the remainder of his team killed or wounded during his platoon's frontal attack against a well-entrenched hostile force estimated at 100-strong and occupying the top of a steep hill, Private Robinson boldly exposed himself to a hail of enemy machine-gun and automatic weapons fire to continue his lone advance to a point where hand grenades could be effectively thrown on an opposing strongpoint. Carrying out a single-handed assault, he destroyed a heavy machine-gun emplacement and killed or routed all the surrounding enemy. Although painfully wounded in the shoulder and back during the fierce close-in encounter, he bravely consolidated his position as security against possible counterattack and, when that assault materialized, successfully beat off the enemy and drove them from the hill. Personally killing fifteen of the enemy throughout the action, Private Robinson, by his outstanding courage, daring initiative and unswerving devotion to duty served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1270 (January 4, 1952)
Born: at Wichita, Kansas
Home Town: Plains, Kansas

ROISE, HAROLD S.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Harold S. Roise (0-6134), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 15 to 26 September 1950. With his battalion assigned the lead position during the amphibious assault at Inchon the night of 15 September, Lieutenant Colonel Roise hit the beach in darkness under heavy enemy fire. Maintaining superb control of his companies in the bitter action that followed, he took position on the beachhead line in a heavy rainstorm and personally directed his units into a defensive perimeter to drive off repeated counterattacks launched by the fanatical aggressors. Continually subjecting himself to devastating artillery, mortar, automatic- weapons and small-arms fire, he pressed forward in his rapid advance to the city, expeditiously capturing assigned objectives and, on one occasion, leading a brilliantly executed maneuver to repulse a heavy counterattack with six hostile tanks and approximately 100 of the enemy destroyed without a single loss among his own units. Seriously wounded in a mortar barrage against his forward observation post as he directed his assault companies against the enemy's main line of resistance outside the city of Seoul, on 24 September, Lieutenant Colonel Roise refused medical attention for his own wounds and diligently supervised the care and evacuation of all the wounded. Calling for and briefing his executive officer in the tactical situation, he submitted to emergency first aid but refused evacuation and, although suffering severe pain, encouraged and deployed his men in routing and destroying the enemy in each fierce encounter on their drive to capture the city. His gallant leadership, great personal valor and cool courage, maintained against tremendous odds, served to inspire all the men of his battalion and reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Roise, his heroic command and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 587 (July 2, 1952)
Born: at Moscow, Idaho
Home Town: Moscow, Idaho
Other Award: Navy Cross w/Gold Star (Korea)

ROISE, HAROLD S.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Harold S. Roise (0-6134), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 27 November to 11 December 1950. With his battalion in point position in defense of Yudam-ni as Marine elements moved out in the attack to Koto-ri on 27 November, Lieutenant Colonel Roise consistently remained with the leading assault forces under heavy enemy fire emanating from hostile positions deeply entrenched on commanding ground, personally deploying directing his companies and utilizing all available supporting fires in defeating the outnumbering enemy in each furious encounter. Realizing the impossibility of gaining the assigned objective before nightfall in the face of the fierce resistance and treacherous terrain conditions, he ordered his units to set up a hasty defense on the ice and snow-covered hillside and, throughout the night as wave after wave of outnumbering forces persisted in their attempts to penetrate the area, expertly shifted elements of his command from one portion of the perimeter to another and supervised each maneuver to prevent the enemy from breaching his lines. Assigned as rear guard commander for his regiment's withdrawal from Yudam-ni on 1 December, Lieutenant Colonel Roise welded his remaining men and reinforcing units into an impregnable defense of several key terrain features imperative to the continued drive to the sea. With the column held up by a roadblock following an all-night march in bitter sub-zero weather over a narrow, frozen path along the mountain north of Hagaru-ri, he formulated and directed a brilliantly executed Maneuver to wipe out the obstruction and enable the entire column to proceed. Inculcating in his officers and men his own courageous spirit of heroism and determination, he again employed his 'moving perimeter' to cover the retrograde movement of all elements of the FIRST Marine Division from the Chosin Reservoir area and, on 11 December, arrived at Hungnam with his battalion an intact, fighting organization. His brilliant combat tactics, inspiring leadership and great personal valor against tremendous odds reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Roise, his intrepid command and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: 1stMarDiv Serial 10643 (August 21, 1952)
Born: at Moscow, Idaho
Home Town: Moscow, Idaho
Other Award: Navy Cross (Korea)

ROMERO-NIEVES, ENRIQUE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Enrique Romero-Nieves (1240226), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 26 October 1952. When both the platoon commander and sergeant were wounded and evacuated during his platoon's night counterattack against a bitterly defended hill mass which had been overrun by the enemy a few hours before, Private First Class Romero-Nieves unhesitatingly continued the attack in the face of intense artillery, mortar, automatic-weapons and grenade fire and skillfully directed the emplacement of a machine gun within seventy-five yards of the hostile position to increase the volume of covering and supporting fire fore the final assault on an enemy bunker. Armed only with hand grenades, he single-handedly charged the bunker and, although knocked down and painfully wounded by an enemy grenade, which rendered his left arm useless, quickly regained his feet and again stormed the bunker. Unable to pull the bin of a grenade with his wounded left hand, he coolly extracted the pin by hooking it in his belt buckle and hurled the deadly missile into the bunker, killing six of the enemy and enabling his comrades to continue in the assault. His intrepid fighting spirit, resolute determination and courageous initiative were contributing factors in the recapture of the platoon's objective and reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Romero-Nieves and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 423 (June 1, 1953)
Born: at Culebra, Puerto Rico
Home Town: Ferderiksted, Puerto Rico

ROWE, JOHN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John A. Rowe (0-52166), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company D, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 31 May 1952. When his unit was subjected to intense hostile small-arms, grenade and mortar fire while participating in a combat patrol, Second Lieutenant Rowe, despite wounds in both legs, constantly exposed himself to the enemy fire to deploy his platoon for an assault. Although his carbine was blown from his hands by the explosion of a hostile grenade, he continued to supervise and direct his unit in the face of withering enemy fire. When a grenade landed among a group of his men, he bravely grasped the deadly missile in a daring attempt to hurl it from the area and, despite serious wounds to his hands and face from the resultant explosion, urged his men forward in the assault until he lost consciousness. By his courageous leadership, valiant fighting spirit and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of his mission in the face of overwhelming odds, Second Lieutenant Rowe served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 254 (April 7, 1953)
Born: at Wilmington, Delaware
Home Town: Wilmington, Delaware

ROY, FRANKLIN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Franklin D. Roy (1194858), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Wireman in Headquarters Battery, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 26 October 1952. With the entire area subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire after the outpost was destroyed and the observation team forced to seek cover in a bunker on the reverse slope of the hill, Corporal Roy quickly armed himself and unhesitatingly left the bunker with his comrades to meet the impending round attack. When the intensity of the barrage increased, preventing the evacuation of the wounded and forcing most of the defenders to withdraw to an adjoining hill, he immediately returned to the bunker with a companion and positioned himself in front of the entrance to protect the wounded. Receiving the brunt of the hostile attack, he gallantly engaged the enemy and aided in killing an estimated twelve attackers before his ammunition was expended. Although painfully wounded when a hostile grenade landed in the bunker, he and his comrade feigned death until enemy soldiers had searched the shelter and departed. Refusing to leave his wounded companion, Corporal Roy remained in the danger area until the early hours of dawn and, although unarmed and aware that the position was still under enemy control, fearlessly left the bunker to go for aid. Twice wounded when the enemy opened fire on him from an observation trench immediately above the bunker, he chanced upon a box of hand grenades in the rubble and hurled the missiles into the trench until his supply was exhausted, escaping through a hail of hostile fire to friendly lines where he refused evacuation until he disclosed the situation on the hill. His indomitable fighting spirit, great personal valor and exemplary courage in the face of heavy odds reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Roy and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 790 (September 15, 1953)
Born: at Manchester, New Hampshire
Home Town: Manchester, New Hampshire

*RUST, CHARLES VERNON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Vernon Rust (1067789), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 12 September 1951. Boldly leading his fire team through intense enemy fire in a daring frontal assault against a hostile stronghold of well-fortified bunkers on Hill 673, Corporal Rust skillfully knocked out the first of four bunkers with accurately placed grenades and, although sustaining a serious arm wound during the action, steadfastly refused evacuation to continue in the attack. As the assault team moved forward, he seized an automatic rifle and, resting it on a tree stump, delivered deadly fire with his uninjured arm to cover the advance. After neutralizing an enemy machine-gun emplacement, he courageously rejoined the leading elements for the assault on the final objective, taking command of his entire squad when its leader was fatally wounded. Leading the men steadily forward, he spearheaded a fierce assault on the remaining hostile positions, braving heavy enemy grenade fire to launch a final attack which enabled the remainder of the assaulting unit to secure the objective, although he himself fell, mortally wounded in this last valiant effort. By his heroic initiative, aggressive determination and unflagging devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds, Corporal Rust served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 288 (April 12, 1952)
Born: August 21, 1930 at Shreveport, Louisiana
Home Town: Shreveport, Louisiana

*RYAN, HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Howard Ryan (1036624), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 7 October 1952. Assigned the mission of assaulting a portion of a steep hill, strongly defended by well-entrenched enemy troops, Sergeant Ryan vigorously led his squad up the slope during a twilight attack in the face of intense enemy small-arms and grenade fire. When his unit was pinned down by hostile machine-gun fire, he quickly picked up an automatic rifle from a wounded comrade and single-handedly charged the emplacement, hurling grenades and firing his weapon to silence the machine gun and permit the squad's advance into the trench line to the crest of the hill. Continually exposing himself to the devastating fire, he bravely moved forward to clear out bunkers and entrenched enemy positions until all resistance had ceased in his zone of action. With his unit subjected to a heavy mortar and artillery barrage after securing the objective, he immediately proceeded to reorganize and re-supply his men in preparation for the defense of the position. Mortally wounded by enemy fire while moving bout the area, Sergeant Ryan, by his outstanding leadership, courageous initiative and aggressive fighting spirit, served to inspire all who observed him. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 411 (May 22, 1953)
Born: May 31, 1929 at East Meadow, New York
Home Town: Bellmore, New York

S - Z

SALSBERRY, ROBERT B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert B. Salsberry (570755), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. Although six members of his group became casualties and he, himself, suffered serious wounds when his squad was cut off from the rest of the company and pinned down by an intense barrage of enemy small-arms and machine-gun fire, Corporal Salsberry remained with the wounded and single-handedly held off the enemy for seven hours until friendly reinforcements arrive to assist him and evacuate the dead and wounded Marines. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless devotion to duty in the face of almost insuperable odds, Corporal Salsberry upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 365 (April 16, 1951)
Born: at East Liverpool, Ohio
Home Town: East Liverpool, Ohio

SAWYER, WEBB D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Webb D. Sawyer (0-7874), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 22 to 25 April 1951. In the face of mounting enemy resistance on 22 April, Lieutenant Colonel Sawyer courageously moved among the foremost elements of his command, boldly exposing himself to intense hostile fire in order to direct his battalion in attacking and seizing strongly defended enemy positions. When a numerically superior enemy force launched a concerted night attack and penetrated an adjacent friendly unit, leaving his left flank completely exposed, he skillfully deployed his men to meet the threat before moving to a forward command post from which he could effectively observe and control the action. Remaining in this exposed position throughout the night and the following morning despite the imminent danger of enemy encirclement, he personally directed the repulse of repeated hostile thrusts and the containing of a dangerous penetration of the center of the line after bitter hand-to-hand fighting. When the enemy withdrew to the immediate front of the battalion shortly before daylight, simultaneously delivering a fierce volume of fire and sending a large force to envelop the penetrated unit on the left flank, he coolly supervised the evacuation of casualties and steadfastly refused to relinquish his exposed position until all had reached safety and he was ordered to assume new defensive positions. Selecting locations for defenses for the night after skillfully guiding the battalion over tortuous mountain trails to the assigned area, he conducted his unit in inflicting severe losses on the hostile force, continuing his engagement of the enemy throughout the night and remaining with the last elements of his command until the withdrawal of two friendly regiments had been covered. His inspiring leadership, aggressive determination and valiant devotion to duty in the face of constant attack and overwhelming odds were contributing factors in containing the hostile attack and in securing the vital left flank of the Division, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Sawyer and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 173 (March 27, 1952)
Born: at Toledo, Ohio
Home Town: Toledo, Ohio

SCOTT, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James E. Scott (365832), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving in Headquarters and Service Company, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 30 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked vital regimental supply dumps and threatened to overrun friendly defensive positions, Sergeant Scott mounted the lead vehicle of a column of six Army tanks which arrived on the scene and personally directed accurate, effective fire on the enemy. Undaunted by intense hostile small-arms and mortar fire, he moved fearlessly among the vehicles and spotted enemy positions until fire superiority was gained and the hostile attack was successfully repulsed. Blown from a tank on two different occasions by the enemy barrage, he courageously remounted the vehicle and continued his voluntary mission, thereby assisting materially in preventing the determined hostile force from attaining its objective. His courageous initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and inspiring devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Scott and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 659 (July 14, 1951)
Born: at Cleveland, Oklahoma
Home Town: Cleveland, Oklahoma

SEEBURGER, EDWARD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edward H. Seeburger (0-43049), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Unit Commander of the Dog Company Unit, Provisional Dog-Easy Company, Composite Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 2 December 1950. First Lieutenant Seeburger was ordered to lead the attack of the combined Regimental Combat Teams FIVE and SEVEN in the breakout from Yudam-ni south to Hagaru. Soon after jumping off along the Main Supply Route with a single tank in the lead together with the remnants of about 20 men, he came under intense enemy fire from small arms, automatic weapons, rockets, and mortars from enemy forces deeply entrenched over commanding ground to the front and both flanks. First Lieutenant Seeburger began deploying his men in defilade on either side of the road. When he spotted many of the enemy on the high ground on the right flank, he contacted the tank commander through the integral phone on the back of the tank and directed their fire to silence the enemy there. As he was doing this, enemy fire severed the telephone connection and wounded him in the knee. At the same time, with well-entrenched machine guns defending a roadblock to the front, and with his ranks depleted by eight further casualties and he himself painfully wounded and unable to walk, he staunchly refused evacuation, and directed his men in an enfilade movement which wiped out the obstruction and enabled the entire column to move forward. By his great personal valor and dauntless perseverance in the face of almost certain death, First Lieutenant Seeburger saved the lives of many Marines; thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Born: August 8, 1922 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

SELDAL, RUSSELL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Russell J. Seldal (540487), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Cannoneer in Battery B, First Battalion, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 4 December 1950. Quickly realizing the extreme danger of the situation when the lead truck in his convoy was set afire during an attack by a numerically superior and cleverly concealed enemy force well-entrenched in near-by hill positions, Private First Class Seldal rushed forward from his covered position to the blazing vehicle which was loaded with ammunition and, braving a concentrated hail of intense and accurate hostile machine-gun and rifle fire, courageously disposed of the burning ammunition and smothered the flames that were spreading throughout the remaining ammunition. By his swift action, he averted an almost certain catastrophe, saving valuable ammunition, preventing an explosion that would have resulted in numerous casualties, and keeping open the only road to safety for the friendly forces. His outstanding initiative, superb courage and selfless devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Seldal and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 970 (September 27, 1951)
Born: at Madison, Wisconsin
Home Town: Madison, Wisconsin

SHONK, WALTER C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Walter C. Shonk (1137377), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Automatic Rifleman of Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 10 June 1951. When his squad temporarily halted its attack to allow four enemy soldiers to approach with hands raised in token of surrender, when the four supposed prisoners suddenly took advantage of the situation to begin a vicious hand grenade attack, Private First Class Shonk courageously remained in his exposed position to cut down all four with bursts from his gun. Although bleeding from multiple wounds caused by the hostile grenades, he charged forward in a fierce assault on concealed enemy positions from which a hail of small-arms fire had begun simultaneously with the grenade attack. Boldly pressing his assault, he killed four more of the enemy occupying a well-hidden bunker and, despite further wounds received during this action, aggressively continued his attack until he was ordered to seek medical treatment. By his daring initiative and indomitable fighting spirit, he was responsible for neutralizing two serious attempts on the security of his unit and thereby served to inspire all who observed him. His valiant devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds reflects the highest credit upon Private First Class Shonk and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 210 (March 31, 1952)
Born: at Oakland, California
Home Town: Oakland, California

SIGMUND, LOUIS J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Louis J. Sigmund (1184679), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 November 1951. Although heavily outnumbered during a strong enemy assault against the company's defensive positions, Private First Class Sigmund boldly delivered effective fire on the hostile force until the attack was repulsed. When a grenade from the retreating enemy landed within an adjacent bunker occupied by another Marine, he bravely leaped into the emplacement, seized the missile and threw it clear in time to avoid the full force of the explosion, suffering the loss of his left hand and sustaining severe shrapnel wounds on his head and face. By his outstanding courage, daring initiative and selfless efforts in saving the life of a comrade in the face of grave peril to himself, Private First Class Sigmund upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 669 (July 28, 1952)
Born: at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*SMALLEY, LLOYD BUCHANAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Lloyd Buchanan Smalley (1156994), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Reconnaissance Company, Headquarters Battalion, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 8 December 1952. When a numerically superior enemy force effected a partial penetration of his squad's position far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Smalley skillfully directed the fire and efforts of his small group of men in repelling the attack, inflicting heavy casualties and forcing the enemy to withdraw. During a temporary lull in the battle, he quickly moved about the area to locate and rescue his wounded comrades and, while working his way to a sector extremely close to the enemy, discovered a severely wounded Marine in urgent need of medical treatment. While subjected to intense hostile automatic-weapons and hand-grenade fire, he proceeded to remove the stricken man to the comparative safety of the squad's position. Although sustaining two severe and painful wounds while engaged in this action, he succeeded in gaining the friendly position with his comrade before he was again struck by enemy fire and fell, mortally wounded. By his marked fortitude and resolute determination in the face of heavy odds, Sergeant Smalley served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the success of his squad in repulsing the enemy and in safely returning to the main line of resistance. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 1042 (December 7, 1953)
Born: June 26, 1930 at Boston, Massachusetts
Home Town: New York, New York

*SMITH, DAVID E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to David E. Smith (1154434), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company F, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 9 July 1953. With the forward outpost he was commanding subjected to an attack by an overwhelming force of enemy troops who surged into the trench lines under cover of a devastating mortar and artillery barrage, Sergeant Smith immediately organized the defense and maintained constant contact by radio with the company command post. When the situation became hopeless, he dauntlessly called in machine-gun fire on his own position, thereby making it extremely difficult for the attackers to approach, and accounting for a large toll of enemy dead. Together with the remaining men of his squad, he proceeded to fight his way through the trench line and off the outpost in order to return to the main line of resistance. Hearing the cry of a wounded comrade who was inadvertently left behind, Sergeant Smith ordered his men to continue on to friendly lines and returned alone to the outpost to aid the stricken Marines. Although the position was overrun with hostile troops, he fearlessly moved into the trench line and engaged the enemy in bitter hand-to-hand combat until he fell, mortally wounded. When another counterattack was organized, the men of his unit, aroused by his courageous act, succeeded in routing the hostile force, killing every enemy defender and secured the vital outpost position. By his indomitable fighting spirit, courageous leadership and self-sacrificing efforts in behalf of a comrade, Sergeant Smith served as an inspiration to all who observed him. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and sustains the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 368 (June 5, 1954)
Born: April 24, 1932 at Richmond, Virginia
Home Town: Richmond, Virginia

*SMITH, H. J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to H. J. Smith (0-23108), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Seoul Area of Korea on 24 September 1950. With the fighting strength of his company severely reduced by heavy casualties suffered under punishing hostile rifle and automatic weapons fire, First Lieutenant Smith was ordered to assault and seize the enemy-held high ground to the front. Although pinned down on three sides by enemy forces vastly superior in numbers and fire power, he quickly mustered all available men, including the seventeen men remaining of two of his three rifle platoons, forward observers and machine gunners, and led this small but aggressive group of only forty-four men into the assault against an estimated five to seven hundred well dug-in and well camouflaged hostile troops. Out in front without benefit of cover of any kind, he moved forward, shouting encouragement to his men and directing them in the attack until he was fatally struck down by enemy automatic weapons fire after advancing about two hundred yards. Inspired to heroic endeavor by their leader's courage and fighting spirit, twenty-six of his men were able to drive to the top of Hill 90 and seize it. First Lieutenant Smith's forceful leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds sustain and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 477 (May 22, 1951)
Born: March 22, 1918 at New Blaine, Arkansas
Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma

SMITH, LOREN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Loren R. Smith (0-40624), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Executive Officer of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea the early morning of 28 November 1950. Ordered to reinforce a friendly unit on a strategic hill near Yudam-ni, and forced to approach the objective over an un-reconnoitered route, First Lieutenant Smith led his company forward in darkness and sub-zero temperatures, maneuvering up the reverse slopes and gaining the crest and adjoining ridges of the assigned positions before the enemy suddenly opened fire against the forward elements with small arms, automatic weapons, rockets and mortars. Spotting approximately twenty-five of the enemy attempting an enveloping movement of the left flank and firing relentlessly on stretcher bearers evacuating the wounded at the height of the action, he promptly left his command post position under intense enemy fire and, organizing a group of four Marines from the mortar section and machine-gun platoon, personally led them in an assault against the attackers, killing at least ten and forcing the others to withdraw in disorder. With his ranks depleted by casualties and he himself painfully wounded in the face by grenade fragments, he staunchly refused evacuation and, after directing men from the carrying parties into a hasty defense to protect the flank, quickly went forward to the command post to obtain reinforcing units. Integrating a squad from an attacking rifle platoon with elements from Company Headquarters, he placed them in advantageous positions to secure the area, thereby protecting the supply and evacuation route and contributing to the success of his company's mission. By his inspiring leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and courageous devotion to duty in the face of grave peril, First Lieutenant Smith was in large measure responsible for the saving of many lives and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1047 (November 1, 1951)
Born: at Hartford, Kansas
Home Town: Lebo, Kansas

SMITH, RAYMOND C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Raymond C. Smith (1196276), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 6 October 1952. Participating in the defense of a vital combat outpost forward of the main line of resistance when the enemy launched an intense mortar and artillery bombardment which completely disrupted the platoon's communication system, Private First Class Smith, keenly aware of the personal danger involved, advanced through the trench line to lay and repair wire and re-establish contact between the units on the outpost. Fearlessly manning his automatic weapon as an overwhelming force of hostile troops attacked the position, he aided in repelling the first enemy wave and delivered counterfire until his ammunition was expended and the outpost was overrun. Suffering from painful wounds sustained during this furious action, Private First Class Smith refused to leave his post and, armed with a bayonet knife attacked to a broken carbine, stood guard outside the command post bunker to protect the wounded Marines placed within, successfully repulsing the hostile troops as they attempted to approach the bunker. When the enemy threw hand grenades into the bunker, he hurled the deadly missiles back at them and, after a rescue unit arrived, assisted in carrying the wounded back to the main line of resistance, continuing his heroic efforts until he dropped to the ground from exhaustion. By his exemplary valor, fortitude and gallant devotion to duty, Private First Class Smith served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 594 (July 20, 1953)
Born: at Walker County, Georgia
Home Town: Chickamauga, Georgia

SMITH, SAMUEL S., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Samuel S. Smith, Jr. (0-11634), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 and 7 December 1950. With the main supply route from Hagaru-ri menaced by numerically superior and well-entrenched hostile forces commanding strategic hill positions overlooking open terrain, Captain Smith daringly exposed himself to intense mortar, grenade and machine-gun fire to direct his company in a fierce attack on the enemy strongholds. Personally leading his men up the icebound, rocky incline in the face of overwhelming odds, he succeeded in attaining his objective and was materially responsible for the killing of an estimated 200 of the enemy and the capture of 180. Early on the following morning, with the company command post subjected to a savage counter-attack by a hostile force of approximately battalion strength, resulting in heavy casualties to his men, Captain Smith bravely rallied his forces on the razor-backed ledge and, undaunted by heavy fire, gallantly held his ground until the wounded could be evacuated. Later, when mounting casualties and the ferocity of the attack necessitated redeployment to higher ground, he skillfully directed the movement across the treacherous terrain and was one of the last to leave, remaining at his post and inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. Reaching his new position, he immediately reorganized his depleted company to offset any further hostile attacks. By his brilliant strategy and leadership, he contributed directly to the capture and maintenance of valuable ridge lines overlooking the main supply route from Hagaru-ri. His outstanding courage, perseverance and devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Captain Smith and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 838 (August 8, 1951)
Born: at Bellingham, Washington
Home Town: Independence, Missouri

SNELLING, EDWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Edward W. Snelling (0-49734), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a 60-mm. Mortar Section, Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hagaru-ri, Korea, on 28 and 29 November 1950. When a numerically superior hostile force attacked and overran the company's center platoon, Second Lieutenant Snelling braved enemy small-arms, machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire to lead his section in retarding the hostile attack until the command post personnel could organize an effective defense. Observing that his section was drawing enemy mortar and artillery fire, he displaced his weapons in tactical positions and directed their fire until the ammunition supply was exhausted. Although repeatedly exposed to hostile fire, he crossed and re-crossed two open fields to aid the Company Commander in placing reinforcements and, obtaining additional ammunition for his mortars on one trip, was responsible for breaking up an enemy concentration preparing to launch a vigorous attack. Fearlessly traversing an unprotected area, he procured a jeep and trailer loaded with ammunition which had been abandoned between friendly and hostile lines and, driving the vehicle back to the lines, again spotted accurate fire until the ammunition was depleted. By his quick initiative, courageous leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Second Lieutenant Snelling aided materially in routing the enemy and in successfully defending the company positions, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 630 (July 14, 1951)
Born: at Greenville, South Carolina
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

SOUTHALL, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James B. Southall (1096838), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 14 September 1951. Volunteering to lead the assault elements of his platoon up a steep, bare, fire-swept hill during the hours of darkness, Sergeant Southall continually exposed himself to intense hostile small-arms, mortar and automatic-weapons fire in a brave attempt to dislodge stubborn enemy forces from their well entrenched positions on the crest of the vitally strategic ridge. Boldly firing his carbine as he advanced, he inflicted numerous casualties among the hostile troops and, refusing to fall back to obtain a fresh supply when his ammunition was expended, shouted words of encouragement to his men while urging them to make a final effort to reach the top of the hill. Sergeant Southall skillfully directed and coordinated effective machine-gun fire on the hostile positions until his unit, inspired by his daring leadership, charged the last 100 yards, seized the objective and killed the defending enemy troops. Although severely wounded in the wrist, he refused to be evacuated and, remaining with the platoon to organize a hasty defense of the area, aided his men throughout the night in repelling several hostile counter-attacks. By his magnificent courage, fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty throughout the intensive action, Sergeant Southall was greatly instrumental in the success achieved by his battalion and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 654 (July 28, 1952)
Born: at Fordyce, Arkansas
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

*STEPHEN, JAMES WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James William Stephen (1165833), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 6 October 1952. When the outpost was subjected to an intense hostile artillery and mortar barrage and an overwhelming enemy force immediately assaulted and overran the position under cover of darkness, Sergeant Stephen quickly organized his squad to defend his sector and, during the ensuing close-combat struggle with the enemy, personally accounted for several enemy dead with accurate counterfire. Encouraging and inspiring his men to heroic efforts, he spearheaded three determined counterattacks and succeeded in temporarily driving off the hostile forces and in inflicting numerous casualties. With his squad cut down to only four wounded Marines, he ordered his men to take cover and assisted them to the comparative safety of a bunker. Observing six enemy infantrymen advancing along the trench line, Sergeant Stephen single-handedly charged forward with fixed bayonet and, taking the enemy by complete surprise, was last seen alive in full pursuit of the retreating troops. By his daring initiative and resolute fighting spirit in the face of tremendous odds, he enabled the remaining Marines to escape detection until the outpost was retaken by friendly troops. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon Sergeant Stephen and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 789 (September 15, 1953)
Born: November 15, 1929 at Detroit, Michigan
Home Town: Madison, Michigan

STEVENS, JOHN W. II
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John W. II Stevens (0-6180), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 27 November to 11 December 1950. Throughout this period of intensive action, Lieutenant Colonel Stevens gallantly led his battalion in almost daily contact with the enemy in exceedingly difficult mountainous terrain and under bitter, sub-zero weather conditions. Called upon to reinforce heavily-engaged units when the enemy launched a concerted attack against all friendly forces in the Chosin Reservoir Area on 27 November, he personally contacted each company commander and, realizing that they were not familiar with the terrain they were about to occupy, led or directed them to proper routes of approach to their assigned areas in the face of an intense hostile mortar barrage. With his battalion committed to an all-out defense of key terrain features during the following three days, he labored unceasingly to direct and coordinate the successful defense of the vital strategic ground, the loss of which would have seriously jeopardized the bi-regimental defense perimeter. During the redeployment from Yudam-ni to new positions, he established his command post immediately to the rear of the heavily-engaged companies in order to control the precise timing required for a successful disengagement from an aggressive enemy force and, bravely remaining with the last unit to break contact, maintained his post at a key bridge until all elements of the battalion had crossed and the bridge was destroyed by demolition. On the morning of 4 December, when the road on the outskirts of Hagaru-ri was blocked by vehicles of other units and subjected to fierce hostile mortar and automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant Colonel Stevens immediately committed elements of his command to seize and neutralize enemy-held positions, boldly moving through the fire-swept area to clear key vehicles and facilitate movement of the stalled column. When the battalion defense sector was attacked by two enemy regiments at Hagaru-ri on the night of 6 - 7 December, he expertly controlled his forces and, although his command post was exposed to intense and accurate hostile fire throughout the action, skillfully directed the repulse of the enemy with heavy losses. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and steadfast devotion to duty, Lieutenant Colonel Stevens contributed immeasurably to the success of the FIRST Marine Division during this period and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 415 (March 19, 1952)
Born: at Takoma Park, Maryland
Home Town: Evanston, Illinois

STEWART, ROY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Roy L. Stewart (1205796), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 16 - 17 July 1953. Participating as a member of a combat patrol operating three thousand yards forward of the main line of resistance, Private First Class Stewart was directly instrumental in saving the lives of at least eight fellow Marines. When the patrol sustained fifty percent casualties when ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force under cover of darkness at extremely close quarters, he repeatedly exposed himself to the hail of hostile fire to protect his fallen comrades and succeeded in repelling numerous attempts by the attackers to overrun the position. On one occasion during the fierce fire-fight, a live enemy grenade landed among the wounded. Without a moment's hesitation, Private First Class Stewart retrieved the burning missile and hurled it back at the enemy. On a later occasion when the patrol was completely surrounded and he was the only man able to fire, he stood upright to draw the hostile fire from his comrades and personally killed five of the onrushing enemy before he was seriously wounded. Despite his wounds, he single-handedly kept the enemy at bay until the arrival of reinforcements. Private First Class Stewart's dauntless determination, great personal valor and heroic fighting spirit in the face of almost prohibitive odds reflect the highest credit upon himself and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 650
Born: at Star City, Arkansas
Home Town: Pine Bluff, Arkansas

STOUFFER, FREDERICK E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Frederick E. Stouffer (1093276), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Runner to Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Koto-ri, Korea, on 8 December 1950. When his platoon was cut off from two friendly M-1 tanks spearheading an assault and forced to take cover under a blistering automatic weapons and machine-gun attack suddenly launched by an overwhelming hostile force deeply-entrenched on commanding ground, Private First Class Stouffer voluntarily charged through fifty yards of open fire-swept terrain and climbed to the top of the lead tank. Remaining in his exposed position as the concentrated hostile fire continued, he expertly directed a deadly barrage to neutralize the emplacements and enabled his platoon to advance and overwhelm the enemy. Although painfully wounded and bleeding profusely, Private First Class Stouffer refused to be evacuated and, when the enemy viciously counterattacked in force from the right flank, staunchly remained in his position to direct the tank's effective fire until the attackers were repulsed and his unit's objective attained. By his daring initiative, fortitude and gallant fighting spirit in the face of tremendous odds, Private First Class Stouffer served as an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed to the success achieved by his unit. His valiant devotion to duty throughout was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Born: at Huntington, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Johnstown, Pennsylvania

*STROPES, DALE LEMOINE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Dale Lemoine Stropes (338703), Master Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Gunnery Sergeant of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 2 December 1950. When numerically superior enemy forces attacked his company's defensive position in the vicinity of Yudam-ni, Master Sergeant Stropes repeatedly exposed himself to hostile small-arms and machine-gun fire, pole charges and hand grenades to move among his company position while directing the accurate and effective fire of his men, shouting orders and words of encouragement and assisting in the rapid evacuation of casualties. Although seriously wounded during this action, he refused medical attention and voluntarily continued to assist in the evacuation of other Marine casualties until he was mortally wounded by enemy mortar fire. By his aggressive and courageous actions while under hostile fire, Master Sergeant Stropes served to inspire all who observed him and materially contributed to the successful repulse of the enemy attack. His outstanding leadership, initiative and selfless devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 636 (July 6, 1951)
Born: September 14, 1921 at Andelusia, Illinois
Home Town: Andelusia, Illinois

*SULLIMAN, GEORGE SIMON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to George Simon Sulliman (0-49450), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces near Map'yong-ni, Korea, on 24 April 1951. Observing approximately one hundred twenty-five of the enemy charging toward his position on his battalion's exposed left flank as his company was reorganizing to occupy new defense positions near Hill 435, First Lieutenant Sulliman quickly shouted a warning and rallied the extremely limited friendly troops available into position to attack. Almost instantly the fanatical force approached to within twenty-five yards of the exposed flank, attacking with automatic weapons, mortars and devastating hand grenade barrages as First Lieutenant Sulliman crawled from position to position, controlling his men, pointing out targets and shouting words of encouragement, instilling in his men the will and determination to hold at all costs. When a heavy machine gun jammed and failed to fire at the height of the furious battle as the attackers advanced to within feet of the area, he ordered fixed bayonets, then charged toward the forward slope of the hill where the heavy gun was located and leaped into the exposed emplacement, manning the gun himself when the gunner was struck by enemy fire and seriously wounded. Fending off the attackers and attempting to clear the gun as the enemy advanced almost to the muzzle of the weapon, he was desperately trying to put the gun into action when he himself was fatally wounded. First Lieutenant Sulliman's indomitable courage, brilliant and forceful leadership and great personal valor maintained against tremendous odds, served as the driving force which spirited his men to fight a brief but fierce battle which ultimately ended in victory, and his fortitude and devotion to duty sustain and enhance the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 1278
Born: April 26, 1929 at New Britain, Connecticut
Home Town: New Britain, Connecticut

SUTTER, ALLAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Allan Sutter (0-5610), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Second Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces at Koto-ri, Korea, during the period 25 November to 10 December 1950. A gallant and resolute leader, Lieutenant Colonel Sutter continuously exposed himself to intense hostile machine-gun, mortar and small-arms fire to direct his Battalion in repelling the repeated fanatical assaults of enemy forces, estimated at two Divisions, surrounding his defensive position. With his sector constantly swept by grazing hostile fire over a period of 14 days, he bravely moved among his troops across open terrain in sub-zero weather, encouraging the men and sustaining their fighting spirit. When the enemy launched an exceptionally savage and determined assault on the night of 29 November, Lieutenant Colonel Sutter, by his brilliant direction of all phases of the defense and expert maintenance of operational control throughout the action, inspired his Battalion in repulsing the hostile force and inflicting severe casualties, including 175 dead and several hundred wounded. During the attack from Koto-ri to Sudong-ni on 10 December, he skillfully led his unit on a continuous march down a tortuous mountain defile and, although suffering from a high fever, reached his objective in minimum time with personnel and equipment intact. His superb tactical ability, fortitude and Battalion leadership in holding the strategic position at Koto-ri were contributing factors in the successful redeployment of the FIRST Marine Division to Hungnam. His outstanding courage, selfless devotion to duty and unwavering perseverance in the face of great odds reflect the highest credit upon Lieutenant Colonel Sutter and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1075 (October 25, 1951)
Born: at Mount Holy, New Jersey
Home Town: Germantown, Pennsylvania

SWIGART, ORAL R., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Oral R. Swigart, Jr. (0-50666), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company G, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 24 and 25 July 1953. Assigned the mission of defending a vital sector of the main line of resistance, Captain Swigart carried out a thorough reconnaissance to ensure that his men and automatic weapons were disposed to the best advantage. Although painfully wounded and rendered unconscious when the position was subjected to an intense mortar and artillery barrage which was followed by an attack by an overwhelming enemy force, he quickly reassumed command of his unit when he regained consciousness, alerted his platoon commanders of the impending attack and, after repelling the enemy, immediately prepared for another encounter. Through his remarkable leadership, a second vicious enemy attack on his position was also repulsed. Despite his painful wounds, he continued to supervise operations throughout the night and constantly exposed himself to intense enemy artillery, mortar and small-arms fire in order to direct his men effectively and to offer them words of encouragement. By his inspiring leadership, marked fortitude and courageous initiative, Captain Swigart contributed in large measure to the successful defense of his position and to the accomplishment of the battalion's mission. His personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 460 (August 3, 1954)
Born: at Annapolis, Maryland
Home Town: Norfolk, Virginia

*TAFT, KENNETH EDWIN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Kenneth Edwin Taft, Jr. (0-51174), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 26 March 1953. When a numerically superior hostile force launched a savage assault on the critically important outpost position his unit was defending far forward of the main line of resistance, Captain Taft, fearlessly exposing himself to murderous enemy artillery and mortar fire, skillfully effected an urgently needed reorganization of his intrepid garrison of Marines in a gallant attempt to stem the onrushing hostile troops. When the enemy gained the friendly trench line and overran the position forcing his platoon to withdraw to the command post bunker, he provided a stirring example of leadership and courage during these crucial moments by opening fire with his pistol in a final courageous effort to stave off the attackers, personally killing several of the enemy before a hostile satchel charge was hurled into the shelter. Mortally wounded by the exploding missile, Captain Taft, by his indomitable fighting spirit and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, served to inspire all who observed him. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 30 (January 29, 1954)
Born: December 17, 1926 at Belleville, Illinois
Home Town: White Plains, New York

TAPLETT, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert D. Taplett (0-6678), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 28 November to 10 December 1950. When a vastly outnumbering hostile force attacked his Battalion assembly area northwest of Yudam-ni during the pre-dawn hours of 28 November, Lieutenant Colonel Taplett remained steadfast in the midst of heavy fire and bursting grenades as the enemy penetrated to within ten yards of the command post, maintaining communications with and directing the fire of two of his companies which were also under attack and directing the third reserve company in delivering a brilliantly executed counterattack to repel the onslaught in all sectors before daybreak. Assigned, on 1 December, to break the enemy's main line of resistance which controlled the principal supply route of entrapped Marine units near Yudam-ni, he placed himself in a forward position to observe and control operations and, although he was knocked to the ground by mortar fire on one occasion, and subjected to continuous small-arms and artillery fire throughout two days of intensive action, succeeded in driving the enemy from the area, thereby enabling the FIRST Marine Division to remove all troops, casualties, equipment and supplies in safety. With the Division train cut in half by hostile fire during the march from Hagaru-ri to Koto-ri on 7 December, and the rear elements unable to advance for a period of more than ten hours, Lieutenant Colonel Taplett moved two miles to the head of the convoy under heavy fire and, effecting a skillful reorganization, started the train moving, at the same time supervising his own Battalion in offensive neutralizing action against the strongpoint. Later the same day when the enemy struck the rear echelon in estimated battalion strength, he again left his position and braved the intense fire to analyze the situation. Promptly calling for air strikes, bringing his own supportive fire to bear and maneuvering two rifle companies into action, he conducted a devastating offensive to annihilate the attackers and enable the Marine units to reach their destination without further opposition. By his inspiring leadership, forceful combat tactics and gallant fighting spirit maintained against staggering odds, Lieutenant Colonel Taplett contributed to the success of his Battalion in accounting for more than 2,000 of the enemy with a total of only 117 in his own ranks. His fortitude and devotion to duty throughout the bitterly fought twelve-day battle reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1119 (November 5, 1951)
Born: at Tyndall, South Dakota
Home Town: Tyndall, South Dakota

*THOMAS, FRANCIS ROBERT, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Francis Robert Thomas, Jr. (1333319), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Fire Team Leader of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the early morning of 27 October 1952. While advancing in an attack against a series of mutually supporting hostile bunkers and trenches massed on a hill overlooking the company front, his unit was subjected to a murderous hail of enemy mortar and artillery fire. With members of his squad pinned down by intense small-arms and hand-grenade fire as they neared the objective, Private First Class Thomas, fully aware of the danger involved, picked up an automatic rifle and, dashing through the open area in the face of almost certain death, single-handedly stormed the hostile position. Firing his gun with devastating effect and hurling grenades with deadly accuracy, he continued to advance against the enemy until mortally wounded by an exploding enemy grenade. By his courageous leadership, indomitable fighting spirit and selfless devotion to the fulfillment of his mission in the face of overwhelming odds, Private First Class Thomas inspired the remaining members of his squad to charge the enemy and overrun the position. His heroic actions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 422 (June 4, 1953)
Born: September 1, 1930 at Millvale, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Millvale, Pennsylvania

*THOMPSON, WILL ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Will Allen Thompson (635703), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 October 1952. When the assault platoon suffered heavy casualties during the initial attack against a fiercely defended and well-concealed enemy outpost on commanding ground while he was engaged in directing covering fire for the operation, Staff Sergeant Thompson unhesitatingly volunteered to lead a second assault on the objective. Although constantly exposed to the withering hail of hostile mortar fire which blanketed the area, he bravely led his men to the enemy trench lines, reorganized the remaining five survivors of his unit and led them in a gallant and final assault on the hostile strong point. When the enemy launched a determined counterattack on his position, Staff Sergeant Thompson promptly seized an automatic rifle and a supply of hand grenades and single-handedly repelled the hostile troops while his wounded comrades were removed from the area, continuing to deliver deadly fire upon the enemy until he was mortally wounded. By his indomitable courage, outstanding leadership and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, Staff Sergeant Thompson served to inspire all who observed him. His exceptional bravery and valiant fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon himself and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 412 (May 27, 1953)
Born: August 29, 1929 at Sallis, Mississippi
Home Town: Brandon, Mississippi

*TIDWELL, GERALD GLADDEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Gerald Gladden Tidwell (0-50417), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander in Company B, First Amphibian Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, during the evacuation of friendly forces from Hungnam, Korea, on 24 December 1950. When a large fire in an ammunition dump threatened to destroy several near-by amphibian tractors with crews on board, Second Lieutenant Tidwell requested and received permission to move the vehicles to a place of safety. Racing fearlessly down the beach, he warned tractor crews and other personnel in the vicinity to evacuate the danger area immediately. When the fire gained momentum and exploded the ammunition dump, he was mortally wounded, still gallantly attempting to wave vehicles off the beach to safety. His quick and courageous initiative and self-sacrificing efforts in saving the vitally needed amphibian tractors and their crews reflect the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Tidwell and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 715 (July 21, 1951)
Born: August 24, 1929 at Langdale, Alabama
Home Town: Long Beach, California

*TOLAND, DONALD TIMOTHY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Timothy Toland (1123138), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Radio Operator of a Forward Observer Team of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 May 1951. Courageously refusing to return to the medical aid station to be treated for serious wounds that he received while en route to a forward observation post during a strong enemy attack, Corporal Toland ingeniously utilized field expedients in repairing his damaged radio and restored it to operation. Although considerably weakened from loss of blood, he steadfastly refused to seek cover and, braving continued hostile fire, succeeded in transmitting vital fire mission commands for the forward observer, thereby aiding materially in bringing repeated heavy artillery barrages to bear on the advancing enemy. When hostile forces threatened to penetrate the position during the action, he boldly seized a weapon and engaged the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties and assisting materially in preventing a break-through. Aggressively and boldly manning his gun throughout the fire fight, he was mortally wounded in the closing minutes of the battle. His indomitable fighting spirit and steadfast devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon Corporal Toland and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 179 (March 27, 1952)
Born: June 5, 1932 at Boston, Massachusetts
Home Town: Boston, Massachusetts

TOUCHETTE, ROBERT F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert F. Touchette (409195), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 May 1952. With the platoon fighting its way through barbed wire, minefields and intense hostile machine-gun, mortar and artillery fire during the initial assault against a strongly defended enemy hill in the vicinity of Tumae-ri, Sergeant Touchette bravely remained in the forefront of the attack and delivered effective machine-gun fire into the hostile bunkers and trenches. When his squad was pinned down by enemy machine-gun fire from a heavily fortified bunker while halfway to the objective, he boldly charged the obstacle with hand grenades in a daring attempt to wipe out the emplacement and killed two of the occupants, enabling his unit to resume the advance. Although seriously wounded in the right arm and in both legs, he refused to be evacuated and continued to move forward in the assault, shouted words of encouragement to his men and skillfully directed their fire until the objective had been secured. His exceptional courage, inspiring leadership and valiant fighting spirit were major factors in the ultimate destruction of the hostile force and reflect the highest credit upon Sergeant Touchette and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 211 (April 1, 1952)
Born: at Boston, Massachusetts
Home Town: Cambridge, Massachusetts

*UMBAUGH, ERNEST JUNIOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Ernest Junior Umbaugh (333872), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant of the First Platoon, Company A, First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 9 December 1950. Subjected to heavy and accurate fire while leading his platoon in the attack against well-entrenched hostile positions on snow-covered mountain slopes dominating the Koto-ri Pass Road, Staff Sergeant Umbaugh repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to cross and re-cross the crest of the ridgeline as he coordinated and directed the systematic destruction of two of the three heavily defended hostile positions. Although his platoon was suffering many casualties, he rallied his men and charged in the lead of the final assault in which he personally destroyed two enemy machine-gun bunkers and annihilated ten of the gun crew. As he advanced toward a third hostile machine gun, he was mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. By his courageous actions, he served to inspire others of his group to heroic endeavor in quickly overrunning the remaining hostile positions and seizing the objective, thereby contributing materially to the successful advance of the Division through Koto-ri Pass. His outstanding fortitude, leadership and aggressive fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon Staff Sergeant Umbaugh and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 636 (July 5, 1951)
Born: February 21, 1923 at Coon Rapids, Iowa
Home Town: Marshalltown, Iowa

*VALENTINE, EARL LESTER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Lester Valentine, Jr. (0-51968), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company H, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 25 - 26 August 1953. Assigned the mission of restoring the company defensive perimeter when numerically superior hostile forces overran a key ridge line on the right flank, Second Lieutenant Valentine bravely led his platoon through intense enemy artillery and mortar barrages to the line of departure in preparation for a counterattack. Undeterred by persistent hostile fire, he boldly reconnoitered the terrain in the darkness, called in a mortar fire plan to the company command post to support his attack and, although wounded, moved his unit forward in the assault. At the height of the battle, he assumed a position forward of the platoon and spearheaded the attack in the face of a barrage of hostile mortar, grenade and artillery fire until he was mortally wounded. Second Lieutenant Valentine's forceful and determined leadership served to inspire his men to heroic endeavor in driving the enemy from the ridge and in restoring the company perimeter. His superb courage and valiant fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 301 (April 28, 1953)
Born: March 19, 1929 at Lexington, Virginia
Home Town: Lexington, Virginia

VESTAL, LUCIAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lucian L. Vestal (0-50091), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a Rifle Platoon of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 May 1951. Assigned the mission of assaulting a strongly fortified enemy hill position which necessitated a frontal attack across open ground, First Lieutenant Vestal bravely led his platoon in a fierce bayonet charge in the face of hostile machine-gun, small-arms and grenade fire. Although seriously wounded in the stomach when intense enemy fire inflicted numerous casualties among his men as they reached a position within a few yards of the objective, he skillfully redeployed his platoon and personally directed the removal of the wounded and a screen of protective fire to cover the evacuation. Ordered evacuation for medical attention, he cheerfully joked with his men despite the pain from his wound and, by his gallant fighting spirit and aggressive leadership, served to inspire his platoon in carrying out a second assault which completely routed the enemy. His outstanding courage, fortitude and unswerving devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon First Lieutenant Vestal and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 291 (April 15, 1952)
Born: at Whitewright, Texas
Home Town: Whitewright, Texas

*WALTER, STEPHEN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen C. Walter (1170365), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Squad Leader of the advance assault element of a combat patrol of Company C, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 17 - 18 July 1953. With the enemy opening fire with a machine gun and hurling a shower of grenades upon his men during the squad's initial assault against a strongly fortified hostile position located far forward of the main line of resistance, Sergeant Walter fearlessly moved about in the face of heavy fire and skillfully directed his unit in destroying the enemy machine gun and its crew. Observing a group of the enemy attempting to outflank the patrol, he immediately led his men in a determined fire fight and succeeded in cutting down the hostile troops and in achieving fire superiority over the fanatical enemy. Although critically wounded by an enemy fragmentation grenade as the patrol proceeded to move to the main lines, Sergeant Walter bravely attempted to persuade the patrol leader to leave him in order to facilitate the safe return of his comrades. Concerned only with the welfare of his unit and the successful completion of the mission, he gallantly fought off the imminent threat of shock and unconsciousness from loss of blood during the return trip and continued to instruct his men and to offer advice to the patrol leader. When extreme darkness prevented the patrol from sighting the exact location of the main line of resistance, he requested that a white phosphorous grenade be thrown from the main lines as a guide, which enabled the group to move in without further incident. Succumbing to his wounds shortly after being evacuated, Sergeant Walter, by his indomitable fighting spirit, inspiring leadership and exceptional fortitude, was largely responsible for the success of the patrol's mission. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 227 (April 16, 1954)
Born: February 3, 1931 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*WALZ, RALPH LINUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Ralph Linus Walz (0-47422), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 29 March 1953. Assigned the mission of recapturing a vitally important hill position forward of the main line of resistance after sustaining heavy casualties in a counterattack against an enemy outpost, Captain Walz led his men over rugged and difficult terrain under heavy enemy fire to a launching point for a determined assault against the strategic objective. Skillfully maneuvering his depleted striking force up steep slopes in the face of devastating enemy artillery and mortar fire, he succeeded in gaining the crest of the hill despite additional heavy casualties. Through sheer courage and exceptional leadership, he inspired his shattered forces to heroic endeavor in sweeping the hostile troops from the position and in repelling repeated counterattacks by a fanatical and numerically superior enemy force. Fully recognizing the importance of holding the vital position, he exposed himself to the continuing barrage of withering hostile fire to move along the lines, strengthening the company's defensive perimeter and exhorting his men to hold their positions. Fatally wounded by enemy mortar fire shortly after the success of the mission was assured, Captain Walz, by his exceptional valor, outstanding leadership and indomitable fighting spirit in the face of great odds, served to inspire all who observed him and enhanced the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 941 (October 23, 1953)
Born: October 21, 1921 at Park City, Montana
Home Town: Revillo, South Dakota

WARD, JOSEPH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Joseph M. Ward (422506), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in the Second Platoon of Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 19 September 1950. When an enemy grenade fell into a foxhole occupied by two members of his squad during an enemy attack, Sergeant Ward immediately leaped into the hole, picked up the grenade, and attempted to hurl it back toward the enemy. Directly after leaving his hand, the grenade exploded in mid-air and severely wounded his right hand and lower arm. By his alert and courageous actions at the risk of his own life, Sergeant Ward undoubtedly saved the two men from serious injury and possible death. His outstanding fortitude and selfless devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 309 (March 27, 1951)
Born: at Leitrim, Ireland
Home Town: Pittsfield, Massachusetts

WASSON, MARVIN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Marvin L. Wasson (1094605), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Gunner in Anti-Tank Company, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the town of Sudong-ni, Korea, on the night of 10 December 1950. Immediately following a highly organized enemy ambush of the Regimental motor convoy, Private First Class Wasson participated in a dangerous reconnaissance well into the hostile lines and, after his companion had been killed and he himself wounded by intense hostile fire, returned to the column. Boldly placing his weapon in a strategic position within close range of the enemy, he delivered effective fire which drove the hostile troops from well-concealed emplacements and other tactical locations into several houses nearby where he observed the enemy organizing an attempted attack against his company positions. Voluntarily firing white phosphorus, he succeeded in burning down the buildings and in illuminating the area, thereby destroying possible strong hostile points and aiding his company in repulsing the enemy. His daring initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of intense hostile opposition reflect the highest credit upon Private First Class Wasson and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 629 (July 7, 1951)
Born: at New Gloucester, Maine
Home Town: Naples, Maine

WATSON, JOHN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John E. Watson (0-53153), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to Headquarters and Service Company, Third Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 12 and 13 August 1952. When a numerically superior hostile force isolated a rifle company on a vitally important outpost far forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Watson fearlessly led his unit forward under full enemy observation and through a heavy small-arms and mortar barrage to an enemy-occupied ridge in an effort to determine the strength and disposition of the hostile troops. Upon successful completion of the mission, he voluntarily returned to the same area in a daring attempt to recover the casualties sustained by his unit and subsequently led his remaining force forward of the main battle position to protect he highly vulnerable left flank of the beleaguered outpost. When an estimated enemy regiment launched a series of strong attacks against the outpost and bombarded it with a devastating artillery and mortar barrage throughout an eight and one half hour period, Second Lieutenant Watson courageously led his men in aggressive counterattacks and in hand-to-hand combat with hostile forces and, skillfully directing the few Marines under his command, succeeded in repulsing at least three savage attacks on his exposed position and in inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. By his indomitable fighting spirit, valiant leadership and resolute determination in the face of overwhelming odds, Second Lieutenant Watson served to inspire all who observed him and contributed in large measure to the success of his unit in insuring the integrity of the critical hill position. His great personal valor reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 1023 (December 4, 1953)
Born: at Griswold, Connecticut
Home Town: Jewett City, Connecticut

WAWRZYNIAK, STANLEY J.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Stanley J. Wawrzyniak (636571), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Gunnery Sergeant of Company F, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 19 September 1951. Voluntarily joining the leading assault squad in his company's final attack against a heavily fortified and strongly defended enemy hill position, Staff Sergeant Wawrzyniak courageously exposed himself to a hail of intense, hostile small-arms and grenade fire to move along the line, encouraging the men and pointing out targets for their fire. As the unit neared the crest of the hill, he observed an enemy position which threatened the squad's entire left flank and, single-handedly charging the emplacement, killed its three occupants. Although painfully wounded by an enemy grenade during the action, he immediately rejoined the attack and, seizing an automatic rifle from a fallen comrade when his own ammunition was exhausted, aggressively aided the squad in overrunning the position, directed the pursuit of the fleeing enemy and consolidated the ground. By his daring initiative, gallant determination and steadfast devotion to duty in the face of heavy hostile opposition, Staff Sergeant Wawrzyniak served to inspire all who observed him and contributed materially to the success achieved by his company, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 320 (April 28, 1952)
Born: at Gary, West Virginia
Home Town: Buffalo, New York
Other Award: Navy Cross w/Gold Star (Korea)

WAWRZYNIAK, STANLEY J.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Stanley J. Wawrzyniak (636571), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 16 April 1952. When an outpost occupied by his unit was subjected to a fierce assault by vastly outnumbering enemy forces and the outpost commander and a section of the area were cut off during the intensive action, Technical Sergeant Wawrzyniak unhesitatingly assumed command of the remaining troops and promptly organized an effective defense against the fanatical attackers. With the position completely encircled and subjected to extremely heavy enemy machine-gun, recoilless rifle, mortar and small-arms fire, he repeatedly braved the hail of blistering fire to reach the groups cut off by the enemy, boldly led the men back into the defensive perimeter, replenished their supply of ammunition and encouraged them in repelling the close-in enemy attacks. Although painfully wounded, he refused immediate treatment for himself, dressed the wounds of other casualties and assisted the stricken men to the safety of the bunkers before accepting medical aid. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and valiant devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, Technical Sergeant Wawrzyniak was greatly instrumental in the successful defense of the outpost and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 868 (October 30, 1952)
Born: at Gary, West Virginia
Home Town: Buffalo, New York
Other Award: Navy Cross (Korea)

WEISGERBER, WILLIAM D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William D. Weisgerber (1072880), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Right Guide in a Platoon of Company I, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 2 October 1952. With his platoon engaged in attacking a well-entrenched enemy force occupying an outpost forward of the main line of resistance, Staff Sergeant Weisgerber aggressively led his men in the face of a devastating barrage of hostile small-arms, artillery, mortar and grenade fire and initiated a daring charge against a machine-gun emplacement, succeeding in destroying the enemy position with hand grenades and small-arms fire. Although painfully wounded by the intense enemy fire, he steadfastly refused medical treatment and courageously moved forward to aid a wounded comrade. Fearlessly exposing himself to a veritable hail of hostile fire falling over the area, he personally carried the casualty down a hazardous slope. Severely wounded by a burst of mortar fire while engaged in this heroic act, he continued to assist his wounded comrade until physically incapable of proceeding any further. By his outstanding leadership, great personal valor and intrepid fighting spirit, Staff Sergeant Weisgerber served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 349 (May 12, 1953)
Born: at Bend, Oregon
Home Town: Boise, Idaho

WEST, ROBLEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robley E. West (0-7057), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the First Battalion, First Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 23 and 24 April 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and seizing critical high ground on the division flank to prevent encirclement by a large enemy force which had penetrated the adjacent friendly unit, Lieutenant Colonel West courageously led his battalion into an engagement with powerful hostile forces driving toward the exposed flank of the division. When the numerically superior enemy force launched a violent attack which continued unabated for fifteen hours, he coolly and skillfully directed a brilliant defense of his battalion's position on a vital terrain feature and, boldly exposing himself to intense hostile fire, held the ground until ordered to assume new defensive positions. Although the battalion was virtually surrounded, he expertly directed the movement, fearlessly guiding his men as they fought their way along approximately 1,000 yards of a route dominated by enemy troops occupying positions on high ground. Under his excellent direction, the battalion successfully completed its mission, major elements of the hostile regiment were destroyed, and the many casualties were safely removed along with vital battalion equipment. By his inspiring leadership and aggressive determination, he contributed materially to the infliction of severe losses on the enemy in that sector, which resulted in their subsequent inability to interfere seriously with the remaining elements of the friendly division. His unwavering devotion to duty in the face of heavy odds reflects great credit upon Lieutenant Colonel West and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 212 (March 31, 1952)
Born: at Cunningham, Kansas
Home Town: Wichita, Kansas

WESTERMAN, JACK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Jack Westerman (0-49516), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company G, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, First Provisional Marine Brigade (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 10 August 1950. Learning that a party of four Marines had been ambushed by the enemy during a reconnaissance patrol forward of his position while he was directing his platoon in an attack against a strategic hostile strong point, First Lieutenant Westerman immediately advanced to a point from which the casualties could be seen lying around their jeep and, with enemy troops firing at the stricken men, carried out a heroic attempt to recover his comrades. Collecting a supply of hand grenades from the members of his platoon, he bravely advanced alone in the face of intense hostile fire and, alternately rushing across the fire-swept terrain and dropping to the ground to hurl his missiles, made his way to the jeep some two hundred yards distant, forcing the enemy troops to retreat. In full view of the hostile force, he picked up a wounded Marine in a gallant effort to carry the stricken man from the danger zone and, although repeatedly forced to the ground by withering enemy small-arms fire throughout the return trip, succeeded in hauling his comrade to friendly lines. By his indomitable courage, outstanding initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of his fellow Marines, First Lieutenant Westerman served to inspire all who observed him. His exceptional bravery and valiant fighting spirit in the face of overwhelming odds reflect the highest credit upon himself and enhance the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 410 (May 27, 1953)
Born: at Keota, Oklahoma
Home Town: Oakland, California

*WILLIAMS, JACK VERNON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Vernon Williams (562557), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a Machine Gun Squad attached to Company E, Second Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces during the perimeter defense of Hagaru-ri, Korea, on the night of 6 - 7 December 1950. During the fire fight following an attack on his company by a hostile Battalion employing small arms, automatic weapons and grenades, Corporal Williams observed several of the enemy capture and prepare to use one of his company's light machine guns against friendly forces. Undaunted by intense hostile fire, he rushed across an unprotected area to the captured weapon and, boldly launching a single-handed attack with grenades and rifle fire, killed three of the enemy, recaptured the machine gun and returned it to his company before he was mortally wounded by enemy small-arms fire. By his quick initiative, indomitable fighting spirit and staunch devotion to duty in the face of hostile opposition, Corporal Williams assisted materially in averting a serious threat to the front lines, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 933 (September 4, 1951)
Born: August 31, 1927 at Phoenix, Arizona
Home Town: Higley, Arizona

*WILLIAMS, LESLIE CONRAD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Leslie Conrad Williams (0-49933), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company A, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces south of Yudam-ni, Korea, on 1 December 1950. When intense and accurate hostile fire pinned down and inflicted heavy casualties on part of his platoon during a company assault against a well-entrenched, numerically superior enemy force occupying commanding ground, Second Lieutenant Williams personally disposed his support squad in tactical positions in the face of hostile small-arms and automatic weapons fire and skillfully reorganized the remaining platoon members in order to continue the advance. Spearheading an aggressive frontal attack, he courageously led his men in a fierce hand-to-hand struggle with the enemy and, moving boldly among his group, directed its fire and encouraged its members to greater efforts in overwhelming the enemy. His quick initiative, gallant leadership and indomitable devotion to duty in the face of extremely heavy hostile opposition were contributing factors in the successful seizure of the Battalion objective, thereby reflecting the highest credit upon Second Lieutenant Williams and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 935 (September 11, 1951)
Born: September 1, 1928 at Phoenix, Arizona
Home Town: Phoenix, Arizona

WILSON, FRANK E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Frank E. Wilson (0-24941), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Helicopter Pilot in Marine Observation Squadron SIX (VMO-6), during the rescue of three downed airmen in enemy-held territory north of Hwachon Reservoir, Korea, on 13 April 1951. Although keenly aware that another helicopter had been shot down together with its two-man crew in an endeavor to rescue a downed pilot behind enemy lines, Captain Wilson unhesitatingly volunteered to fly his unarmed, extremely vulnerable aircraft into an area occupied by thousands of hostile troops in a brave attempt to bring back the three airmen, and carried out the mission alone to afford sufficient passenger space for the return journey. Flying at a dangerously low altitude through intense hostile ground fire, he skillfully maneuvered his aircraft into position over the men isolated in a deep ravine and, despite their frantic signals imploring him to leave the enemy-infested area, boldly lowered the hoist and hauled one of them into the helicopter. Realizing that further rescue attempts by this method were almost impossible in view of the turbulent winds and rugged terrain, Captain Wilson searched the area at tree-top level until he located a minute clearing and, although raked by fierce antiaircraft and small-arms fire from the rapidly closing enemy troops, hovered with one wheel touching the uneven ground while the two remaining men climbed aboard the helicopter. Unable to gain sufficient altitude to climb over the high ridges enclosing the area, he flew a distance of approximately 15 miles through the narrow valley in the face of withering hostile machine-gun and antiaircraft fire, returning safe to base in complete darkness with less than five minutes of fuel remaining. By his outstanding courage, brilliant airmanship and selfless efforts in behalf of others at the risk of his own life, Captain Wilson upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 590 (July 24, 1952)
Born: at St. Louis, Missouri
Home Town: Jerome, Arizona

*WILSON, LOYD JUNIOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Loyd Junior Wilson (1180537), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Machine Gunner of Weapons Company, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 October 1952. Occupying a position on the main line of resistance when his sector was subjected to an intense and devastating barrage of enemy artillery and mortar fire, Private First Class Wilson unhesitatingly rushed forward through the deadly fire to aid a wounded Marine lying in an exposed position. Quickly picking up his wounded companion, he proceeded to carry him up the treacherous hill in a valiant attempt to reach a safe position. Unyielding in the face of the intense hail of fire, he bravely continued to struggle up the slope until he fell, mortally wounded by an enemy mortar shell. By his courageous initiative, marked fortitude and selfless efforts in behalf of a comrade, Private First Class Wilson served to inspire all who observed him. His great personal valor in the face of heavy odds reflects the highest credit upon himself and enhances the finest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 408 (May 18, 1953)
Born: June 3, 1931 at Fairmont Township, Illinois
Home Town: Baylis, Illinois

WOLF, WILMOT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Wilmot H. Wolf (432200), Technical Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Assistant Patrol Leader in Company H, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 24 November 1952. When the reinforcing element he was leading approached a patrol which was surrounded by the enemy and had sustained numerous casualties, Technical Sergeant Wolf voluntarily crawled forward alone in the face of intense hostile fire to render aid and encouragement to the beleaguered Marines. After assisting the critically wounded patrol leader in rallying his unit, he crept back to his own group with one of the seriously wounded men on his back. Subsequently returning to the besieged unit with a fire team, Technical Sergeant Wolf quickly established a defense and began the evacuation of eleven wounded men to a comparatively safe position in the center of the perimeter. With two Marines still unaccounted for, he moved forward with a comrade to search the area and, surprising one of the enemy in the act of removing a deceased Marine, opened fire and killed him. Continuing his search until he found the other missing Marine, he carried the bodies back to the center of the perimeter and assisted in the evacuation of the patrol and its equipment from the area. By his outstanding courage, inspiring leadership and selfless efforts in behalf of others, Technical Sergeant Wolf was greatly responsible for saving the lives of several Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 802 (September 15, 1953)
Born: at Manchester, New Hampshire
Home Town: Manchester, New Hampshire

WORD, JOHN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John G. Word (0-54219), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Rifle Platoon Commander of Company I, Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea from 5 to 7 September 1952. Assigned the mission of commanding a relief force for a badly depleted unit occupying a combat outpost more than one mile forward of the main line of resistance, Second Lieutenant Word, although wounded during the initial stages of the action, bravely exposed himself to enemy fire to supervise the evacuation of the casualties, skillfully deployed his men and directed the construction of defensive positions while subjected to persistent hostile artillery and mortar fire. When the outpost was attacked during the night by a reinforced enemy company supported by an intense mortar and artillery barrage, he engaged the hostile force in a fierce fire fight and, maintaining effective control of his unit, directed his men in successfully repulsing the assault. Throughout repeated attacks on the following night by numerically superior enemy forces of approximately battalion strength, he continuously exposed himself to hostile fire to direct the supporting arms and, controlling and coordinating the fire of his unit with outstanding tactical skill, inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy. Constantly moving among his men to encourage and reassure them between assaults, he directed the preparation of defenses in readiness for further attacks and administered timely assistance to the casualties, greatly aiding in saving the lives of three of the wounded Marines. Second Lieutenant Word's forceful and determined leadership served to inspire his men to heroic endeavor in successfully defending the strategic outpost. His superb courage and valiant fighting spirit reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 382 (May 14, 1953)
Born: at Memphis, Tennessee
Home Town: Dallas, Texas

*WORSTER, VANCE OLLAND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Vance Olland Worster (1200104), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Battery, Eleventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on the night of 26 October 1952. With the entire area subjected to intense artillery and mortar fire after the outpost was destroyed and the observation team forced to seek cover in a bunker on the reverse slope of the hill, Private First Class Worster quickly armed himself and unhesitatingly left the bunker with his comrades to meet the impending ground attack. When the intensity of the barrage increased, preventing the evacuation of the wounded and forcing most of the defenders to withdraw to an adjoining hill, he immediately returned to the bunker with a companion and positioned himself in front of the entrance to protect the wounded. Receiving the brunt of the hostile attack, Private First Class Worster gallantly engaged the enemy and aided in killing an estimated twelve attackers before his ammunition was expended. Although painfully wounded when a hostile grenade landed in the bunker, he and his comrade feigned death until enemy soldiers had searched the shelter and departed. Unable to walk, he persuaded his companion to go to friendly lines for assistance. Subsequently killed or succumbing to his wounds before the arrival of aid, Private First Class Worster, by his indomitable fighting spirit, great personal valor and exemplary courage in the face of heavy odds, upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 791 (September 15, 1953)
Born: April 30, 1930 at Springfield, Maine
Home Town: Kingman, Maine

YANCEY, JOHN
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to John Yancey (0-36570), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company E, Second Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 27 and 28 November 1950. With his company subjected to a savage and sustained night attack by an enemy force of approximately two battalions while defending strategic high ground north of Yudam-ni, and with adjacent platoon positions infiltrated by hostile troops, First Lieutenant Yancey bravely rushed into the thick of the fighting in a daring attempt to rally the men and seal the gap in the lines. Although wounded by an enemy bullet which penetrated his cheek and lodged in his neck, he led the Marines through snow and sub-zero temperatures in a fierce hand-to-hand encounter with the hostile force, drove off the attackers and quickly reorganized the unit. Learning that his company commander had been killed, Lieutenant Yancey unhesitatingly assumed command and boldly made his way from one platoon to another in the face of intense enemy fire, shouting words of encouragement to the men, seeking aid for the casualties and directing the defense of the vital terrain. Despite two further wounds sustained during the intensive action, he gallantly refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his company in repelling the hostile attacks until, weakened by loss of blood and no longer able to see, he was forced to accept medical aid. By his inspiring leadership, outstanding courage and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of overwhelming odds, First Lieutenant Yancey was directly instrumental in the successful defense of the area and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Board Serial 755 (September 11, 1952)
Born: at Plumberville, Arkansas
Home Town: Little Rock, Arkansas
Other Award: Navy Cross (WWII)

*YATES, GEORGE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to George W. Yates (0-51368), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Commander of Company B, First Battalion, Seventh Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 - 9 April 1953. With his platoon subjected to a devastating barrage of hostile mortar and artillery fire while occupying an extremely vital outpost far in advance of the main line of resistance, First Lieutenant Yates, although painfully wounded, steadfastly continued to move about the dangerous area in order to check his perimeter positions and to ascertain the combat readiness of his men. When the enemy launched a vicious assault against the outpost during the hours of darkness, attacking from two flanks with an estimated infantry company, First Lieutenant Yates personally participated in the ensuing bitter hand-to-hand struggle and accounted for several enemy dead while his gallant defenders were repulsing the assault on one of the flanks. Reorganizing his depleted garrison and moving about through a hail of murderous enemy fire to direct the fire of his men when the numerically superior hostile force penetrated the other flank of the position, he again engaged in the fierce hand-to-hand fighting and, in addition, called down accurate artillery and mortar fire on the enemy throughout the savage assault in which the Marine defenders were firing point-blank at the onrushing hostile troops until the enemy withdrew at daylight. Although weak from his previous wounds, First Lieutenant Yates braved the continuing barrage of hostile fire to move among the few remaining survivors and to assist his casualties. Mortally wounded by an exploding enemy shell after he left the comparative safety of the trench line to go to the aid of another casualty, First Lieutenant Yates, by his inspiring leadership and remarkable fortitude in the face of tremendous odds, was greatly responsible for the successful defense of the vital outpost position. His exceptional valor sustains and enhances the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Board Serial 962 (November 6, 1953)
Born: September 8, 1929 at Columbia, Mississippi
Home Town: Mount Olive, Mississippi

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