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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
  O - R  

O

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

OAKLAND, PATRICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick Oakland (RA17681858), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Sergeant Oakland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 April 1968 as a squad leader of an infantry company during a waterborne reconnaissance-in-force operation. The boat column was attacked by a well-entrenched enemy force firing rockets and machine guns. Sergeant Oakland's troop carrier beached immediately and, despite the heavy volume of hostile fire, he advanced into the face of the enemy. Moving from man to man, he organized his squad for an assault. The enemy's fire was too intense for his troops to suppress it effectively. Sergeant Oakland fearlessly moved forward alone and killed two Viet Cong in a key machine gun position that was blocking the platoon's movement. Although wounded in the shoulder, he made his way back to his platoon leader and reported the disposition of the enemy. He then returned to the area of heaviest contact to bring additional fire on the insurgents and to further evaluate the situation. Although wounded a second time by machine gun fire, Sergeant Oakland again maneuvered through the heavy fire to report to his platoon leader. As the numerically superior Viet Cong prepared to assault, his platoon began a withdrawal. Sergeant Oakland voluntarily remained behind to provide covering fire as his comrades re-boarded the troop carrier. After delaying the enemy advance for as long as possible, he camouflaged himself to escape detection and, under cover of darkness returned to friendly lines that night. Sergeant Oakland's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3761 (August 2, 1968)

*O'BRIEN, TERENCE DALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Terence Dale O'Brien (OF-104218), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant O'Brien distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 November 1966 while serving as Platoon Leader during a search and destroy operation in enemy controlled territory along the Cambodian border. As his platoon moved through the jungle forward of the company, it received voluminous machine gun and mortar fire from a large North Vietnamese force. Lieutenant O'Brien immediately deployed his unit to return fire and counter the enemy thrusts. While moving to place his troops into more advantageous positions throughout the area, he was wounded in both legs by enemy sniper fire. Disregarding his painful injuries, Lieutenant O'Brien remained on the front lines to direct his men and aid the wounded. As the North Vietnamese repeatedly attempted to overrun the platoon with human wave assaults, he relentlessly held his position, allowing the remainder of the beleaguered force to establish a defensive perimeter. He then braved the onslaught of enemy fire as he led his troops back to the friendly perimeter and directed their tactical positions. It was during this action that Lieutenant O'Brien was fatally wounded by an exploding mortar. First Lieutenant O'Brien's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3969 (August 2, 1967)
Home Town: Vicksburg, Mississippi

O'CLAIRE, RICHARD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard D. O'Claire (0-5339857), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 33, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. First Lieutenant O'Claire distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 February 1969 while serving as Battalion Senior Advisor and accompanying a Vietnamese company which was conducting a joint operation with a tank platoon. The combined elements encountered a battalion-sized Viet Cong force entrenched in bunkers, streams and rice paddies to the east of the hamlet of Binh Lam. Immediately exposing himself to enemy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and rocket fire, Lieutenant O'Claire pinpointed several Viet Cong bunkers and brought accurate tank fire against these positions. His unit advanced to a stream line where he again directed tanks and gun ships, personally killing a communist by crawling to within four feet of a bunker and hurling a grenade inside. After spearheading an assault during which three Viet Cong were captured and directing air strikes, he was attempting to advance when the hostile fire increased in intensity, wounding him and forcing the Vietnamese troops to withdraw to permit additional air strikes. Disregarding his injuries, he continued to supervise the tanks and other fire support until his men had reached safety and sufficient fire power was being placed on the enemy. First Lieutenant O'Clare's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1582 (May 3, 1969)
Home Town: Hattiesburg, Mississippi

O'CONNELL, TERRENCE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Terrence M. O'Connell, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant O'Connell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 January 1970 while leading a combat patrol in search of enemy soldiers near Cu Chi. As the patrol maneuvered beside a thickly vegetated hedgerow, faint voices were heard coming from the mouth of an underground enemy tunnel. Lieutenant O'Connell immediately directed his interpreter to instruct the enemy soldiers to surrender. Two enemy soldiers surrendered immediately upon hearing the first command and a third yielded after a second directive was issued. As the third enemy soldier left the tunnel opening, a grenade was tossed from the hole but exploded harmlessly among the alert patrol members. Utilizing the temporary disorganization caused by the explosion, the third enemy soldier drew a grenade he had concealed on his person and tossed it toward Lieutenant O'Connell and two patrol members. Lieutenant O'Connell immediately shoved one dazed comrade to the ground and fell on top of the second man as the grenade descended toward his left shoulder and exploded. Although critically wounded by the explosion, Lieutenant O'Connell's unhesitating actions enabled his two companions to escape the blast with only minor fragmentation wounds. First Lieutenant O'Connell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3377 (July 23, 1970)

O'CONNOR, OSCAR L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Oscar L. O'Connor, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain O'Connor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 November 1967. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 13 (March 6, 1969)
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O'DELL, EUGENE J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eugene J. O'Dell, Jr., Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four O'Dell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 March 1969 while operating a ninety- millimeter recoilless rifle during a mission near Fire Support Base Danger in Giao Duc District, Kien Phoung Province. After calling in air strikes on a suspended enemy position in a woodline, Specialist O'Dell's company advanced and was pinned down by heavy machine gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire from the enemy. Specialist O'Dell immediately rushed forward of his company to lay a base of fire. Standing up in full view of the hostile force, he delivered round after round into the ranks of the foe, destroying three vital enemy positions. Having exhausted his supply of shells, he proceeded to evacuate the seriously injured. On his fourth trip to the evacuation point, he succeeded in carrying a casualty to safety although in the process he became wounded in the shoulder. Specialist Four O'Dell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2710 (July 17, 1969)

OGAS, FRED, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Fred Ogas, Jr., Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Ogas distinguished himself by exceptional valorous actions on 19 June 1969 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. When a large well-entrenched enemy force opened fire on his troop, the commander and several other officers were killed or wounded as antitank rockets struck their tracked vehicle. Sergeant Ogas was thrown from his vehicle and wounded. Despite his wounds, he immediately moved to the aid of his injured comrades. As he was evacuating two officers, deadly fire erupted from an enemy bunker nearby. Sergeant Ogas single-handedly stormed the hostile fortification and killed the enemy soldiers with rifle and hand grenade fire. Returning to the wounded officers, he succeeded in evacuating them out of range of direct fire. Realizing that the troop was without command, Sergeant Ogas quickly assumed control of the unit and reorganized the now-scattered men. Establishing communication with the squadron commander who was aloft in the command and control helicopter, Sergeant Ogas assembled the casualties and guided medical evacuation helicopters into the contact area. After moving his men to a selected night position, he accomplished contact with and successfully directed another troop to his location. He retained control of the unit until an officer could be inserted into the area. Sergeant Ogas' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3420 (September 7, 1969)

OKAMOTO, VINCENT HICHIRO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Vincent Hichiro Okamoto (OF-1124459), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Okamoto distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 August 1968 while serving as a platoon leader with an infantry unit near Dau Tieng. A ground attack was launched against his battalion's night location by three reinforced North Vietnamese and Viet Cong companies. The initial assault destroyed a strategic section of the perimeter. Under heavy automatic weapons, small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire, Lieutenant Okamoto moved with five of his men to restore this vital position. Realizing the need for supporting fire, he ran to a partially destroyed armored personnel carrier and manned its machine gun. After the weapon malfunctioned, he dashed through the fusillade of enemy fire to a second and then a third carrier to place suppressing fire on the aggressors. Spying a group of enemy soldiers maneuvering toward the unit's lines, Lieutenant Okamoto crawled under cover of small arms and automatic weapons fire to less than ten meters from the communists and destroyed them with fragmentation grenades. He was injured by a hostile concussion grenade, which exploded close to his position, but refusing aid he kept fighting until the North Vietnamese/Viet Cong force was defeated. Second Lieutenant Okamoto's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5636 (December 7, 1968)

*O'KUSKY, HENRY JOSEPH, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Joseph O'Kusky, Jr. (0-5346474), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Second Lieutenant O'Kusky distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 July 1968 while serving as a platoon leader during an assault on a large North Vietnamese Army bunker and tunnel complex located on a hill in triple canopy jungle, southwest of Camp Evans. He and a squad leader fought their way to within a short distance of the nearest bunker. Lieutenant O'Kusky then crawled into the open and threw a hand grenade into the fortification, silencing its occupants. While advancing alone towards the next hostile position he was wounded in the thigh by enemy fire. Ignoring the pain of his injury and the communists' fusillade, he continued to close on the emplacement and threw a grenade which partially destroyed it. As Lieutenant O'Kusky released the grenade, he was fatally wounded by a burst of automatic weapon fire from a third North Vietnamese fortification. Second Lieutenant O'Kusky's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5163 (November 6, 1968)
Home Town: Craddockville, Virginia

OLIVER, J. L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to J. L. Oliver (RA16306964), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Oliver distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 May 1967 while serving as squad leader during a search and destroy mission near the Cambodian border. As the friendly units moved through dense undergrowth, Sergeant Oliver detected movement to his right front. Without hesitation, he ordered his machine gun and grenade launching crews into action. While a platoon provided a base of fire, Sergeant Oliver led his squad toward the Viet Cong emplacements. He spotted several bunkers and cautioned his men to take cover. While they engaged the insurgents with rifle and machine gun fire, he bolted towards the first fortification, threw a grenade inside, and killed all of its occupants. Again exposing himself to the hostile barrage, Sergeant Oliver ran to the next Viet Cong bunker and was successful in blowing it up. He then fired on the remaining insurgents with extreme effectiveness. His aggressive moves throughout the engagement seemed instinctive and without regard for his own safety, and his destruction of the Viet Cong fighting strength saved his unit from summering many casualties. He was credited with seven insurgents killed in action and many wounded. Staff Sergeant Oliver's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3871 (July 28, 1967)

O'NEILL, DANIEL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel L. O'Neill, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant O'Neill distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1969 while serving as platoon leader on a search and destroy mission. His unit was ordered to attack a heavily-fortified hilltop position near the city of Tam Ky. A large open rice paddy lay between his position and the objective. Immediately upon initiating the attack, his platoon was subjected to heavy enemy automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Employing fire and maneuver, he began to move his platoon forward. Realizing that his men were reluctant to move because of the heavy volume of enemy fire, Lieutenant O'Neill began to move up and down the line shouting encouragement. He then took the lead and led his platoon across the rice paddy to the base of the enemy positions. Employing hand grenades and close fighting, his platoon broke through the initial enemy bunkers and continued to ascend the hill. He then realized that his platoon was receiving fire from its flanks and rear as well as from the enemy positions to the front. Temporarily halting his platoon, he directed the destruction of the enemy positions to his flanks and rear with light antitank weapons and hand grenades. He then renewed the assault, called for and redistributed ammunition, and led the final assault to the top of the hill, eliminating the final pockets of enemy resistance. Ordered to withdraw from the hill to reinforce another platoon, he effectively led his men against the insurgents and rescued the besieged elements. Lieutenant O'Neill's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 499 (February 22, 1970)

*OQUENDO, FRUTO JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fruto James Oquendo (124-40-0554), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Oquendo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 May 1969 while serving as a machine gunner at a fire support base in Tay Ninh Province. In the early morning hours, the base began to receive heavy rocket and mortar fire followed by a ground assault. When a North Vietnamese regiment armed with machine guns and satchel charges rushed the perimeter, Specialist Oquendo detonated claymore mines and placed rifle fire into their advancing ranks. As the enemy attempted to blast openings in the wire barrier, he valiantly attempted to abort their efforts. Soon, however, the enemy forces penetrated the berm in several spots and began throwing grenades and small arms fire at Specialist Oquendo's position. He and several others in his bunker were wounded, but he refused to be evacuated. When he depleted his ammunition, he grabbed one of his wounded comrade's weapons and continued firing. In a determined bid to capture his bunker, the communists stormed his position. During the hand to hand struggle, he was mortally wounded while defending his area. Specialist Oquendo's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2673 (July 17, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

O'QUINN, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald L. O'Quinn (US53612487), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four O'Quinn distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 March 1969 as a medic during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. When Specialist O'Quinn's company was ambushed and one of the infantrymen was seriously wounded, he crossed an open area through a hail of bullets to reach the casualty. As he was administering aid, an enemy grenade landed eight feet away. Specialist O'Quinn used his body to shield the man, and was hit in the leg by shrapnel. Disregarding his painful injury, he continued to treat his comrade and then maneuvered about the battlefield to care for the other wounded. After the fighting subsided, he refused evacuation until the other casualties had been cared for and extracted. Specialist Four O'Quinn's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1629 (May 7, 1969)

*O'REILLY, ANTHONY PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Anthony Paul O'Reilly (0-5334133), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant O'Reilly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 1 to 3 June 1968 as commander of an infantry company during a reconnaissance-in-force operation near the Cambodian border. A sister company was pinned down by an estimated battalion of Viet Cong firing small arms, machine guns, rockets and mortars from a well fortified bunker complex. Lieutenant O'Reilly attempted to lead his force to the beleaguered unit, but was stopped by the enemy's barrage. Disregarding his safety, he crawled twenty-five meters toward the nearest bunker and hurled grenades into it which killed its two occupants and silenced its deadly stream of automatic weapons fire. He then sprang to his feet and rallied his men for an assault on the remaining fortifications. In fierce close combat the Viet Cong abandoned their emplacements and broke contact. During the next two days the search for the elusive foe continued, and on 3 June contact was made again. As his unit came under intense automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant O'Reilly quickly moved his troops on line and assaulted the hostile positions. While deploying his men so they could effectively engage the Viet Cong bunkers with comparative safety, he was killed by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire. First Lieutenant O'Reilly's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4132 (August 28, 1968)
Home Town: Kettering, Ohio

ORSINI, DONALD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald A. Orsini (0-5315538), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Orsini distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 December 1967 as commander of an infantry company conducting a search and destroy mission. His unit was moving toward a small village when it was subjected to intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from a well entrenched and numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Captain Orsini quickly moved forward to the point of heaviest contact and deployed his troops in defensive positions. When he was informed that the men of the company's right flank security element were wounded and unable to take cover, he fearlessly raced across one hundred meters of bullet-swept terrain to rescue the casualties. He reached them only to find that they had been killed. Returning to his command post, Captain Orsini learned that three soldiers of the point element were pinned down fifty meters to the front by the hostile fusillade. Braving a withering hail of enemy fire, he led two men to assist the beleaguered troops. One volunteer was killed and the other wounded by a North Vietnamese sniper, and Captain Orsini was forced to withdraw, carrying his wounded comrade back to the company' s defensive perimeter. He then called for armored personnel carriers to cover the withdrawal of the point men. When they arrived, he resumed his rescue efforts under their heavy suppressive fire. Although seriously wounded by the explosion of an enemy recoilless rifle round, Captain Orsini refused medical treatment and guided the beleaguered troops to safety. Captain Orsini's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2019 (May 2, 1968)
Home Town: Coraopolis, Pennsylvania

ORTIZ, RAYMOND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond Ortiz (RA54223477), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 3 and 4 November 1965, Specialist Ortiz was serving as a medical corpsman accompanying the 3d platoon of Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division on a night air assault mission of a Viet Cong held zone. At approximately 2330 hours, 3 November 1965, after landing and leaving his troop carrying helicopter, Specialist Ortiz was wounded in his left arm which rendered it useless. Disregarding and refusing treatment of his won painful wound, he remained with the 3d platoon during its assault on the hostile positions. As the platoon advanced to within thirty meters of the insurgent position, he continually refused to be evacuated and personally gave aid and evacuated six of his wounded comrades. Notwithstanding the murderous hail of hostile fire, he rushed to the aid of his platoon leader, who had been wounded and was lying in the line of the hostile barrage. Moving forward in this attempt Specialist Ortiz was again wounded in the chest and knocked to the ground. Although in great pain from this wound he got to his feet, continued in the valorous attempt to aid his wounded superior, and was again wounded in the chest by small arms fire. When he was picked up for evacuation he refused aid until the rest of the wounded had been evacuated. His gallantry under fire saved the lives of several of his comrades and greatly inspired the members of the platoon. Specialist Ortiz's extraordinary heroism and compassion for his fellow man were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 44 (February 28, 1966)

*O'SULLIVAN, CHRISTOPHER JO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Christopher Jo O'Sullivan (0-85063), Captain, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain O'Sullivan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 April 1965 while serving as Senior Advisor to the 39th Ranger Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, which was participating in a search and destroy mission in connection with Operation THANG 518. During the operation, the Ranger Battalion as lead element of a northern force moved west on one axis while another battalion of Vietnamese Marines and armored personnel carriers, which composed the southern force, also moved west on another axis. At 1700 hours, the composite battalion was attacked by a strong Viet Cong force and was forced to withdraw towards the 39th Ranger Battalion. During the initial contact of the friendly forces, Captain O'Sullivan, realizing the importance of command and control, attempted to stop the withdrawing troops and establish a defensive line to hold back the attacking insurgents. However, due to the heavy concentration of insurgent fire, his attempt proved futile and the friendly forces were forced to withdraw to another defensive position approximately four hundred meters to the rear of the first line. Upon establishing this hasty defense, Captain O'Sullivan, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continuously exposed himself to the hostile fire and moved from one position to another to effectively direct a hail of deadly fire upon the advancing insurgents. During the ensuing battle, Captain O'Sullivan personally accounted for fifteen Viet Cong casualties and as a result of his dynamic leadership and heroic actions, seventy five troops which were pinned down and trapped by the Viet Cong were rescued. Captain O'Sullivan's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 195 (1965)
Home Town: Astoria, Long Island, New York

O'SULLIVAN, JOHN I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John I. O'Sullivan, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 174th Aviation company, 14th Aviation Battalion, Americal Division. Second Lieutenant O'Sullivan distinguished himself while serving as fire team leader of a helicopter gunship team flying in support of allied operations near Quang Ngai. Although under a continuous hail of enemy automatic weapons fire, Lieutenant O'Sullivan led an aggressive attack on three companies of enemy soldiers that were entrenched in a Vietnamese village. Repeatedly exposing his aircraft to intense enemy automatic weapons fire, he eliminated four enemy soldiers and destroyed two enemy bunkers. His aircraft was then shot down by intense enemy fire as he descended to a low altitude to provide cover fire for another downed friendly helicopter. After surveying the damage to his downed ship, Lieutenant O'Sullivan returned to the cockpit and flew the crippled craft to a nearby air strip. He then obtained another gunship and returned to the area to take command of the fire team. While covering the recovery of the downed helicopter, he eliminated five more of the enemy. Responding to an urgent appeal for assistance from another allied unit, he again braved intense fire as he assaulted three enemy machine gun positions. During this encounter, his gunship was damaged by enemy fire. Undaunted, he continued his aggressive assault, destroyed the enemy machine gun positions, and completely routed the enemy force. Second Lieutenant O'Sullivan extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3869 (August 21, 1970)
Born: at Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland

OTIS, GLENN K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Glenn K. Otis (0-68668), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Otis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as commanding officer of a cavalry squadron defending against the communist Lunar New Year offensive at Tan Son Nhut Air Base. Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army forces launched a massive attack on the base and penetrated the defensive wire. Colonel Otis responded to a call for assistance and immediately led his squadron to reinforce the beleaguered friendly elements. Braving devastating rocket, machine gun and mortar fire, he repeatedly ordered low passes over the enemy positions to assess the rapidly changing situation and skillfully coordinate his unit's defenses. His aircraft was forced down on three occasions by the intense enemy fusillade, but he refused to leave the battle area and quickly secured another helicopter each time. The battle grew in intensity, as he fearlessly landed amid a curtain of fire to coordinate with his ground commanders and encourage his men to continue their staunch defenses. His skillful and aggressive leadership inspired his men to repel the attack and force the determined insurgents to withdraw. Informed that an estimated Viet Cong battalion, poised outside the perimeter, was threatening the air base, he quickly directed his unit in a search and clear operation. Repeatedly exposing himself to savage enemy fire, he led his men in a fierce attack that totally destroyed the enemy forces. His fearless leadership in the heat of battle was instrumental in preventing the vital military installation from falling into enemy hands. Lieutenant Colonel Otis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2546 (May 28, 1968)
Home Town: Vicksburg, Michigan

OTIS, MALCOLM D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Malcolm D. Otis (0-98880), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Otis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 at Tan Son Nhut Air Base in Saigon. Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army forces launched a major offensive against the Saigon area with the mission of seizing control of critical allied military installations. One of the largest of the attacks was directed against the west end of Tan Son Nhut Air Base. The enemy succeeded in penetrating the defensive wire there and occupied the west end of the runway. Captain Otis quickly assembled his force and moved to the battle scene. Arriving at the gate of Tan Son Nhut, he immediately deployed his troop to the west into the face of the insurgent forces. Without losing the impetus of his maneuver, Captain Otis then wheeled to the south and attacked directly into the enemy flank. Even though greatly outnumbered by the enemy, the speed and ferocity of the assault forced the insurgents to take cover or flee. Throughout the seven and one-half hour battle for the hotly contested terrain, Captain Otis countered each enemy movement with a flanking force and heavy fire from his guns. Continuously exposing himself to the intense enemy fusillade, he moved from position to position on the battlefield, directing the attack and encouraging his men's fight. When the enemy had been decisively beaten, he directed his forces in a detailed sweep through the area. Captain Otis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3011 (June 23, 1968)

*OVERWEG, ROGER DALE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roger Dale Overweg (374-54-4051), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Sergeant Overweg distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 September 1970 while serving as a member of a combat patrol during search operations in the mountainous area of Binh Dinh Province. While advancing through the rugged terrain in search of an enemy camp, the allies observed an enemy soldier run into an underground cave complex. The allies quickly sent a three-man team into the cave to search for the enemy soldier. Almost immediately they were taken under fire and all three men were seriously wounded. Sergeant Overweg, realizing the gravity of the situation, secured a rope and descended into the cave to assist his comrades. Soon after dragging one of the soldiers to a rescue point, the enemy unleashed a flurry of fire which mortally wounded Sergeant Overweg. Sergeant Overweg's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5248 (December 10, 1970)
Home Town: Zeeland, Michigan

P

*PAGAN-LOZADA, WILFREDO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Wilfredo Pagan-Lozada (RA12639932), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Pagan-Lozada distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1967 while serving as a platoon sergeant with elements of the 5th Cavalry during a combat reconnaissance mission near Phu Loc. As his company maneuvered across open rice paddies, it suddenly received intense hostile fire from a village 100 meters to its front. Seeing his platoon leader wounded and lying exposed to enemy fire, Sergeant Pagan-Lozada dauntlessly left his covered position and dashed forward firing his weapon. When his rifle jammed, he grabbed another and fearlessly continued across the bullet swept sandbar. Unmindful of the grave dangers, Sergeant Pagan-Lozada charged on through a hail of bullets to the fallen soldier. He then fired an entire magazine into the hostile emplacements less than twenty- five meters away, as he shielded his stricken leader with his own body. When Sergeant Pagan-Lozada tried to pull the officer to safety, he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. His unimpeachable valor and selfless sacrifice, while trying to save a fellow soldier, will serve as a source of lasting inspiration to all those who knew him. Sergeant First Class Pagan-Lozada's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3405 (July 6, 1967)
Home Town: New York, New York

PALMER, HAROLD T., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold T. Palmer, Jr. (RA13562217), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-253, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 12 April 1966, Sergeant Palmer was serving as an Advisor to a Civilian Irregular Defense Group on a reconnaissance patrol operating in the Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. As the patrol screened their assigned area, they came under intense hostile automatic weapons fire directed by a well-fortified Viet Cong force wounding the patrol's two point men and halting their progress. After hastily organizing the evacuation of the wounded, Sergeant Palmer led the patrol in an assault which routed the insurgents from their concealed positions. As the friendly forces pursued the Viet Cong, they came upon a well-positioned insurgent force. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Palmer exposed himself to intense automatic fire and single-handedly attacked and destroyed two Viet Cong machine gun positions. Sergeant Palmer radioed for air support when the Viet Cong began to move reinforcing infantry to the flanks of the patrol and courageously adjusted the 20-mm. cannon fire to within five meters of his position. As the insurgents pressed their attack, Sergeant Palmer skillfully regrouped the patrol, organized a withdrawal through the undergrowth and, upon reaching a suitable landing zone, immediately radioed for helicopters which evacuated twenty-five of the original thirty-man patrol. Sergeant Palmer's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 194 (August 19, 1966)

*PAONESSA, MICHAEL DOMINIC
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Dominic Paonessa (US51835814), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D (ARP), 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Paonessa distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 October 1968 while serving as a radio operator on a reconnaissance in force mission west of Cai Lay. His platoon suddenly came under intense fire from a large and well entrenched Viet Cong force, Unmindful of his own safety, Private Paonessa remained exposed to the fusillade, returning fire and using his radio to relay information to the command helicopter. When one of the squad leaders was severely wounded, he called for a rescue aircraft and further exposed himself to the barrage of hostile fire to direct the ship with hand signals. As the helicopter landed, the communists began a rocket and mortar attack. Completely ignoring the rounds bursting all around him, he provided suppressive fire while the casualties were loaded. As the craft lifted off it was hit by an enemy rocket. Seeing that the ship was falling toward the platoon leader, Private Paonessa pushed him to safety, but was himself pinned by the wreckage. He realized that another aircraft would be needed to free him and demanded that the rest of his platoon pull back while he covered the withdrawal. Although he was severely wounded, he kept the Viet Cong away from the helicopter until a rescue party was able to reach him. He was taken to a hospital where he died from his injuries. Private First Class Paonessa's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5831 (December 23, 1968)
Home Town: Akron, Ohio

PARKER, GEORGE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George W. Parker, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Platoon Sergeant Parker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 May 1969 when Fire Support Base Airborne came under intense mortar and rocket grenade attack, followed by an enemy sapper assault on the perimeter. With the first incoming rounds, Sergeant Parker rallied his mortar crews and commenced firing illumination and high- explosive rounds on the hostile fire that rained around his mortar emplacement, Sergeant Parker made his way to the platoon leader to warn of the ground attack on two sides of the compound. Suddenly a rocket-propelled grenade struck one of the mortar emplacements and knocked it out. Running to the position, Sergeant Parker immediately set up the mortar tube and started firing on the enemy. Although a satchel charge thrown at his position momentarily stunned him, he continued his mission, often exposing himself to the enemy barrage to obtain re-supplies of ammunition. On one of his trips to the munitions stockpile, he was attacked by four sappers armed with satchel charges, and he eliminated them with a well-thrown grenade. Through his courageous example, the Fire Support Base successfully repelled the enemy attack. Platoon Sergeant Parker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 477 (February 20, 1970)
Home Town: Florence, Alabama

PARKER, JESSE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jesse J. Parker (US52650803), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Parker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 June 1967 while serving with an airborne infantry platoon on a search and destroy mission near Duc Pho. The lead elements of his platoon were savagely ambushed by a large Viet Cong force firing machine guns and automatic weapons while moving through dense jungle terrain. One of his comrades was killed and two others were seriously wounded ten meters from the enemy lines by the intense barrage, but Specialist Parker completely disregarded his own safety and dashed to carry the casualties to cover. He sprinted through a hail of ravaging fire, to retrieve the machine gunner and carried him to his own lines. Heedless of the intensifying insurgent barrage, he ran back to within ten meters of the enemy positions and picked up the machine gun. After carrying the gun to his perimeter, he returned once more with a comrade to carry another wounded man out of the dangerous area. Deadly enemy fire cut down his assistant, but he refused to take cover and carried the man back to the platoon. Again risking his life, he moved alone through the bullet-swept battleground to remove the final casualty from the firing zone. In the midst of the raging firefight he repeatedly exposed himself to enemy weapons to return time after time and retrieve equipment left by his fallen comrades. His uncommon bravery under fire resulted in his saving the lives of at least two comrades and inspired the men around him to fight furiously against the overwhelming onslaught and defeat the determined Viet Cong attackers. Specialist Four Parker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6120 (November 27, 1967)

*PARKER, OTIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Otis Parker (RA14668481), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Parker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 April 1970 while serving as senior advisor to a Vietnamese Mobile Strike Force during an assault upon enemy fortifications at the top of Nui Khet Mountain, in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Parker's unit gained a foothold on the southern side of the mountain, but they met stiff resistance from a concealed enemy bunker. Braving the intense barrage of enemy rocket and mortar fire which pinned his unit down, Sergeant First Class Parker maneuvered to a position where he was able to locate the enemy bunker. He then charged the bunker while firing his rifle with one hand and carrying a hand grenade in the other. Lurching forward, he threw the grenade into the bunker and destroyed it. As his team moved forward, they encountered another enemy bunker. Despite a painful shrapnel wound, Sergeant First Class Parker advanced directly into the enemy fire and destroyed the bunker with several well-placed grenades. Although dazed by the concussion from his own grenades, Sergeant First Class Parker maneuvered to the top of a rock formation and located an open enemy bunker. Again exposing himself to intense enemy fire, he climbed a boulder adjacent to the enemy bunker and with a rifle volley, killed the bunker's occupant. Later, as his element was attempting to establish contact with a friendly unit, they were fired upon from another bunker. As the enemy fire raked his position, Sergeant First Class Parker fired several rockets into the bunker and completely destroyed it. Although wounded twice, Sergeant First Class Parker personally accounted for six slain enemy soldiers and the destruction of four enemy bunkers. Sergeant First Class Parker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3617 (August 7, 1970)
Home Town: Green Cove Springs, Florida

PARRISH, ANDREW W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andrew W. Parrish (52620511), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Parrish distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 December 1966 while serving as machine gunner during a Viet Cong attack on his squad near Hoi Loi. The friendly unit had assumed a perimeter formation in a ditch when insurgents came into view moving towards them. As the enemy approached to within 100 meters, the squad opened fire. Hostile fire soon began to penetrate the friendly positions from three sides and Specialist Parrish realized that decisive action had to be taken. He left his covered position and single-handedly counterattacked the insurgents. He was wounded in the back, but continued to advance, firing his machine gun steadily. Specialist Parrish was wounded a second time and then a grenade exploded at his feet, damaging his machine gun and wounding him in the legs. Undaunted, he ran back to his squad's position, picked up a wounded man's rifle, and again assaulted the enemy. His fierce attacks had an effect and the insurgents began to withdraw. Specialist Parrish then ran out of ammunition and returned to his unit's perimeter. He ignored his own multiple wounds and administered first aid to his wounded comrades. Almost alone, his fearless attacks on the numerically superior enemy force were responsible for disrupting the hostile attack and saving his unit from being overrun. Specialist Four Parrish's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4323 (August 25, 1967)

PARRISH, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard Parrish, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 1st Battalion, 92d Artillery, United States Army Military Forces, MR2. Specialist Four Parrish distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period from 16 to 18 March 1971 while serving as an artillery forward observer with 3d Troop, 3d ARVN Cavalry Squadron, while the Vietnamese force was attempting to break through NVA forces surrounding besieged Fire Support Base T. C. Miller in Pleiku Province. Throughout the action, Specialist Parrish remained with the lead elements of the ARVN unit, calling in artillery fire support from US howitzers located at Landing Zone T. C. Miller and Landing Zone Lonely. The ARVN forces made four assaults on a banana grove occupied by hostile forces. In spite of heavy enemy fire at close range, Specialist Parrish disregarded his own safety in order to call in repeated artillery and air strikes, along with gunship support and medevac helicopters. His actions, in placing supporting fire, enabled the ARVNs to maintain the initiative in the battle. During the fourth assault, the ARVN force became caught in a withering volume of fire from 75 mm recoilless rifles, B-40 rockets, mortars and automatic weapons. Even when five of the 11 armored personnel carriers were knocked out by hostile fire, Specialist Parrish remained with the command vehicle in order to direct highly effective fire against the enemy positions. As casualties mounted, he requested medevac helicopter assistance, alternately calling in artillery support, napalm and high-explosive bombs within 200 meters of his position. He left his position several times to help load the wounded personnel aboard medevac helicopters and at one point exposed himself to intense enemy fire to carry a wounded ARVN lieutenant to a medevac aircraft. Even after sustaining leg and chest wounds, he continued to direct air and artillery support until he was evacuated. Specialist Four Parrish's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2847 (October 5, 1971)

PATTERSON, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Patterson (0-6725), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 116th Assault Helicopter Company, 11th Combat Aviation Battalion. Major Patterson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 October 1966 as aircraft commander of a helicopter during a troop evacuation from a heavily embattled area. While carrying the last load of troops from the landing zone, Major Patterson saw a gunship crash nearby. As he maneuvered his helicopter to attempt a rescue, his own helicopter received hits and crash landed. When a man was wounded in the neck while exiting, he ignored the intense hostile fire, dragged him behind a rice paddy dike, and then immediately directed the formation of a defensive perimeter. Seeing the security deteriorate, he ran to the helicopter to obtain a machine gun. He then deliberately exposed himself to intense fire, positioned his weapon, and personally attempted to repel the insurgents. While being attacked, he moved through open positions to ensure the welfare of his men and bolster their confidence. When a rescue helicopter crashed 75 meters from his position, Major Patterson crawled and swam through the rice paddies and quickly set up their defense perimeter. Again braving the fire raking the paddies, he returned to his own crew and lead them to the perimeter of the recently downed aircraft. This consolidation of forces was a critical factor in their being saved. He realized the necessity of moving the wounded to better security, and again entered the riddled helicopter to remove a small cargo door, on which he dragged a disabled man to the rice paddy dike. When a medical evacuation aircraft arrived, he dragged the wounded across the rice paddy dikes and loaded the wounded aboard the helicopter. After a fourth helicopter crashed, he extended his perimeter to protect its men. In the morning he lead a small patrol to the originally downed ship, strengthened their perimeter with his patrol, treated three wounded men, and directed their medical evacuation. His courageous actions saved for aircraft, their crews and infantrymen. Major Patterson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 63 (January 5, 1967)

PATTON, GEORGE SMITH
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Smith Patton (0-28685), Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Colonel Patton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 September 1968 during a battle with a North Vietnamese Army force near Chanh Luu. From his command and control helicopter Colonel Patton saw a force of fifty-eight hostile soldiers attempting to escape his troops' encirclement. He immediately directed his door gunners to engage the communists and ordered his pilot to land in the vicinity of the enemy element. As the aircraft touched down it was damaged by an intense barrage of hostile fire from a deep, well concealed ravine. Aided by helicopter gunships, Colonel Patton led an assault against the North Vietnamese positions which forced the enemy to withdraw. A three-man rocket propelled grenade team remained behind to cover their retreat. When a platoon of infantry arrived to assist him, Colonel Patton led a squad into the ravine and directed an assault on the hostile position. During the fierce engagement Colonel Patton captured one of the aggressors, and the other two were killed as they tried to flee the ravine. Colonel Patton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5468 (November 27, 1968)
Home Town: Fort Myer, Virginia
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

PATTON, GEORGE SMITH
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to George Smith Patton (0-28685), Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Colonel Patton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 September 1968 while directing a sweep around the village of Chanh Luu conducted jointly by the 36th Army of the Republic of Vietnam Rangers and Troop B of his 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Intense automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire from a house destroyed an assault vehicle and wounded several men, including the Rangers' commanding officer. Seeing that the Ranger unit was beginning to lose momentum, Colonel Patton had his command and control helicopter land in the middle of the embattled area and left the ship to rally the Vietnamese soldiers. Exposing himself to the hostile fire raking the area, he maneuvered them back to a supporting position near the enemy stronghold and directed his troops to more defensible terrain, while personally engaging the communists with his grenade launcher. He then led a charge which destroyed the house and revealed a heavily fortified bunker that had been concealed by the building. Ordering his men to lay down a base of fire, Colonel Patton crawled through the open terrain until he was at the fortification's entrance and hurled a grenade inside. When the enemy in the extensive and well protected bunker continued to resist, he assaulted a second time with two other men and placed TNT in the emplacement, annihilating the position. Colonel Patton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 839 (March 9, 1969)
Home Town: Fort Myer, Virginia
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

PAYNE, PATRICK J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick J. Payne (RA19821190), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 7 February 1966, specialist Payne, a member of Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, was accompanying his unit on a search and destroy mission near My Canh, Republic of Vietnam. Following a trench line, his platoon was suddenly subjected to an intense hail of small arms and machine gun fire from insurgents concealed in well-fortified positions. The platoon was pinned down in an exposed position and men were being killed and wounded by the grazing fire inflicted by the insurgents. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Payne assaulted the Viet Cong machine gun and completely neutralized the deadly weapon by throwing a grenade through the front opening of the bunker. He then killed two insurgents attempting to protect the bunker by firing his rifle while rolling away from the exploding bunker. His initial assault and successful destruction of the machine gun bunker enabled his platoon to advance and completely rout the Viet Cong. Specialist Four Payne's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 145 (June 24, 1966)

PEACOCK, MICKEY K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mickey K. Peacock (US53442136), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 6th Battalion, 32d Artillery, I Field Force. Specialist Four Peacock distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 January 1968 while serving with his artillery battery during an attack on its position near Tuy Hoa. A North Vietnamese Army battalion launched a massive rocket, mortar and ground attack against his unit's perimeter during the pre-dawn hours and succeeded in breaching a sector of the defense. Realizing two of his comrades were trapped inside a bunker which was surrounded by the enemy, Specialist Peacock launched a personal assault on the insurgents and reached the position through a curtain of fire. Wounded by the intense fusillade, he ignored his own welfare and carried one of the wounded soldiers to safety. He refused aid for his own wound and assaulted against the enemy on and around the besieged bunker a second time. The hostile force concentrated its fire on him as he charged, but he refused to take cover and killed several of the attackers with deadly rifle firs. His heroic efforts were stopped when he was severely wounded by an exploding enemy rocket, but his furious fighting forced the North Vietnamese to withdraw from around the bunker. Inspired by his actions, his fellow soldiers mounted a savage counterattack which inflicted heavy casualties on the insurgents and forced them to break contact. Specialist Four Peacock's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1424 (March 30, 1968)

PEARSON, SAMUEL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel L. Pearson, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 3d Battalion, 82d Artillery, Americal Division. Specialist Four Pearson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 September 1969 while serving as an artillery fire direction computer at a fire base in northern I Corps Tactical Zone. In the early morning hours of 11 September 1969, Specialist Pearson's battery was assaulted by a large and well armed enemy force advancing under cover of intense rocket and mortar fire. As the first enemy rounds began impacting within the battery compound, Specialist Pearson left his bunker and took up a position with an M-60 machine gun before the fire direction center. Although inflicted with multiple fragmentation wounds moments later when a satchel charge was flung at his position by an enemy sapper, Specialist Pearson remained at his position and continued to ward off infiltrators from the vital fire direction center, and flame throwers moving toward the fire direction center, Specialist Pearson, his vision obscured by head wounds, leaped up, charged the intruders, and killed all five with bursts of machine gun fire. Specialist Pearson then returned to his defensive position, and refusing medical attention, he fought off enemy sappers and relayed observations of enemy movement to the fire direction center for more than four hours amid barrages of rocket and mortar fire. Only at first light, when he was sure that the enemy had been repulsed and that his position was secure, did Specialist Pearson permit himself to be evacuated and given medical care. Specialist Four Pearson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1034 (May 4, 1970)

PEASE, THOMAS S.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas S. Pease, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 75th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Pease distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 March 1969. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1630 (1969)
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PECK, MILLARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Millard A. Peck (OF-13260), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Captain Peck distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 and 20 May 1968 while commanding an infantry company in Dinh Tuong Province, Vietnam. As his unit began an air-mobile assault against a Viet Cong force, it came under intense fire in the landing zone. Captain Peck immediately led a ground attack against the enemy, overrunning their positions and single-handedly capturing a communist soldier who attempted to escape. During a sweep of the battle area his men were fired upon by two well concealed snipers. Captain Peck crawled forward of his company and killed both aggressors. Interrogating his prisoner he learned a battalion was planning to attack the town of Vinh Kim. Reinserted by air to protect the threatened village, he established his company in night defensive positions. As the enemy came within range, several Viet Cong made suicidal charges against the company. Captain Peck directed his men to hold their fire and use only hand grenade and claymore mines so that their position would remain undetected. Aided by his skillful direction of artillery, his troops were able to repulse the numerically superior force. He then led a night patrol in pursuit of the fleeing enemy and again called in artillery fire forcing the communists to break into small groups and disperse. Early the next morning, Captain Peck led an assault against an enemy bunker complex and totally defeated the Viet Cong. Captain Peck's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5485 (November 29, 1968)

*PEDA, ROBERT CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Charles Peda (0-5330079), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Peda distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 April 1968 as wingman of an aero-scout fire team that was engaged in reconnaissance of an area near Long Vinh known to contain many enemy positions. Lieutenant Peda located several of the insurgent emplacements and unhesitantly attacked them while being subjected to intense hostile fire. During the battle, Lieutenant Peda's helicopter was hit by automatic weapons fire, causing it to burst into flames and crash. He was thrown out of the aircraft as it hit the ground. Though badly wounded, he crawled back to the blazing wreckage to rescue his observer who was trapped inside it. Prior to reaching the aircraft, it exploded and threw Lieutenant Peda through the air, mortally wounding him. His courageous actions and determined efforts to save a fellow soldier's life were an inspiration to other aviators and troops in the area. First Lieutenant Peda's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3116 (June 29, 1968)
Home Town: Kingston, New York

*PEDERSON, ROGER ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roger Allen Pederson (398-54-5854), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). Specialist Four Pederson distinguished himself as a medical aidman in support of a besieged American unit. While en route to the contact area, his convoy was ambushed by an enemy force firing rocket propelled grenades and automatic weapons. Specialist Pederson leaped from his vehicle amid intense enemy fire and raced forward to treat the wounded. With enemy rounds spraying around him, Specialist Pederson treated two wounded soldiers and dragged both to safety. Although wounded in this action, he again attempted to reach another casualty. Ignoring his own wounds, Specialist Pederson began treating the casualty's wounds when a hail of enemy bullets struck his location. Specialist Pederson shielded the soldier with his own body, sustaining additional wounds. Shortly thereafter, he succumbed to his own wounds. Specialist Four Pederson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2060 (June 14, 1971)
Home Town: Elk Mound, Wisconsin

PEOPLES, LEON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leon Peoples, Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Peoples distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 April 1968 while leading a fire team on a search and destroy mission in Phu Bai Province. After long hours of exhausting and indecisive battle, Sergeant Peoples' platoon had made little progress in precisely locating the enemy's bunker fortifications in the thick, mountainous jungle. Discontented with his unit's stalemated advance, Sergeant Peoples crawled alone toward the North Vietnamese to reconnoiter their positions. When in sight of the first bunker, he was spotted and turned back by heavy fire. He then gathered his fire team and initiated a flanking maneuver on the enemy bunker. As the team advanced, the enemy opened up on them with streams of automatic weapons fire which held them fast to the ground and wounded many. Sergeant Peoples then drew the attention of the communist firepower by rushing them and dropping behind available cover as he assaulted. With grenades prepared for immediate detonation he made a final spring and dived for cover as the ejected grenades ripped through the hostile stronghold. Detecting a second bunker from which the enemy were placing suppressive fire on his team, Sergeant Peoples stole near the emplacement and unleashed on it several well-placed grenades. After dropping back for re-supplies of ammunition, he again infiltrated the enemy complex under thick fire and crawled without rifle up to a third bunker and eliminated its occupants with grenades. Picking up an enemy weapon, he then began routing the demoralized communists as they frantically retreated. Sergeant Peoples' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping and highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3419 (September 7, 1969)
Home Town: Alexandria, Virginia

*PEREZ, DANIEL FLORES, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Daniel Flores Perez, Jr. (US54369072), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Perez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1967 while serving as machine gunner of an infantry platoon on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. The platoon engaged and killed two hostile soldiers but when one man moved forward to search the area, he was seriously wounded by intense enemy fire. Without regard for his own safety, Specialist Perez rushed forward and directed a heavy volume of accurate fire into the enemy positions. Remaining exposed, he fought off repeated attempts by the enemy to reach his comrade. An enemy' grenade wounded. him seriously but he continued to repel numerous hostile assaults. During a lull in the battle, Specialist Perez dashed to retrieve his fallen friend. He then continued to fight courageously until the enemy broke contact. He gave his life while gallantly fighting to protect his comrades in the face of grave danger. Specialist Four Perez' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4666 (September 14, 1967)
Home Town: Mathis, Texas

PEREZ, JOSEPH M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph M. Perez (US50011800), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Perez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 May 1967 as a fire team leader of an infantry company conducting a search and destroy mission near the Cambodian border. As the unit reached the crest of a hill, it came under heavy sniper fire from tree lines to the front and left flank. The commanding officer was mortally wounded by the initial volley. Specialist Perez directed the troops to seek cover while he remained exposed to the enemy and laid down suppressive fire. Several men took cover behind a log to escape the hostile barrage. As Specialist Perez joined them, the enemy began to employ mortars and rockets in addition to small arms fire. He and the small group behind the log were temporarily immobilized and forced to remain in that position, returning fire as effectively as possible. Suddenly, an enemy grenade landed in front of Specialist Perez. Without hesitation, he seized the grenade and absorbed its explosion with his own body to shield his comrades from the blast. He lay unconscious in the open area for approximately twenty minutes as continuing insurgent fire prevented anyone from going to his aid. Upon regaining consciousness, he crawled twenty meters to a point where he could be reached and treated by medics. His heroic act enabled his fire team to remain an effective fighting force and saved several of its members from being severely wounded or killed. Specialist Four Perez' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3691 (August 1, 1968)

PERRY, MICHAEL P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael P. Perry (RA14926438), Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Perry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 September 1967 while serving as squad leader of an airborne infantry company on a search and destroy mission near Chu Lai. The forward platoons of the company received a heavy volume of enemy automatic weapons fire that pinned them down and inflicted several casualties. Sergeant Perry's platoon was contacted and requested to move forward and flank the Viet Cong. While advancing toward its sister elements, his unit was suddenly subjected to intense hostile fire from fortified and well concealed bunkers. While the rest of the troops provided supporting fire, Sergeant Perry and his platoon sergeant charged through a hail of bullets, firing their rifles and throwing hand grenades into the Viet Cong position. Several enemy grenades landed near Sergeant Perry, and he unhesitantly grabbed them and hurled them back at the insurgents. Although wounded by fragments from an exploding grenade, he refused to withdraw for medical treatment and continued his fierce assault until he had destroyed four enemy bunkers. He then quickly helped reorganize the platoon's troops and led them to relieve their beleaguered comrades. When savage automatic weapons fire again erupted on the platoon, Sergeant Perry and his platoon sergeant braved murderous fire to assault a Viet Cong position, successfully destroying it with hand grenades. Having expended his grenades, Sergeant Perry armed himself with enemy grenades and continued the attack through a curtain of fire. Sergeant Perry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 836 (February 23, 1968)

PHIFER, WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Phifer (US52757329), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Phifer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1968 during an attack against North Vietnamese regulars who were blocking his unit's entry into the city of Hue. His element came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from the well entrenched enemy. When supporting aerial rocket artillery and gunships failed to silence the communist positions, Specialist Phifer began a one-man assault on the nearest bunker. Arming himself with several hand grenades, he crawled seventy-five meters through intense hostile fire to the base of the fortification. Exposing himself to the adjacent North Vietnamese positions, he twice crawled on top of the bunker to drop grenades inside, but the emplacement was not silenced. Specialist Phifer then climbed on the bunker a third time, and remained on top of it to shoot his pistol into the entrance after tossing another grenade inside. At the same time the occupants attempted to throw a grenade at him, but they were unable to release their grenade or dispose of his because of his pistol fire. Both grenades exploded within the bunker, killing the four North Vietnamese soldiers inside and wounding Specialist Phifer in the arm. Specialist Four Phifer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5166 (November 6, 1968)

*PHILLIPS, HENRY RICHARDSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Richardson Phillips (0-5020183), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion (Mechanized), 23d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Phillips distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1968 when his company and a convoy that it was supporting were ambushed by two North Vietnamese Army battalions between Tay Ninh and Go Dau Ha. Captain Phillips flew to the scene of battle and jumped to the ground from his hovering helicopter amid intense enemy fire. Finding that his first platoon was in danger of being overrun, he quickly gathered a force to assist the threatened element and halted the advance of the communists. As he was leading a counterattack to secure a landing zone for an ambulance helicopter, he and his men came under heavy rocket-propelled grenade and automatic weapons fire from the flank. Grabbing four light antitank weapons, he moved through the hostile fusillade to a point from which he was able to destroy a rocket-propelled grenade team and an automatic weapons position. Once the casualties were safely evacuated, Captain Phillips led a small group of volunteers into the killing zone of the ambush to extract several remaining dead and wounded personnel. He then organized a withdrawal as darkness set in and, although wounded by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade, succeeded in leading his men to an allied compound. Captain Phillips' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1143 (April 3, 1969)
Home Town: Foster, Rhode Island

*PICKARD, ALFRED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred Pickard (450-84-0231), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Pickard distinguished himself while serving as a machine gunner with a reconnaissance patrol during operations in Phuoc Long Province. The squad-size patrol walked into an enemy bunker complex and was caught in a crossfire of rocket and machine gun fire. Five members of the patrol fell wounded in the initial barrage of enemy fire. Although twice wounded in the first hostile fusillade, Private Pickard unhesitatingly took command of the trapped patrol. He secured an M-60 machine gun and placed suppressive fire on the enemy fortifications while the rest of the patrol began pulling back to positions of cover. While thus covering the withdrawal of his comrades, Private Pickard was again hit by a burst of enemy fire and his machine gun rendered inoperative. Despite the heavy volume of fire now focused on him, Private Pickard held his position and continued covering the withdrawal of his comrades with M-16 rifle fire. It was then that he was again hit and mortally wounded by enemy fire. Private First Class Pickard's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1044 (May 4, 1970)
Home Town: Houston, Texas

*PIERCE, BERNARD LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bernard Lawrence Pierce (046-34-3275), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop I, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. First Lieutenant Pierce distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 June 1969 while serving as leader of an armored platoon near An Loc. Late in the afternoon his troop and an element of infantry came under intense hostile rocket grenade and automatic weapons fire. Seeing that the squad of foot soldiers was pinned down in an exposed position, Lieutenant Pierce directed his vehicle and another track to go to their aid. As the two tracks moved in, Lieutenant Pierce's track was struck by an antitank rocket, the blast of which rendered him blind. Despite the pain of his serious wounds, he ordered the assault continued as he valiantly manned his machine gun, unleashing a fusillade of suppressive fire. Just after the other track succeeded in rescuing the wounded infantrymen, a rocket-propelled grenade again struck his vehicle and claimed Lieutenant Pierce's life. First Lieutenant Pierce's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4281 (December 1, 1969)
Home Town: Windsorville, Connecticut

*PINA, FRANK DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank David Pina (0-5320367), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Captain Pina distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1968 while serving as commanding officer of an infantry company on a heliborne reconnaissance-in-force mission near Cai Be. The first airlift received heavy automatic weapons, rocket and mortar fire immediately upon landing. Captain Pina quickly organized the two platoons aboard and personally led an assault on the woodline bordering the landing zone, ejecting the Viet Cong from a narrow bunker line. He then radioed for the remainder of his company to make an air assault on the flank of the fortified positions he faced. With all his troops on the ground, he braved withering enemy fire time after time to link the two elements together. It soon became evident that his company was positioned in the midst of a Viet Cong main force battalion and greatly outnumbered. At that time, Captain Pena took over the direction of supporting fires as the forward observer had been killed. He adjusted artillery fire while extracting the wounded from the open landing zone which was still under intense fire. He then directed air strikes on the principle sources of enemy fire. Reinforcements were unable to penetrate the strong enemy defenses, and Captain Pena unhesitatingly elected to stay with the wounded rather than attempt a withdrawal of his able-bodied men. He continued to direct artillery fire and air strikes with such accuracy that the enemy was unable to mount an attack on his perimeter and withdrew during the night. Captain Pina's personal bravery and outstanding professional leadership not only prevented his unit's annihilation, but was also responsible for substantially weakening Viet Cong strength and effectiveness in the Cai Be area. Captain Pina's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1748 (April 16, 1968)
Home Town: Montclair, California

PIPER, JOHN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John D. Piper (0-5418909), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 19th Field Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Piper distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1966 while serving as executive officer of an artillery battery during a massive Viet Cong attack in Binh Dinh Province. The two insurgent battalions began their attack with a mortar, recoilless rifle, and machine gun barrage which swept the artillery battery. Although barefoot, Lieutenant Piper seized a grenade launcher and raced to a howitzer position, suffering a serious knee wound as he ran. Exposing himself against a backdrop of burning ammunition to attract hostile fire away from the howitzers, he fearlessly engaged the waves of assaulting Viet Cong. When he learned that two guns on the far side of the battery had been overrun, he began crawling up to a vantage point to check the positions, ran into two insurgents, and killed them with his weapon. When the crew of his howitzer was forced to withdraw to another position to regroup, Lieutenant Piper personally covered their movement with intense fire. When he saw that the men at the rear position were unable to fire their artillery because of intense fire by hostile groups a short distance in front of the gun, Lieutenant Piper requested permission to fire anti-personnel rounds, warned the defenders in the camp to take secure cover, then personally fired two rounds which struck terror into the Viet Cong and routed them from their attacking positions. Moments later, while checking wounded in the battery, he came upon an insurgent with explosives at a howitzer and killed him with his pistol. First Lieutenant Piper's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2377 (May 25, 1967)

PITTMAN, HOMER L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Homer L. Pittman, Jr. (RA21722323), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop K, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Pittman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1967 while serving as vehicle commander and acting platoon sergeant of a re-supply convoy on Route 1 near Soui Cat. As the convoy moved along the road, a hostile battalion attacked with anti-tank and automatic weapons and mortars. Sergeant Pittman's vehicle was hit and set afire by a recoilless rifle round, but he managed to maneuver out of the withering concentration of enemy fire to evacuate his men safely. Jumping from the vehicle, he immediately began grenading enemy soldiers to provide cover for his men. Seeing another vehicle nearby, Sergeant Pittman took command of it and fought through intense fire to evacuate the friendly wounded. This vehicle was also disabled and set afire by an enemy rocket, but he braved the intense heat without regard for his personal safety to remove all the ammunition. Once on the ground he exposed himself to the enemy fire time after time to carry the ammunition to the perimeter he had set up. For twenty minutes Sergeant Pittman directed the fire of his men to repel the assaults by the numerically superior and determined insurgents. His courage in the face of grave danger was responsible for saving the lives of many of his men. Staff Sergeant Pittman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4489 (September 2, 1967)

*PLATO, ROBERT DEAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Dean Plato (RA54140742), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), FOB 1 (Phu Bai), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Plato distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 May 1968, as the leader of a Vietnamese platoon on a reconnaissance-in-force patrol. His unit had become surrounded by a numerically superior enemy force which began closing on one squad that was isolated from the rest of the platoon. Exposing himself to enemy fire, Sergeant Plato joined the squad, rallied its members and directed their counterfire against the insurgents. As the fight grew more intense, the enemy received reinforcements, and Sergeant Plato realized that his men would not be able to hold their ground much longer. Ordering the squad to join the main force's perimeter, he remained behind and placed devastating fire on the insurgents to cover the withdrawal. As he began his own maneuver toward the perimeter, he discovered that not everyone had returned. Disregarding his own safety, he ran back to his former position, saw three missing men, and made his way to them. Only one was still alive. Sergeant Plato held off the assaulting enemy long enough for the man to reach the safety of the perimeter. Realizing it was too late to return there himself, he chose to hold his ground as long as possible. He fought the enemy with deadly fury until his position was overrun and he was killed. His gallant stand diverted the insurgents' attention from the main perimeter and totally disrupted their assault. Master Sergeant Plato's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3333 (July 15, 1968)
Home Town: El Reno, Oklahoma

*POLUSNEY, JAMES FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Francis Polusney (171-36-0223), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Five Polusney distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman with an infantry unit of the 1st Cavalry Division during a reconnaissance operation in Tay Ninh Province. His company was moving over flat terrain densely wooded with bamboo when the forward platoon was engaged by an estimated platoon of North Vietnamese regulars firing from trees and heavily fortified bunkers. In the initial concentration of command detonated mines and automatic weapons fire, the lead platoon of the reconnaissance force sustained numerous casualties. Although seriously wounded himself, Specialist Polusney dragged himself forward to where several comrades lay critically wounded and moved from man to man administering first aid under constant and heavy enemy fire. After saving the life of one soldier by stopping the bleeding of his sever abdominal wound and bandaging it, Specialist Polusney began crawling to another soldier who lay wounded in a small clearing. Before he reached the man, however, Specialist Polusney was hit by sniper fire from the front and left flank. Specialist Polusney nevertheless struggled on and reached his wounded comrade. While administering aid to the wounded soldier, Specialist Polusney succumbed to his own wounds. Specialist Five Polusney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 769 (March 28, 1970)
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

PONDER, BILLY W., SR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy W. Ponder, Sr. (RA27517303), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Staff Sergeant Ponder distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 August 1968 while on an ambush mission in Binh Dinh Province. He was standing guard by four sleeping fellow soldiers near two buildings suspected of being used by the Viet Cong. Shortly after midnight he saw an enemy soldier rise from a rice paddy dike twenty-five meters to his front and immediately fired at the aggressor. Suddenly a grenade landed amid his four awakening comrades. With complete disregard for his own life, Sergeant Ponder yelled a warning to the men and jumped on the deadly missile to shield them from the blast. Some seconds later, when the grenade failed to detonate, he took it from under his stomach and threw it toward the enemy's position, where it finally exploded. Staff Sergeant Ponder's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5424 (November 25, 1968)

*PONGRATZ, RONALD EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ronald Eugene Pongratz (464-66-5198), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Specialist Four Pongratz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 and 18 April 1969 while serving as a vehicle commander during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. As his armored vehicle team was moving through the jungles north of Dau Tieng in Tay Ninh Province on 13 April, an enemy force initiated a mortar and automatic weapons assault from a series of concealed fortifications. Specialist Pongratz quickly directed his vehicle to lay a base of suppressive fire while the team began an on-line assault and overran the bunker complex. Specialist Pongratz was leading a dismounted sweep when suddenly a hostile soldier threw a grenade into the midst of the team. He grabbed the device and threw it away. Although the explosion inflicted shrapnel wounds to his arm he fired on and killed the enemy. Declining evacuation, Specialist Pongratz stayed with the mission, and on the morning of 18 April, another hostile bunker system was encountered and overrun. As Specialist Pongratz was conducting the right flank of a dismounted sweep, an enemy emplacement opened fire pinning down several men. Rushing the position, he tossed a grenade which silenced it. Then, as another bunker attacked the team, Specialist Pongratz charged the fortification. Despite being struck by rifle fire, he continued to crawl toward the bunker into which he delivered another grenade, ending the hostile resistance. Specialist Four Pongratz' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4052 (November 3, 1969)
Home Town: Houston, Texas

*POOLE, THOMAS DEWITT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Dewitt Poole (US67109268), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Poole distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 February 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy operation in Quan Huong Tra Province. His company was moving toward a treeline on the far side of a rice paddy when it was subjected to heavy mortar, recoilless rifle and small arms fire from a North Vietnamese Army force occupying entrenched and fortified positions in the woods. Private Poole's platoon was temporarily pinned down behind some mounds of earth, but soon began an assault on the enemy. Braving a hail of bullets and shrapnel. Private Poole charged across one hundred meters of open rice paddy and engaged the North Vietnamese at close range. Moving directly into the treeline, he personally assaulted an enemy bunker in his path, killing its three occupants with rifle fire. The savage fusillade delivered by other hostile bunker increased in intensity, and his platoon was ordered to withdraw and regroup. As Private Poole drew back across the rice paddy, he noticed a wounded platoon member lying exposed to the enemy weapons. Completely disregarding his safety, he moved to assist the fallen soldier. He was mortally wounded while attempting to rescue his comrade. Private First Class Poole's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1569 (April 8, 1968)
Home Town: West Blocton, Alabama

PORTER, ALFRED L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alfred L. Porter, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Porter distinguished himself while serving as a tank commander when his troop encountered a large Viet Cong and North Vietnamese force near Quan Loi. A sister platoon had earlier established a blocking force across enemy travel routes, and when the enemy opened fire with rocket-propelled grenade fire, Specialist Porter quickly directed his tank toward the position of the beleaguered platoon. Unleashing main-gun salvos,, he silenced several hostile emplacements. As he advanced toward further enemy positions, his tank turret received a direct hit from a rocket grenade which wounded Specialist Porter and knocked his driver unconscious. The tank careened into a rubber tree and burst into flames. When Specialist Porter and the crew abandoned the vehicle and headed back to the troop's position, the enemy concentrated their fire on them. Although injured again before he reached the troop, he checked on his crew members. Discovering that one man had fallen to enemy fire, he charged back into the strafing fusillade to drag his comrade to safety. Specialist Four Porter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4496 (December 22, 1969)

POUTRAIN, JEAN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jean D. Poutrain (RA12737992), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Poutrain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1967 while serving as a member of an infantry company during a search and destroy mission near Phu Loc. As his company approached to within 100 meters of a village, it was hit and pinned down by intense machine gun fire. Private Poutrain was assigned to a squad that assaulted the Viet Cong weapon emplacements through a rice paddy. When he saw a fellow squad member fall in an area exposed to the insurgent gunners, Private Poutrain unhesitatingly ran through the hostile barrage to bring his comrade back to a covered position. He treated the wounded man, then ran to another squad to administer first aid to other casualties. When the order was given to withdraw so that an air strike could be made on the village, Private Poutrain carried his wounded platoon leader across the rice paddy, protecting him with his own body. Reaching cover with his leader, he once again ignored his own safety to retrieve another casualty from a position exposed to the Viet Cong gunners. He was hit in the face by shrapnel while treating the casualties, but refused to be evacuated and remained with his platoon until the next day. Private First Class Poutrain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2709 (June 7, 1967)

POWELL, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas E. Powell, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for exceptional heroism in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Powell distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 November 1970. Disregarding the high degree of personal risk involved, Sergeant Powell volunteered to participate in a heliborne assault on the Son Tay prison in North Vietnam in an heroic attempt to rescue United States military personnel being held there as prisoners of war. On insertion into the target area, Sergeant Powell completely disregarded his personal safety and exposed himself to automatic weapons fire in order to provide effective supporting machine gun fire for his element. When his fire was masked by friendly troops, he again unhesitatingly braved automatic weapons fire to locate a position from which he could bring withering fire upon the enemy. Sergeant Powell's professionalism, personal courage, and devotion to his fellow team members contributed significantly to the success of the mission. Sergeant Powell's premeditated personal risk, extraordinary heroism in combat, and extreme devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (August 9, 1971)

*POWERS, FRANCIS EDWARD, JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Francis Edward Powers, Jr. (023-26-1612), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, 23d Infantry (Americal) Division. Captain Powers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 October 1970 while serving as Company Commander during a combat assault operation near the village of An Kinh, Quang Ngai Province. Upon helicopter insertion into the landing zone, Captain Powers' company was engaged by North Vietnamese Regulars, firing from well-concealed bunkers. Immediately Captain Powers raced across a fire-swept rice paddy in order to direct his company movements. After calling for air and artillery support, the captain led a five-man team on a rescue mission to retrieve friendly casualties located just meters from enemy bunkers. Amid a fusillade of enemy bullets, Captain Powers extracted numerous wounded ground troops to a safer position. During this rescue operation, Captain Powers was mortally wounded by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade. Captain Powers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1428 (April 28, 1971)
Home Town: Charlestown, Massachusetts

*PRICE, ARNOLD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arnold W. Price (RA11858839), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Private First Class Price distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 February 1968 as a rifleman during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Thu Duc. As his company's lead platoon entered an overgrown stand of small trees, it began receiving sniper fire. Suddenly the entire unit was subjected to intense small arms, automatic weapons, rocket and machine gun fire from two Viet Cong battalions. The lead platoon was isolated from the company by the concentrated enemy fire. Private Price was returning fire when he heard the lead element was being assaulted and had sustained heavy casualties. He ran through the murderous enemy fire into the grove to assist his comrades. Although wounded by the fusillade, Private Price refused medical aid and braved the relentless enemy fire to evacuate three casualties. As he carried a fourth man from the battlefield, he was killed by the ravaging enemy fire. Private First Class Price's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3579 (July 26, 1968)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

PRIMMER, FRANK G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank G. Primmer (0-5325625), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Primmer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 November 1966 while serving as a platoon leader on a combat reconnaissance patrol. When the company to his left made contact with an entrenched Viet Cong force, Lieutenant Primmer immediately led his platoon forward to provide flanking fire. As the unit advanced, it was pinned down by intense automatic weapons and sniper fire. With complete disregard for his safety, Lieutenant Primmer repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire to encourage his men and organize the defense. Although wounded, he refused evacuation and remained with his beleaguered platoon. While under attack from three sides, he dauntlessly directed air strikes and artillery fire against the hostile positions. Rather than withdraw and leave the casualties behind, Lieutenant Primmer continually inspired his men to hold their position and fight off numerous insurgent attacks during the four hour battle. When a relief force finally arrived, he was again wounded as he directed the evacuation of dead and wounded comrades. Through his courage and leadership heavy casualties were inflicted on the numerically superior Viet Cong force. Lieutenant Primmer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Untied States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 7026 (December 25, 1966)

PRITCHARD, PAUL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul M. Pritchard, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Senior Advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On 23 April 1972, the 91st Company and the Command Group of the 9th Airborne Battalion were located in the vicinity of the 22nd Army of Vietnam Division. Throughout the pre-dawn hours the area had been under constant bombardment from enemy artillery, mortar and rocket fire. While under the rocket attack the TOC of the 22nd Army of Vietnam Division took a direct hit. While the shells continued to rain onto the position, Major Pritchard immediately went into the burning structure to assist in the removal of the friendly casualties. Shortly after returning to his position, he spotted three enemy tanks wheeling onto the airstrip and heading directly for the now smoldering ruins of the 22nd Army Vietnam Division Headquarters. Major Pritchard immediately left the safety of his position and directed a 105 recoilless into position, scoring a direct hit and knocking out the lead tank. Two 9th Battalion paratroopers had secured a XM-202 and successfully knocked out the second tank, causing the third tank to immediately withdraw to a more suitable firing position. At this time, and from exposed positions, Major Pritchard alternately directed air strikes into the enemy forces. In the late hours of 23 April 1972, as a result of constant shelling and continued enemy pressure, an evaluation of the situation resulted in the command issuing orders for the battalion to relocate. As the first helicopters to make the extraction took off it was immediately taken under fire by intensive and accurate AK-47 and 51 caliber fires, crashed, and exploded into flames. The aircraft Major Pritchard was on also crashed upon take off, and resulted in him being wounded in the arms, legs and face. Major Pritchard's courageous and professional leadership directly resulted in the destruction of two T-54 tanks and countless recoilless rifles, with no less than 50 enemy dead, not to include the countless unconfirmed dead and wounded. His professional competency and bravery enabled his men to tactically withdraw under fire and return safely. Major Pritchard's extraordinary heroic actions and conspicuous gallantry are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 3, 1976)

*PROFFIT, JOHN BERNARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Bernard Proffit (245-88-7500), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Proffit distinguished himself while serving as machine gunner during combat operations northwest of An Khe. As Specialist Proffit's platoon was preparing to depart their night defensive position on the morning of 3 August 1970, they were suddenly attacked by an element of enemy soldiers firing small arms, rockets, and hand grenades. Although wounded in the initial attack, Specialist Proffit secured his machine gun and ran to a forward position to obtain a clear field of fire. Standing alone in an exposed position, he directed a continuous stream of fire at the enemy soldiers, ultimately forcing them to withdraw. Throughout the engagement, Specialist Proffit remained in his exposed position repulsing the enemy attack until he collapsed over his weapon. Specialist Four Proffit's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4854 (October 16, 1970)
Home Town: Todd, North Carolina

PRUITT, JAMES N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James N. Pruitt, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 17 July 1969 while serving with the Command and Control Detachment North, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, as a Team leader of a seven-man Long Range Reconnaissance Team operating deep within enemy territory on an intelligence-gathering mission. Shortly after insertion Sergeant Pruitt observed an enemy platoon approximately fifty meters from his position. Utilizing the advantage of surprise, Sergeant Pruitt led an assault upon the enemy platoon. Under Sergeant Pruitt's professional guidance the team captured one enemy soldier and killed five more. However, in doing so they exposed their position and were soon surrounded by two more platoons of the enemy. During the ensuing firefight the prisoner of war was killed. Sergeant Pruitt directed airstrikes against the attacking force while his assistant team leader directed the team members' fire. Sergeant Pruitt then saw another enemy soldier and recognized an opportunity to capture a prisoner of war. Sergeant Pruitt informed the Airborne Controller of his intentions and directed the air support to diminish momentarily. Taking his assistant team leader Sergeant Pruitt assaulted the enemy's position. In this assault Sergeant Pruitt killed two more enemy and succeeded in capturing another insurgent. Upon returning to his team's defensive perimeter, he requested emergency extraction. The enemy renewed their attack in a determined effort to annihilate the reconnaissance team, thus preventing the capture of one of their comrades. In this murderous assault one of the team members was killed and one seriously wounded. Realizing the importance of returning the prisoner of war to allied forces, Sergeant Pruitt threw his own body against the prisoner of war in an effort to prevent his death. However, the numerically superior enemy force gained fire superiority and seriously wounded Sergeant Pruitt and silenced their captured comrade. Although painfully wounded, Sergeant Pruitt continued to direct friendly airstrikes until so weakened by loss of blood he could not continue to do so, at which time the assistant team leader took command and directed the extraction. Throughout the entire action Sergeant Pruitt clearly and sincerely placed the importance of accomplishing his assigned mission above any other aspect, including his personal safety. Sergeant Pruitt's team accounted for nine enemy soldiers killed with Sergeant Pruitt personally accounting for four of this number. Sergeant Pruitt's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 50 (September 8, 1970)

PRYOR, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Pryor, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-344, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Specialist Four Pryor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as an intelligence specialist at Camp Bunard. During the early hours of 20 June 1969 hostile mortars and rockets began to rain on the compound and a force of enemy sappers managed to infiltrate the perimeter defense and sever communication lines between the tactical operations center and the perimeter bunkers. Specialist Pryor left his mortar pit where he had been firing illumination rounds and immediately headed for the edge of the camp. On discovering that the trench system on the east and northeast sides of the base were occupied by the Viet Cong, he commenced relaying information that enabled the operations center to direct airstrikes on the invaders. Meanwhile, Specialist Pryor rallied an element of camp strike force personnel to recapture the enemy-held positions. Spotting a number of hostile rocket emplacements near the airstrip, he quickly informed the operations center and the rocket emplacements were destroyed. After the trenches had been secured, Specialist Pryor continued to check the perimeter defense, giving encouragement to the indigenous soldiers and reporting enemy positions to the operations center. Discovering that the southeastern section of the perimeter had been overrun by the Viet Cong, he informed his superiors of the threat and then proceeded to assist two Vietnamese troops in routing the enemy. When reinforcements arrived, they found that Specialist Pryor had stood his ground, even after his two comrades had been killed and he himself had been seriously wounded. Specialist Four Pryor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3422 (September 7, 1969)
Born: January 31, 1949 at San Bernardino, California
Home Town: San Bernardino, California

PUCKETT, RALPH, JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph Puckett, Jr. (0-59165), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Lieutenant Colonel Puckett distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 August 1967 while serving as Commanding Officer of an airborne infantry battalion on combat operations near Duc Pho. Shortly after elements of his unit were heavily engaged by a hostile battalion, Colonel Puckett landed in the battle zone to coordinate defenses and to assess the battlefield situation. Disregarding his own safety, he moved across a heavily mined area to the point of the most ferocious fighting to direct and inspire his men against the hostile force. Other elements were savagely attacked with intense mortar fire, so he decentralized the command post to reduce the chance of entire command element being hit. To do this, he personally occupied a foxhole position. He exposed himself to withering fire throughout the night to visit the men in their positions and to encourage and inspire them with his personal bravery and firm determination to overcome the overwhelming onslaught of the fanatical force. He heard cries for help during an intense mortar barrage later that night and dashed through a hail of flying shrapnel to give aid. He personally carried the two wounded soldiers back to safety and used his skill and experience as a truly professional soldier to treat their wounds. When rescue helicopters came in, he repeatedly refused extraction for himself and directed that the casualties be evacuated. With bullets striking all around him, he remained in the open to rally his fatigued men through the long night by sharing every phase of the battle with them. His fearless leadership and aggressive, determined actions in the face of grave danger inspired his men to fight furiously throughout the night and obtain a decisive victory over the numerically superior Viet Cong attackers. Lieutenant Colonel Puckett's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6075 (November 24, 1967)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

PURCHASE, STEPHEN R.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stephen R. Purchase, Warrant Officer (WO-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance). Warrant Officer Purchase distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 April 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1199 (June 1, 1972)
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Q

QUAMO, GEORGE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Quamo, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), FOB 3 (Khe Sanh), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Major Quamo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 February 1968. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 56 (December 31, 1974)
Born: June 10, 1940 at Lynn, Massachusetts
Home Town: Averill Park, New York
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QUEEN, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William R. Queen, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with United States Army Training Advisory Group (TF1AE), United States Army Vietnam Training Support Headquarters. Staff Sergeant Queen distinguished himself on 7 August 1971 while serving as a member of a small reconnaissance team operating deep within enemy held territory. On that date, his team came under assault by enemy small arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and rocket fire. Staff Sergeant Queen began returning a heavy barrage of CAR-15 and hand grenade fire, and directed a steady barrage of 60-mm. mortar fire upon the advancing enemy force, slowing their advance and inflicting heavy losses. During the ensuing battle, his beleaguered team was threatened to be overrun, so Staff Sergeant Queen established communications with friendly air assets. Upon arrival of the air support, he exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire in order to move about the team's perimeter, effectively directing devastating airstrikes 360 degrees around their position. Shortly thereafter, he was seriously wounded by a close impacting enemy mortar round, but despite his wounds continued to place effective CAR-15 and hand grenade fire upon the advancing enemy force. Inspiring team members to become more aggressive, Staff Sergeant Queen successfully led his portion of the team in driving the enemy force back. With the aid of airstrikes, the team was finally able to suppress the heavy enemy fire to sporadic shots. During the extraction, Staff Sergeant Queen remained on the ground and provided the rest of the team with heavy cover fire. His gallant actions were directly responsible for repelling numerous enemy assaults and saving the lives of many of his fellow team members. Staff Sergeant Queen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3397 (November 30, 1972)

QUICK, CLAUDE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Claude Quick, Jr. (RA12710336), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action during military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Quick distinguished himself by heroic actions on 19 May, 1966 while serving as a medical aidman attached to a rifle company on a search and destroy mission when elements of the company encountered intense Viet Cong fire from automatic weapons concealed in the thick jungle foliage. As injured Americans fell, he immediately moved through the withering enemy fire to give aid. Approaching one injured man, he observed that his injury was of a nature that the man could not be moved. Completely disregarding his own personal safety, he remained by the man's side, trying vainly to revive him. Specialist Quick, though wounded himself turned his attentions elsewhere, moving to other injured soldiers, giving aid and encouragement, and directing the evacuation of the wounded. Specialist Quick is credited with saving several lives during this action. This outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery at the risk to his own life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

*QUINN, RICHARD FLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Floyd Quinn (196-40-9443), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Quinn distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman during ground combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Specialist Quinn's company had just departed its night defensive position and was advancing down a narrow jungle trail when the allied lead element contacted an enemy force of unknown size. several allied casualties were sustained in the initial fighting and Specialist Quinn immediately moved forward to treat the casualties. Ignoring the intense enemy fire that swept the area, he moved from one position to another to treat the wounded allies and assist them to positions of relative safety. When a series of incoming enemy rockets exploded to Specialist Quinn's front, he immediately went to the aid of two seriously wounded soldiers. Although exposed in a forward position, the specialist skillfully administered aid to his comrades. As he prepared to evacuate them to rear positions, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fire. Specialist Four Quinn's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4973 (October 29, 1970)
Home Town: Woodstock, New York

R

RADCLIFFE, RONALD A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald A. Radcliffe, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop F, 4th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Radcliffe distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 April 1972. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 10 (April 2, 1975)
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*RAGIN, WILLIAM DAVID HOWSA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William David Howsa Ragin (0-94420), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Ragin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1964. Captain Ragin was serving as an Advisor to a Ranger Battalion of the armed forces of the Republic of Vietnam when the friendly forces were suddenly ambushed by hostile elements. Undaunted by the extremely heavy gun fire, Captain Ragin completely disregarded his own personal safety, took a lead position, and encouraged the friendly forces to defend themselves. During the ensuring engagement in which the enemy gun fire was concentrated on his position, he demonstrated fortitude and perseverance by retaliating with the utmost accuracy and succeeded in annihilating a great number of enemy troops during a battle that lasted for 1 hour and 40 minutes. Despite overwhelming onslaught, he covered the withdrawal of the Rangers with outstanding effectiveness and continued his courageous efforts until mortally wounded. Captain Ragin's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroic actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 5, 1965)
Home Town: Palatka, Florida

*RAMIREZ, LORENZO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lorenzo Ramirez, Jr. (US56714304), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. Private First Class Ramirez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 June 1968 as an assistant machine gunner during a combat mission near the Village of Binh An. As his company advanced toward well-entrenched North Vietnamese positions, it was hit by intense small arms fire and hand grenades. Suddenly a grenade landed a few feet away from Private Ramirez and two of his comrades. Disregarding his safety, he jumped up from his position beside the machine gun and knocked down a rifleman to his left. He then sprang to the right to push the machine gunner away, shielding the man with his body when the grenade detonated. Private Ramirez was mortally wounded by the blast. Private First Class Ramirez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5359 (November 19, 1968)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

RAMIREZ, RAMIRO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ramiro Ramirez (RA50142407), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. First Sergeant Ramirez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 October 1968 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in a heavy jungle west of Lai Khe. The point element of his company suddenly received intense small arms, automatic weapons and rock-propelled grenade fire, causing several casualties. Exposing himself to the enemy barrage, Sergeant Ramirez made his way to one of the wounded men, carried him to a covered position and administered lifesaving first aid. While rescuing a second injured comrade, he was struck in the head by automatic weapons fire. Despite his pain, he continued to pull the man to the safety of a bomb crater and refused aid until all others had been treated. Receiving word that another man had been severely wounded, Sergeant Ramirez volunteered to rescue him and was hit in the arm and chest as he left the crater. Disregarding his own injuries, he reached the casualty and dragged him back to the protection of the shell crater where he again refused medical treatment until he finally lost consciousness. First Sergeant Ramirez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 706 (February 27, 1969)
Born: at Puerto Rico Home Town: , Puerto Rico

*RANDALL, MICHAEL EUGENE, SR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Eugene Randall, Sr. (RA68009673), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Randall distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 October 1968 while serving as a machine gunner during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. Private Randall's company came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from a fortified Viet Cong base camp. His platoon was pinned down and his squad leader and point man lay wounded in an open field, entirely exposed to the enemy barrage. With complete disregard for his safety, he advanced through the communists cross fire to the front of the platoon and kept a steady fusillade on the enemy positions, allowing his comrades to evacuate the wounded men. Continuing his one-man assault, Private Randall concentrated his fire directly into the hostile bunker's gun port until another concealed enemy position opened fire, wounding him and damaging his machine gun. After returning to his platoon to secure a rifle, he advanced on the second Viet Cong fortification, killing the two occupants. Although suffering from his wounds, he took grenades from his ammunition pouches and ran across an open area toward an enemy machine gun position that had his platoon pinned down. As Private Randall was tossing a grenade into the enemy bunker, the Viet Cong opened fire and he was mortally wounded. Private First Class Randall's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 409 (February 5, 1969)
Born: July 18, 1947 at Noblesville, Indiana
Home Town: Noblesville, Indiana

RANGER, MICHAEL B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael B. Ranger, First Lieutenant (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while assigned to Company E, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division during the period 4 to 6 March 1969. During this period, with eight men Captain Ranger engaged a massed enemy force and aborted their attack. Captain Ranger met the charge of the enemy and killed two of them with rifle fire, knocking out a machinegun position and carrying a wounded soldier back to the patrol base. While directing airstrikes, artillery, and gunships, he was wounded and blown into the air by an enemy mortar round which landed at his feet. Despite painful wounds in his leg and arm he refused medical attention and continued to control supporting fires and direct the actions of his platoon. In the early hours of 5 March an estimated North Vietnamese battalion launched an assault against the platoon. Under a rain of rockets and mortars Captain Ranger called in artillery rounds on his own position as the enemy force entered the perimeter. Captain Ranger killed two North Vietnamese soldiers in front of his position and three more on top of his bunker. The following day while the patrol base was receiving small arms and mortar fire, Captain Ranger killed four snipers in the trees and two North Vietnamese soldiers in bunkers while sustaining wounds to his arm. He then directed airstrikes and artillery into the remaining enemy while his troops were being extracted from the landing zone and refused to leave the ground until all of his men were aboard the helicopters. Captain Ranger's decisiveness, vigorous leadership, sound judgment, and personal bravery instilled courage and determination into his platoon, enabling them to hold off and destroy a superior enemy force. Captain Ranger's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (July 22, 1970)

RANKIN, HOWARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard F. Rankin (RA14451025), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Rankin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 December 1968 while serving as platoon sergeant during reconnaissance-in-force operations north of An Loc. Early in the morning soon after breaking camp, his company ran into intense automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire coming from a bamboo treeline approximately fifty meters from their position. Seated in the lead track, Sergeant Rankin was thrown from his vehicle along with the other occupants when a grenade exploded close by. Although he was wounded, he immediately manned the machine gun and leveled a strafing fusillade at the enemy. He then checked the condition of his men and insured their medical attention and evacuation. While a comrade applied a tourniquet to his profusely bleeding leg, he continued firing his machine gun until it malfunctioned. Seizing a grenade launcher, he delivered a barrage that killed seven enemy troops. Throughout the action, his only concern was that all wounded personnel be extracted safely and that the enemy be dispersed rapidly. When the foe had been routed and his platoon accounted for, he allowed himself to be medically treated. Staff Sergeant Rankin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2073 (June 12, 1969)
Home Town: Ozark, Alabama

*RARRICK, JOHN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Edward Rarrick (129-42-8195), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Rarrick distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 April 1970 while serving with an infantry company airlifted into a dense jungle area in Tay Ninh Province. Soon after insertion, Specialist Rarrick's company engaged a battalion size enemy force entrenched and concealed in a thick hedgerow. Because of the intense enemy fire and the close proximity of the enemy positions, Specialist Rarrick and other members of his company found themselves immobilized. One of Specialist Rarrick's comrades noticed his predicament and attempted to come to his aid, but was seriously wounded. Without hesitation, Specialist Rarrick crawled to within fifteen meters of the closest enemy position to treat the wounded man. Specialist Rarrick treated his wounded comrade and then attempted to extract him to a safer position. Increased enemy fire directed toward the two individuals stopped their progress. Specialist Rarrick then maneuvered himself toward the enemy barrage so that he could shield his wounded comrade with his own body. While in this position, Specialist Rarrick was mortally wounded. Specialist Rarrick's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3187 (July 13, 1970)
Home Town: Beaver Dams, New York

RASSER, GARY V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary V. Rasser (0-5334611), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Rasser distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 July 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an infantry company on a reinforcing mission deep in hostile territory. While moving through dense jungle to relieve a beleaguered friendly unit, his company was savagely attacked by an estimated North Vietnamese regiment. Completely disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant Rasser exposed himself to withering hostile fire to deploy his platoon and provide security for the rest of the company. The enemy directed a hail of mortar, rocket and recoilless rifle fire against his positions killing the company commander and inflicting numerous casualties on his men, but he immediately took command and moved into the open to direct air and artillery strikes on the furious hostile onslaught. Fighting fiercely, he directed deadly rifle fire on the advancing enemy until he ran out of ammunition. Grabbing the weapon of a fallen comrade, he dashed among his men to rally them against the determined Viet Cong. As the hostile soldiers moved closer, he secured a grenade launcher and fired deadly rounds into the enemy concentrations, heedless of the bullets and shrapnel flying all around him. The attackers concentrated their fire on him as he moved to a machine gun, but he inflicted numerous casualties with extremely accurate bursts. Unable to stop the overwhelming assault, he led his men in a fierce charge through the enemy lines to a safer position. Moving into a tight perimeter, his inspired men fought furiously to defeat the numerically superior force. His fearless leadership in the face of grave danger contributed greatly to the destruction of the enemy. Second Lieutenant Rasser's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5534 (October 31, 1967)

RAU, RAYMOND R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond R. Rau (0-91491), Captain (Aviation), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 221st Reconnaissance Airplane Company, 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Rau distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 June 1967 while serving as pilot of a reconnaissance airplane supporting Special Forces guerrilla operations in Vinh Binh Province near the South China Sea. The ground unit had split into small teams to move through dense mangrove swamps. One team was suddenly ambushed by a large Viet Cong force firing automatic weapons and small arms. Captain Rau called for medical evacuation helicopters and gunships and immediately dove his light plane toward the ambush site to locate enemy positions in the heavy undergrowth. Despite a hail of heavy automatic weapons fire directed at his aircraft, he began a series of rocket runs, firing his ordnance at the insurgents from treetop level. Debris from the resulting explosions raked his plane, but Captain Rau fearlessly continued to strike the enemy positions until his rockets were expended. Remaining over the battle site, he fired his automatic rifle from the window of the cockpit and directed gunship runs which suppressed the hostile fire while the unit's casualties were evacuated. After refueling and rearming his aircraft, he returned at dusk to again support the ground troops who had come under a fanatical attack by a numerically superior Viet Cong force. Braving a curtain of enemy fire, Captain Rau made repeated low level passes and placed devastating rocket fire on the insurgents. Out of ammunition, he directed mortar fire of nearby Navy patrol boats against the enemy. When the boats began receiving hostile fire from concealed enemy positions on the beach, he turned on his landing lights and dove through an intense barrage of automatic weapons fire at the Viet Cong. This action enabled the ships to pinpoint and destroy the enemy positions. Throughout the night, he directed medical evacuation helicopters to the beleaguered force and skillfully adjusted the supporting fires of friendly ships and aircraft on enemy positions. His gallant actions saved many fellow soldiers from almost certain destruction. Captain Rau's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1406 (March 28, 1968)

*RAY, WILLIAM DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William David Ray (RA18860514), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Ray distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 November 1968 as a medic during a combat air assault in the vicinity of Tay Ninh. As Private Ray's company landed in knee-high grass in a flat, open area close to an enemy base camp, it came under intense machine gun, automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire from well-concealed bunkers in a nearby hedgerow. Despite the vicious enemy fire, Private Ray immediately left his covered position and crawled to his comrades who had been wounded. After treating several casualties, he began to call to the injured who were hidden by the tall grass to show their locations by shouting or firing smoke grenades. Although the movement of the grass indicated his position to the communists, he continued to render aid and encouragement, treating four more wounded men. While fearlessly exposing himself to care for his fellow soldiers, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. Private First Class Ray's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 660 (February 25, 1969)
Home Town: El Centro, California

*REEDER, PHILIP DALLAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Philip Dallam Reeder (RA15845733), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Private Reeder distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 September 1968 while serving as an automatic rifleman with the 173d Airborne Brigade. His unit made contact and began receiving a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire from an estimated reinforced North Vietnamese Army company occupying well- fortified bunkers. As Private Reeder's squad deployed against the hostile positions, an enemy hand grenade landed among four of his comrades. With complete disregard for his safety, Private Reeder rushed through the withering hail of enemy fire toward it. As he dashed across the exposed area, he was wounded. Despite the injury he grasped the grenade and ran toward the hostile bunker in an attempt to hurl it back at the communist soldiers. As the grenade left his hand, it detonated, killing him instantly. His body shielded the men from the blast and shrapnel, saving them from injury or possible death. Private Reader's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5750 (December 17, 1968)
Home Town: Beaumont, Texas

*REES, RICHARD MORGAN
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Morgan Rees (274367706), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Field Team 6, Control Team B, Headquarters, Joint Casualty Resolution Center. Captain Rees distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 December 1973. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 24 (December 2, 1975)
Home Town: Kent, Ohio
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REEVES, THOMAS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas M. Reeves (0-5317534), Captain (Transportation Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 170th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Reeves distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 and 22 March 1967 as a helicopter pilot supporting ground forces during a pitched battle with the enemy in Kontum Province. When the fight began, he volunteered to fly the ground unit's operations officer into the battle site. Despite intense enemy machine gun and automatic weapons fire, he delivered the officer, enabling the battalion command group to quickly assume control of a difficult situation on the ground. Soon after, he volunteered to fly reinforcements to a company which was heavily engaged with the enemy. Captain Reeves deftly maneuvered his aircraft into the tiny landing zone, overcoming dense foliage, limited visibility, and intense enemy fire to safely deliver the badly needed replacements. The battle continued, and he made repeated trips into the area to provide the infantry with critically needed ammunition, medical personnel and supplies. Captain Reeves then acted as an aerial radio relay for four ground companies, continually flying at low level through a friendly and enemy crossfire. He also made repeated trips into the area to land and pick up critically wounded men who required immediate evacuation. During the course of these evacuations, the enemy unleashed intense mortar attacks on his stationary craft. Captain Reeves flew to an altitude where he could observe the location of the mortar position, and then directed a helicopter gunship in an attack on it. The weapon was silenced and the evacuation was successfully completed. Captain Reeves' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4125 (August 26, 1968)

REINBURG, JOHN E., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John E. Reinburg, III, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 June 1965, while serving with Detachment A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. The 883d Regional Force Company, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, and four American advisors were returning from a successful predawn combat mission when they were attacked by a superior Viet Cong force. Barely escaping total annihilation, the company began to move onto high ground. By this time two of the American advisors had been critically wounded and the company as desperately short of ammunition. At this moment Sergeant Reinburg arrived at the battle zone in an armed helicopter, bringing with him the much-needed ammunition. After distributing ammunition to two of the platoons, Sergeant Reinburg reorganized them and deployed them in a position to give covering fire to elements of the company still exposed on the forward slope of the hill. He accomplished these tasks with efficiency and at great personal risk, exposing himself many times to the withering fire of the pursuing Viet Cong forces. In response to sniper fire the company was receiving on the left rear flank, Sergeant Reinburg took a squad of Regional Force troops and flushed out the snipers. While still under enemy fire, he returned to the main position, bodily carrying one wounded soldier and assisting another, less seriously wounded. During this period Sergeant Reinburg was seriously wounded, but refused first aid and medical evacuation until the troops were cared for. Ignoring his wounds Sergeant Reinburg continued directing friendly fire. Observing an American advisor lying in an exposed position, he again braved the harrowing Viet Cong fire and crossed the open terrain to assist in moving his comrade to safety. Sergeant Reinburg then located an enemy automatic weapon whose accurate fire was seriously suppressing friendly fire. Disregarding the continuing pain from his wounds, he secured a Regional Force's machinegun and proceeded to deploy it, crossing some 75 meters of terrain under extremely heavy enemy fire. He was critically wounded while accomplishing this task. Though knocked to the ground, he still attempted to crawl and drag the machinegun into position until he became unconscious. The Regional Force gun crew, inspired by Sergeant Reinburg's heroic example, overtook him and dragged him to safety and proceeded to deliver successful fire on the enemy weapon emplacement. His actions on this occasion presented a sterling example of the highest standard of professional dedication, performance and extraordinary heroism. Sergeant Reinburg's outstanding leadership and heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 50 (September 8, 1970)

*REITER, CLYDE ALVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clyde Alvin Reiter (RA16877783), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-431, Company D, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant Reiter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 December 1968 while serving as an advisor to a Vietnamese patrol on a mission to destroy two enemy bunkers. As Sergeant Reiter and the demolition team were preparing to demolish the first fortification, they came under intense automatic weapons fire. Exposing himself to the fusillade, Sergeant Reiter placed effective counter fire on the communists which allowed his comrades to reach the safety of the bunker. When he saw that the other American advisor needed help in rescuing two men who had been wounded by the initial burst of hostile fire, he maneuvered to the aid of his fallen comrades. After administering first aid, he began to carry one man to the rear while shielding him from the aggressors with his own body, and was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Reiter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 732 (March 3, 1969)
Home Town: Pontiac, Michigan

*RENTERIA, RUDOLPH SOTELO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Rudolph Sotelo Renteria (US5682954), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Renteria distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 August 1968 while serving as a squad leader of an infantry company in the district of Phu Giao, Binh Duong Province. His company attacked a North Vietnamese Army company, and received hand grenade, automatic weapons, small arms and anti- tank rocket fire. One of the grenades landed near him and his men, and Specialist Renteria immediately shouted a warning to them. Although wounded when the grenade exploded, he ignored his injury and continued to fire his rifle and throw hand grenades at the North Vietnamese. Another hostile grenade landed next to a wounded comrade. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Renteria attempted to reach it to hurl it away from the stricken man. Before he could accomplish this the grenade detonated, killing him instantly. Specialist Four Renteria's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5330 (November 17, 1968)
Home Town: San Jose, California

*REYES, TOMAS GARCIA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Tomas Garcia Reyes (RA10106244), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Reyes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 November 1967 while serving as a squad leader of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission near An Tay. The company had moved to a small area of high ground, and Sergeant Reyes' platoon was directed to cross an open rice paddy and secure the hedgerow on the far side. As his squad reached a position ten feet from the hedgerow, intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire erupted from well-concealed bunkers to the front and flanks. Sergeant Reyes immediately directed his troops to return fire on the hostile forces. Moving from position to position, he fired his weapon and threw grenades at the enemy. He then crawled forward through the withering fusillade to within two feet of a bunker in the hedgerow, fired his weapon on full automatic with one hand and with the other hurled several hand grenades into the position, destroying it and its occupants. When Sergeant Reyes received the order to break contact and allow supporting fire to be placed on the well-entrenched enemy, he remained exposed to a savage hail of bullets and fought a delaying action as his men withdrew. One of his squad members was wounded, and he gallantly returned to the bullet-swept rice paddy to rescue his comrade. While others followed him out to recover the casualty, Sergeant Reyes charged forward alone through a curtain of hostile fire. Hurling grenades and firing his weapon, he destroyed a second enemy emplacement. He was mortally wounded while courageously placing the welfare of his fellow soldiers above his own. Staff Sergeant Reyes' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1150 (March 16, 1968)
Born: December 29, 1935 at Santa Cruz, Guam
Home Town: Agana, Guam

*RHODES, DONALD RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Ray Rhodes (309-44-6295), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Rhodes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1969 while serving as a squad leader during a combat operation. When his squad became scattered and pinned down by enemy automatic weapons fire, he began advancing toward the hostile emplacement to attract enemy fire, enabling his men to move to secure positions. Determined to silence the position, he rose to throw a grenade and was struck to the ground by enemy fire. He nevertheless resumed his advance on the entrenchment until he was fatally wounded by a burst of automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Rhodes' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3271 (August 23, 1969)
Home Town: Evansville, Indiana

RICE, ROBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert C. Rice (0-5304149), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Major Rice distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 April 1968 while serving as operations officer of an infantry battalion during an air assault against elements of a reinforced enemy main force battalion in Binh Hung Province. As the friendly battalion and brigade command groups were moving forward to direct the final assault on an enemy bunker complex in the woodline near their landing zone, they came under intense machine gun fire from a concealed enemy position. Major Rice immediately moved out in advance of the command groups and located the enemy position. He called in and directed accurate artillery fire and air strikes upon it, but the emplacement was so well fortified it survived the bombardment. Darkness was rapidly approaching and the enemy position posed a serious threat to the command groups' extraction. Major Rice decided to assault the bunker. After arranging for covering fire, he rushed approximately two hundred meters across an open field, maneuvered to the rear of the bunker and threw a grenade into the enemy position, killing its occupants and silencing their fire. As his battalion prepared for extraction, three men were discovered to be missing. Major Rice quickly gathered some volunteers to search for them. Braving intense mortar and small arms fire, he located the men and brought them to safety. Major Rice's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3825 (August 7, 1968)

RICH, DAVID F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David F. Rich, Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 319th Artillery, 101st Airborne Division (Airborne). Captain Rich distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while commanding an allied artillery base while subjected to a prolonged enemy attack during the period 5 July 1970 through 17 July 1970. Throughout this period, the fire support base was battered by an intense barrage of enemy rocket, mortar, and recoilless rifle fire. Exposing himself to each enemy attack, Captain Rich skillfully examined the craters left by each incoming enemy round to approximate the enemy location from which it was fired and then directed his men to pound the position with a barrage of artillery fire. Although wounded on seven different occasions, the captain continuously pinpointed enemy positions to his men and assured that all the wounded received medical treatment before himself. During an intense barrage of enemy mortar fire on the final day of the attack, Captain Rich left the relative security of his command post and conducted accurate crater analysis amid the hail of enemy shrapnel. Although painfully wounded in the leg, arm, chest, and eye, he refused to relinquish the command of his battery and continued to direct the defensive fire of his men. Inspired by his tireless and determined efforts, Captain Rich's men bitterly resisted the enemy force while maintaining a high level of fighting spirit throughout the ordeal. Captain Rich's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5096 (November 19, 1970)

*RICHARDSON, ROY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roy Lee Richardson (528-60-1323), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Richardson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 May 1970 while leading a platoon in search of suspected enemy positions near an allied fire support base. As the platoon advanced through the area of operations, they were suddenly ambushed by a well-concealed enemy force utilizing hand and rocket-propelled grenades. Lieutenant Richardson immediately began moving through the enemy fire to deploy his men into defensive positions and direct aerial rocket artillery on the hostile force. As the enemy fire intensified, the lieutenant moved forward to rescue a critically wounded comrade. Although under constant enemy attack, Lieutenant Richardson continuously maneuvered through the fusillade to place suppressive fire on the enemy while inspiring his men to sustain their defensive efforts. As the contact continued at an intense level, Lieutenant Richardson was mortally wounded by the hostile fire. First Lieutenant Richardson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4826 (October 14, 1970)
Born: August 25, 1944 at Alberta, Canada
Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah

RICHARDSON, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William R. Richardson (US55349923), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Richardson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 January 1968 as squad leader of a mechanized infantry unit on combat operations in Tay Ninh Province. His unit was attacking an enemy battalion base camp in dense jungle terrain when he detected three fortified bunkers in a clearing to his front. Seeing a North Vietnamese soldier aiming a rocket-propelled grenade at his advancing troops, Specialist Richardson yelled at his men to take cover and killed the insurgent with deadly rifle fire. He charged an enemy bunker and hit the ground at the entrance just as automatic weapons fire erupted from the firing ports. He quickly delivered a burst of fire into the bunker, killing one enemy soldier. Fearlessly assaulting the hostile position, he leaped into the bunker and captured a prisoner after a fierce hand-to-hand struggle. As he moved from the position, the enemy soldier attempted to escape into the jungle. Reacting quickly, he knocked the insurgent to the ground with his rifle, recaptured him and led him to an interrogation point where he gained much valuable intelligence information. His fearless actions in the heat of battle were instrumental in the defeat of the determined enemy forces. Specialist Four Richardson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2734 (June 7, 1968) and 4013 (1968)

RICKMAN, WILLIAM M., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William M. Rickman, Jr. (w-3158926), Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 170th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer Rickman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1968 as commander of an armed helicopter providing support for a scout reconnaissance team inserted deep into an area of known enemy activity. A troop carrying helicopter was struck by hostile 37 millimeter weapons fire and was forced to land within range of the communist gunners. Leading his team of armed gun ships to the site, Mister Rickman flew at an extremely low speed to locate the helicopter through the tall trees and dense foliage. After spotting the craft and making its position known to the rescue ship, his helicopter became the target of intense enemy fire. He immediately established an orbit to provide close cover for the rescue effort. While he was coordinating his team, directing the rescue ship and firing numerous rockets at the enemy, his aircraft was riddled by a hostile barrage which wounded him in the leg. Disregarding his safety, Mister Rickman continued to place suppressive fire until the downed crew was extracted. His team headed back to its staging area, but a call for help was monitored from a Cobra helicopter shot down in the center of known enemy positions. Although almost out of ammunition and low on fuel, Mister Rickman returned with his team to provide suppressive fire until the crew was successfully extracted. With his rocket supply expended and mini-guns knocked out by enemy fire, he next returned to cover the pickup of the scout team which was amid heavy enemy movement and sporadic sniper fire. Attempting to make the communists believe that he was armed, he flew low-level between two enemy-entrenched ridge lines with only door mounted machine guns to give covering fire. When his aircraft came under machine gun fire as the extraction was being completed, he returned the fire and directed his door gunner to mark the area with smoke for tactical air strikes. Chief Warrant Officer Rickman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1233 (April 8, 1969)

RIDER, ARCHIE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Archie A. Rider (0-77650), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Major Rider distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 December 1967 as a troop commander near Duc Pho. Major Rider was directing aerial reconnaissance and insertion of his infantry platoon when contact was made with a large enemy force. Although seriously wounded in the initial exchange of fire, he refused to depart the area and had his aircraft deliver suppressive fire on the aggressors which enabled his infantrymen to reach cover. Although he was a vulnerable target for the enemy automatic weapons fire, he maneuvered his ship into point-blank range and attacked two hostile positions, killing several communists and disorganizing the others. After his men had completed the destruction of the two strongholds, Major Rider led the assault on the main enemy force. Despite his injuries, he skillfully coordinated with a support unit which was mounting an airmobile assault, called in artillery and air strikes and directed the movements of his troop. Once arrangements had been made for extraction of his unit, he allowed himself to be evacuated, passing out from loss of blood on the way to the aid station. Major Rider's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 727 (March 1, 1969)

RIDLEY, MARK T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mark T. Ridley (RA18611697), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Ridley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 and 2 January 1968 as an infantry patrol leader. Sergeant Ridley had positioned his twelve-man unit near a trail approximately eight hundred meters from the fire support base it was protecting. When the base came under an intense night mortar attack, Sergeant Ridley observed the source of the hostile fire and immediately called counterfire on the enemy gun positions. Moments later he observed the first wave of enemy ground troops moving past his position toward the fire support base and he quickly alerted the camp of the impending assault. He then moved his team into a defensive position. As the insurgents closed on the support base's perimeter and his patrol's position, he called supporting artillery and mortar fire on the enemy, at times to within fifteen meters of his own location. Although surrounded throughout the attack, he continued to radio a steady stream of information to the besieged camp, while successfully directing the defensive fires of his men. Sergeant Ridley's personal bravery and exemplary leadership contributed significantly to the defeat of a determined enemy force. Staff Sergeant Ridley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3074 (June 25, 1968)

RILEY, RONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald J. Riley (OF-104978), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Riley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 and 17 February 1967 while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 1st Cavalry Division on a search and destroy mission near Bong Son. After conducting a sweep along the Song Tam Quan River, the platoon set up defensive positions for the night. At approximately 2130 hours, the perimeter received an intense mortar, grenade and automatic weapons attack from a large North Vietnamese Army force, which wounded several men at the outset. Seeing his radio operator hit and lying helpless in an open area, Lieutenant Riley fearlessly rushed to him and carried the stricken soldier through a hail of bullets to cover. He then began moving around the ravaged perimeter redeploying his men, assisting the wounded and shouting encouragement. As the insurgent attack intensified, Lieutenant Riley repeatedly exposed himself to call in artillery and air strikes that forced the North Vietnamese to break contact and flee. When evacuation aircraft arrived, he directed the extraction of the casualties and kept his men alert during the remainder of the night for a possible counterattack. As the platoon prepared to move out the next morning, it received harassing sniper fire. Quickly maneuvering his men, Lieutenant Riley succeeded in trapping the enemy soldiers on a small island. Armed only with a pistol, he gallantly entered the river alone to probe the bank for a cave and killed one sniper who suddenly lunged at him. Lieutenant Riley and a machine gunner then aggressively engaged and killed five other insurgents in a brief fight. His unimpeachable valor and assuring composure throughout the battle enabled his platoon to inflict heavy casualties upon a numerically superior hostile force without sustaining any fatalities. First Lieutenant Riley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2660 (June 6, 1967)

RINALDO, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard J. Rinaldo (0-5016186), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Rinaldo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 March 1969 while commanding his company in an attempt to capture a strategic hill near Tien Phuoc. Braving heavy automatic weapons fire from well-concealed, fortified North Vietnamese Army positions, Captain Rinaldo led his men in securing the western half of the hilltop. As he began to evacuate his unit's nine casualties, heavy mortar and machine gun fire erupted from the valley below, with one of the first mortar rounds wounding the entire command group of a sister company that was bringing up reinforcements. Elements trying to go down the hill were pinned down by small arms fire from the flank and the remaining troops of both companies were exhausted after fighting and carrying casualties in the intense heat. Captain Rinaldo moved among his men, calming them and preventing panic. He was wounded by mortar fragments, but, refusing medical aid, continued to encourage his soldiers and called in gun ships against the enemy mortar and machine gun emplacements. Although he had now suffered twenty-six casualties, including all of his platoon leaders and platoon sergeants, he realized pulling back under the hostile barrage would result in many more injuries. Rallying the ten men who were still able to fight, he held off the communists until he had directed air strikes against the enemy mortar position. He then covered his troops withdrawal, staying behind and directing gun ship strikes within twenty meters of his position. When he went to the landing zone, he reorganized the remnants of both companies and established a defensive perimeter on a nearby hill. Captain Rinaldo's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2046 (June 11, 1969)

RING, GEORGE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George M. Ring (0-5337793), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Ring distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 June 1968 as an infantry platoon leader during a mission in the Que Son Valley. A sister unit became encircled by a large enemy force, and Lieutenant Ring repeatedly exposed himself to heavy hostile fire as he led his men through enemy lines to reach and relieve the pressure on the embattled company. As the trapped company broke out of the encirclement, Lieutenant Ring remained behind to organize and evacuate the wounded. The enemy closed the breach in their envelopment, leaving him and an element of fifty men completely surrounded. After making several attempts to break through the enemy lines, the small detachment formed a defensive perimeter. Lieutenant Ring then called in and adjusted a concentrated ring of artillery fire around the position. The North Vietnamese Army troops repeatedly assaulted the defenders, attempting to overrun their position. Each attack was successfully repulsed as Lieutenant Ring skillfully coordinated and adjusted artillery barrages and the small arms and automatic weapons fire of his men on the assaulting troops. During one attack a group of enemy soldiers made their way to within three meters of where the element's wounded were lying. Lieutenant Ring immediately charged the intruders and killed them with rifle fire. Second Lieutenant Ring's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3990 (August 17, 1968)

RIOS, ALFRED R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alfred R. Rios (RA15840685), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 4th Battalion, 60th Artillery, I Field Force, Vietnam. Sergeant Rios distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 May 1968 while serving as section chief of an artillery unit. His section was guarding the Bong Son Bridge on Highway One. Shortly after midnight his position was suddenly attacked by a Viet Cong force, and an enemy grenade was thrown into the midst of several of his men. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Rios leaped on the grenade, using his body to shield his comrades. The grenade malfunctioned and failed to explode. Sergeant Rios rolled over on his side, picked up the grenade, and threw it back toward the enemy positions. It exploded in the air. He then rallied his troops and directed their fire on the aggressors, killing Two Viet Cong and repelling the enemy attack. Sergeant Rios' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5341 (November 17, 1968)

RIOS, RICARDO L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ricardo L. Rios, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Rios distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1969 while serving as a medical aidman on a combat operation in Kontum Province. As the point element of Specialist Rios' platoon was nearing a small stream bed, a well-concealed enemy force initiated contact with small arms and light machine gun fire. Specialist Rios discovered that the point man was wounded and rushed from the rear to his aid. En route, he was seriously wounded in the arm by sniper fire, but he stubbornly moved forward, braving the intense enemy fire to treat the injured man. Threading his way back through enemy fire, he treated two other wounded platoon members. Meanwhile, the point man was wounded again and lapsed into unconsciousness. Specialist Rios moved forward, and although the constant target of enemy snipers, pulled the point man to the safety of nearby concealment. Shortly thereafter, the wounded machine gunner called for a re-supply of ammunition. Specialist Rios responded by making three trips with ammunition from the rear to the machine gunner's position. On the fourth trip, Specialist Rio's wounds no longer allowed him to continue and he fell unconscious. Specialist Four Rios' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2009 (June 23, 1970)

*ROBERTS, MARVIN JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marvin James Roberts (0-2320412), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as company commander of Company B, 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), on 27 March 1969. Wounded while leading his men against the entrenched enemy positions, Captain Roberts still managed to call for and adjust artillery and tactical air strikes on the NVA positions. He then moved through the ranks shouting encouragement and giving directions to continue the attack. As his unit neared the crest of the hill, an enemy grenade bounded into the company command group. Immediately and without regard to his own safety, he hurled the grenade back into the aggressor's position, killing the occupant. At that point, hostile machine guns opened fire from a concealed position inflicting casualties upon the exposed forces. Realizing that the machine guns threatened the lives of most of his company, Captain Roberts drew his pistol and charged up a hill through a curtain of fire and hurled a grenade into the position, silencing the enemy weapons. At this point the captain was the only officer remaining in the command group. His assault carried him to the enemy position where he fired his pistol at point blank range and killed the remainder of the machine gun crew. Captain Roberts was again seriously wounded in the assault on the machine gun position. Inspired by his leadership, the men of his unit rushed the crest of the hill and overcame the remaining enemy resistance. Mortally wounded and unable to move, he continued to point out enemy positions to his company and refused to be evacuated until the objective was secured and all other casualties had been treated and evacuated. Captain Roberts extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (July 22, 1970)
Home Town: Baton Rouge, Louisiana

*ROBINSON, CALVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Calvin Robinson (US67088065), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Robinson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 January 1969 while serving as radio-telephone operator on a night patrol near Cai Nua in Dinh Tuong Province. A numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force attacked the patrol and within minutes Specialist Robinson was wounded by a rocket- propelled grenade and automatic weapons fire. Finding that the assistant machine gunner had been seriously wounded, he voluntarily left a relatively safe location and went with the machine gunner to a site directly in the path of the main hostile element. Despite his painful injuries, Specialist worked feverishly to place an intense barrage on the aggressors which helped to turn back the first wave of the assault and enabled his comrades to move casualties and establish a perimeter behind a rice paddy dike. When the machine gun ran low on ammunition, he braved the communists' fusillade to pick up a re-supply and returned to his exposed position. As he and the machine gunner were continuing to hold back the overwhelming hostile force, they were both mortally wounded by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade. Specialist Four Robinson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1538 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: Johnston, South Carolina

ROBINSON, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Robinson (0-5336691), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Second Lieutenant Robinson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 November 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an airborne infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Dak To. While setting up a perimeter atop Hill 882, his unit was heavily attacked on all sides by a reinforced North Vietnamese Army company firing automatic weapons, small arms and grenades. Lieutenant Robinson was wounded by grenade fragments as he moved to direct the fires of his men, but refused aid and helped evacuate a wounded comrade. The hostile force advanced as close as three meters to his perimeter, and he delivered deadly fire into the attackers which silenced several automatic weapons and forced a momentary lull in the assault. As he called for a machine gun to replace one that had been destroyed, the enemy renewed the vicious attack with anti-tank weapons, penetrated a portion of the perimeter, and knocked out his remaining machine gun. Although wounded again by a rocket, Lieutenant Robinson maneuvered his men into a blocking position, trapping and killing the insurgents inside the perimeter and forcing those outside to withdraw. Bleeding severely from a third wound, he crawled forward of his lines to search for a missing squad leader and was pinned down by withering machine gun and automatic weapons fire. He destroyed the machine gun with grenades and demolished another position with deadly rifle fire. Returning to his own lines, he quickly directed the evacuation of his wounded men and continued to refuse aid for his own wounds until he had secured his perimeter for the night. Second Lieutenant Robinson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 837 (February 23, 1968)

*ROBINSON, MELVIN C. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Melvin C. Robinson (248-70-6387), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with A/227th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Specialist Four Robinson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 May 1971 while serving as crewchief on an emergency medical evacuation mission near Dac To. His helicopter embarked on a mission to rescue a seriously wounded survivor of a U.S. helicopter which had crashed the day before. This involved braving intense enemy anti-aircraft fire since an estimated two enemy regiments completely surrounded the besieged firebase. Specialist Robinson realized the enemy situation and strength, but his concern for the life of a fellow American soldier overshadowed this knowledge. It was further learned that two ARVN soldiers were also critically wounded and in dire need of medical evacuation. Specialist Robinson's aircraft proceeded through the hail of fire to the firebase and picked up the seriously wounded American as well as the allied soldiers. Upon departing the firebase, his helicopter received heavy enemy fire and lost its motor before it burst into flames and crashed into the jungle. It was during this period that Specialist Robinson was killed. Specialist Robinson's personal bravery and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3412 (December 2, 1971)
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

*ROBISON, DONALD ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Robert Robison (0-98269), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop M, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Captain Robison distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1968 as commanding officer of an armored cavalry company on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Duc Hoa. When his unit suddenly encountered a well armed enemy battalion occupying fortified positions, Captain Robison skillfully maneuvered his platoons to the point of heaviest contact and personally led an attack on the hostile force. His company advanced on the Viet Cong positions in the face of an intense barrage of highly accurate automatic weapons, small arms, and anti-tank rocket fire. One of the tanks in the lead platoon sustained a direct hit from a rocket, disabling the vehicle and wounding several crewmembers. Captain Robison fearlessly maneuvered his tank toward the disabled vehicle to prevent the insurgents from annihilating its crew. Firing his main gun and the turret machine gun, he provided protection for an evacuation team attempting to remove the casualties already suffered. He and his crew were wounded when his tank took a direct hit. Disregarding his welfare, Captain Robison began to evacuate the wounded from his tank. Each time a wave of the enemy rushed his crippled vehicle, he stopped their advance with deadly suppressive fire. As the medics began moving the injured to a more secure area, Captain Robison stayed on his tank to provide covering fire for them. He was mortally wounded while selflessly placing the welfare of his fellow soldiers above his own in close combat with a determined enemy. Captain Robison's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2865 (June 15, 1968)
Home Town: College, Alaska

ROCK, PAUL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul J. Rock (US56909293), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Rock distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1967 as grenadier of a seven-man killer team on a combat mission near My Binh. The team had left its company perimeter late at night and was moving toward a small village when Specialist Rock heard the handle of a grenade pop. Realizing that he and his fellow soldiers were walking into an ambush, he immediately turned and fired on the North Vietnamese soldier holding the grenade, thus setting off the ambush before the patrol had entered its killing zone. The enemy grenade exploded and severely wounded Specialist Rock and several comrades. Ignoring his painful wounds, he got to his feet and dauntlessly charged the enemy positions through a curtain of hostile fire. Although wounded four more times by savage automatic weapons fire, he pressed his personal assault, killing one North Vietnamese soldier and wounding several others with fierce rifle fire. Specialist Rock continued to expose himself to a relentless hail of bullets as he rendered first aid to a wounded team member and then gallantly remained behind to cover the team's withdrawal. His fearless and determined actions in close combat saved the lives of all the patrol members. Specialist Four Rock's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1398 (March 28, 1968)

RODELA, JOSE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jose Rodela, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Rodela distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 September 1969 while serving as the company commander of a mobile strike force unit on an operation in Phuoc Long Province. When the battalion came under an intense barrage of mortar, rocket, and machine gun fire, Sergeant Rodela, ignoring the withering enemy fire, immediately began placing his men into defensive positions to prevent an enemy assault which might overrun the entire battalion. Repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire, he began to move from position to position, suppressing fire and assisting wounded men, and was himself wounded in the back and head by rocket shrapnel while recovering a wounded comrade. Alone, Sergeant Rodela assaulted and knocked out the rocket position. Successfully returning to the battalion's perimeter, Sergeant Rodela continued in command of his company, despite his painful wounds, throughout eighteen hours of continuous contact until he was evacuated. Sergeant First Class Rodela's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4373 (December 6, 1969)

RODRIGUEZ, ENRIQUE P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Enrique P. Rodriguez (0-5419318), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Rodriguez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1969 while leading his company on a reconnaissance-in-force mission seven miles west of Bear Cat. While sweeping an area near Fire Support Base Aachen, his unit encountered heavy machine gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire from an enemy base camp. As Captain Rodriguez organized and led an assault against the well-fortified positions, the intense barrage caused numerous friendly casualties. Disregarding his own safety, he crawled forward and laid suppressive fire on the foe, thus enabling his men to evacuate the wounded. After he had ordered his men to withdraw with the casualties, he noticed three wounded soldiers lying exposed to the strafing volleys from a hostile bunker complex. By inching forward, he was able to get close enough to one of the fortifications to destroy it with light anti-tank weapons fire. While his men placed machine gun fire on the enemy, he raced toward a second bunker and silenced it with hand grenades. His men then retrieved the three men. Captain Rodriguez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2211 (June 24, 1969)

RODRIGUEZ, FRANCISCO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francisco Rodriguez, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Staff Sergeant Rodriguez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 April 1969 as commander of a tank reconnaissance force. While moving through the jungle Sergeant Rodriguez and his men were in front of a troop when they suddenly came upon a large North Vietnamese Army base camp. An intensive volume of small arms, automatic weapons fire and antitank grenades slammed into the three vehicles. Sergeant Rodriguez immediately exposed himself to the hostile volleys as he directed counterfire against the well-entrenched enemy force. As enemy soldiers suddenly appeared out of spider hole bunkers on all sides of the vehicles, he used different types of main gun ammunition to place the most effective fire on the enemy. After one tank was hit with a rocket-propelled grenade, Sergeant Rodriguez braved the hostile fire to clear a landing zone for the evacuation of several seriously wounded crew members. On one occasion when a tank threw a track tread, he dashed through the withering hail of fire to help with the repair. Later, when another vehicle sheared a final drive shaft, he rigged a tow bar and attached the crippled tank to his own. As the three vehicles began to move toward a fire support base, they came under fire from a North Vietnamese battalion-sized force. Although he was seriously wounded, Sergeant Rodriguez directed his vehicle into a position to protect one of the tanks that had been damaged in the initial volley. He provided suppressive fire as the wounded were treated and evacuated. Sergeant Rodriguez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4383 (December 6, 1969)

*RODRIGUEZ, REINALDO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Reinaldo Rodriguez (583-10-8711), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Rodriguez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 January 1971 while serving as a member of a reconnaissance platoon during operations in Long Khanh Province. As Private Rodriguez's platoon was reconnoitering the area, they encountered a well-entrenched hostile force firing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades. Observing that an allied machine gunner was wounded and unable to defend his position, the private crawled forward to the gunner's location and began placing devastating volleys of bullets upon the hostile force. When an enemy sniper began concentrating accurate fire upon the allied defenses, Private Rodriguez exposed himself to the foe and silenced the belligerent with a well-aimed burst from his M-16 rifle. While he was in this open position, the private was wounded in the flurry of bullets. With enemy rounds striking all around him, Private Rodriguez disregarded his own pain as he felled another sniper. His platoon was running perilously low on ammunition and began to withdraw to a re-supply point. Voluntarily, the private remained at the rear to provide cover fire for his comrades. Suddenly, an enemy rocket-propelled grenade impacted just meters from him, inflicting additional wounds. Despite his weakened condition, Private Rodriguez continued to maintain suppressive fire upon the adversary until he was wounded a third time. Although evacuated immediately to the rear medical facilities, Private Rodriguez succumbed to his wounds in the early morning hours of 16 January. Private First Class Rodriguez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 920 (March 16, 1971)
Home Town: Guanica, Puerto Rico

*ROGAN, JAMES PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Paul Rogan (0-96492), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Captain Rogan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 November 1967 while serving as commanding officer of an airborne infantry company during combat operations near Dak To. His company was pinned down by withering rocket and automatic weapons fire from a large enemy force, and Captain Rogan immediately called for reinforcements and moved through a murderous hail of bullets to direct their deployment in support of his troops. When his two radio operators were killed, he personally took over communications and coordinated the actions of his platoon while maintaining contact with his higher headquarters. Completely disregarding his personal welfare, Captain Rogan repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy weapons and moved among his men to encourage them and treat the wounded. He called for medical evacuation helicopters and personally supervised the clearing of a landing zone despite continuous sniper fire which was being directed at his movements. When the helicopters arrived, he moved into the center of the open landing zone to guide them in. Savage fire forced the aircraft to discontinue their rescue mission, and Captain Rogan deployed his men in a defensive perimeter for the night. Throughout the night, he continued to expose himself to the ravaging enemy barrage to command his men in repelling repeated assaults within twenty meters of his positions. His fearless leadership inspired his troops to fight furiously and inflict a decisive defeat upon the determined enemy. Captain Rogan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1079 (March 11, 1968)
Home Town: Salt Lake City, Utah

ROGERS, BERNARD WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bernard William Rogers (0-25867), Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division. Brigadier General Rogers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 March 1967 while serving as Assistant Division Commander, 1st Infantry Division during a Viet Cong attack on a Vietnamese Special Forces camp at Cau Song Be. Upon being notified that the Vietnamese camp was under attack, he immediately flew to the area. General Rogers made several low helicopter passes over the besieged camp, despite intense hostile fire, to investigate the strength and disposition of the Viet Cong forces. He alerted nearby artillery and aircraft bases and then landed in the beleaguered camp amidst an enemy mortar barrage. He conferred with the ground commander, assessed the battle situation, and mapped a plan of defense. Exposing himself constantly to the insurgents' fire, he supervised the positioning of the defenders on the perimeter and adjusted artillery and air strikes. General Rogers' willingness to risk his life for the Vietnamese soldiers and their camp inspired the men to fight with renewed vigor. Returning to his helicopter, he made additional passes over the area to further assess the situation and to ensure that the Viet Cong positions had not changed. Flying at extremely low levels, he accurately marked the enemy concentrations with smoke grenades to aid incoming support aircraft in locating their targets. However, the fighter pilots were unable to see the smoke well enough because of the darkness and dense jungle foliage. General Rogers directed his pilot to maneuver over the insurgents at minimum altitude while the door gunner marked the targets with tracer rounds from his machine gun, enabling the supporting aircraft to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. When the Viet Cong broke contact and began to retreat, General Rogers directed additional air strikes on them, inflicting further casualties. His dynamic leadership, outstanding tactical ability and unparalleled courage were responsible for the overwhelming defeat of the insurgent forces. Brigadier General Rogers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4124 (August 14, 1967)

ROGERS, JAMES D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James D. Rogers, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the 11th Ranger Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Rogers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous during the period 8 to 10 December 1965. On 8 December, the South Vietnamese ranger battalion to which Captain Rogers was assigned as Senior Advisor, came under heavy hostile mortar and small arms fire which wounded the battalion commander and his radio operator. After administering first aid, Captain Rogers elected to remain behind to provide fire for the withdrawal of the wounded. While moving to join the remainder of the personnel assigned to the command post, he noticed four insurgents attempting a flanking movement. Killing three of the insurgents, Captain Rogers was forced to withdraw through a partially destroyed village. Captain Rogers saw the wounded battalion commander lying on the ground exposed to insurgent fire. Without regard for his own personal safety, he shouldered his wounded comrade-in-arms and carried him, under intensive fire, to the battalion medic. He exposed himself to a continuous hail of small arms fire while supervising the remainder of the battalion in preparation for withdrawal. Captain Rogers personally attended the wounded, redistributed ammunition, and inspired both Vietnamese and United States personnel by his examples of dedication to duty and concern for the welfare of the individual soldier without regard to personal safety. Captain Rogers' extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 107 (1966)
Home Town: San Marcos, Texas

ROGERS, ROBERT B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert B. Rogers, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), [then Warrant Officer W1], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 7th Squadron, 17th Air Cavalry, 17th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer W2 Rogers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 November 1969 while commanding a transport helicopter during a rescue operation near the Duc Lap Special Forces camp. Responding to an urgent request to evacuate crewmen from downed United States helicopters, Warrant Officer Rogers and his crew sped to the contact area and discovered that the selected landing zone was vulnerable to fire from enemy positions. Undaunted, Mister Rogers maneuvered his aircraft into the pickup site. Upon receiving intense enemy machine gun and automatic weapons fire which wounded the co-pilot and heavily damaged his helicopter, Warrant Officer Rogers was forced to abort the rescue attempt. Skillfully maintaining control of his crippled aircraft, Mister Rogers flew it back to the friendly camp at Duc Lap where he made an emergency landing. After learning that allied ground troops engaged in bitter fighting with the adversary needed immediate evacuation, Warrant Officer Rogers unhesitatingly volunteered to fly his damaged craft back to the contact area in darkness and without the aid of navigation lights. Although receiving a deluge of hostile anti-aircraft fire as he approached the location of the friendly troops, Mister Rogers continued into the pickup zone and safely extracted seven infantrymen, transporting them to near facilities. Then the determined Mister Rogers returned once again to the conflict area in search of additional downed airmen. Spotting a flashing strobe light used by comrades on the ground, Warrant Officer Rogers fearlessly descended amid a barrage of enemy bullets and remained on station until the downed crewman was safely aboard. Still under heavy fire, Warrant Officer Rogers took evasive measures, maneuvering his badly crippled ship out of the combat zone. Miraculously, Mister Rogers maintained complete control of this aircraft despite the extensive damage it had sustained and successfully guided it back to his base. Mister Rogers' skill and determined professionalism were instrumental in saving the lives of eight of his compatriots. Chief Warrant Officer W2 Rogers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 75 (January 8, 1971)

*ROLLINS, DALE FRANKLIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dale Franklin Rollins (RA19467203), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Rollins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 November 1968 as first sergeant of an infantry company at Fire Base Vera. When his unit came under an intense enemy mortar and rocket attack, Sergeant Rollins unhesitatingly left the safety of the command bunker and moved through the hostile barrage to check the bunker line and render aid and encouragement to the wounded. Finding a critically injured officer, he treated the man's wounds and had him taken to the helicopter pad for immediate evacuation. He next went to a section of the perimeter which was receiving heavy small arms and grenade fire. When he arrived he spotted and killed a North Vietnamese soldier who had breached the perimeter. After warning the bunker line that the aggressors bad broken through the defensive wire, he spotted four more enemy troops. Alerting a fellow soldier to their location, Sergeant Rollins approached and spoke to them In Vietnamese. Confused by his action, the communists exposed themselves and were killed by him and his comrade. One of the enemy who had crossed the perimeter opened fire from the rear, mortally wounding Sergeant Rollins. Sergeant First Class Rollins' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 291 (January 25, 1969)
Home Town: St. Ignatius, Montana

ROMERO, ARTENIO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Artenio Romero, Jr. (RA19365858), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Sergeant First Class Romero distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 May 1968 during a combat mission against a battalion-sized enemy force located on a ridge near the village of Phu Vinh Dong. The enemy held extremely well fortified positions. Sergeant Romero's company came under a devastating mortar attack as it neared the North Vietnamese fortifications. Sergeant Romero organized and deployed his men to provide suppressive fire on the attackers, and then began a personal assault on the enemy bunkers. After successfully destroying three emplacements, he learned that his platoon leader and another man were wounded and pinned down in front of the bunker line. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved across open terrain through a withering hail of bullets to aid the men. Reaching them, he dressed their wounds and assisted them to safety. He next learned that another man had been shot and pinned down within ten meters of an enemy trench. As he started up the steep slope toward the man he encountered and killed two North Vietnamese soldiers about to overrun a friendly machine gun crew. Continuing toward the injured man, he was fired at by an enemy soldier hiding in a hole only a few feet from him. The bullet pierced his helmet and threw him to the ground. Despite his dazed condition, he got up and killed his attacker. Along with several volunteers who had moved up to assist him, he again advanced up the hill. He and two other men were wounded by the heavy enemy fire. Sergeant Romero gave first aid to himself and the other two casualties and then helped carry them back to safety. Undaunted by the strong opposition he returned to the battle and destroyed the enemy bunker which had halted his rescue attempt. He then advanced to extract his fallen comrade, but this time the wounded man's position had been overrun. The North Vietnamese were assaulting toward Sergeant Romero and their increased volume of fire forced him to withdraw to the main body of the company. Platoon Sergeant Romero's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4036 (August 20, 1968)

*RONIGER, JUNIOR FLOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Junior Floyd Roniger (RA16870457), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Sergeant Roniger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 February 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a reconnaissance-in-force mission east of Ben Tre in Kien Hoa Province. While his company was being inserted into a landing zone, it came under small arms, automatic weapons, rocket and mortar fire from an estimated Viet Cong battalion occupying fortified bunkers in a nearby woodline. Sergeant Roniger led an assault until the intensity of the enemy barrage forced him and his men to take cover behind a dike within a hundred meters of the woodline. Disregarding his safety, he braved a hail of bullets to maneuver along the dike and direct the fire of his men. As he was exposing himself to the Viet Cong to provide covering fire for a medic who was trying to reach a casualty, he was hit in the shoulder and knocked down. Disregarding his wound, he dragged himself to a better vantage point and continued to fire at the communists. When the medic was temporarily blinded by an exploding enemy rocket, Sergeant Roniger fearlessly stood up to effectively engage a machine gun position. While he was firing at the emplacement, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. Sergeant Roniger's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1534 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: Trenton, Illinois

ROSE, GARY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary M. Rose, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as a medical aidman with a company-size exploitation force, Command and Control (Central), Task Force 1, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 12 September 1970, his company was engaged by a well armed hostile force. Enemy B-40 rockets and mortar rounds rained while the foe sprayed the area with small arms, automatic weapons, and machine gun fire, wounding many and forcing everyone to seek cover. One ally, was unable to reach protective shelter due to his weakened condition. Sergeant Rose, braving the bullet-infested fire zone, sprinted fifty meters to his downed comrade's side. The sergeant then used his own body to protect the casualty from further injury while treating his wounds. After stopping the blood flow from the wound, Sergeant Rose carried the man back through the bullet-ridden zone to protective cover. As the belligerents accelerated their attack, Sergeant Rose continued to disregard his own safety as he ran from casualty to casualty, administering emergency first aid. Suddenly, a B-40 rocket impacted just meters from Sergeant Rose, knocking him from his feet and inflicting wounds throughout his body. Ignoring his own pain, Sergeant Rose struggled to his feet and continued to administer medical treatment to the other injured soldiers. As night approached, the order was given to dig defensive slit trenches. Sergeant Rose, his own wounds yet untreated, worked tirelessly to excavate many trenches for the severely injured who were unable to dig their own, stopping only when all the casualties had been placed in safe positions. All through the night and into the next day, the foe pounded the allied force with a continuous barrage of B-40 rockets and mortars. Despite the deadly volleys falling around him, Sergeant Rose displayed a calm professionalism as he administered medical treatment to countless men; two were so severely wounded that they would have died without the sergeant's vigilant care. Finally, on 14 September, the company was successfully extracted from the embattled area by helicopter support ships. Sergeant Rose, though tired and wounded, refused evacuation until all other casualties were safely out of the area.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 143 (January 1, 1971)

*ROSE, ONSBY RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Onsby Ray Rose (RA15697809), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Rose distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1966 while serving as radio-telephone operator for a company involved in providing security for a helicopter landing zone deep in hostile territory. Early in the evening, his company was attacked by a large enemy force using automatic weapons, small arms and hand grenades. As the fierce fighting increased, a machine gunner was wounded, weakening defenses in a critical position. Specialist Rose, without regard for his own safety, grabbed a machine gun and braved the withering fire to take his place on the line. His heavy and accurate fire on the enemy caused many casualties and forced the insurgents to retreat. As the firing subsided, an enemy hand grenade landed in his position. Seeing that he could not throw it away before exploding, Specialist Rose bravely threw himself on the grenade to save his assistant gunner. His immeasurably courageous action to save his comrade resulted in the loss of his life. Specialist Four Rose's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4428 (August 30, 1967)
Home Town: Clinchco, Virginia

ROSS, EDGAR A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edgar A. Ross, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Ross distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 March 1969 while leading a platoon on a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province. As the platoon members moved across an open field, they were ambushed and pinned down by a North Vietnamese force. Many casualties were immediately inflicted by the rain of grenades hurled at the platoon. Sergeant Ross, remaining calm, directed the foremost fire team to the assistance of the rear element who were receiving the brunt of the attack. Grabbing a machine gun, Sergeant Ross ran forward to spray suppressive fire on the assaulting communists in order to gain fire superiority. Becoming the main target of fire, he soon was wounded by the enemy. Observing a casualty trapped close to the enemy position, he managed to drag the man back to the remaining members of the platoon despite his own wounds. When reinforcements arrived, he was so weak due to the loss of blood, that he was unable to assist his men in their evacuation. Platoon Sergeant Ross's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3045 (August 11, 1969)

*ROUSH, WILLIAM WAKEFIELD
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Wakefield Roush (0-74477), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Major Roush distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 January 1968 while accompanying an infantry company conducting a combat mission near Bo Tuc. The unit had just completed an airmobile assault on a landing zone adjacent to a North Vietnamese Army battalion base camp when the departing helicopters were subjected to intense hostile automatic weapons fire. One of the ship exploded into flames and crashed several hundred meters away, leaving its crew members stranded amid North Vietnamese positions. Savage heavy enemy machine gun fire also erupted on the infiltrated company. Major Roush fearlessly raced into the bullet-swept landing zone to rescue several troops who were pinned down by the raking fusillade. He sprayed the enemy emplacements with deadly carbine fire, killing three North Vietnamese gunners, and proceeded to extract his men from the landing zone. Continually braving a withering hail of bullets, Major Roush made repeated trips across the exposed terrain until he had guided all his troops to cover. He then quickly organized a patrol to rescue the beleaguered crew of the downed helicopter. Daringly leading his team through a maze of occupied North Vietnamese positions, he successfully reached the crash site and maneuvered the group to safety. His gallant and determined actions in the heat of battle saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Major Roush's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1836 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: Houston, Texas
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

*ROUSH, WILLIAM WAKEFIELD
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Wakefield Roush (0-74477), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Major Roush distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1968 as operations officer of an infantry battalion operating near Saigon. While moving along a narrow path between two canals, one platoon of his force was subjected to intense enemy small arms fire from the front and both flanks and several casualties were sustained. Major Roush directed two companies into the area to assist the beleaguered platoon, but they were immediately engaged in separate fire fights. Moving into the enemy fire, he noticed one company commander asking for volunteers to move ahead and provide covering fire for the trapped platoon. Directing the officer to stay in his location and maintain radio contact with the other elements, Major Roush led the volunteers down one of the canals toward the platoon's position. Unsuccessful in this attempt to join with the trapped element, he returned to the company command post and, with three other volunteers, began crawling into the path of the enemy fire. While trying to reach the platoon's casualties, his group was detected, and the enemy opened up with brutal small arms fire, mortally wounding Major Roush. His actions, however, had diverted the insurgents' attention to his own position, allowing the battered platoon to escape the deadly cross fire and find safety. Major Roush's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3185 (July 4, 1968)
Home Town: Houston, Texas
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

*ROUSKA, DENNIS LEON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dennis Leon Rouska (533-52-5221), Sergeant [then Specialist Fourth Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 46th Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Sergeant Rouska distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1970 while serving as a machine gunner in a rifle platoon during the night of a mortar attack. As the lethal mortar rounds began falling, Sergeant Rouska unhesitatingly left his secure position and maneuvered through the exploding enemy rounds to aid his wounded comrades. Although wounded by fragmentation, he remained exposed to the fusillade of rounds impacting around him. Attempting to administer first aid, Sergeant Rouska heard an incoming mortar round, and, realizing the full implication of his sacrifice, he threw himself upon his comrade, shielding him from the exploding mortar. Through his indomitable courage, disregard for his safety and concern for his fellow soldier, he averted the loss of a life. Sergeant Rouska's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 32 (August 3, 1972)
Home Town: Cosmopolis, Washington

ROWLAND, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Rowland, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Second Lieutenant Rowland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 June 1970 while serving as platoon leader during combat operations in Cambodia. On this date, Lieutenant Rowland's company was engaged by a large, well concealed enemy force firing small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket grenade launchers. Reacting immediately to the intense hostile fire, the lieutenant maneuvered among his men to direct their suppressive fire and locate them in strategic defensive positions. When the allies ran perilously low on ammunition, Lieutenant Rowland utilized a bomb crater as a drop zone and directed a helicopter re-supply operation. Although wounded by enemy fire, Lieutenant Rowland continued to distribute the ammunition to his men. Exposing himself to intense hostile fire, he lieutenant, on two separate occasions, charged forward through the fusillade to shield a medic and a wounded soldier with his body. After securing a landing zone, he supervised the helicopter evacuation of his wounded men amid a hail of enemy fire. Then, refusing to allow his own wounds to be treated, he remained with his men throughout the night to direct their defenses against the determined enemy force. Second Lieutenant Rowland's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5218 (December 4, 1970)

ROWSER, PRESTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Preston Rowser (RA16622409), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Rowser distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1969 during a mortar and ground attack against Patrol Base Diamond. While Sergeant Rowser was pouring fire into the advancing enemy, a rocket-propelled grenade destroyed his bunker and wounded him in the neck, shoulder and chest. Making his way through the communists' fusillade to a secondary defensive position, he began placing accurate fire on a number of aggressors who had succeeded in breaching the perimeter. Although exposed to a hail of bullets and in pain from his wounds, he succeeded in killing six of the foe and pinning down the others until artillery and gun ships raked the enemy-held sector. He then organized a counterattack, braving continuing hostile mortar, rocket-propelled grenade and machine gun fire to throw hand grenades and fire his rifle at the remaining infiltrators. Once the bunker line was restored, Sergeant Rowser helped evacuate casualties and led a sweep along the perimeter. Sergeant First Class Rowser's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1752 (May 15, 1969)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

ROZELLE, JOSEPH H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph H. Rozelle (OF-101799), Major (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Major Rozelle distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 April 1968 while leading a mounted ground assault against the enemy at Coa Bang. His second platoon encountered a bunker complex concealed in a treeline, and as six armored personnel carriers neared the position, Major Rozelle's entire command received intense automatic weapons fire from machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades. He pressed the attack toward the foe with a drive into the treeline in an effort to breach the first bunker line. Heavy ground fire caused the ground element to halt its advance, although Major Rozelle's element drove relentlessly into the enemy bunker line. During the assault, the machine gunner and the radio-telephone operator on Major Rozelle's track vehicle were seriously wounded. Major Rozelle then manned the machine gun and continued to do so during the entire mounted portion of the assault. As his armored personnel carrier broke through the treeline, he found his element surrounded and receiving barrages from all sides. He called in air strikes and then advanced to insure that contact was maintained with the disorganized enemy force. Receiving ground fire from the bunker complex again, he called in deadly accurate air strikes which destroyed the enemy emplacements and routed them from the area. Major Rozelle's courageous determination in the face of heavy enemy resistance significantly contributed to lessening of communist activity in the Coa Bang region. Major Rozelle's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2049 (June 11, 1969)

RUBIN, KENNETH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth E. Rubin (0-5406362), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 334th Assault Helicopter Company, 145th Combat Aviation Battalion, 12th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Rubin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as mission commander of a firefly-heavy fire team at Bien Hoa Air Force Base. As his team refueled in the early morning hours after their third mission, the base came under heavy rocket and mortar fire. Captain Rubin and his ream immediately sought out the launching positions, directing devastating aerial rocket and machine gun fire into them. Returning to Bien Hoa after completing this and another engagement, they found the east end of the perimeter under intense automatic weapons attack. Captain Rubin exposed the enemy positions by flying low and attracting their fire, enabling his gunships to then rake the Viet Cong. His helicopter was hit, and both the pilot and gunner were wounded. He secured another ship, and next aided a ground unit which had sent an urgent request for gunship support. This accomplished, his team continued the search for the enemy. Locating a force of nearly two hundred Viet Cong, Captain Rubin directed his team in strikes on them, while he lay down a sheet of fire to keep the enemy from escaping. As daylight came, more hostile positions were discovered and silenced. Spotting two wounded Air Force guards caught between enemy forces, Captain Rubin directed his ships in an attack on the Viet Cong positions which annihilated them and permitted him to land and rescue the trapped men. He then coordinated with ground security forces as they swept the area and wiped out the remaining resistance. Captain Rubin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4314 (September 11, 1968)

*RUCKER, JOHN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John William Rucker (US222302703), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C (Ranger), 75th Infantry Regiment (Airborne), 17th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Sergeant Rucker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 December 1970, while serving as assistant team leader to a six-man patrol during ground operations near Tuy Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. As the small unit advanced along a narrow trail, the lead man observed a large enemy force moving toward the friendly element along the path. Immediately, the American patrol hastened into an ambush position paralleling the enemy avenue of approach. Although vastly outnumbered, Sergeant Rucker and another team member initiated contact with the foe as they unleashed a barrage of claymore anti-personnel mines and automatic weapons fire. Utilizing the element of surprise, Sergeant Rucker's stratagem resulted in the elimination of approximately ten belligerents. The foe reacted to the initial onslaught with fragmentation grenades and automatic weapons fire while attempting to maneuver into position surrounding Sergeant Rucker's team. Realizing the peril caused by the threat of encirclement, Sergeant Rucker exposed himself to the hail of enemy rounds as he fought to prevent the foe from flanking and trapping his men, Suddenly, Sergeant Rucker was knocked to the ground by a flurry of bullets. Although painfully wounded, the sergeant refused medical assistance and continued his mission of resistance. Numerous enemy troops attempted to overrun the friendly perimeter, but Sergeant Rucker challenged the charge with accurate bursts from his M-16 rifle. Refusing to relinquish his position in the face of the enemy counter-attack, the tenacious Sergeant Rucker held his ground until his injuries weakened him and caused him to fall unconscious. Moments later, American medical helicopters and gunships arrived at the scene to evacuate the beleaguered troops. Sergeant Rucker succumbed to his wounds en route to the base hospital. Sergeant Rucker's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 963 (March 20, 1971)
Home Town: Roanoke, Virginia

*RUSHING, GARY GRANT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary Grant Rushing (RA14872076), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Rushing distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 October 1966 while serving as pointman with a platoon of the 35th Infantry on a search and destroy mission. Leading the unit out of the landing zone, Private Rushing alertly spotted and fired on two North Vietnamese soldiers ahead of him. After mortar fire was placed in the area to their front, Private Rushing again took the point. When he suddenly received hostile sniper fire, he dauntlessly returned the fire, allowing the platoon time to deploy just before the entire area erupted into a fierce battle. When a soldier's rifle jammed, Private Rushing daringly exposed himself, ran to the man's side and provided covering fire until the weapon was repaired. Then, as the enemy began to assault from another direction, he fearlessly shed his cumbersome web gear, picked up his grenades and advanced alone through the dense undergrowth. Disregarding the intense hostile fire directed at him, Private Rushing continued to charge while firing his weapon and throwing grenades. Through his courageous actions he killed three insurgents and inspired his comrades to rout the enemy; however, he was mortally wounded by hostile fire as he attempted to return for more ammunition. Private First Class Rushing's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3134 (June 24, 1967)
Home Town: Winston-Salem, North Carolina

*RUSSELL, GREGORY ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gregory Allen Russell (RA18911190), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Russell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 May 1968 as a radio operator during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near the village of Da Phuoc. He was in the point squad when his company began to cross a river to establish a night defensive position. Just as he entered the water, his squad came under extremely heavy enemy fire which wounded him and threw him into the river. Finding his radio inoperative, he ignored the pain of his injury and swam ashore to obtain another radio. He then reentered the water and swam more than fifty meters to the side of his platoon leader. Completely exposed to the continuing enemy fire, Specialist Russell provided desperately needed communications until he received a mortal wound from a sniper's bullet. Specialist Four Russell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4493 (September 25, 1968)
Home Town: Rio Linda, California

 

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