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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
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T

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

TACKABERRY, THOMAS H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas H. Tackaberry (0-60504), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1966 while serving as Commanding Officer, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) on a search and destroy operation near Bong Son. At approximately 1500 hours a fifteen man patrol was engaged in an intense fire fight with a reinforced company of the North Vietnamese Army. The platoon leader had been killed and the patrol was pinned down. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry ordered his unarmed command helicopter to land near the action. Running through the intense fire, he reached the besieged patrol and assumed personal command of the unit. He then called for a reserve force to reinforce his position. As the reinforcements arrived in the landing zone, Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry again exposed himself to the full observation and fire of the insurgents as he positioned them for an attack on the North Vietnamese emplacements. With complete disregard for his safety, he personally led the assault on the forward hostile bunkers and succeeded in driving the insurgents from their positions. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry directed and assisted his men in clearing the captured bunkers, steadily forcing the numerically superior hostile unit to withdraw. Receiving word to extract his force, the patrol quickly returned to the landing zone and established a defensive perimeter. Two of the pickup helicopters were hit by intense fire from the rapidly regrouping hostile troops. Despite the threat of an all out insurgent assault on the landing zone, Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry refused to leave until the rest of his men had been extracted. Along with two remaining soldiers, he dauntlessly continued to fire on the advancing hostile troops until being picked up by the unarmed command helicopter. Through his courage and leadership under the most critical of conditions, he contributed immeasurably to saving the trapped patrol from being overrun, and inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile force. Lieutenant Colonel Tackaberry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6537 (November 28, 1966)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea), Distinguished Service Cross w/2nd OLC (Vietnam)

TACKABERRY, THOMAS H.
(Third Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas H. Tackaberry (0-60504), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 196th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Colonel Tackaberry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 September 1969 while serving as commanding officer of the 196th Infantry Brigade. When Landing Zone Siberia came under intense mortar, recoilless rifle, and heavy automatic weapons fire from three companies of North Vietnamese Regulars, Colonel Tackaberry flew to the besieged firebase. Despite the heavy barrage of fire directed at his craft, Colonel Tackaberry jumped from the helicopter and immediately began assessing the tactical ground situation. Braving the relentless enemy fire, he moved from position to position to instruct, encourage, and direct effective suppressive fire against the determined hostile force. He then left the safety of the firebase to move outside the perimeter, personally directing an assault against the enemy emplacements. Obtaining an M-60 machine gun, he led the attack against the dug-in communists until they were soundly routed. After returning to the firebase, Colonel Tackaberry spent an additional four hours on the landing zone until the perimeter defense was reestablished. Colonel Tackaberry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4035 (October 31, 1969)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea), Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

TAFT, JOHN K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John K. Taft, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Taft distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 June 1969 while leading his company during a reconnaissance-in- force mission. As the unit's lead platoon advanced into a jungle clearing, they were suddenly met with barrages of automatic weapons fire which instantly cut down a number of troopers. Captain Taft quickly moved from the rear of the company to an exposed position on the edge of the clearing where he surveyed the situation and radioed for artillery fire and gunship strikes on the enemy. Attempting to pull back without cover fire, the lead elements sustained additional casualties. Captain Taft saw their plight and rushed out into the open to assist them. He laid down suppressive fire with his rifle which enabled several wounded to be withdrawn. He then returned to his observation point. While directing gunship fire on the enemy, he received a bullet wound in the head. He refused medical attention, and when he saw a comrade downed in the open, he dashed forward under intense fire and dragged the man to cover. The firefight raged on, and as he continued in his weakened state to train gunship strikes on the hostile troops, he received another bullet wound in the head. But Captain Taft refused evacuation and courageously remained in command of his men until all the wounded had been extracted and reinforcements had arrived. Captain Taft's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3466 (September 13, 1969)

*TASKER, JAMES BRUCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Bruce Tasker (W-3157697), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 9th Infantry Division. Warrant Officer Tasker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 June 1968 while participating in a visual reconnaissance mission north of An Nhut Tan. He was flying his aircraft at low altitudes over a suspected enemy-held area when he received a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire which wounded him and his crew chief and caused the ship to crash. Mister Tasker jumped out of the craft and began firing at the Viet Cong, thus enabling his crew chief to escape the wreckage. Then, with complete disregard for his wounds and his safety, he attacked and silenced two enemy bunkers with grenades. Gunships repeatedly attempted to effect a rescue, but were stopped by a devastating fusillade of hostile fire. Mister Tasker and his crew chief heroically fought their way through the Viet Cong lines until the position was overrun and they were killed. Warrant Officer Tasker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4492 (September 25, 1968)
Home Town: Troy, Ohio

*TAYLOR, JAMES EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Edward Taylor (0-5429070), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry Division Artillery, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1969 as acting commander of an artillery battery twelve miles northwest of Lai Khe. Shortly after midnight Lieutenant Taylor's fire support base came under intense mortar and rocket-propelled grenade fire, followed by a ground assault. As he was checking his six howitzer positions to insure that they were properly manned, he spotted a break in the perimeter wire made by an enemy bangalore torpedo. Braving the hostile shrapnel and automatic weapons fire, he ran to one of the howitzer positions and fired the gun directly into the charging communists. Although he became the target of a rocket-propelled grenade team, he continued his suppressive fire and succeeded in preventing the enemy from entering through the break in the wire. A rocket-propelled grenade struck his position, wounding him and throwing him against a sandbag wall of the howitzer parapet. Ignoring his painful injuries, he returned to the howitzer and fired the weapon until fatally wounded by a second direct hit on his position. First Lieutenant Taylor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1138 (April 2, 1969)
Home Town: Punta Gorda, Florida

TAYLOR, JAMES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James R. Taylor (0-87941), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Major Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 March 1969 while controlling a volunteer night raiding force operating in Dinh Tuong Province. Shortly after landing, the team encountered a large Viet Cong force using automatic weapons, small arms and rockets. During the initial exchange of fire, the radio- telephone operator was killed and the radio damaged. When communications were severed, Major Taylor immediately directed his command-and-control ship to set down in the area. In spite of the barrage that assailed the craft on landing, Major Taylor disembarked and ordered the ship away. He then attempted to join the team members, who at this time were almost surrounded by the enemy. By attacking a group of Viet Cong who were executing a flanking movement and killing two of them, he managed to reach the team. After strengthening the team's defensive position, he turned his attention to calling in supportive fire from gun ships. Because the radio had been damaged he could transmit but not receive. Controlling the firing of the Cobra gun ships, therefore, seemed an impossible task. Nonetheless, he established an ingenious system of signals incorporating radio transmissions and flashing aircraft landing lights. In this manner he effectively directed and adjusted bombardment upon the enemy. Then, while braving hostile ground fire to assist in evacuating the wounded and dead, he killed five Viet Cong. Having determined a rendezvous point using the radio and aircraft light code, he guided the remainder of the raiding team to the pick-up zone. Major Taylor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2030 (June 9, 1969)

TAYLOR, JAMES THOMPSON, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Thompson Taylor, Jr. (RA13733619), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-342, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 9 June 1965 to 10 June 1965 while serving as a medical specialist for the Special Forces camp at Dong Xoai. At the onset of a vicious attack by an estimated Viet Cong regiment, Sergeant Taylor dashed into the deadly fire in search of casualties. He found his seriously wounded commander crawling to a firing position, carried him the rest of the way, and gave him treatment that saved his life. Sergeant Taylor then moved among the deteriorating defensive positions, calming the men, controlling their fire, and treating the wounded. To reestablish communications with the executive officer, he ran and crawled 300 meters through explosions and rifle fire. Finding the officer without a radio, he returned to his compound, escorted an operator to the isolated area, and again returned to his defensive duties. Each time Sergeant Taylor risked death while passing through the frenzied fire of both hostile and friendly lines. When perimeter positions became untenable, he helped carry his commander 300 meters to the headquarters building, the final strongpoint. Throughout the day, ignoring his own injuries, he alternately treated wounded men and fought off attacks to within 20 meters of the building. Sergeant Taylor's inspired leadership enabled the force to hold back an overwhelming Viet Cong siege for fourteen hours. Sergeant Taylor's stamina and courage as a medic and as a fighter preserved the defensive strength of the beleaguered unit. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 737 (February 20, 1967)
Home Town: , Pennsylvania

TAYLOR, LAWRENCE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lawrence R. Taylor (RA15536235), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 April 1967 while serving as a member of a tank unit during a search and destroy mission in the Filhol Plantation. While Sergeant Taylor's platoon searched for a Viet Cong unit known to be in the vicinity, it entered a heavily mined and booby trapped area. When one of the platoon's tanks hit a mine, the men dismounted their vehicles to search the area and disarm the insurgent traps. A few minutes later, they received a sudden outburst of rifle and machine gun fire from a bunker 30 meters away. Six men were wounded immediately and remained exposed to hostile fire. Sergeant Taylor unhesitatingly ran 30 meters through the mined field, ignoring the intense Viet Cong barrage, to lay down a heavy base of fire to protect the casualties. When his ammunition ran out, he charged the enemy bunker, armed only with two grenades, and threw them into the emplacement. The insurgents were silenced, but only momentarily, so Sergeant Taylor ran to a machine gun on a nearby truck. He fired on the hostile fortification until his machine gun would no longer fire, then once again charged directly at the enemy weapons to throw two grenades at the Viet Cong. After his own assault, he directed a tank to engage the insurgents. When the smoke had cleared, five Viet Cong were found dead, and there was evidence that the insurgents had suffered several more serious casualties. Sergeant Taylor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3058 (June 22, 1967)

TAYLOR, RONALD S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald S. Taylor (0-5237610), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 as acting executive officer of his company during a mission in the Que Son Valley. His unit became engaged in heavy fighting with a reinforced North Vietnamese battalion. As the battle developed, Lieutenant Taylor, and an element of fifty men became surrounded by the hostile forces. He immediately made two attempts to break the enemy encirclement, but both were driven back. Lieutenant Taylor then ordered his men, twenty of whom were already wounded, into a hasty defensive perimeter. Constantly exposing himself to the continuing enemy fusillade, he moved from position to position as he called for and adjusted a ring of friendly artillery fire around the location of his troops. The determined enemy repeatedly assaulted the defenders, attempting to overrun them. Each attack was successfully repulsed by Lieutenant Taylor's skillful adjustment of coordinated artillery barrages and the small arms and automatic weapons fire of his men. For more than twenty six hours he successfully directed the defense of the position inflicting heavy casualties on the North Vietnamese foe. First Lieutenant Taylor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4093 (August 23, 1968)

*TAYLOR, WILLIAM EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Edward Taylor (0-84004), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Taylor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 and 15 August 1966 while serving as commanding officer during a company search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. Upon entering the operational area, the lead platoon became pinned down after making contact with a large Viet Cong force. Captain Taylor, moving at the head of the second platoon, exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun and sniper fire to direct the movement of his company. He repeatedly braved hostile fire while maneuvering his company to the Viet Cong flank. When the artillery forward observer was wounded, Captain Taylor moved to an advanced position and directed aerial rocket artillery and tactical air strikes. These strikes were called to within twenty meters of the friendly forward elements and caused the Viet Cong to break contact. When darkness fell, Captain Taylor personally supervised the evacuation of the dead and wounded. The following morning, as the company was preparing to continue its mission, it was again attacked by the Viet Cong employing mortar fire. Captain Taylor, with complete disregard for his safety while receiving intense hostile fire, refused to leave his observation post and continued to direct the defense of his perimeter. Although wounded by shrapnel, he continued to issue orders and exercise control of his unit until he was mortally wounded by an incoming mortar round. Captain Taylor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5967 (1966)
Home Town: Miami, Florida

*TECHMEIR, LARRY LESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Lester Techmeir (398-46-8060), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Sergeant Techmeier distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 July 1969 while serving as a platoon sergeant during the construction of Fire Base 411 near Quang Ngai. In the early morning hours, Sergeant Techmeier, who was on listening post, observed five enemy sappers moving through the wire perimeter. Immediately notifying the command post of the danger, he began maneuvering toward the hostile force. Suddenly the members of Sergeant Techmeier's platoon opened fire on the infiltrating element. As the enemy returned a heavy volume of fire, two of the North Vietnamese managed to penetrate the wire and flank the bunker. Rising form his position, Sergeant Techmeier charged the two invaders, killing one and causing the other to flee. Obtaining permission to pursue the retreating enemy, he and three of his men went beyond the wire to reconnoiter the area. Just as they passed the outermost wire, a hostile element pinned them down with strafing automatic weapons fire and grenades. After Sergeant Techmeier killed two enemy soldiers, he was severely wounded by an exploding grenade. Rushing the thrower of the grenade, he killed the enemy soldier and captured his weapon. As he was returning to his men, he succumbed to his wounds. Sergeant Techmeier's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3591 (1969)
Home Town: Stanley, Wisconsin

*TEEVENS, RICHARD PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Paul Teevens (18733344), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-36, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Teevens distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 November 1967 while serving as a member of a Special Forces combat patrol on a mission deep in hostile territory. While moving through dense jungle in an attempt to engage enemy elements and capture a prisoner, his team detected heavy activity to its front. A reconnaissance element moved forward to investigate and reported finding a hostile base camp occupied by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. After requesting air strikes on the enemy camp, his unit was ordered to assault the position and mark it with smoke. As the patrol approached the camp, it was ambushed by insurgents firing the automatic weapons and small arms from well fortified positions. Sergeant Teevens saw a comrade hit and pinned down in the ravaging barrage and dashed across fifty yards of open ground under a hail of fire to rescue the man. With bullets striking all around him and friendly air strikes pounding the camp, he completely disregarded his own safety and remained exposed to the enemy weapons to treat the wounded man. The insurgents concentrated their fire on him, and he was hit by fragments from an exploding grenade while shielding his comrade with his body. Heedless of his wounds and the intensifying barrage, he crawled across the bullet-swept battlefield dragging his helpless comrade to safety. He was mortally wounded while unselfishly placing the safety of a fellow soldier above his own welfare. Sergeant Teevens' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6248 (December 4, 1967)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

TERRY, GILBERT N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gilbert N. Terry (W-3160019), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 155th Assault Helicopter Company, 10th Combat Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer Terry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 August 1968 as commander of a helicopter gunship operating near the city of Duc Lap. As his fire team approached the besieged city, it was discovered that the radio transmitter in the lead aircraft was inoperative. Mister Terry immediately took over the critical task of coordinating the team's activities with the forward air controller and the ground elements. A series of daring attacks was made on an enemy-held tree line, during which his ship was showered by the hostile fusillade. Although the helicopter had received numerous hits and the increasingly intense enemy fire continued to inflict damage on the aircraft, Mister Terry pressed the attack. Noting that the heaviest concentration of fire came from a row of buildings next to the tree line, he unleashed three rockets, scoring direct hits with each. Finding that he had no engine oil pressure, he attempted to reach a nearby friendly compound, but his helicopter received another concentrated burst of fire and crashed. Although painfully injured, he freed his pilot from the smoldering wreckage. Struggling through enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire, he and the pilot carried the severely wounded crew chief to the compound. After reaching the post, he was told there was a desperate shortage of ammunition. Without hesitation, and with complete disregard for his safety, he returned to the ship under a hail of bullets and impacting mortars and recovered the needed re-supply. Returning to the compound, he refused medical aid for himself until the crew chief had been treated. Warrant Officer Terry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5646 (1968)

TERRY, RONALD T.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald T. Terry, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Terry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 through 14 December 1964. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 73 (March 30, 1966)
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*THERIAULT, SAMUEL SILVER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Samuel Silver Theriault (RA11252308), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-344, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Theriault distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 November 1967 while serving as senior Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese company on a search and destroy operation deep in hostile territory. While moving through dense jungle, his unit was savagely attacked by a large Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons, small arms and machine guns. The initial barrage wounded Sergeant Theriault, but he ignored his injury and moved through a curtain of fire to deploy his men in a hasty defense and direct their fire on the enemy. With his every move drawing intense fire from the Viet Cong, he organized his troops for an assault. He personally led the vicious charge into the point of heaviest fighting and forced the insurgents to pull back under lethal fire. Constantly exposed to enemy weapons, he moved among his men to encourage their aggressive attack on the insurgents. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading their pursuit of the enemy, and his valiant actions inspired his men to overwhelm the Viet Cong. Master Sergeant Theriault's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6701 (December 30, 1967)
Home Town: Rochester, New Hampshire

*THOMAS, JOE MINOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joe Minor Thomas (US54663060), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Specialist Four Thomas distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 September 1967 while serving as medic of an armored cavalry platoon on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. While moving along rice fields in search of hostile elements, his platoon was savagely attacked by a Viet Cog force firing automatic weapons from well fortified positions. He saw three comrades wounded by the intense barrage and sprinted three hundred meters across an open rice paddy under a hail of fire to aid them. With bullets striking all around him, he remained in the open to treat the casualties and move them to safety. He detected the Viet Cong emplacement and fired furiously into the attackers. Completely disregarding his own safety, he stood up in the midst of the firefight and fearlessly assaulted the enemy bunker alone. Firing lethal bursts as he ran into the face of the enemy weapons, he reached the fortifications and destroyed them with grenades and rifle fire, killing three enemy soldiers. He was mortally wounded while gallantly defending his comrades in the face of grave danger. His fearless actions completely defeated the determined insurgents and enabled his men to successfully complete their mission. Specialist Four Thomas' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6017 (November 21, 1967)
Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma

THOMAS, RICHARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard A. Thomas (0-5335163), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Thomas distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 July 1968 when his cavalry troop was ambushed during a movement from Tay Ninh to Cu Chi. Lieutenant Thomas was riding with the troop commander in an armored personnel carrier when the column was attacked by a reinforced North Vietnamese company firing antitank rockets, automatic weapons and small arms. Within fifteen seconds the commander had been wounded by a rocket. Moments later another one stuck the vehicle, hurling Lieutenant Thomas to the ground. With complete disregard for his safety, he fully exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire and climbed back into the damaged track to reestablish contact with other elements of the column. He then called for gunship support and aircraft to evacuate the wounded. Shortly after reorganizing the unit and receiving air support, his vehicle was again hit by antitank fire, seriously wounding him in the arm. Refusing to be medically evacuated, he moved from vehicle to vehicle, ignoring the continuing fusillade to encourage his men and aid in the extraction of the other casualties. First Lieutenant Thomas' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4523 (September 28, 1968)

THOMAS, WILLIAM C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William C. Thomas (US56497048), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four thomas distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 November 1967 while serving as a rifle squad leader conducting a reconnaissance patrol on a hill near Dak To. His squad had penetrated the perimeter of a well entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion when it suddenly began receiving intense automatic weapons fire from fortified bunkers. As the firefight grew more intense, it became necessary for the squad to return to its company's perimeter. Specialist Thomas remained in the battle area and covered his squad's withdrawal with his shotgun and grenade launcher. Rejoining his men, he learned that a squad member lay critically wounded near the enemy positions. With complete disregard for his own safety, he crawled back up the hill through a hail of bullets and retrieved the casualty. He then treated the man's wounds, saving his life. Again exposing himself to the withering barrage, Specialist Thomas fearlessly and expertly directed artillery strikes on the enemy bunker complex. Later, a sister squad maneuvering against the hostile force was pinned down by the fire from a spider hole emplacement. He crawled through a savage curtain of fire to within five meters of the position, threw a hand grenade into the hole, and silenced the enemy weapon. When he noticed an enemy soldier aiming his rifle at the American commander, Specialist Thomas threw himself onto the officer, knocking him to the ground as the bullet sped over their heads. He then courageously maneuvered through a fusillade of hostile fire and destroyed three more enemy bunkers. Specialist Four Thomas' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6547 (December 21, 1967)

THOMPSON, BYRON W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Byron W. Thompson (US56419800), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Thompson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 July 1967 while serving as point man of the lead platoon of an infantry company on a reinforcing mission deep in hostile territory. While moving through dense jungle toward a beleaguered friendly unit, his company was savagely attacked by an estimated North Vietnamese regiment firing rockets, mortars and recoilless rifles. Completely ignoring his own safety, Specialist Thompson volunteered to provide rear security for a withdrawal despite bullets and shrapnel striking all around him. He was wounded while fighting through the first line of the enemy, but he refused medical aid and inflicted heavy casualties on the attackers with deadly rifle fire. He was seriously wounded and thrown to the ground by an exploding hand grenade while piercing the last enemy positions, but he continued to expose himself to the hostile weapons to cover his comrades. Three enemy soldiers rushed him when he ran out of ammunition soon afterwards, but he unhesitantly stood his ground in the face of the savage charge and killed two of the attackers with his knife and the third in a furious hand-to-hand battle. Before reaching safety, he killed thirty North Vietnamese soldiers with deadly rifle fire and close-in fighting. His fearless actions, though he was seriously wounded and under intense fire, contributed greatly to the successful withdrawal of his company in the heat of battle against the numerically superior enemy force. Specialist Four Thompson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5594 (November 1, 1967)

THURMAN, JERRY W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry W. Thurman (0-5426997), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters & Headquarters Troop, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. First Lieutenant Thurman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 December 1968 while serving as a helicopter commander on a visual reconnaissance mission. Between Lai Khe and Tan Binh, a Viet Cong soldier was seen hiding in a stream and was killed. Lieutenant Thurman banked his ship and engaged several more Viet Cong spotted at the same site. Although he was advised that there was an estimated forty Viet Cong in the area, he landed to capture prisoners who might provide valuable intelligence information. He and the crew chief armed with pistols and the door gunner with a rifle advanced upon the dead Viet Cong. Moments after Lieutenant Thurman shot and killed a Viet Cong hidden in a stream, he and his two companions came under intense fire from other concealed communists. Lieutenant Thurman signaled to his co-pilot to take off in the helicopter so it would not be hit by enemy rounds. The three men then advanced, securing two wounded Viet Cong and killing two more who jumped out of the water. Receiving fire from a sniper in a tree, Lieutenant Thurman crawled under the tree and killed him. After four infantrymen arrived to give assistance, he maneuvered forward with one of the men, but a Viet Cong sprang from his hiding place and mortally wounded the infantryman. Lieutenant Thurman quickly engaged and killed the aggressor, only to come under attack from another enemy soldier located on higher ground. Realizing it was useless to proceed alone, he returned to his comrades and established a secure position. When more reinforcements arrived, he and his crew returned to their ship from which they continued to provide covering fire and aerial observation for the ground troops. During the ensuing battle, they landed twice to evacuate casualties. Lieutenant Thurman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1857 (May 23, 1969)

*THURSTON, CLAIR H., JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clair H. Thurston, Jr. (OF-101747), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade (Separate). On 8 November 1965, Second Lieutenant Thurston was accompanying his unit on a search and destroy mission in War Zone "D". Lieutenant Thurston received orders to move his platoon to the flank of numerous Viet Cong riflemen and hostile machine gun emplacements. As his platoon assumed their flanking position, they were subjected to intense hostile fire. Notwithstanding the vulnerability of his position and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he moved from squad to squad to encourage and prepare them for the assault upon the insurgent position. As he gave the order to attack, his platoon immediately received a heavy concentration of small arms and automatic weapons fire from the Viet Cong positions. Steadfast, he raised his arm, as a signal to his men, yelled "Follow me", and led the assault on the hostile machine gun emplacements. During the charge, he was mortally wounded by the deadly hail of fire which was directed into his ranks. As a result of his inspiration, courage, and leadership, the machine gun emplacements were overrun and destroyed, causing the insurgents to flee. Lieutenant Thurston's extraordinary heroism, gallantry in action, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 18 (January 27, 1968)
Born: June 20, 1943 at Lampass, Texas
Home Town: Lampass, Texas

*TIERNEY, BRIAN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Brian Edward Tierney (US52722852), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Squadron, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Tierney distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1968 while serving as a radio telephone operator near Quang Tri City. Specialist Tierney and two other soldiers entered a small village to capture a Viet Cong whose position had been spotted from a helicopter. When the point man saw the enemy crouching in a thicket and ordered him to surrender, the communist started to stand up as if to give himself up, but suddenly threw a grenade that he had been concealing. Seeing the deadly missile land a few feet from himself and his companions, Specialist Tierney shouted a warning and lunged towards the grenade to shield the others from the blast. Specialist Tierney was mortally wounded when the grenade exploded, but by his selfless act he saved his companions from injury. Specialist Four Tierney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 728 (March 1, 1969)
Home Town: Roxbury, Connecticut

*TIFFANY, DAVID L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David L. Tiffany (546-76-7938), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Tiffany distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 May 1969 as a senior medical aidman on an airmobile operation in Long An Province. Immediately upon being inserted into its area of operation, Specialist Tiffany's platoon came into heavy contact with and enemy force. Returning fire, they forced the enemy troops to disperse. While moving n pursuit of the fleeing enemy, the platoon again came under intense fire and suffered casualties in the command element. Specialist Tiffany, who had been at the rear of the sweep formation, moved to the point of heaviest contact where his wounded comrades lay exposed to the hail of enemy ordnance. Although he was pinned down before he could reach the wounded men, he managed to silence a hostile emplacement long enough to run to the casualties. He quickly administered aid to the injured men and carried on casualty to safety. Returning to the center of conflict, he spotted his wounded platoon leader and immediately moved to his assistance. While attempting to rescue his comrade, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Five Tiffany's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3273 (August 23, 1969)
Home Town: Riverside, California

TILLEY, LEONARD W.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leonard W. Tilley, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), FOB 2 (Khe Sanh), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Tilley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 February 1967. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1373 (March 27, 1967)
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*TILLQUIST, ROBERT ARNOLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Arnold Tillquist (US51500892), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 4 November 1965, Specialist Tillquist, a medical corpsman attached to Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, was accompanying Company B on a search and destroy mission near Plei Me, Republic of Vietnam. As the lead platoon hacked its way through the dense Vietnamese jungle growth, they suddenly came upon a well-fortified Viet Cong emplacement, whereupon the point man immediately opened fire on the insurgent position. As the remainder of the company reached the area, they began a full scale assault on the hostile position. In what seemed to be a final defensive effort on the part of the insurgents, they steadily increased their fire on the advancing group. During this affray, a member of the friendly attacking force was wounded. A cry for a "medic" was heard, and Specialist Tillquist, who was in the front line of the assault, immediately gathered his medical equipment; went to the aid of the wounded man; administered first aid; and moved him to a better sheltered position, some thirty meters from the main line of fire. After securing his patient, he noticed that another of his comrades was wounded and lying in the midst of hostile fire. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he charged through the intense hostile barrage to the aid of the wounded man and again administered first aid, moving his comrade to a safer position. As he secured the second man, he saw another of his comrades fall wounded, directly in front of a Viet Cong machine gun emplacement. Despite being almost completely exhausted and disregarding his own personal safety, Specialist Tillquist stripped off his web gear; grabbed his rifle and aid kit; and began to crawl to the aid of the wounded man. During this valiant attempt, he was mortally wounded when hit in the back by a burst of fire from the hostile machine gun. Specialist Tillquist's extraordinary heroism, compassion for his fellow man, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 43 (February 28, 1966)
Born: July 10, 1942 at Branford, Connecticut
Home Town: Branford, Connecticut

TISSLER, JOHN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John G. Tissler, First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 34th Artillery, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Tissler distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1969 while serving as a forward observer during a reconnaissance-in-force mission north of Ben Tre in Kien Hoa Province. As the company was moving into night ambush positions, an enemy force opened fire. Lieutenant Tissler immediately retaliated with his rifle and sought cover in a shallow canal. Finding himself alone well forward of his unit's position with a radio damaged by hostile rounds, he proceeded to rejoin his group. As he moved along the ditch, he encountered fire from a sniper hidden in a tree. He quickly killed the sniper and moved toward a machine gun emplacement, which he destroyed with a grenade. Soon he detected a Viet Cong squad of twenty, maneuvering into a position to assault the friendly force. From his location behind a fallen tree, Lieutenant Tissler threw two grenades into their ranks and strafed them with rifle fire. With only two magazines left and perceiving that the enemy had started to surround him, he crawled along the canal until he came upon four friendly troops who were treating two casualties. He repaired their radio and contacted his unit. When the small group moved out to rejoin the main patrol, Lieutenant Tissler, acting as rear guard, killed two Viet Cong and wounded a third. As soon as he reached his unit, he asked for and received nine volunteers to search for five missing personnel. Until the missing were found or accounted for, he continued his efforts. First Lieutenant Tissler's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2809 (July 24, 1969)
Born: at Austria Home Town: Edgewood, New Mexico

TOLSON, JOHN J., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Tolson, III (0-20806), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major General Tolson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 14 February 1968 to 27 March 1968, as Commanding General of the 1st Cavalry Division in Hue. During the Tet offensive the city was gravely endangered by North Vietnamese Army Forces, and General Tolson decided that only by personal liaison could he determine the situation and proper course of action. On three separate occasions he piloted his helicopter at low level through heavy enemy ground fire and adverse weather conditions to the Hue Citadel for urgent operational conferences with the embattled South Vietnamese commander. By establishing close liaison with the South Vietnamese commander, General Tolson developed a coordinated plan to liberate the city with minimum destruction to property and its friendly inhabitants. His personal bravery and leadership by example were an inspiration to the beleaguered defenders and gave the South Vietnamese commander renewed hope and confidence. On 14 February the Citadel was under siege when he again flew his aircraft through the intense hostile small arms fire to land at an allied command post. Upon finding two wounded marines in need of medical treatment, he directed his pilot to fly to a hospital. During the infantry assault on Hue, General Tolson landed his aircraft at each of the commander posts of the four 1st Air Cavalry battalions to effectively coordinate their attack. In so doing he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire as he flew at three top level over occupied terrain and often times landed while the maneuver battalions were engaging in combat with insurgent forces. The divisions overwhelming success in the liberation of Hue can be attributed to General Tolson's dynamic leadership. Major General Tolson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2806 (June 11, 1968)
Home Town: Raleigh, North Carolina

TOMCIK, DENNIS C.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis C. Tomcik (0-5341518), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Tomcik distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 October 1968 as a platoon leader during an aerial combat assault near the village of Trum Doung in Kien Hoa Province. As Lieutenant Tomcik's unit landed, it came under intense automatic weapons fire from an estimated company of Viet Cong occupying well fortified positions. The platoon was split into two parts and pinned down by the barrage. Fearlessly moving ahead of his element, Lieutenant Tomcik assaulted an enemy bunker and killed three communists with bursts from his rifle. When six of his men moved up to join him and began providing covering fire, he charged a second stronghold and threw a grenade into its gunport, killing two Viet Cong and capturing a third. He and his comrades were then subjected to heavy fire from their flank. Dodging through the bursts of enemy fire, Lieutenant Tomcik ran to his element which was still pinned under the hostile fusillade, secured a machine gun and ammunition, then returned to his forward position to counter the heavy flanking fire. After directing gunship strikes within twenty-five meters of his location which killed eight of the enemy, he led his small band in assaults on six more bunkers, killing seventeen Viet Cong. First Lieutenant Tomcik's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 697 (February 27, 1969)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

TOMCIK, DENNIS C.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis C. Tomcik (0-5341518), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Tomcik distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 December 1968 while commanding his company on a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Kien Hoa Province. After moving into an enemy infested area, and establishing his unit in a defensive position, Lieutenant Tomcik left with eight men to locate hostile activity. Approaching a small hut, he spotted a Viet Cong and wounded him with a burst of rifle fire, but the enemy managed to escape. Lieutenant Tomcik pursued the fleeing communist and, coming upon a large stream, directed his troops to take cover while he and one man continued the chase. Hearing voices while searching a dwelling, he stepped outside and confronted three armed Viet Cong, whom he shot and killed Fifteen to twenty Viet Cong suddenly opened fire, and Lieutenant Tomcik courageously returned the fire, killing one of the advancing foe, enabling his comrade to withdraw. When he reached the stream, he found that his companion was floundering in the deep, rapid water. Disregarding a hail of enemy bullets, he plunged in and pulled the man to safety. He then directed his elements fire and called in artillery strikes during the trip back to the company. First Lieutenant Tomcik's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1729 (May 14, 1969)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

TOMLINSON, RAYMOND F. R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond F. R. Tomlinson, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Delta Combat Assistance Team 60, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Major Tomlinson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 15 to 17 January 1971 while serving as the G-3 advisor to the 9th Infantry Division (ARVN) during a search for three Americans missing in action near Ta Bec Mountain, Chau Doc Province. Shortly after finding and evacuating one of the Americans, his patrol was engaged by a Viet Cong company which inflicted heavy losses upon the friendly team. Although wounded in the initial encounter, Major Tomlinson quickly organized a defensive perimeter and summoned a rescue helicopter. Upon arrival the helicopter was shot down by enemy ground fire. With darkness approaching, Major Tomlinson, realizing that the hostile force could annihilate his patrol if located, moved his besieged team to another location. Using night tactics, he successfully avoided detection by the enemy. The following day he established communications with evacuation helicopters and they were extracted from the contact area. Major Tomlinson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2264-342 (June 29, 1971)
Born: Jackson, Mississippi
Home Town: Brownsboro, Alabama

TOMLINSON, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Tomlinson (0-4061499), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry (Mechanized), 9th Infantry Division. Captain Tomlinson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 January 1968 while serving as commanding officer of an infantry company during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Bien Hoa Province. During the early morning hours, a sister company made heavy contact with a large, well entrenched Viet Cong force and was completely pinned down by accurate automatic weapons and rocket fire. Upon hearing the sounds of battle, Captain Tomlinson ordered his unit to move toward the enemy positions. Maneuvering through thick underbrush to the left flank of the beleaguered force, he and his men came under rocket attack from enemy bunkers. Without hesitation, Captain Tomlinson pressed the attack, continuously exposing himself to intense small arms fire. His company broke through the enemy's outer perimeter and began drawing heavy fire from every direction. Fighting from within the insurgent's stronghold, Captain Tomlinson brilliantly maneuvered his company to bring maximum casualties on the Viet Cong. His force completely overran the enemy. He then led his troops to suspected Viet Cong escape routes and established hasty ambushes which caused further casualties to the fleeing enemy. Captain Tomlinson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3657 (July 30, 1968)

TONSETIC, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Tonsetic (0-5226257), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Captain Tonsetic distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 31 January 1968 as commander of an infantry company on a combat mission near Ho Nai. While leading his men through the village, his point squad encountered the forward elements of a large Viet Cong unit which was preparing to attack the United States' 199th Infantry Brigade base camp. Braving heavy enemy fire, he moved forward to direct artillery fire to within fifty meters of his troops' position. He then called helicopter gunships. As they spewed their deadly fire upon the enemy, he exposed himself to ricocheting small arms fire and rocket shrapnel to locate and bring firepower on additional hostile positions. Captain Tonsetic then personally led an assault on the enemy, inspiring his men to move forward under the barrage of enemy fire. The Viet Cong attacked the advancing force with mortars. Captain Tonsetic engaged the enemy mortars with a massive volley of all available grenade fire and destroyed the position. He then maneuvered to close with the insurgents in a creek bed. After an hour-long battle, the enemy withdrew, and the friendly force established a defensive perimeter. The enemy counterattacked from three sides. Captain Tonsetic skillfully deployed his maneuver elements and adjusted tactical air strikes and supporting artillery fire on the assaulting insurgents. His fearless leadership inspired his men to fight furiously and successfully repel the Viet Cong. Captain Tonsetic's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3687 (August 1, 1968)

TOOMEPUU, JURI
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Juri Toomepuu (0-2273837), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 175th Aviation Company, 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Major Toomepuu distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while serving as commander of a troop transport helicopter during an aerial assault on a large entrenched Viet Cong force near Vihn Long. Although intense fire greeted the lead helicopters entering the landing zone, Major Toomepuu calmly landed, discharged his troops, then skillfully maneuvered out of range of the enemy weapons. His aircraft had received many hits during the infiltration operation, but when it was decided to evacuate casualties from the ravaged battlefield, Major Toomepuu readily volunteered. Helicopters spread a screen of smoke in the area, but Viet Cong machine gunners were only 75 meters from the touch down point and constantly raked the zone with deadly fire. Heedless of his personal safety, he hovered around the field searching for disabled soldiers. Each time the smoke screen dissipated, enemy gunners poured intense fire at his aircraft and repeatedly succeeded in hitting it. Nevertheless, Major Toomepuu painstakingly searched the zone and found a wounded pilot, a downed crewman, and a Vietnamese soldier with a critical head wound. When his two crewmen were unable to life a wounded pilot out of the rice paddy, Major Toomepuu jumped from the helicopter and freed the pilot from mud and tall grass, while four Viet Cong machine guns tried to cut down the rescuers. With the casualties on board, he returned to the controls of the aircraft and made a fast, low-level departure. Major Toomepuu's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2376 (May 25, 1967)

TOTTEN, CLIFFORD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clifford R. Totten (RA17570748), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Totten distinguished himself on 3 July 1966 while serving as artillery forward observer for a two squad patrol near Thang Duc. When his patrol received intense hostile fire from an estimated company of Viet Cong. a portion of the patrol was overrun and the reminder surrounded. Observing that he was about to be overrun himself, Sergeant Totten, with complete disregard for his safety, called in an uninterrupted barrage of artillery fire on his own position for a period of three hours. When his platoon leader was killed, Sergeant Totten immediately assumed command of the remaining men and organized a tight defensive perimeter. When their ammunition was expended, Sergeant Totten and one of his comrades dashed onto the battlefield to collect more. On five occasions during the repeated attacks on the perimeter, Sergeant Totten fearlessly picked up Viet Cong grenades and threw them back at the fanatical insurgents. A sixth hostile grenade exploded and wounded him in the arm. When reinforcements arrived, he pointed out the location of his men as well as nearby Viet Cong replacements. Sergeant Totten left the area after his seriously wounded comrades had been safely evacuated. Sergeant Totten's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty in close combat against a numerically superior hostile force were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United states Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5803 (September 26, 1966)

TOWNSEND, SAMUEL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel W. Townsend (US55830321), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 77th Artillery, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Townsend distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1967 while serving as member of a battalion reaction force during a massive Viet Cong attack on n artillery base near Suoi Tre. At the onset of the attack, Specialist Townsend's unit moved out to reinforce the infantry on the perimeter. The perimeter force began to fall back under the surge of hundreds of Viet Cong. Specialist Townsend noticed a wounded man who had been left behind and returned to the original perimeter line, under intense fire, to carry him back to safety. A few minutes later, an enemy recoilless rifle protected by a machine gun began to fire on the battalion command post. Specialist Townsend again advanced beyond the friendly lines through fields of intense fire until he was within hand grenade range of the hostile emplacement. He jumped to his feet in this bullet-swept area, in order to see the enemy position and destroyed both the recoilless rifle and its machine gun with a grenade. As he was moving back towards the perimeter, another machine gun began firing on the camp's perimeter. He moved around and behind this weapon and also destroyed it with a single grenade. After returning to the friendly perimeter, Specialist Townsend received shrapnel wounds in his left thigh and left arm. He ignored these wounds and continued to fight until the Viet Cong had been decisively repulsed. Specialist Four Townsend's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4153 (August 15, 1967)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

TRENT, HERMAN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herman L. Trent (RA15526783), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 506th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Sergeant Trent distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 July 1968 while serving s First Sergeant and platoon leader of an infantry company on combat operations near Cu Chi. As his unit was crossing a rice paddy, it came under heavy fire from well entrenched North Vietnamese troops. Sergeant Trent immediately organized his platoon and began returning fire on the enemy positions. Realizing that the machine gun positions would have to be destroyed before they could advance, he ordered the platoon to pull back with the wounded and regroup with the main body of the company. Remaining behind, Sergeant Trent then moved through the fusillade with three other men and annihilated several enemy positions with hand grenades. Using his radio, he called in air strikes from a site less than fifty meters from the targets. He then entered a destroyed hostile bunker and remained in it for six hours, directing the ordinance nearly on top of his position. When he noticed that some of the better camouflaged emplacements remained untouched by the air strikes, he crawled through a nearby hedgerow and down the line of enemy bunkers, killing three snipers. As darkness fell the North Vietnamese fire ceased. Returning to the rice paddy, he discovered a member of this company who was seriously wounded and carried him more than four hundred meters to the unit's night defensive positions. First Sergeant Trent's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 150 (January 14, 1969)
Home Town: Clarksville, Tennessee

TRINKLE, PATRICK M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick M. Trinkle (0-93977), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, 11th Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Trinkle distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1968 as commanding officer of an infantry company on a search and clear mission near My Lai. While moving through a low, wooded area, his troops were savagely attacked by a well-entrenched, numerically superior enemy force firing automatic weapons, recoilless rifles and mortars. Braving a hail of fire, Captain Trinkle called for air and artillery strikes and helicopter gunship support. Wounded in the leg, he continued to expose himself to the ravaging barrage and adjusted artillery on the attackers while a medic briefly treated his injury. With bullets striking all around him as he moved among his men to direct the attack, he was seriously wounded by Viet Cong sniper fire. Seeing one of his men wounded and trapped in the open, he began moving across the open ground to his aid. A sniper directed intense fire at him, and Captain Trinkle altered his course, moved through a curtain of fire and killed the insurgent with a grenade. He then carried the wounded soldier to safety. He was told to move to an evacuation point for treatment of his wounds but refused and fearlessly directed the attack in which his men overran the enemy positions. Finally ordered to leave the battle area, he continued to direct his men by radio during treatment. His gallant actions in the heat of battle inspired his men to fight furiously and overwhelm the determined hostile forces. Captain Trinkle's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2717 (June 6, 1968)

TUCKER, GARY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary L. Tucker, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Tucker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1968 while serving as platoon leader during a cordon-and-search operation north of An Loc near the village of Ap Charac. As his force neared the hamlet, the enemy opened fire with small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket-propelled grenades. Lieutenant Tucker immediately coordinated a counter attack, killing three enemy soldiers while his men overran five hostile bunkers. He then maneuvered his platoon to the assistance of another element. En route, one of his track vehicles detonated a mine. He quickly ran to the aid of the wounded men, ensuring their evacuation and care. When a machine gunner was struck by grenade fragmentation, Lieutenant Tucker pulled the injured man from his vehicle and carried him to safety. Returning to his platoon, he repaired a malfunctioning machine gun. Throughout the battle, he continued to evacuate casualties, repair jammed weapons, distribute ammunition, and constantly exposed himself to the hostile barrage. He conducted the final sweep through the communist position and was responsible for killing one soldier and capturing another. He then called in air strikes to completely destroy the enemy force. First Lieutenant Tucker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2495 (July 11, 1969)

*TURNBULL, ROBERT CHESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Chester Turnbull (0-5337991), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Turnbull distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 February 1968 as platoon leader of an infantry company on combat operations near Ben Cat. When other elements of his company became heavily engaged by a numerically superior Viet Cong force, Lieutenant Turnbull led his platoon to reinforce the besieged troops. His force was hit by devastating machine gun and automatic weapons fire as it fought through dense jungle, and several of his men were wounded. After deploying his platoon in a defensive perimeter, he directed his troops to lay down a base of fire and then maneuvered to silence the enemy weapons. He located three Viet Cong firing automatic weapons and killed them with rifle fire. Bullets continued to sweep the jungle battlefield but he refused to halt his advance and moved toward an enemy machine gun. Coming to within ten meters of the weapon, he stood up and destroyed it with hand grenades, killing the six insurgents who occupied the emplacement. He was wounded by a second machine gun but continued his assault and circled behind the enemy fortifications. Disregarding his safety, he again stood up under a ravaging barrage and destroyed the position with hand grenades. As he threw the last grenade, he was instantly killed by enemy rocket fire. His gallant and selfless leadership in the heat of battle saved the lives of numerous fellow soldiers. Second Lieutenant Turnbull's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2248 (May 14, 1968)
Home Town: Andover, New Jersey

TUSI, RONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald L. Tusi, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery F (AFA), 79th Artillery, 3d Brigade (Separate) 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Chief Warrant Officer Tusi distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 April 1972 while serving as pilot of a Cobra helicopter gunship in support of Vietnamese forces defending An Loc, the provincial capital of Binh Long Province. Outnumbered by three enemy divisions and more than 20 enemy tanks, the defenders at An Loc were forced to withdraw to a small area where the 5th Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division Headquarters was located. Heavy tactical air support was urgently needed to halt the attack, but its use was denied because of the grave danger it posed to civilians who were being held hostage by the enemy and hundreds of soldiers who had been pinned down by the enemy tanks. Confident in his ability to provide protective firepower with pinpoint accuracy, Chief Warrant Officer Tusi committed himself to the battle. Despite extremely intense anti-aircraft fire, he launched a solo attack against the threatening enemy force by flying through anti-aircraft explosions that enveloped his gunship in smoke and personally destroyed four enemy tanks and damaged another. His devastating rocket attacks forced the remaining tanks to seek cover, and enabled Army of the Republic of Vietnam infantrymen to destroy all but two of the remaining enemy tanks. After halting the armor just meters short of their objective, chief Warrant Officer Tusi engaged the enemy infantry and forced scores to retreat from their attacks. Chief Warrant Officer Tusi's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1798 (August 4, 1972

TWIFORD, LARRY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry M. Twiford (RA19859904), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Twiford distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 December 1967 while serving as an artillery radio-telephone operator with a Riverine Assault convoy on the Rach Ruong River. While on a search and destroy mission the convoy was suddenly ambushed with rocket, machine gun and small arms fire by an enemy force well entrenched along both banks of the river. Braving the deadly barrage, Specialist Twiford took a position on the forward deck of the command and control boat and attempted to suppress the attack. When a comrade was seriously wounded, he moved through the withering hail of enemy fire and, covering the fallen soldier with his body, called to others to move the man to safety. While two men carried the casualty below deck, Specialist Twiford kept a steady volume of accurate fire on the enemy. As the boat was moving out of the ambush area, a rocket struck nearby, wounding him grievously. Disregarding his critical injuries, he held his position and continued to engage the communists until his boat escaped the killing zone. Specialist Four Twiford's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 488 (February 12, 1969)

U

UNDERWOOD, VICTOR C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Victor C. Underwood, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Underwood distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 to 12 March 1966 while serving as Senior Operations Advisor with an element of the Army of the Republic of South Vietnam at Camp A Shau. On the night of 9 March Sergeant Underwood was asleep in the camp dispensary when a two-battalion force of Viet Cong attacked the camp. The insurgent's mortar, machine gun, and small arms fire caused several Americans to be seriously wounded while attempting to get to their battle positions. Without regard for his own safety, he left his secured position in the face of the deadly insurgent fire to drag the wounded to safer positions and administer first aid. On 10 March 1966, the insurgents launched a heavy attack on the East and North walls of the camp. After several hours of fighting, the insurgents breached the East wall and forced the friendly defenders on the South' wall to withdraw to the trench lines along the North wall. Sergeant Underwood, who was on the North wall, managed to steady the retreating defenders and encouraged them to maintain such a murderous barrage of fire at the assaulting Viet Cong that it kept the camp from being overrun. After friendly air strikes had been directed at the insurgents along the camp's southern trenches, Sergeant Underwood took part in a counterattack to retake the South wall. During the action that followed, Sergeant Underwood was seriously wounded in both legs by an insurgent grenade but kept on fighting until the friendly force was ordered to withdraw. When the surviving defenders were ordered to break out of the camp to the north in an attempt at a helicopter rescue, Sergeant Underwood led the contingent, fighting his way yard by yard, and encouraging his comrades to follow. At the rescue site he elected to remain and cover the evacuation of the seriously wounded. Because of this action, Sergeant Underwood and a small group of defenders were forced to evade the Viet Cong for an entire day without food or water in dense jungles until they were rescued by friendly aircraft. During thirty-eight hours of close combat with a fanatical insurgent force and twelve hours of evading the same hostile force in treacherous jungles, Sergeant Underwood was a constant source of inspiration to his American and Vietnamese comrades. Sergeant First Class Underwood's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect treat credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 224 (September 12, 1966)

URBAN, DALE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dale A. Urban (RA16957493), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Urban distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 February 1968 as a team leader during an assault by his company against a strongly entrenched enemy force near Hue. As his unit drew near a stream fronting the communists' strongholds, it was met by rocket and machine gun fire from a series of bunkers lining the opposite shore. The barrage caused the company to halt and take cover, but Sergeant Urban and his squad leader rushed forward in a daring assault through the chest-deep water silencing several positions. When the company advanced deeper into the dense woods, the hostile fire increased from the strategically placed bunkers and fortified villages. The deadly cross fires again caused men to falter and take cover as the casualties mounted. Ignoring the devastating fusillade, Sergeant Urban and his squad leader sprang forward and assaulted several more bunkers with hand grenades, eliminating all resistance. Ahead of them, however, lay a line of four fortifications which were placing fire into the flanks of their unit, effectively halting further advance. Sergeant Urban and his squad leader, in total disregard for their safety, rushed forward and ran along a trench line fronting the bunkers, throwing hand grenades inside and raking the positions with rifle fire as they passed. They killed all the occupants, except for two who staggered out and were captured. Sergeant Urban then rushed another bunker totally destroying it with an incendiary grenade, and began to deliver heavy fire into two more emplacements, one harboring a machine gun. Both of these were soon silenced by his accurate fire. The enemy's final line of resistance had all but disintegrated, except for sporadic fire which continued from an undetermined location. Sergeant Urban and his squad leader, though unable to spot any movement, quickly estimated the source of the fire to be in some high brush just thirty meters to their front. Putting their rifles on full automatic, the two men sprayed the suspected area and waited for a response. There was no return fire. Suspecting a possible trap, Sergeant Urban courageously crawled forward and found three North Vietnamese officers, killed by rifle fire behind the concealing underbrush. Sergeant Urban's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 502 (February 13, 1969)

V

VALOR, FRANK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank Valor (RA12664462), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Valor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 January 1968 as a medical aidman on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Phu Chong. Moving from a defense hedgerow into an open field, the lead element of his company came under heavy automatic weapons and machine gun fire from an estimated enemy battalion occupying concealed, well fortified positions. Several casualties were immediately sustained. Specialist Valor was wounded three times as he moved to the point of heaviest contact to assist his fallen comrades. Upon reaching the casualties, he remained in an exposed position and began treating them. Despite being wounded once again, he assisted his injured comrades to a more secure position. Upon reaching a relatively safe area, he was hastily treated for his wounds while organizing an emergency treatment area for the other casualties. Although weak from loss of blood, Specialist Valor then returned to the battle area time after time to evacuate additional casualties. When evacuation helicopters arrived, he immediately established extraction priorities for the wounded, refusing evacuation for himself until he was sure that all other casualties had been extracted. Specialist Four Valor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3684 (August 1, 1968)

*VAN DEUSEN, FREDERICK FREN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frederick Fren Van Deusen (0-68756), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Van Deusen distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 July 1968 as commanding officer of an infantry battalion on combat operations near Ben Luc. Early in the morning, he inserted two rifle companies into landing zones on the west bank of the Song Vam Co Dong River. With the support of an armed helicopter company and an air cavalry troop, he maneuvered them in an attempt to encircle a Viet Cong battalion command post. Throughout the morning, he directed his command helicopter to maintain a tree-top level position to best control the ground elements. On several occasions he joined his companies to personally coordinate their efforts. In each case, he disregarded his personal safety to cross open areas under intense hostile fire and join the forward elements. During the afternoon, one company lost contact with one of its platoons. Colonel Van Deusen immediately directed his helicopter to land, crossed an open field under a hail of enemy automatic weapons fire, and joined the company commander in an exposed position. To assist the officer in finding the isolated platoon, Colonel Van Deusen returned to his aircraft and directed the pilot to circle the battlefield at treetop-level despite the constant enemy fusillade directed at the ship. He spotted enemy activity on the company's flank and directed his pilot to fly closer for a better view. At that moment enemy automatic weapons fire raked the aircraft, causing it to crash into the river. Lieutenant Colonel Van Deussen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3240 (July 9, 1968)
Home Town: Blacksburg, Virginia

*VAN POLL, HUBERT CLARENCE (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Hubert Clarence Van Poll (19488345), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam as a member of Detachment A-219, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Van Poll distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 June 1967 while serving as Special Forces platoon leader of a Mike Force Company which was moving to relieve a beleaguered Vietnamese unit near Dak To. As Sergeant Van Poll's company moved along a heavily wooded trail, it received a sudden outburst of intense Viet Cong machine gun fire from concealed, fortified positions. When another American, who was leading a small element in counterattack, was hit, Sergeant Van Poll left his cover and, firing steadily, crawled toward the wounded man. Despite intense fire raking the ground all around him, he reached his comrade and administered first aid. He then picked up the wounded man and ran towards his own lines through a tremendous outburst of fire. Sergeant Van Poll was knocked to the ground by a grenade explosion, but struggled to his feet and reached a covered position. The insurgents' attack intensified and as Sergeant Van Poll was treating his comrade's wounds, he was mortally wounded himself, Staff Sergeant Van Poll's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3867 (July 28, 1967)
Home Town: Cottage Grove, Oregon

VAUGHAN, DENNY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Denny R. Vaughan (0-4074862), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 7th Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Vaughan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 April 1968 in an air rescue mission west of Kontum. During a low-level aerial reconnaissance, a scout aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and crashed in the midst of a reinforced North Vietnamese Army battalion. When it was reported that two crew members had survived the crash, Captain Vaughan immediately volunteered to lead a twenty-man force in an attempt to extract them. On the approach to the landing zone the lead aircraft began receiving intense fire from machine gun positions surrounding the pickup site, and the flight commander decided to abort the mission. Captain Vaughan, though fully aware of the enemy's strength, persuaded the flight commander to remain at a twenty-foot hover while he and his men jumped to the ground. Ignoring an injury to his ankle, he rapidly deployed his platoon and began maneuvering it toward the downed ship. After moving a short distance, it received heavy enemy automatic weapons fire. Captain Vaughan requested and adjusted air strikes around his platoon's position. The bombardment stopped the attackers' fire and he continued to lead his men toward the injured crew members. The North Vietnamese launched a furious ground assault on his platoon. Captain Vaughan fearlessly exposed himself to the withering hail of fire to organize and direct his troops' defenses. As the attack was driven back, he once again called air strikes on the enemy, enabling him and his men to return to the landing zone with the downed aircraft crew for extraction. Captain Vaughan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4080 (August 23, 1968)

VERNON, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles E. Vernon (0-5322470), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 61st Infantry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized. Captain Vernon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 September 1968 as commander of a mechanized company during a combat operation. Informed that one of his platoons on a flank security mission had been ambushed and was receiving heavy fire, Captain Vernon unhesitatingly moved with his headquarters section toward the battle area. As they neared the beleaguered element, they were also ambushed. His track was hit by an enemy rocket, which seriously wounded him and killed or injured the entire crew. Despite his injuries he directed his driver to move the crippled track toward the enemy positions. They were again hit by an enemy rocket which completely disabled the vehicle and wounded him again. Although in great pain and exposed to the hostile barrage, he continued to place effective fire on communist troops who attempted to assault his damaged vehicle. While fighting off the aggressors, he reorganized his company into a perimeter and directed the evacuation of casualties. Captain Vernon remained in command and maintained complete control of his unit until his wounds caused him to lose consciousness and he was evacuated. Captain Vernon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 129 (January 11, 1969)

VESSEY, JOHN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John William Vessey (0-65047), Lieutenant Colonel (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 2d Battalion, 77th Artillery, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Vessey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1967 while serving as a Battalion Commander during a combat mission near Suoi Tre. During the early morning hours, Colonel Vessey's battalion received a massive assault by a Viet Cong regiment. Although more than 200 mortar rounds fell, Colonel Vessey fearlessly moved through his unit area, first to alert his men, then to direct various phases of the defense. When vital howitzer positions were destroyed by hostile fire, he rallied men from other sections to man the guns, and he himself assisted as a cannoneer. He was wounded during this action, but continued to lead and fire the artillery pieces. At one point, he spotted Viet Cong rocket launchers that were placing devastating fire into the battery perimeter. He seized a grenade launcher, moved into an open area and knocked out three of the insurgents' weapons. When an enemy tracer round ignited a drum of diesel oil and threatened to set off two drums of explosives nearby, Colonel Vessey ran to that highly dangerous point and helped move the drums to safety. His professional command and courageous fighting throughout the battle were instrumental in turning back the numerically superior enemy force and killing more than 600 Viet Cong. Lieutenant Colonel Vessey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4206 (August 18, 1967)
Born: June 29, 1922 at Minneapolis, Minnesota
Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota

VIAU, WALLACE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wallace E. Viau, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, on 8 March 1965. As a Senior Advisor serving with the United States Army Special Forces at Camp Kannack in the southern area of the Republic of Vietnam, Captain Viau demonstrated fortitude and determination when the Camp was attacked during the night by a fanatical and numerically superior hostile force with a tactical advantage. With complete disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense small arms fire and heavy bombardment by moving from bunker to bunker to insure that they were manned, to aid and encourage the defenders, and to direct the defense operations. At the height of the battle, he bravely and unhesitatingly crossed sixty yards of open terrain under heavy enemy fire to administer first aid to a critically wounded American serviceman. Upon learning that an outpost had fallen he again exposed himself to the Viet Cong gunfire and succeeded in reaching a precarious position in close proximity of the enemy. From this dangerous position, he directed mortar and other weapons fire, disrupting enemy attacks from that direction. He then organized and led a counterattack against stubborn resistance which resulted in the recapturing of the outpost and destroying the enemy who held the position. When the long awaited daylight brought defeat to the enemy, he personally led a combat patrol against the withdrawing Viet Cong which was highly effective in annihilating more of the enemy. Throughout the violent battle that lasted approximately eight hour, he displayed indomitable courage and professional skill which inspired the defenders and contributed to the successful defense of the Camp and to the repelling of the insurgent forces. Captain Viau's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroic actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 23, 1966)

*VICKERS, ROGER LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roger Lee Vickers (0-5347766), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Vickers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 January 1969 while commanding a company during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the Plain of Reeds, Thu Thua Province. As his unit was crossing an open area, it was engaged by an enemy force occupying well fortified bunkers in a nearby woodline. Spotting three wounded men who lay exposed to the hostile fire, Lieutenant Vickers unhesitatingly advanced through the hail of bullets to rescue the casualties and succeeded in carrying them to the safety of a dike. He then returned to the front of his company and began directing his troops toward the bunkers. Braving the enemy fusillade, he moved from position to position with a grenade launcher and placed accurate fire on the aggressors. After tossing smoke grenades to mark the hostile strongholds and directing air strikes, Lieutenant Vickers led an assault on the now disorganized communists. Shortly before the enemy withdrew, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire. First Lieutenant Vickers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1532 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: Springfield, Ohio

VILLANUEVA, DAVID O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David O. Villanueva (US54719484), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Villanueva distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 February 1968 during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Ben Cat. His unit engaged a well entrenched and numerically superior enemy force. During the initial minutes of the fight, the heavy volume of enemy fire caused numerous casualties. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Villanueva charged forward, braving a murderous hail of bullets to obtain a good firing position. Although completely exposed to the fierce barrage, he delivered deadly fire on the enemy from a tactically advantageous location. During the battle, four grenades were thrown into his position. Each time he courageously picked up the armed explosive and hurled it back, finally killing the two insurgents who had thrown them. When the machine gun he was firing became inoperative, he ran back to his unit's perimeter to obtain another weapon. He then returned to his position with a grenade launcher and continued to silence enemy fortifications with extremely accurate fire. After expending all his ammunition, he picked up an automatic rifle and charged the Viet Cong emplacements, eliminating them with a devastating hail of fire. His courageous actions inspired his comrades to press the attack and completely rout the insurgents. Specialist Four Villanueva's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3690 (August 1, 1968)

*VILLAROSA, PAUL HERMAN (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul Herman Villarosa (RA19707581), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), FOB 4 (Marble Mountain), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Villarosa distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 January 1968 while leading a Special Forces long range reconnaissance patrol on a mission in enemy-controlled territory. As his team moved through the jungle, it became apparent to him that an enemy force was attempting to flank his unit. Sergeant First Class Villarosa halted his team and was preparing to establish communications with his headquarters when the hidden hostile force ordered his men to throw down their weapons and surrender. Acting quickly, he directed his men to withdraw to more defensible positions while he remained behind to cover their movement. The enemy launched a vicious assault using automatic weapons, grenades and a flamethrower, but Sergeant First Class Villarosa stood his ground despite the savage fusillade and delivered withering fire on the advancing insurgents which slowed their progress and allowed his men to set up a secure defensive perimeter. He was mortally wounded while gallantly and selflessly defending his fellow soldiers in the heat of battle. Sergeant First Class Villarosa's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 541 (February 6, 1968)
Home Town: Lake Tahoe, California

VILLARREAL, RAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raul Villarreal (RA19666819), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 70th Engineer Company, 937th Engineer Group, 18th Engineer Brigade, Engineer Troops Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Villarreal distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 March 1968 while second in command of a convoy traveling from Pleiku to Kontum. Two companies of North Vietnamese regulars ambushed the convoy with small arms, automatic weapons, recoilless rifles, rockets and mortars, killing the platoon leader. Sergeant Villarreal immediately assumed command, directed heavy and accurate return fire on the enemy, and skillfully guided the first two vehicles out of the danger area. Sergeant Villarreal was wounded when his weapon was struck by automatic weapons fire. Although momentarily dazed, he took one driver's weapon and continued to return the enemy fire while he led wounded personnel to an area of security for treatment, Vietnamese soldiers in the area with armored personnel carriers were unaware of the exact enemy situation. Sergeant Villarreal persuaded the unit to attack the enemy force. He led the six personnel carriers to six different enemy strong points and joined in the assault of these positions. He was wounded a second time when the personnel carrier he was fighting beside was struck by rocket fire. He continued to refuse medical attention until the enemy force was driven off, remaining until late in the day to insure that both his men and vehicles were evacuated from the ambush site. His fearless actions resulted in heavy losses to the enemy force and saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Staff Sergeant Villarreal's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3019 (June 23, 1968)

*VILLASENOR, GONZALO H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gonzalo H. Villasenor (RA15812734), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Villasenor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 April 1969 while serving as a rifleman with a platoon operating in Hau Nghia Province. His platoon was carrying out an intelligence mission when the lead man detected an enemy ambush in time to warm his comrades. A fire fight erupted, and the hostile forces were routed. Wishing to maintain contact with the fleeing enemy, the platoon pressed forward. On entering a wooded area, the friendly element came under an enfilade from automatic weapons, rifle grenades and mortars. Identifying a source of enemy fire to the left flank, Specialist Villasenor began moving toward the emplacement. Although he was struck in the leg by hostile fire, he continued advancing, crawling toward the bunker, alternately firing his rifle and tossing grenades. Just as he succeeded in silencing his target, he came under intense fire from another enemy fortification. Despite being wounded a second time, he bravely retaliated with a hail of rifle fire. Continuing forward he received a fatal wound to the head ending his brave advance. Specialist Four Villasenor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2024 (1969)
Home Town: Fort Worth, Texas

*VINASSA, MICHAEL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael G. Vinassa (RA19835678), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Vinassa was serving as a Grenadier in the 3d Platoon, Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), on a search and destroy operation in Binh Dinh Province. About 1500 hours on 21 May 1966, Company C was engaged by a large Viet Cong force that halted their advancement. The 3d Platoon was then given the mission of moving through the intense hostile fire to reinforce the right flank of Company C. A machine gun caused the 2d Squad to be pinned down. Specialist Vinassa started moving u the left draw delivering supporting fire that caused the 2d Squad to be pinned down. Specialist Vinassa started moving up the left draw delivering supporting fire that caused several of the insurgents to be killed. As the squad continued up the hill, several friendly defenders were wounded, however, Specialist Vinassa encouraged his comrades to follow him as he pressed forward. As they came in close to the Viet Cong positions, the insurgents began throwing grenades, at which time Specialist Vinassa had managed to crawl within ten meters of the machine gun position. As the machine gun poured deadly fire at the remaining members of the squad, Specialist Vinassa, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, charged through the open ten meters and threw a grenade at the emplacement destroying the gun and its crew. Just before the grenade went off, Specialist Vinassa was mortally wounded. His valor made it possible for the rest of the company to continue up the hill. Specialist Vinassa's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 230 (September 22, 1966)
Home Town: Culver City, California

VOILES, LANNY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lanny Voiles (US53757060), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Voiles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 April 1969 while serving as acting platoon sergeant during a nighttime ambush mission. While advancing, his unit suddenly encountered a barrage of hostile cross-fire from rifles, automatic weapons and claymore mines. During the initial assault, the platoon leader was disabled and Sergeant Voiles immediately assumed command of the pinned-down element. As he maneuvered forward to an observation position, he noticed that the radio-telephone operator had been downed by enemy rounds. He braved the fusillade to retrieve the injured man and then organized the safe withdrawal of the wounded platoon leader. Hearing that the platoon medic was lying wounded near an empty bunker, he moved through the bullet-swept area, placing accurate small arms and grenade fire on the aggressors. As he aided the wounded medic, he shielded him from the devastating wall of enemy fire until relief came and evacuation was effected. Sergeant Voiles' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2248 (June 25, 1969)

*VOLNER, JOHN DELANE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Delane Volner (US53429994), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Volner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 15 February 1967 to 17 February 1967 while serving as radio-telephone operator with an infantry unit during combat operations in Kontum Province. After learning that lead elements of his force were pinned down by intense cross fire from hostile emplacements, Private Volner unhesitatingly volunteered to move to their position to keep the company commander informed of developments in that sector. When these men were able to withdraw to higher ground, Private Volner received notice that another platoon was about to be overrun. Unflinching under the hail of fire that raked the area, he threaded his way into the pinned platoon. With a clearheaded account of enemy movements, he enabled the company commander to effectively maneuver his forces. On the evening of 17 February, Private Volner detected movement outside his unit's perimeter. His alertness prompted the company commander to call for artillery fire. While he was radioing information to the command post, Private Volner heard artillery rounds coming in on his own position. Heedless of his own safety, he grabbed a comrade moments before a round struck, pulled him to the bottom of the foxhole, and threw his own body on top of him to shield him from the blast. Private Volner was fatally wounded in this selfless and courageous sacrifice to save his comrade. Private First Class Volner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1730 (April 15, 1967)
Home Town: Lexington, Tennessee

 

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