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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
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M

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

 

MACE, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James E. Mace (0-98342), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Mace distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 2 to 4 December 1968 while commanding his company on a search and clear mission near Dong Xoai. When his point element came under heavy fire, Captain Mace moved forward and directed his men in a flanking movement which forced the enemy to retreat from their bunkers. He then led his unit through the hostile emplacements to link with a sister company in a night defensive position. Braving intense enemy fire, he organized a rescue party and led it from the night location to rescue the crew of an ammunition re-supply helicopter shot down by the communists. On the next day, he led his unit in an attack against another bunker complex. After exposing himself to the vicious enemy fire to carry a wounded man to safety, Captain Mace stood up to spot the enemy gunners, personally killing two and wounding three of them. Finding that the foe was attempting to encircle his company, he ordered a withdrawal and remained behind to direct rocket artillery to within one hundred meters of his position. While returning to the same site from another direction the following day, the unit was hit by command detonated mines and heavy machine gun fire which caused several casualties. Captain Mace led his men on an assault of the enemy fortifications, killing one communist and rescuing two wounded comrades from under the hostile fusillade. As a result of this action, a major enemy supply complex was destroyed. Captain Mace's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 838 (March 9, 1969)

*MADDOX, JULIUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Julius Maddox (54968086), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Maddox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Hoi An. While crossing an open, dry rice paddy, his unit was hit by devastating fire from enemy soldiers entrenched in camouflaged positions within two meters of the friendly forces. The ravaging small arms and machine gun barrage killed or wounded many of the men in his platoon during the initial moments of the ambush, and the remainder of the friendly force withdrew to the concealment offered by a nearby cane field. With complete disregard for his welfare, Private Maddox sprinted across the bare terrain under a hail of fire to reach a wounded comrade and carry him to safety. Seeing a fellow medic hit, he returned through withering enemy machine gun fire to move the man to a helicopter evacuation landing zone. When the rescue ships arrived, he placed his patients aboard, secured a litter from one of the crews, and returned to aid soldiers still trapped in the deadly killing zone. He was shot in both legs by North Vietnamese fire, but ignored his wounds to carry another casualty to the waiting aircraft. He was urged to board the helicopter for evacuation, but he refused any aid for himself and returned to rescue more wounded. Only when he was certain that all his injured comrades were safe did he allow treatment and evacuation for himself. His courageous and selfless actions in the heat of battle were directly responsible for saving the lives of several fellow soldiers. Private First Class Maddox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2555 (May 29, 1968)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

MAGOUYRK, JAMES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James R. Magouyrk, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Magouyrk distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 February 1969 while serving as a rifle platoon leader during operations near Phan Thiet in Binh Thuan Province. When combined elements of the South Vietnamese Army and Regional/Popular Forces encountered heavy enemy contact during the defense of the city, Lieutenant Magouyrk and his unit were flown in to reinforce the allied elements. As the helicopters touched down, enemy B-40 rocket and small arms fire burst from bunkers surrounding the landing zone. Immediately Lieutenant Magouyrk disembarked and set up defensive positions. He continually exposed himself to the fusillade to pull casualties to a safe area for medical evacuation and to redistribute ammunition among his men. Observing an enemy in a nearby bunker preparing to launch a rocket, he charged the fortification, destroying it with hand grenades and capturing the rocket launcher. While supervising a sweep of an area vacated by the enemy, he was wounded by hostile fire. Not until he had organized his men into a defensive night position did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. First Lieutenant Magouryk's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3079 (August 12, 1969)

MALACHI, RONALD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald E. Malachi (US56694642), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light), Americal Division. Staff Sergeant Malachi distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 and 6 January 1968 as squad leader of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation. His unit was ambushed on the morning of 5 January by a Viet Cong force firing machine guns and automatic weapons from well-fortified positions, and he joined a fire team which advanced toward one of the hostile bunkers. As his platoon leader, a member of the team, began to charge the bunker alone, Sergeant Malachi stood up to draw a hail of enemy fire away from the officer and toward himself. Braving the devastating fusillade, he joined the assault on the position and destroyed it, forcing the remaining insurgents to flee. Later in the day, his company was again attacked. Sergeant Malachi quickly deployed his men in a tight defensive perimeter and then moved through intense enemy fire to search for casualties and dispersed elements of the company. With the unit consolidated, he repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile weapons and moved along his lines to repel probes by the determined attackers. He detected a particularly effective North Vietnamese mortar position supported by two machine guns and, disregarding his personal safety, he furiously assaulted them until his ammunition was expended. Heedless of bullets striking all around him, he returned to his perimeter, secured a machine gun and continued his attack on the hostile weapons. Standing erect, he delivered deadly fire on the enemy positions at close range and destroyed all three emplacements. Early in the morning of 6 January, the insurgents directed a fierce rocket and mortar attack on the company command group. Sergeant Malachi immediately organized a security force to cover the command group's withdrawal. He then took up an exposed position and repulsed strong enemy probes until reinforcements arrived. Staff Sergeant Malachi's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1854 (April 22, 1968)

*MALAVE-RIOS, ABELARDO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Abelardo Malave-Rios (RA50101308), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. First Sergeant Malave-Rios distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1968 while defending against a massive attack on his unit's perimeter by a North Vietnamese Army force. His unit was guarding the battalion fire base when it was subjected to a savage ground attack. Exposing himself to the deadly automatic weapons fire, Sergeant Malave-Rios moved along the defensive perimeter shouting commands, pointing out targets and giving words of encouragement to his men. When an exploding grenade wounded a machine gunner, he immediately moved to the weapon and poured a concentrated volume of fire into the charging enemy troops. Several well-aimed bursts of fire killed five North Vietnamese as they assaulted his position. When this enemy foray had been repelled, he moved to aid several soldiers who had been wounded. Despite constant enemy fire, he treated their wounds and made several trips to a nearby bunker, carrying a wounded man to safety each time. He continued to expose himself to the fusillade until all the wounded had been taken to the landing zone for medical evacuation. Sergeant Malave-Rios then assumed the responsibility of guiding the arriving helicopters and prepared to load the wounded. As the first helicopter landed, the landing zone came under intense enemy fire, mortally wounding Sergeant Malave-Rios as he selflessly placed the welfare of his men above his own safety. First Sergeant Malave-Rios' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2886 (June 17, 1968)
Home Town: New York, New York

MALONEY, GEORGE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George A. Maloney, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action. Major George A. Maloney, Infantry, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, from 26 April to 30 April 1964. With full knowledge that a helicopter evacuation was not possible for at least three days, Colonel Maloney unhesitatingly joined a Vietnamese Strike Force Patrol that had been harassed by the Viet Cong for over two weeks as it penetrated deep into insurgent controlled territory. While the discouraged, sick, and wounded defenders were anticipating the aerial evacuation, Colonel Maloney encouraged them to continue to defend themselves. He reorganized the patrol and, while exposed to sporadic gun fire, led the troops into positions to construct a landing zone and establish a perimeter of defense for the arriving aircraft. As the first helicopter landed, it became the target of heavy gun fire from multiple automatic weapons and was badly damaged. Although the armed helicopters repeatedly suppressed the gun fires on known enemy positions and the evacuation operation was resumed several times, the perimeter of defense became smaller and smaller throughout the air lifts. Despite the decrease in the defense patrol and the increase in the intensity of enemy gun fire at closer range, Colonel Maloney demonstrated complete disregard for his own safety and directed return fire into enemy positions. With fortitude, determination, and indomitable courage, he continued to expose himself to the heavy enemy gun fire to cover the loading zone until the last evacuation helicopter had landed. Colonel Maloney's extraordinary heroic actions and conspicuous gallantry are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 19 (May 28, 1965)

MALONEY, ROBERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert W. Maloney (US50203024), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 3d Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Specialist Four Maloney distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 16 May 1968 as a ninety millimeter recoilless rifle gunner during operations southwest of Saigon. As his platoon moved to the aid of a company which was heavily engaged with a large enemy force, it was hit on three sides by intense hostile force coming from well fortified enemy positions in the tree lines. Advancing with his unit through knee-deep mud to within fifty meters of the attacker's emplacements, Specialist Maloney saw two comrades who had been overcome by heat exhaustion. He unhesitatingly crossed open marsh to rescue the two men and carried them one at a time two hundred and fifty meters through hostile fire to safety. Returning to his weapon he continued to engage the enemy and destroyed a key bunker. One squad of his platoon then came under a barrage of enemy mortars and automatic weapons fire from three separate positions. Moving forward seventy-five meters, Specialist Maloney took the emplacements under fire and destroyed all three with devastating accuracy. He next went to aid a squad member who lay injured within twenty-five meters of the enemy fortifications. While bringing the man back to friendly lines he was seriously wounded by an exploding hostile grenade. Specialist Four Maloney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4521 (September 28, 1968)

*MANGAN, MICHAEL ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Robert Mangan (US56703895), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Mangan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 August 1968 while serving with a mechanized infantry company combating a large enemy force in the Ben Cui rubber plantation. The communists began a human wave assault. Specialist Mangan maneuvered his armored personnel carrier into a position from which it could deliver the most effective firepower and began firing his light anti-tank weapon into the charging enemy. Constantly exposed to the intense hostile fusillade, he continued firing until ordered to withdraw. As he maneuvered his assault vehicle into a defensive position, it was struck by an enemy rocket which caused it to burst into flames. Specialist Mangan again exposed himself to the communist's barrage to extinguish the fire and was wounded in the arm. The vehicle was then struck by a mortar round. Finding the carrier inoperative, he ran to another assault vehicle to assist its machinegunner in delivering suppressive fire on the enemy. When the gunner had expended his ammunition, Specialist Mangan ran through a hail of bullets to obtain a resupply from his demobilized track. As he climbed into the vehicle it was struck by a rocket, knocking him to the ground. Struggling to his feet, he picked up the vital ammunition and returned it to the machine gunner's position. While handing the resupply to his comrade, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Mangan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5006 (October 29, 1968)
Home Town: Costa Mesa, California

MANGLONA, MARTIN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Martin A. Manglona (RA50010158), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Manglona distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early hours of 23 February 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Tinh Bien Province. Staff Sergeant Manglona's company's night defensive position was attacked by a North Vietnamese Army company using mortars, rockets and hand grenades and, in the first minutes of the fighting, Sergeant Manglona, his platoon leader and the radio operator were wounded by an incoming mortar. Despite his painful injury, he evacuated his stricken comrades and quickly deployed his men to effectively engage the enemy. Braving the hostile fusillade, he resupplied his troops with ammunition, directed their fire, hurled grenades and helped evacuate other casualties. While helping to defend the most vulnerable section of the perimeter, he was blinded by fragments from an enemy rocket. Sergeant Manglona ordered his men to place him so that his weapon was aimed at the communists, and refused to be evacuated until the attack was repelled. Staff Sergeant Manglona's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1730 (May 14, 1969)

MANLEY, GLEN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Glen R. Manley (RA18662198), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Manley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 November 1955 while serving as team leader within his platoon during a search and destroy mission near Di An. Moving ahead of his unit, Specialist Manley discovered a booby trap and disarmed it before his mean reached that position. During a subsequent search, a grenade was thrown among the men. Specialist Manley shouted a warning, picked up the grenade, and hurled it back towards the Viet Cong. In the following outburst of fire from the insurgents, he noticed that the most effective fire was coming from a group of bunkers and crawled on his stomach to within five meters of one of them. Again a grenade fell near him. Undaunted, he threw that grenade back into the bunker and two of his own after it. The insurgents retreated. Noticing the friendly unit removing its casualties from the field, the Viet Cong attacked again. Specialist Manley, however, had entered their bunker and prevented them from effectively striking his comrades. While his unit moved from its dangerous position to a helicopter landing zone, it received sniper fire. Fearlessly, Specialist Manley raced towards the sniper and silenced him. At the landing zone, snipers continued to harass the platoon. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Manley single-handedly maintained a guard post at the tree line, protecting his unit until all of the casualties had been evacuated. Specialist Four Manley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2378 (May 25, 1967)

MANSFIELD, GORDON H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon H. Mansfield (0-5325599), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne) 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Captain Mansfield distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 February 1968 as commanding officer of an airborne infantry company on a search and clear operation near Hai Lang. When his company came under devastating enemy fire, he immediately maneuvered his elements into positions for an attack. Receiving word that one platoon had been pinned down by enemy automatic weapons fire, he led a second platoon into position for a frontal assault upon the enemy. When the attack stalled in the face of ravaging fire, he led five men to the enemy's flank. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he led a savage charge upon the enemy position that completely destroyed it. Captain Mansfield repeatedly exposed himself to enemy weapons fire to evacuate his wounded men. While moving the casualties to safety, he was seriously wounded. Refusing aid, he continued to direct the evacuation of the wounded and coordinated with an adjoining company for aid. Only when he was certain that his men were safe did he agree to his own evacuation. Captain Mansfield's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2945 (June 20, 1968)

MARECEK, GEORGE
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Marecek, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-401, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Major Marecek distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 2 to 4 March 1967. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5999 (1967)
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MARI, LOUIS A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis A. Mari (0-98818), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. First Lieutenant Mari distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 - 12 March 1966 while serving as Executive Officer, Officer at Camp A Shau, Republic of Vietnam. On 9 March 1966, the camp was attacked by a large Viet Cong force. Without regard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Mari braved the insurgent fire ran 200 Meters to his position where he helped to organize the confused and stunned defenders and hold off the insurgent attack. Later in the day he was to accompany a detail to secure and cover an airstrip for the landing of two aircraft to evacuate a seriously wounded American. Upon returning to the camp, he was faced with the insurgent main attack upon the camp. Lieutenant Mari immediately formed a perimeter and held his position until the insurgents broke into the camp from the rear, forcing Lieutenant Mari and his comrades to take a different position in the camp. Observing a large insurgent horde massing for an attack on the communications bunker, he and another American boldly fought off the attack until the weapon was destroyed and the American was killed. He then led a small force in counterattack which halted the Viet Cong assault and drove them back with heavy casualties. Repeated attacks from the large Viet Cong forces brought about the order for the friendly defenders to withdraw from the camp, at which time Lieutenant Mari destroyed the radios and classified documents and prepared the wounded men for evacuation. He then led his troops through 500 meters of intense fire and fought a delaying action until all the defenders had cleared the camp. Lieutenant Mari continued to evade the Viet Cong and direct evacuation of his men for several days until he was rescued by a helicopter. Lieutenant Mari's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 204 (August 26, 1966)
Home Town: Stone Mountain, Georgia

MARINACCI, JACK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack L. Marinacci (US56588320), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 6th Battalion, 29th Artillery, 4th Infantry Division Artillery, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Marinacci distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 August 1968 while serving with an artillery forward observer team accompanying a two-platoon reconnaissance patrol in the Central Highlands northwest of Dak To. While preparing a night location, the unit came under heavy enemy recoilless rifle, mortar and small arms fire. Realizing that immediate artillery support was required, Private Marinacci ran through the murderous fusillade to the forward observation post to assist in calling in artillery fire. Racing toward the post he was wounded, however he continued to the position where he found the company commander and the forward observer had been killed in action and the radios damaged. Ignoring his wounds, he fearlessly exposed himself to the aggressor's fire until he located a working radio. Private Marinacci then assumed command of the surviving elements and made contact with the battalion commander. After leading his comrades out of the killing zone, he returned to the exposed hill top with a small group to evacuate the wounded. He left the area only after he conducted a complete check to insure that all wounded personnel had been evacuated. Private Marinacci then led the group to another night location where he established a tight defensive perimeter and adjusted artillery fire to provide security during the night. At daybreak he supervised the extraction of the unit by helicopter. Private First Class Marinacci's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5679 (December 10, 1968)

MARINOVICH, BRANKO B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Branko B. Marinovich (0-2319333), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Marinovich distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 May 1967 while serving as Commanding Officer of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission forty miles from Pleiku. When another company of his battalion was attacked and surrounded by a North Vietnamese force, Lieutenant Marinovich immediately rushed his company to assist in repelling the attack. En route to the battle area, his unit was stopped by heavy automatic weapons fire, but they fought their way through the enemy positions to the friendly company. Finding the commanding officer of the company mortally wounded, Lieutenant Marinovich took command and organized both units into a defensive perimeter. Ignoring his personal safety, he exposed himself to hostile fire to direct air and artillery attacks on enemy positions. He was painfully wounded in the latter stages of battle but refused medical aid until the enemy was defeated. Still under sporadic fire, he directed the evacuation of friendly casualties and was wounded once more before being evacuated himself. First Lieutenant Marinovich's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4469 (September 1, 1967)

MARK, MARION L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Marion L. Mark (W-3154644), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 176th Aviation Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Warrant Officer Mark distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 October 1967 as pilot of a utility helicopter supporting ground operations near Chu Lai. An airborne infantry company conducting search and clear operations was heavily engaged by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force firing automatic weapons from well-concealed and fortified positions. The friendly force expended much of its ammunition and requested immediate re-supply. Aware that intense enemy antiaircraft fire had destroyed five helicopters and prevented gunship support, Warrant Officer Mark volunteered to attempt the mission. Devastating machine gun and automatic weapons fire raked his ship as he reached the area, but he refused to terminate his flight. As he flew low over the friendly force, the enemy launched a withering mortar barrage to prevent his landing. Disregarding his personal safety, he hovered ten feet above the ground while his crew pushed the vital ammunition out to the waiting ground forces. Machine gun fire shattered both of his legs and forced him to crash land. Despite his severe wounds, he skillfully controlled the crippled ship and brought it to the ground. With bullets striking all around him, he shut down all electrical systems to prevent an explosion and then moved to safety. His fearless actions in the heat of battle prevented his fellow soldiers from being overrun and annihilated by the determined enemy. Warrant Officer Mark's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2736 (June 7, 1968)

MARSHALL, CARL B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Carl B. Marshall, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Marshall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism on 20 January 1970, while serving as an aircraft commander with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, while flying a reconnaissance mission near the village of Bu Dop, a light observation helicopter received intense enemy ground fire, causing the aircraft to crash and burn in an open field, killing the co-pilot. The pilot made his way to a nearby bomb crater amidst a hail of fire from an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese Army Regulars, who were entrenched in bunkers surrounding the clearing. Captain Marshall, who was in command of a squad of gunships, circled the area in an attempt to locate any survivors. Once he identified the downed pilot, he notified his commander of his intention to accomplish a rescue. Cautiously lowering the craft near the crater, Captain Marshall was savagely attacked by a barrage of small arms and automatic weapons fire from the insurgents' position. Hovering his helicopter at the proposed site of recovery, he rotated his gunship, firing his minigun into the wood line, attempting to suppress the concentrated enemy attack. As Captain Marshall brought the craft to rest near the bomb crater and enemy mortar rounds began exploding in close proximity, the gunner opened the canopy and aided the wounded pilot aboard. With his helicopter grossly overloaded, Captain Marshall skillfully circled the open area to gain sufficient speed to clear the tree tops. After transferring the injured pilot to another helicopter at Bu Dop, Captain Marshall eagerly refueled, rearmed and returned to the contact area. Captain Marshall's profound courage, conspicuous flying ability, concern for his fellow human being, and unwavering devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)

*MARTIN, DONNIE JOE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donnie Joe Martin (US55948425), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Specialist Four Martin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 March 1969 during a combat sweep operation near the village of Bich Chieu, in Quang Ngai Province. As his company was struggling through thick underbrush, hedgerows and bamboo, it suddenly came under heavy fire from a well-concealed bunker. Specialist Martin spotted the stronghold and led two comrades on an assault, killing four North Vietnamese soldiers in the position and capturing their weapons. His company continued its advance and made contact with another concealed enemy force. Seeing that one of his men had been seriously wounded and lay trapped under the hostile fusillade, Specialist Martin rushed into the bullet-swept area and carried the man to safety. A short time later, while his unit was again moving through open terrain, the communists sprang an ambush, firing automatic weapons and throwing grenades from three sides. After locating the enemy bunker which was the greatest threat to his element, Specialist Martin jumped a hedgerow and single-handedly assaulted it. During an intense exchange of fire between him and the North Vietnamese soldiers in the fortification, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Martin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1832 (May 21, 1969)
Home Town: Frankfort, Indiana

*MARTIN, LARRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Martin (RA16840149), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Sergeant Martin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 while serving as squad leader of an airborne infantry company during the battle at Dak To. His squad was serving as point element for the company as it attempted to join a battalion. As Sergeant Martin quickly led his squad to join the beleaguered company, withering machine gun fire wounded two of his men. He dashed to aid the injured troops and was hit himself, but he ignored his wound and carried one man to the relative safety of the defensive perimeter. After integrating his troops with the main force, he fought furiously to repel repeated fierce assaults by the North Vietnamese soldiers. He was wounded a second time by a mortar air burst, but he continued to refuse aid and moved among the bullet-swept positions to direct the fires of his men. When the order to counterattack came, he led his squad in an assault up the enemy-controlled hill. He was again wounded by an exploding enemy rocket, but he fearlessly continued his advance on a hostile machine gun position. In the face of ravaging enemy hand grenades and machine gun fire, he unhesitantly assaulted the gun emplacement and suppressed its fire while one of his men destroyed the position with a grenade. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men in the heat of battle. His fearless and courageous actions inspired his men to defeat the North Vietnamese forces and reach their objective. Sergeant Martin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 698 (February 15, 1968)
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

*MARTIN, LINWOOD DWIGHT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Linwood Dwight Martin (RA13525139), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Martin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 March 1968 as team leader of a small Special Forces long range reconnaissance team operating in enemy-controlled territory. On 21 March his patrol discovered a freshly-dug enemy bunker and tunnel complex. Sergeant Martin thoroughly reconnoitered the area and then moved his men to a night defensive perimeter. During the night, an unknown size Viet Cong force closed on three sides of the friendly position and, at daybreak, raked the team with heavy automatic weapons fire. Braving the withering fusillade, Sergeant Martin fearlessly led his troops through the enemy's flank without a casualty and quickly established a hasty defensive perimeter on a ridgeline to await helicopter extraction. The Viet Cong pursued the team, completely surrounded it and unleashed a savage attack, determined to annihilate the trapped soldiers. Directing his men to hold their positions, Sergeant Martin gallantly charged down the ridge and sprayed the advancing insurgent ranks with fierce rifle fire, killing many of the Viet Cong. Before his team members could come to his aid, Sergeant Martin was overpowered by the enemy force and mortally wounded. His dauntless and courageous efforts enabled the rest of the patrol to hold off the enemy until helicopters arrived and extracted them to safety. Sergeant First Class Martin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1842 (April 20, 1968)
Home Town: Bassett, Virginia

MARTIN, ROY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roy D. Martin (0-5307243), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Martin was serving as Commanding Officer of Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On 21 May 1966, his unit was assigned the task of routing an unknown Viet Cong force out of a nearby valley. While moving up, Captain Martin's unit came under intense automatic weapons and sniper fire from a well-dug-in reinforced Viet Cong battalion. As a counter movement, the friendly defenders launched a frontal assault but were beaten back by the insurgents. Realizing the necessity of a break in contact with the hostile forces prior to darkness, Captain Martin withdrew his troops and called for aerial rocket artillery, mortar, and artillery fire support. He then took his headquarters element and the second platoon and moved to within 30 meters of the Viet Cong's line of defense. A machine gun opened fire on the advancing platoon and Captain Martin, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to the intense fire, shot the gunner, and threw a grenade into the emplacement killing the three remaining Viet Cong. Continuing another 25 meters, Captain Martin eliminated two more bunkers which allowed his unit to advance. Still moving up, he exposed himself three more times to kill snipers. Captain Martin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 223 (September 12, 1966)

MATZ, WILLIAM M., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William M. Matz, Jr. (OF-102228), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Captain Matz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1968 as the commander of an infantry company conducting an operation in the city of My Tho. Captain Matz's unit was on a follow-and-support mission to three other companies. The company on the right met strong resistance as it moved through a complex of buildings near the My Tho reservoir. Its left flank platoon soon became heavily engaged with a large hostile force entrenched in a cemetery. Its other two platoons were unable to advance due to the intense enemy fire. Captain Matz's company received orders to assist the beleaguered unit and assume its mission. As the company began to maneuver, it came under intense hostile fire from well-fortified enemy positions in the surrounding buildings. While directing his company in the attack, Captain Matz discovered four casualties pinned down by the withering fusillade. He immediately ran to the aid of one of the men, and was wounded in the arm as he dragged him to a safe position. Ignoring his painful injury, he made three more trips through heavy hostile fire to rescue the remaining men. After the casualties had been evacuated, he returned to the front of his unit with anti-tank weapons and directed their fire against the insurgents. Captain Matz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3824 (August 7, 1968)

MAUS, WILLIAM C.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William C. Maus, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 51st Infantry, II Field Force. Lieutenant Colonel Maus distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2654 (1968)
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MAYER, FRANK H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank H. Mayer (0-506344), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as Pilot with the 114th Assault Helicopter Company, 12th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant Mayer distinguished himself on 10 April 1966, while serving as a member of an armed helicopter platoon in support of a beleaguered Special Forces outpost near Moc Hoa. After obtaining vital ammunition and communications equipment, First Lieutenant Mayer entered the operational area while exposed to intense hostile fire. Although all communications within the outpost were severed and the insurgents were known to have breached part of the outpost defenses, First Lieutenant Mayer, despite receiving several hits to his aircraft, successfully landed in the compound with the vitally needed supplies. When a call for the immediate evacuation of casualties was requested, again braving intense Viet Cong ground fire, First Lieutenant Mayer effected the extraction of the wounded. After delivering his patients to a hospital, he returned to the battle area and, with his platoon, began searching for the now retreating Viet Cong. Shortly after dawn, he received word that an American officer had stepped on a land mine and was critically injured. Immediately, First Lieutenant Mayer flew his aircraft to the location and, with complete disregard for his safety, slowly landed the aircraft in the mine field and extracted the injured officer. Later, while searching the area, First Lieutenant Mayer and his fire team located the main body of the retreating Viet Cong concealed in tall grass. For the next four hours, he and his platoon repeatedly took the insurgents under attack. When one of the armed helicopters was shot down near the hostile lines, wounding the aircraft commander, First Lieutenant Mayer immediately began to render suppressive fire on the Viet Cong as they attempted to close in on the downed crew. This effective fire also enabled a rescue aircraft to land and extract the downed crew. Through his courageous efforts, First Lieutenant Mayer contributed immeasurably to the success of the operation. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6055 (October 18, 1966)

*MAYNARD, THOMAS HARRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Harry Maynard (RA19286737), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Maynard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1965 while serving as an ammunition bearer during a search and destroy operation in the vicinity of Plei Me, Republic of Vietnam. At approximately 1330 hours, Private Maynard's unit came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from well camouflaged Viet Cong positions. The insurgents had excellent observation and fields of fire which made it difficult to advance and halted the friendly assault. During the course of action, ammunition was called for by the forward elements of the platoon. With complete disregard for his personal safety while exposed to the intense hostile fire, Private Maynard and another soldier advanced to approximately twenty meters toward the lead elements of the platoon, with the critically needed ammunition and both were immediately wounded. While attempting to locate the Viet Cong positions, a grenade had landed between Private Maynard and the other soldier. Private Maynard, although wounded himself and with complete disregard for his personal safety, pushed his comrade aside and threw himself upon the grenade, smothering the blast with his body. His intentional and selfless act undoubtedly saved the life of his fellow soldier and served as an inspiration to the other members of his unit. Private Maynard's unimpeachable valor and extraordinary heroism in close combat against hostile forces were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 33 (July 26, 1967)
Home Town: El Monte, California

MAYOR, ROBERT G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert G. Mayor, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Captain Mayor distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period from 19 October through 25 October 1968 while leading a reconnaissance-in-force operation in the enemy-infiltrated mountains near DaNang. Late in the afternoon of 19 October, Captain Mayor detected movement on a nearby ridge and quickly positioned his company in an ambush formation. When the North Vietnamese force entered the killing zone, he imitated an attack with Claymore mines and grenades. After the successful skirmish, the unit continued to seek out the enemy. During the early morning hours of 25 October, the company's night position was hit by a hostile force that penetrated the defensive line and swarmed toward the command post. Captain Mayor immediately ordered his men to fire into the center of the camp, even though the members of the command post had only scant protection. After the perimeter troops had unleashed a barrage on the invaders, the command group engaged the fleeing enemy soldiers at close range. Captain Mayor shot one hostile soldier and used his empty rifle to bludgeon another to death. The remnant North Vietnamese force fled into the jungle. Later in the day as communist mortar rounds began to pound the hill, Captain Mayor decided to break camp and capture a nearby hill held by a well-entranced enemy force. He located the site of the hostile mortar emplacement and called in artillery strikes on the North Vietnamese entrenchments. When the enemy soldiers were forced out of their bunkers by the devastating barrage, he led an assault up the hill-side. Suddenly his men were pinned down by strafing machine gun fire. Running and crawling forward through the fusillade, Captain Mayor neared the machine gun emplacement which he destroyed with a well-thrown grenade. Shortly afterward, his men successfully routed the enemy force and secured the hill. Captain Mayor's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3398 (September 4, 1969)
Born: at Denver, Colorado
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri

McAFEE, JERRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry D. McAfee (US56585009), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop F, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Specialist Four McAfee distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 and 29 February 1968 as an armored vehicle driver during a reconnaissance-in-force mission at a village near Bien Hoa. On 28 February, a Vietnamese battalion was taken under intense automatic weapons and rocket fire by a Viet Cong force, and two platoons of Specialist McAfee's troop were dispatched to reinforce it. During their assault on the insurgent positions, Specialist McAfee's vehicle was struck by an enemy rocket, throwing two crew members from the track and seriously wounding a third. He drove his flaming vehicle through the enemy-held area and stopped at a stream where he removed his wounded comrade and concealed him in the underbrush. He then returned to the burning track to recover weapons and radio his position to his platoon leader. Unable to make contact, he went back to his injured comrade and remained with him throughout the night. On the morning of 29 February, Specialist McAfee carried the man to friendly lines. He next voluntarily led a dismounted patrol into the enemy-held village. Under his guidance, the patrol recovered a casualty from the previous day's battle and captured a North Vietnamese soldier. He then joined another assault on the enemy positions as a machine gunner. Specialist Four McAfee's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3420 (July 17, 1968)

McBEE, JAMES M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James M. McBee (RA16817056), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class McBee distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 February 1969 as a platoon leader on a search and clear mission in the vicinity of Chu Pa Mountain. His company was suddenly engaged by a well-entrenched, numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force equipped with small arms, automatic weapons, rockets and mortars. Although he received shrapnel wounds in the leg and shoulder during the initial volley, Sergeant McBee refused treatment and maneuvered through the enemy fire to position his men. Seeing a wounded comrade who lay exposed to the hostile barrage, he advanced twenty-five meters to reach the casualty, administered first aid, and was about to carry him to safety when he saw three North Vietnamese approaching his location. Sergeant McBee waited until all three had come within twenty meters and eliminated them with two well-placed hand grenades. After carrying the wounded man from under the enemy fire, he helped bring seven other casualties to an evacuation point and redistributed their ammunition along his unit's perimeter. Still disregarding his wounds, he moved forward to an exposed site and adjusted artillery fire until dark. Platoon Sergeant McBee's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1583 (May 3, 1969)

*McBRIDE, MORRIS RALPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Morris Ralph McBride (0-75692), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing force in the Republic of Vietnam on 3 March 1964, while serving with Advisory Team 77, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. As an Advisor to a Company in the Army of the Republic of Vietnam, Captain McBride demonstrated fortitude, professional skill, and determination by rendering invaluable assistance to Vietnamese elements when they were suddenly subjected to heavy machine gun fire and mortars by hostile forces. When the initial attack wounded the company commander and several other soldiers, Captain McBride displayed complete disregard for his own personal safety and bravely exposed himself to the intense gun fire while rallying the members of two platoons which had become widely dispersed during the onslaught. Upon assuming command of the leaderless company, and while still under flanking fire, he moved among the members of the company giving them assistance, directions, and encouragement. Then, with sound judgment, professional competence, and steadfast courage, he directed the company's withdrawal through successive positions, remained with the covering force that was the last to withdraw, and continued his dauntless efforts until he was mortally wounded as he stopped to assist the wounded Vietnamese commander. His intrepid conduct, unselfish actions, and devotion to duty inspired his Vietnamese comrades to pursue their efforts in the defense to their homeland and curtailed the activities of the hostile forces. Captain McBride's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroic actions, at the cost of his life, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 22 (June 30, 1964)
Born: April 8, 1935 at Chicago, Illinois
Home Town: South Braintree, Massachusetts

McCAFFREY, BARRY R.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Barry R. McCaffrey (OF-101587), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 2d Airborne Task Force, Airborne Division Advisory Detachment (Airborne). Captain McCaffrey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 October 1966 while advising a Vietnamese Airborne Battalion on a search and clear operation near Dong Ha. At 0315 hours the camp received intense mortar fire which severely wounded Captain McCaffrey in the shoulder. With complete disregard for his safety, he unhesitatingly ran through the intense automatic weapons and mortar fire to estimate the severity of the attack. He soon discovered that the senior American advisor had been killed, and all but one of the company commanders were seriously wounded. After rendering aid to the casualties, Captain McCaffrey took command and dauntlessly proceeded around the perimeter to direct the defense against the insurgent human wave assaults. Again he was wounded by mortar fragments, but ignored his own condition and quickly organized a counterattack which successfully repelled another Viet Cong attack. During the remainder of the 12-hour battle, Captain McCaffrey repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire and directed artillery and air strikes against the insurgent forces. Through his unremitting courage and personal example, he inspired the besieged Vietnamese unit to defeat four determined Viet Cong attacks and inflict heavy casualties on a numerically superior hostile force. Only after assuring that all the wounded had been extracted, and that a replacement advisor was with the battalion, did he permit himself to be evacuated. Captain McCaffrey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 200 (January 16, 1967)
Born: November 17, 1942 at Taunton, Massachusetts
Home Town: Andover, Massachusetts
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

McCAFFREY, BARRY R.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Barry R. McCaffrey (OF-101587), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain McCaffrey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 March 1969 as company commander during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. When elements of one of his platoon came under intense fire from a well-fortified enemy bunker complex, Captain McCaffrey immediately moved forward to assault the hostile position in order to relieve pressure on the beleaguered squad. He quickly deployed his men for an attack and led the advance through the fusillade. When he had pinpointed the source of the greatest concentration of fire, he initiated a single-handed assault on the bunker. After several attempts, he finally succeeded in destroying the machine gun bunker and its occupants. Despite being wounded in the left arm, he continued to supervise the overrunning and destruction of the hostile bunker system. After organizing the evacuation of his casualties, he called in supporting fire on the enemy. Only after he was assured that all of the wounded had been cared for and after he had organized a defensive position, did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment. Captain McCaffrey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeling with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2905 (August 2, 1969)
Born: November 17, 1942 at Taunton, Massachusetts
Home Town: Andover, Massachusetts
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

*McCAIN, MICHAEL CLINTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Clinton McCain (RA14766542), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-244, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant McCain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 May 1968 as Special Forces advisor to a company-size Vietnamese force on a combat mission near Dak To. When his company was hit with intense rocket and mortar fire from a numerically superior force of North Vietnamese Army Regulars, he quickly established a defensive perimeter. The insurgents launched a devastating ground assault from three sides of the unit's position, and Sergeant McCain exposed himself to withering enemy fire in order to rally his men. Although wounded, he fearlessly continued to engage the determined attackers. Informed that the senior advisor had been seriously wounded, he decided to remain behind with the man although his company had been ordered to withdraw. Fighting a furious delaying action against the insurgents' onslaught, he enabled his troops to reach safety. He was mortally wounded while gallantly and unselfishly placing the lives of his men above his own in the heat of battle. Staff Sergeant McCain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2849 (June 13, 1968)
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama

*McCARTHY, JOHN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Edward McCarthy (RA11403641), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-302, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant McCarthy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 February 1967 while serving as a Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese Mike Force company during a combat reconnaissance operation near Bo Duc. At 1620 hours, the lead element encountered an entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion and was quickly pinned down by intense hostile fire from two sides. As the insurgents attempted to encircle the beleaguered company, Sergeant McCarthy moved through the devastating fire to encourage his demoralized men to assault the hostile positions. Noting that the enemy was starting to escape, he dauntlessly charged the emplacements alone. Unmindful of the dangers, Sergeant McCarthy ran across thirty meters of bullet-swept terrain, killed both gun crews and forced another group of insurgents to scatter. Inspired by his gallant actions, several friendly soldiers advanced to his location and took up defensive positions. However, they were soon routed when the North Vietnamese countered with recoilless rifle fire, which seriously wounded Sergeant McCarthy. Ignoring the severe pain, he held his position and single-handedly fought against insurmountable odds to prevent the enemy from retaking the mortars. Demonstrating boundless courage, Sergeant McCarthy killed seven more insurgents before succumbing to his wounds. His unimpeachable valor and selfless sacrifice saved his compound from being overrun by a numerically superior enemy force. Staff Sergeant McCarthy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1060 (March 11, 1967)
Home Town: Peabody, Massachusetts

McCARTHY, THOMAS V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas V. McCarthy (0-5318226), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain McCarthy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 January 1968. Captain McCarthy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 January 1967 while serving as company commander during a search and destroy mission in the Don Dien Filhol Plantation. Captain McCarthy led his unit into an area heavily defended by fortifications, trenches, and mine fields. The infantry was following in the tracks of tanks when two lead tanks tripped large mines and were disabled. As the men dove for cover, several were wounded by booby traps and explosions of numerous command detonated mines. When the insurgents commenced rifle fire from a bunker 15 meters to the front, Captain McCarthy realized that his exposed men were in critical danger from this point. Heedless of his own safety, he charged the hostile emplacement with mines exploding all around him. He was blown to the ground by one blast, which wounded one of his radio operators and killed the other. Captain McCarthy leaped up and dauntlessly resumed his assault, but was knocked down by another explosion. Ignoring his wounds, he again sprang to his feet, sprayed the Viet Cong bunker with rifle fire as he ran towards it, and blew it apart with hand grenades. Having destroyed the source of fire and command detonated mines, he ran back through the booby trapped field, called for medical aid men, and began to treat the casualties himself. His calm courage had prevented panic during the violent attack and saved many men from becoming casualties. Captain McCarthy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2754 (June 8, 1967)
Home Town: Columbia, South Carolina

*McCARTHY, THOMAS WELLER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Weller McCarthy (0-72145), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing force in the Republic of Vietnam on 3 March 1964. As Senior Advisor to a Vietnamese Airborne Battalion, Captain McCarthy demonstrated decisive leadership and fortitude during a mission into an assault zone in support of military operations conducted by the Armed Forces of the Republic of Vietnam in defense of their homeland. While the airborne troops were moving across open territory at daybreak toward their second objective, they were suddenly attacked by hostile forces from three directions and subjected to a barrage of concentrated fire from small arms, automatic weapons, mortars, and recoilless rifles. As the casualties mounted rapidly and the friendly troops were thrown into confusion, Captain McCarthy displayed complete disregard for his own personal safety and unhesitatingly moved into the inferno of hostile gun fire to organize the troops and establish an effective base of operations. He then joined his counterpart with the lead element and continued his brave efforts to rally and encourage the troops until he was mortally wounded. Through his courageous conduct, unselfish actions, and dedicated devotion to duty, his Vietnamese comrades were inspired to pursue their defense efforts and successfully accomplished their objective. Captain McCarthy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 18 (May 29, 1964)
Born: April 30, 1933 at Philippine Islands Home Town: Chevy Chase, Maryland

McCLEAN, MICHAEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael A. McClean, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four McClean distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1969 while serving as a member of an ambush patrol operating in Long An Province. While established in a night defensive position, his platoon came under an intense Viet Cong attack. When rocket-propelled grenade landed in the command post killing the radio-telephone operator and seriously wounding both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant, Specialist McClean immediately rushed forward to lay suppressive fire on the enemy and direct his comrades into effective firing positions. When the squads were in place, he began maneuvering from position to position assisting the wounded. He then moved to the damaged command post and assumed command of the platoon from the wounded leaders. As the battle progressed, he became aware that one hostile emplacement seemed immune to the machine gun fire being placed on it. Obtaining an M-72 light anti-tank weapon, Specialist McClean advanced through the hail of bullets well ahead of his squad's position and eliminated the hostile fortification. Returning to the command post, he found a radio and began to call in gunships, artillery, and medical evacuation helicopters. After adjusting supporting fire on the enemy positions, he began to supervise the extraction of casualties. Learning of another communist machine gun emplacement that escaped the deadly gunship barrage, Specialist McClean again used a light antitank weapon to silence the bunker. He then continued to move among his men directing retaliatory fire until the enemy force was routed. Specialist Four McClean's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3312 (August 29, 1969)

*McCOIG, DONALD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald B. McCoig (W-3155950), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 281st Aviation Company, 10th Combat Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group. Warrant Officer McCoig distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1968 as aircraft commander of an assault helicopter on a combat mission near Hue. After air strikes had pounded an enemy stronghold, he volunteered to fly Vietnamese ground forces into the area to conduct bomb assessment and search and destroy operations. During the second airlift into the landing zone, his ship received intense enemy automatic weapons fire which heavily damaged the craft and wounded the co-pilot and gunner. Displaying outstanding courage and airmanship, Mister McCoig continued into the battle area under heavy fire and landed his helicopter. He then led his men to cover and returned through the fusillade to recover the aircraft's weapons and equipment. Remaining calm, he skillfully treated the wounded until an evacuation ship arrived and carried them all to safety. Three more aircraft were shot down in the ensuing action, and Mister McCoig volunteered to return to the raging firefight to extract their crews. With complete disregard for his safety, he again flew into the area and landed amid a curtain of fire. Bullets tore into his craft, but he refused to take off until the members of one stranded crew had climbed aboard. As he became airborne, the enemy forces concentrated their full firepower on his ship, and he was killed by a hail of rounds tearing into the cockpit. Warrant Officer McCoig's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2250 (May 14, 1968)
Born: January 21, 1946 at Van Nuys, California
Home Town: Ventura, California

McCOLLUM, TIMOTHY P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Timothy P. McCollum, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 502d Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant McCollum distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 March 1969 while leading his platoon in the hills south of the A Shau Valley. His company was engaged in a fierce firefight with a North Vietnamese force holding ridge from well-fortified positions. A ravine separating the two opposing forces obviated a direct assault on the enemy's positions. Undertaking an intricate flanking maneuver, Lieutenant McCollum infiltrated his men across the open ravine under heavy crossfire and ascended the heights behind the enemy as the company's main force continued firing on the hostile element's front. After overtly signaling friendly fire away from his position, he initiated a systematic sweep down through the enemy's hillside emplacements. He attacked an enemy bunker and overcame its unsuspecting occupant. An alerted North Vietnamese then turned and fired from his spider hole, seriously wounding an American. Realizing that the wounded man's recovery hinged on immediate evacuation, Lieutenant McCollum enlisted another soldier's aid and together they carried the casualty down the ridge through enemy positions. Their descent was obstructed by harassing fire from a nearby bunker. Lieutenant McCollum destroyed the fortification with grenades. When the wounded soldier had been delivered to safety, he made his way back to his men by the same treacherous route under a storm of machine gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire. First Lieutenant McCollum's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3418 (September 7, 1969)

*McCRARY, DOUGLAS MACARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Douglas MacArthur McCrary (0-5324222), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airborne). First Lieutenant McCrary distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 February 1967 while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry engaged with a well entrenched enemy force. When the two lead platoons came under intense insurgent fire, Lieutenant McCrary quickly directed a twelve man security team forward to outflank the hostile positions. However, as the team approached the objective, it was suddenly pinned down by devastating fire from concealed enemy bunkers. Realizing the urgency of the situation, Lieutenant McCrary started maneuvering the rest of the platoon toward the besieged force. After advancing to a position near the team, he called for his men to provide suppressive fire as he fearlessly crawled across the bullet-swept field alone. Upon reaching the stranded element, Lieutenant McCrary began to move among the endangered men, treating the wounded and shouting encouragement. Seeing one stricken man lying exposed across a dike, he tossed a smoke grenade to provide cover and then charged forward through a hail of insurgent bullets. But as he started to pull the man to safety, the smoke dissipated and Lieutenant McCrary was mortally wounded. His boundless courage and selfless sacrifice in trying to save a fellow soldier will serve as a source of lasting inspiration to all those who knew him. First Lieutenant McCrary's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2165 (May 14, 1967)
Home Town: Greenville, South Carolina

McDERMOTT, JOHN K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John K. McDermott (13052652), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 229th Engineer Battalion, 937th Engineer Group, 18th Engineer Brigade. Sergeant First Class McDermott distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 while serving with his unit during the conduct of a mission in Kontum Province. He was driving the lead vehicle of a convoy on its way to repair a bridge which had been partially destroyed by enemy activity, when a company- size Viet Cong force unleashed a brutal ambush. A recoilless rifle round exploded against Sergeant McDermott's truck, but he managed to control the badly damaged vehicle and steered it off the road to allow the rest of the convoy to pass. Heedless of intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, he ran toward the rear of the truck to organize his men and move them out of the killing zone. As he came around the side of the truck, three enemy soldiers armed with automatic weapons were preparing to fire on the battalion chaplain. Firing from his hip, Sergeant McDermott killed the three insurgents. Disregarding his own safety, he continued moving through the ambush site to rally his troops. As he did so, two more Viet Cong leaped upon him and knocked him to the ground. He struggled free, wounding both of them, and then braved a savage fusillade to drive several of the convoy vehicles out of the ambush site. Gallantly leading his platoon in a fierce counterattack, he personally destroyed an enemy machine gun position. Sergeant McDermott continued to move forward under intense fire and exploding grenades, inspiring and directing his men until the Viet Cong were defeated. His unhesitating and courageous actions in close combat with a numerically superior hostile force were responsible for saving the lives of many fellow soldiers. Platoon Sergeant McDermott's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 180 (January 15, 1968)

McDERMOTT, MICHAEL A.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael A. McDermott (OF-109765), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant McDermott distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 while leading two rifle squads on a search and destroy operation near Chu Lai. The two squads were separated by two hundred meters when the point man in Lieutenant McDermott's squad surprised approximately fifteen North Vietnamese Army soldiers and opened fire on them. Lieutenant McDermott, realizing they had gained the initiative, immediately ran to the front of the squad and, disregarding the enemy fire, led his men as they chased the communists, personally killing two. Penetrating a North Vietnamese company command post, Lieutenant McDermott's aggressive action completely disrupted and disorganized the enemy troops, causing them to flee, leaving behind many of their weapons and equipment. Knowing that the approximately seventy North Vietnamese in the area would try to retake the position, he quickly called for his other squad to join him and organized a perimeter within the captured post. The enemy launched a fierce counterattack and Lieutenant McDermott was wounded by a hostile grenade, but refused medical treatment until after the aggressors had been repelled and a relief force arrived. Although painfully wounded, he left the medical holding area three times to direct his men in repelling enemy assaults. His fearless leadership, despite being vastly outnumbered, resulted in the complete rout of the communists. First Lieutenant McDermott's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 471 (February 11, 1969)
Home Town: , South Dakota
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

McDERMOTT, MICHAEL A.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael A. McDermott (OF-109765), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Airborne Division Assistance Team, United States Army Advisory Group. Captain McDermott distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as Senior Advisor to the 5th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, during the period 16 April 1972 to 20 May 1972 in the besieged provincial capital of An Loc. During this period, the 5th Airborne Battalion received daily attacks by numerically superior enemy forces during which Captain McDermott continuously exposed himself to the enemy fire and directed devastating airstrikes to turn back their assaults. When the embattled 5th Airborne Battalion was ordered to disengage from the enemy, he remained with rear elements of the unit and protected the movement to a more advantageous position by again directing numerous airstrikes. The enemy then launched a massive mortar and ground assault supported by tanks. During this attack, Captain McDermott disregarded his personal safety by moving from one position to another under a fusillade of enemy fire and adjusted airstrikes to eventually ward off the assault after eight hours of continuous fighting. His determination and heroism in the face of overwhelming odds served as inspiration to the weary paratroopers and rallied them to hold their positions. Captain McDermott's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 2442 (October 17, 1972)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

McDONALD, CHARLES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles A. McDonald (RA54149587), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Airborne Division Advisory Detachment (Airborne), United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant McDonald distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 February 1967 while serving as Assistant Battalion Advisor to a Vietnamese airborne battalion during an attack by an overwhelmingly larger Viet Cong force. Sergeant McDonald was thrown to the ground by the initial mortar explosions that hit his camp. He rushed to the perimeter, through darkness that was filling with the light of hostile tracer rounds, and saw waves of Viet Cong assaulting to within close range. Engaging the insurgents at the point of heaviest fire, he succeeded in closing a gap in his unit's perimeter and killed four of the enemy. Although he was wounded in a subsequent mortar attack, Sergeant McDonald refused to be evacuated and resolutely remained at his post for eight and one-half hours. To prevent the Viet Cong from massing for an effective attack, he periodically saturated his perimeters with air and artillery strikes to within 30 meters of his own position. During the pauses, he led his men in fierce counterattacks on the insurgents. At one point, a Vietnamese soldier ran out to capture an enemy weapon and was cut down by hostile machine gun fire. Sergeant McDonald took two grenades with him, crawled under friendly machine gun covering fire, and threw the grenades into the hostile emplacements, and dragged the soldier to safety. Sergeant McDonald's indomitable fighting, and that of the Vietnamese, inspired by his bravery, accounted for more than 100 Viet Cong killed in action. Staff Sergeant McDonald's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2390 (May 25, 1967)

*McDONALD, MARTIN TERRANCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Martin Terrance McDonald (190-40-5995), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Specialist Four McDonald distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 April 1971. On that date Specialist McDonald was serving as a medical aidman for a six man reconnaissance team on an offensive mission in Phu My District, when the team was taken under fire by an estimated platoon-sized enemy force. The enemy-initiated contact included rockets, machinegun and automatic small arms fire. In the initial hail of fire, the team leader was severely wounded, and the remainder of the team was halted a short distance away, leaving him in an open, vulnerable position. Specialist McDonald, although wounded himself during the initial contact, realized the extreme danger his team leader was in and, with total disregard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and ran to the aid of his fallen team leader. He then placed himself between the team leader and the enemy and began returning fire. An incoming rocket landed nearby, wounding him for the second time as the force of the explosion knocked him to the ground. He immediately recovered and rolled over on his team leader to protect him from the enemy fire. Realizing that further movement was impossible, Specialist McDonald stood up between the enemy and the severely wounded man and began placing accurate semi-automatic fire upon the enemy positions, until he was mortally wounded by an enemy rocket. Specialist Four McDonald's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 32 (August 3, 1972)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

McDOUGALD, LACY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lacy McDougald, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class McDougald distinguished himself while serving as Senior American Advisor to a company of Vietnamese soldiers during an assault of Nui Khet Mountain. Although a previous allied attack on the enemy emplacements had been repulsed, Sergeant McDougald led his men through the intense enemy fire up the steep incline of the mountain. As the enemy fire intensified, the sergeant crawled to a forward observation point where he directed allied artillery on enemy positions less than thirty meters away. Continuing the assault, he exposed himself to a hail of enemy bullets as he moved from man to another encouraging each to sustain the attack. Suddenly, Sergeant McDougald's company came under an intense grenade attack from an enemy bunker complex. Without hesitation, he moved to a large rock formation and tossed numerous grenades into the nearby enemy bunkers thereby destroying them. As a result of this action, the remaining friendly forces soon overran the enemy soldiers and secured the mountaintop for the allies. Sergeant First Class McDougald's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4058 (August 31, 1970)

McENERY, JOHN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John W. McEnery, Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters & Headquarters Troop, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Lieutenant Colonel McEnery distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 March 1969 as commanding officer during an assault on an enemy base camp. After having organized a combined armor and infantry task force to reinforce a platoon engaged with an enemy unit, he flew to the location of the firefight to assess the progress of his troops. Despite the heavy antiaircraft barrage directed at his helicopter, he continued flying at a low altitude to direct the movement of the ground elements. When communication with his ground commanders was disrupted, he had his aircraft land in the combat area in order to maintain control of the attack on the hostile positions. After organizing his elements into an assault formation, he climbed into the deck of a tank and led the assault into the hostile base camp. Although he was wounded by grenade fragmentation, he persisted in directing the operation until the enemy had been eliminated. Only after he was assured that all of the casualties were receiving medical assistance and that a defensive position had been established for the night did he consent to his own evacuation. Colonel McEnery's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2946 (August 4, 1969)

McGINNIS, EDWARD G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward G. McGinnis (RA17519629), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 73, IV Corps Tactical Zone, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class McGinnis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 and 11 February 1969 while advising a regional strike force company on an airmobile search and destroy operation in Kien Hung District, Chuong Thien Province. About noon, his unit was pinned down in a rice paddy by fierce hostile fire from a nearby woodline. Nine men were wounded and trapped in the open field. Sergeant McGinnis rushed from his relatively safe position, through the deadly barrage, to the wounded men. He then began to administer first aid to his Vietnamese comrades. Inspired by his courageous actions, others from his unit followed his example. Soon most of the wounded had been reached, and Sergeant McGinnis, braving the enemy fusillade, began pulling the injured to safety. Having retrieved as many casualties as possible, he assisted in moving them further to the rear to be evacuated. He then proceeded to pinpoint enemy positions, directing gun ship fire until dark. Sergeant McGinnis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2212 (June 24, 1969)

McGOWAN, ARTHUR J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Arthur J. McGowan, Jr. (0-5317345), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 27 and 28 February 1966, Lieutenant McGowan was serving as Assistant Battalion Advisor to the 1st Battalion, 43d Infantry Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, engaged in the defense of Vo Xu, Binh Tuy Province. In the initial insurgent assault, the battalion advisor and the weapons advisor were killed by automatic weapons fire. Captain McGowan immediately took charge and established radio contact with higher headquarters and the United States Air Force Forward Air Controller, providing the necessary information for effective air strikes on insurgent positions. For six continuous hours, under the intense hail of hostile mortar, small arms, and machine gun fire, and despite painful wounds by small arms grenades, Captain McGowan continued to engage the Viet Cong while maintaining Contact with the Air Force Forward Controller. Upon cessation of firing, he directed that a helicopter landing zone be located and personally supervised the orderly evacuation of wounded Vietnamese personnel. Captain McGowan's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 112 (May 19, 1966)

McGOWAN, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert S. McGowan (0-66360), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel McGowan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 March 1969 while serving as commander of a squadron conducting a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the southern portion of the Bo Loi Woods. When his squadron came under intense enemy assault and one of the troop commanders was wounded, Lieutenant Colonel McGowan directed his pilot to land amid hostile fire. He then organized the unit and, when several of the armored personnel carriers sustained direct hits from rocket grenades, carried a stretcher through the bullet-swept area to aid the wounded. To recover the body of a soldier, he raced through the enemy fusillade, passing within ten meters of an active enemy position. After assisting in the casualty evacuation, he guided several vehicles into strategic fighting positions. Returning to his helicopter, he went aloft to lead the ground assault. At one point, while armed only with a .45 caliber pistol, he charged a bunker and killed the occupant. He continued in his heroic manner until the communists were defeated. Lieutenant Colonel McGowan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2282 (June 27, 1969)

McGUIRE, RAY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ray D. McGuire (RA15736857), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four McGuire distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 February 1968 as a radio operator during a battalion reconnaissance-in-force mission near Hoc Mon in Gia Dinh Province. His company commenced the operation with a heliborne assault near its objective. The helicopters received such a heavy volume of fire upon reaching the landing zone, that only five made it to the ground. The fusillade became so intense that the committed platoon was ordered to withdraw to permit suppressive fires to be brought against the enemy. Five men were severely wounded and pinned down during this movement. The rest of the company was then landed a short distance away and given the mission of reestablishing contact with the enemy and extracting its own casualties. As the company began its maneuver, it made contact with insurgent troops occupying well-fortified positions, and the enemy opened fire with grenades, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Specialist McGuire, despite the withering fusillade, volunteered to lead a rescue party to aid the wounded. He led eight men across fire-swept rice paddies, until the small group was finally pinned down and could move no further. Proceeding on his own, Specialist McGuire crawled fifty meters through intense enemy fire to reach his fallen comrades. One by one, Specialist McGuire dragged the wounded men back to a safe area from which they were later evacuated. During this entire period, he maintained radio contact with his commander and the helicopter gunships overhead. In order to prevent the enemy from overrunning or flanking his position, Specialist McGuire was forced several times to interrupt his evacuation mission to bring fire on the enemy. He continuously exposed himself to a withering hail of bullets while extracting the wounded, firing on the enemy and adjusting the supporting helicopter fire. His valiant actions and inspirational leadership on the battlefield were decisive factors which prevented annihilation of the trapped casualties at the hands of a numerically superior enemy force. Specialist Four McGuire's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3097 (June 28, 1968)

*McHUGH, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John J. McHugh (0-5331478), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-22, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. First Lieutenant McHugh distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 January 1968 while serving with the Special Forces. A large force of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army soldiers had taken control of the Qui Nhon radio station complex, and he was making a reconnaissance of their activity. While moving to an advantageous position for observation, he was wounded by fragments from an enemy hand grenade. Refusing to seek medical treatment, he recruited a small force of Vietnamese soldiers from the streets and led an attack through a hail of bullets over a wall into the radio station compound and gained control of one of the buildings. Intense enemy fire wounded him again and, realizing that his troops could not hold their positions much longer, he withdrew to rally reinforcements. After gathering another small force, Lieutenant McHugh launched a second attack on the enemy-held complex. Despite being wounded a third time, he continued leading his gallant assault and seized the ground floor of the radio station. He then returned through savage hostile fire to the streets to solicit more assistance in routing the insurgents. While performing this task, he was intercepted by a medical recovery team and evacuated. First Lieutenant McHugh's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 697 (February 15, 1968)
Born: December 31, 1942 at Lansdowne, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Lansdowne, Pennsylvania

*McKIBBEN, LARRY SIMS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Sims McKibben (W-3155956), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 240th Assault Helicopter Company, 214th Combat Aviation Battalion, 12th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer McKibben distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1968 as aircraft commander of a helicopter supporting ground operations near Loc Ninh. A small reconnaissance team was pursued by a numerically superior enemy force, and Mister McKibben immediately extracted it. A larger team, replacing the first, was quickly surrounded by two companies of North Vietnamese Army troops and he volunteered to attempt a second extraction mission. At the landing zone a supporting gunship was shot down by the murderous enemy fire. Despite extreme hazard to his safety, Mister McKibben braved the savage fusillade to land and successfully rescue the downed crew. After refueling, he returned to the area and prepared to rescue the ground force. Although he was informed that two helicopters had sustained casualties to their crews attempting pickups during his absence, he fearlessly maneuvered through a hail of fire, reached the landing zone and began loading troops. The enemy force concentrated their full firepower on his craft, but he refused to take off until all survivors were on board. As he prepared to fly out of the landing zone, he was instantly killed by an enemy bullet passing through the cockpit. Warrant Officer McKibben's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2883 (June 17, 1968)
Home Town: Houston, Texas

*McKINSEY, GERALD LEROY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gerald Leroy McKinsey, Jr. (W-3155085), Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 282d Assault Helicopter Company, 212th Combat Aviation Battalion, 16th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer McKinsey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 January 1968 as pilot of an assault helicopter on a combat mission near Khe Sanh. When the Hung Hoa district headquarters came under heavy enemy attack, Mister McKinsey volunteered to fly the lead troop transport helicopter because of his familiarity with the area. Gunships fired a preparatory barrage on the landing zone, and he flew in to unload his infantrymen. As the skids touched the ground, North Vietnamese Army soldiers surrounding the landing zone stood up and unleashed a furious barrage on his aircraft from point blank range. His ship was hit by recoilless rifle fire as he attempted to take off, and it crashed in flames. Braving withering fire, Mister McKinsey exited the burning helicopter, took up an exposed position and delivered heavy counterfire on the advancing enemy to cover a comrade attempting to free a body from the wreckage. A rescue helicopter came into the landing zone but was driven off by the enemy fusillade. As the craft departed, its crew chief jumped to the ground and began to maneuver toward Mister McKinsey's downed ship. Disregarding his personal safety, Mister McKinsey gallantly moved into an even more exposed position and covered the soldier's dash to safety. The enemy troops continued their ravaging attack, and he fearlessly fought to hold them off until he was struck and killed by an enemy bullet. Chief Warrant Officer McKinsey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2216 (May 13, 1968)
Home Town: Modesto, California

McNAMARA, LAURENCE V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Laurence V. McNamara, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 4th Battalion, 41st Regiment, Advisory Team 22, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain McNamara distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 13 to 17 April 1971 while serving as a Senior Advisor to the 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry Division (ARVN) during combat operations near Fire Support Base 6. As the South Vietnamese battalion neared its objective, they encountered stiff resistance from a large hostile force firing B-40 rockets, mortars, and automatic weapons. Unhesitantly, Captain McNamara exposed himself to the hostile fusillade as he rallied the allied troops and led them in an assault against the enemy fortifications, successfully dislodging the NVA from their first line of bunkers. During the second charge, Captain McNamara was seriously wounded in both legs while he moved through the heavy enemy fire to direct the allied deployment against the hostile positions. Although unable to walk and despite his wounds, hunger, and exhaustion, he avoided detection by the enemy forces for the next five days. Rescue parties were unable to reach him due to four strong NVA battalions surrounding the location. On 17 April, an allied relief force located Captain McNamara and evacuated him to medical facilities. Captain McNamara's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2264-374 (June 29, 1971)

*McNEIL, HAROLD LOYD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold Loyd McNeil (0-2305903), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 12 August 1964. As Pilot of a HU-1B helicopter, First Lieutenant McNeil demonstrated decisive leadership, fortitude, and professional skill while participating in a reconnaissance mission into an assault zone in support of a military operation conducted by the armed forces of the Republic of Vietnam. When the lead aircraft of the reconnaissance team was struck by hostile ground fire, Lieutenant McNeil bravely flew his helicopter into the combat zone to provide cover for the stricken aircraft. As he skillfully rolled the nose of his helicopter into firing attitude, an enemy missile penetrated the windshield of the aircraft and lodged in his body. Although the physical reaction caused him to release the controls of the aircraft, he quickly resumed them, completely ignoring his own serious injury. He then instructed the co-pilot to take control of the aircraft while he defended the crew and the friendly forces by firing a pair of rockets which silenced a hostile machine gun. His courage, determination, and valiant efforts prevented the destruction of two aircraft and saved the lives of seven men at the sacrifice of his own. First Lieutenant McNeil's extraordinary heroic conduct and conspicuous gallantry are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (December 11, 1964)
Born: November 13, 1933 at Mt. Pleasant, Texas
Home Town: Mt. Pleasant, Texas

*McQUADE, JAMES RUSSELL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Russell McQuade (533525140), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop F, 8th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant McQuade distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 June 1972 while serving in support of the 1st Army of the Republic of Vietnam Division in the Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant McQuade was participating in a rescue mission of a downed helicopter crew in an extremely hostile area. Lieutenant McQuade, knowing that the downed aircraft had received intense automatic small and heavy antiaircraft fire, volunteered to go into the heavily infested enemy territory to search for possible survivors. Upon initial entry into the enemy held terrain, Lieutenant McQuade reported taking heavy automatic weapons fire from all sides. With complete disregard for his own safety, he continued flying towards the crash site. As he proceeded to the area of the downed aircraft, he reported taking further antiaircraft fire. At approximately 750 meters from the crash site and completely engulfed in hostile fire, Lieutenant McQuade reported taking numerous hits and, shortly thereafter, was hit with a missile of unknown type. His aircraft disintegrated in mid-air. Lieutenant McQuade's unselfish concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers resulted in the loss of his own life. He was well aware of the risks involved but refused to give up the search in the face of the fanatical enemy resistance. Lieutenant McQuade's voluntary participation in a desperately dangerous mission demonstrated extraordinary heroism in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 56 (December 31, 1974)
Born: June 3, 1949 at Hoquiam, Washington
Home Town: Hoquiam, Washington

McQUISTON, HUGH J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hugh J. McQuiston, Jr. (RA36969360), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant McQuiston distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 July 1967 while serving as platoon sergeant of an Airmobile platoon on a bunker destroying mission near Tuy An. While entering the village aboard tanks and bulldozers, the platoon was attacked by a well-entrenched enemy force firing automatic weapons and small arms. When the platoon leader was hit, Sergeant McQuiston immediately took command and directed his men into a defensive perimeter. Braving a hail of hostile fire, he dashed into the open numerous times to rescue wounded men from a nearby tank. He continuously exposed himself to the withering fire to rally his men and direct their fire on the Viet Cong positions. He then single-handedly attacked and destroyed an enemy trench with rifle fire and grenades killing eight insurgent soldiers. Notified that reinforcements were on the way, Sergeant McQuiston once more fully exposed himself to organize a blocking force to prevent enemy escape. His calmness and decisive leadership prevented many friendly casualties and contributed greatly to the defeat of the hostile force. Platoon Sergeant McQuiston's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4677 (September 15, 1967)

*McSWAIN, BAYNES BALLEW, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Baynes Ballew McSwain, Jr. (US54720168), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant McSwain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 October 1968 as a squad leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. His company came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from a fortified Viet Cong base camp. Sergeant McSwain's platoon was pinned down and the point man lay wounded in an open field completely exposed to the communists' barrage. Though wounded in the leg by the initial volley, he immediately deployed his men to provide covering fire and disregarding his safety, crawled further into the enemy line of fire to help his stricken comrade. Shielding the man with his body, he quickly administered first aid and was pulling him to safety when he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. Sergeant McSwain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 404 (February 5, 1969)
Home Town: San Marcos, Texas

MEADE, WENDELL T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wendell T. Meade (US52679909), Specialist Fourth Class [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Meade distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March and 13 March 1967 while serving as medical aidman for an infantry platoon on a combat mission near the Cambodian border. Specialist Meade's platoon was on its way to relieve another unit engaged with a numerically superior Viet Cong force when it made contact with the enemy. Weaponless because of his religious beliefs, he braved withering enemy fire to aid his critically wounded platoon leader. Time after time he disregarded his own safety to crawl across the bullet-swept area between his platoon and the enemy positions to administer to his stricken comrades. When half the platoon fell back to a more secure position, Specialist Meade remained behind to supervise evacuation of the wounded. At the new position he exposed himself repeatedly to enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire to build a shelter for the casualties. Although seriously wounded while moving to aid an injured comrade, he ignored his injury until treatment of the other man was completed. He continued to move along the perimeter treating the wounded throughout the night and refused evacuation the next morning until all others had been cared for. Specialist Four Meade's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4476 (September 2, 1967)

MEADOWS, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard J. Meadows, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary gallantry in action on 21 November 1970 as a member of an all-volunteer joint United States Army and Air Force raiding force organized by the Joint Chiefs of Staff to conduct a heliborne assault in a heroic effort to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam. Throughout the execution phase of the raid, Captain Meadows, an assault group leader, repeatedly risked his life above and beyond the call of duty to insure the success of the raid. Captain Meadows as a passenger on a helicopter that crash-landed inside the prison compound. After debarking from the crashed helicopter, oblivious of enemy fire and without regard for his personal safety and the risk to his life, he single-handedly cleared the southeast guard tower and two small adjacent buildings. His unhesitating and purposeful action eliminated the enemy threat and enabled his subordinate elements to continue their mission without the danger of small arms fire from those strong points. Immediately thereafter he took up a completely exposed position in the center of the compound where, with the aid of a portable loud speaker, he shouted instructions for the prisoners to follow to expedite their release. This action pinpointed his position. Captain Meadows' calm leadership under fire and unswerving devotion to duty contributed greatly to the successful execution of the raid. Captain Meadows' extraordinary gallantry in action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (August 9, 1971)

*MEARA, WILLIAM DANIELS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Daniels Meara (0-3190077), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Captain Meara distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 November 1968 while commanding his company on a reconnaissance-in-force-mission south of Landing Zone Billie. As his unit was returning to the landing zone, one platoon suddenly came under intense fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese's Army force and was severed completely from the remainder of the company. Captain Meara immediately turned his lead elements around to go to the aid of the besieged platoon. Approaching the battle area, the relief column also came under heavy small arms fire from enemy bunkers to their front. Captain Meara deployed his troops and moved among their positions, directing their fire, shouting words of encouragement and checking for casualties. After he had prepared his company for an attack, he and his point man led an assault on the first bunker in their path. Firing their weapons and hurling grenades, they charged and destroyed the emplacement, killing its occupants. Despite the fierce hostile fire, the two men continued their furious onslaught until the point man was felled by sniper fire as they advanced on another fortification. Captain Meara instantly placed a heavy volley on the communists and attempted to reach his comrade. Braving the enemy barrage, he courageously persisted in his efforts until he was mortally wounded. Captain Meara's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the coast of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 384 (February 4, 1969)
Home Town: Mount Holly, New Jersey

*MEARS, GUY LAMAR, JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Guy Lamar Mears, Jr. (266-94-8021), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 254th Medical Detachment, 45th Medical Company, 44th Medical Brigade, 1st Logistics Command. Specialist Four Mears distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 October 1970. On that date Specialist Mears was serving as a crew chief aboard a medical evacuation helicopter near Tuy Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. The helicopter in which Specialist Mears was serving as a crew member exploded and started burning as a result of enemy fire. Specialist Mears escaped from the burning aircraft unharmed, but when he discovered the pilot of the aircraft remained trapped inside he re-entered the fiercely burning aircraft at the risk of his life in order to save the lives of fellow crew members. Specialist Mears continued his brave rescue attempt with total disregard for his own safety until he became incapacitated by mortal burns. Specialist Mears' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit on him, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 23 (May 30, 1972)
Home Town: Rockmart, Georgia

MELOY, GUY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Guy S. Meloy (0-68639), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Major Meloy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 3 November 1966 to 5 November 1966 while commanding the 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry on a search and destroy operation near Dau Tieng. When one of his rifle companies engaged a large Viet Cong force, the company commander and first sergeant were killed. With complete disregard for his safety, Major Meloy landed his helicopter while receiving intense hostile fire and took command of the beleaguered unit. After ordering two more companies into the battle, he set up a defensive perimeter for the night. The next morning, Major Meloy was wounded by shrapnel while leading his men against the regrouping insurgents. Although pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire, he refused medical aid, and organized the defense against human wave assaults by the Viet Cong. Throughout the remaining 36 hours of the battle, he continuously exposed himself to the hostile fire to encourage his men and directed air strikes against the attacking insurgents. Wounded, and without sleep for two days, he ordered eight more companies into the engagement and commanded the operation until the Viet Cong finally were routed late in the afternoon of 5 November 1966. His gallantry and composure under fire greatly inspired his men to overcome and defeat a numerically superior hostile force. Major Meloy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6950 (December 19, 1966)
Born: September 4, 1903 at Lanham, Maryland
Home Town: San Antonio, Texas

MENETREY, LOUIS C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Louis C. Menetrey (0-71395), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Menetrey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1968 as a battalion commander during a reconnaissance-in-force mission northwest of Ben Cat. Learning that one man had become separated from the rest of the unit during an encounter between a small security element and the Viet Cong, Colonel Menetrey personally led a platoon into the hazardous area. He and his men located an enemy base camp and received intense fire. Once he had successfully rescued the missing soldier, he brought two additional companies into the battle. Repeatedly exposing himself to the communists' barrage, Colonel Menetrey directed artillery, air strikes and maneuvers of his troops keeping the enemy entrapped and under constant pressure. With complete disregard for his own welfare, he moved to the forefront of the action and led repeated assaults on the enemy strongholds. On one occasion he assisted in moving a wounded tank commander to safety and then directed tank fire from an exposed position, killing several Viet Cong. After being knocked down by a claymore mine, he led a charge which eliminated the enemy troops who had detonated the device. His aggressive and skillful leadership resulted in the severe defeat of the Viet Cong force. Lieutenant Colonel Menetrey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 237 (January 23, 1969)

MERKERSON, WILLIE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willie Merkerson, Jr. (0-5242046), First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-223, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. First Lieutenant Merkerson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions as senior Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese task force conducting a search and destroy mission in Binh Dinh Province. Lieutenant Merkerson repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire and led the two-company force against two North Vietnamese Army battalions. His unit was brought under heavy machine gun and mortar fire, and he moved along his lines, shouting encouragement, rallying the troops, and personally firing machine guns, mortars and grenade launchers. He fearlessly led an attack through the encirclement of the enemy and, under intense sniper fire, set up an evacuation and treatment center for his wounded troops. While rendering first aid to the wounded, he received word that one of his companies was trapped and a fellow advisor had been wounded. He refused airstrikes in the area and proceeded through 250 meters of enemy infested jungle before finding the wounded sergeant. He carried his comrade through intense machine gun and sniper fire to the evacuation area. While in the evacuation area, Lieutenant Merkerson directed air strikes on the enemy positions and called in a Medevac helicopter. He again exposed himself to enemy fire while going back and forth to the helicopter carrying the eleven wounded and five dead soldiers. His fearless leadership and sacrifice turned a possible disaster into a decisive victory. Lieutenant Merkerson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3013 (June 23, 1968)

MICHIENZI, JAMES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James A. Michienzi, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Michienzi distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 23 to 25 May 1969 while serving as battalion commander of operations in An Loc District, Binh Long Province. During three days of intense combat, Lieutenant Colonel Michienzi led his forces to three major victories over the North Vietnamese. In each hard-fought engagement, he was at the forefront of the battle directing his forces, adjusting artillery fire and air strikes, personally engaging and killing the enemy and destroying hostile bunkers with hand grenades. He charged enemy fortifications, eliminated machine gun emplacements and killed an enemy battalion commander. Several times he braved the communist fusillade to render first aid to wounded men and to evacuate them to a secured position. Through his leadership and skillful deployment of troops, over two hundred North Vietnamese were slain, and large quantities of enemy arms, ammunition, and documents were captured. Lieutenant Colonel Michienzi's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2552 (July 14, 1969)

MIDDLETON, JOHN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John C. Middleton, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Specialist Four Middleton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 March 1969 while serving as radio- telephone operator on a combat sweep mission near Tap An Bac. From well-concealed fortifications among hedges and bamboo groves, the enemy initiated an attack as Specialist Middleton's unit neared the village. As members of his element provided cover fire, Specialist Middleton maneuvered to a position flanking the enemy and established a cross fire, pinning down the hostile element. When the communists attempted an escape, he delivered a barrage that killed them. The company pressed toward the village, but a hostile machine gun emplacement opened fire. Specialist Middleton assaulted the bunker with grenades and rifle fire, eliminating the occupants. Seeing two men fall to enemy rounds, he aided the rescue of these and other casualties. When his company commander was wounded, Specialist Middleton carried him to the ambulance helicopter amid heavy sniper fire. He then returned to assist a platoon leader in coordinating the movement of the unit elements, resulting in the enemy's defeat. Specialist Four Middleton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2478 (July 9, 1969)

MILES, MARTIN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Martin C. Miles, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Miles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 March 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a unit reconnaissance-in-force mission near Fire Support Base Danger in Kien Phong Province. After having been inserted into a thickly vegetated area, Sergeant Miles' platoon encountered fifty-caliber machine gun fire from a well-fortified enemy battalion. When a soldier close by was struck down in the initial salvo, Sergeant Miles immediately applied first aid and then carried the critically wounded man across open terrain to the evacuation point. Suddenly the pick-up zone came under rocket-propelled grenade attack, and Sergeant Miles fearlessly stood up to wave the ambulance helicopter away for the dangerous area. He then had his men withdraw an additional two hundred meters before the evacuation was completed. Returning to the battle field, he called in artillery and gun ships. Reinforced with additional men, Sergeant Miles once more advanced his platoon toward the enemy position in a treeline. Again the hostile force unleashed a barrage that pinned the platoon down. Seeing that several of his men were trapped under a lethal crossfire, Sergeant Miles ran through the fusillade to retrieve an abandoned machine gun, which he used to deliver a devastating base of fire on the enemy positions, thereby enabling the trapped men to withdraw. Staff Sergeant Miles' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2906 (August 2, 1969)

MILLER, PHILLIP E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Phillip E. Miller, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 163d Aviation Company, 101st Aviation Group, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Miller distinguished himself on 12 November 1969 while piloting a Light Observation Helicopter near Dang Ha Mountain in Quang Tri Province. While transporting two passengers on a routine mission, Lieutenant Miller monitored an emergency medical evacuation report from a heavily engaged ground unit. Changing course, Lieutenant Miller reached the conflict area to give assistance. As he landed on a knob near friendly troops, his aircraft drew intense enemy fire. Discovering that the location of those needing medical evacuation was several meters below, he took off in search of them. With protection from helicopter gunships, Lieutenant Miller maneuvered his aircraft over the wreckage of a downed medical evacuation helicopter. Seeing no signs of life and receiving intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Miller was forced to withdraw. Lieutenant Miller dropped his two passengers off at a nearby fire base and returned to the conflict area, determined to evacuate the casualties. On his third attempt, Lieutenant Miller successfully landed his aircraft on a very small mountainside clearing. Four of the most seriously injured personnel were loaded on board and evacuated. Despite damages incurred on the previous evacuation when a rotor blade struck the surrounding terrain, Lieutenant Miller returned to the conflict area. Without helicopter gunship protection and under intense enemy fire, Lieutenant Miller landed at the evacuation site. As Lieutenant Miller was preparing to take off, after taking three more casualties on board, an enemy rocket-propelled grenade struck the aircraft and severed its tail boom. The aircraft overturned and burst into flames. Although suffering leg injuries, Lieutenant Miller managed to crawl from the aircraft to nearby friendly troops. First Lieutenant Miller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1589 (June 4, 1970)
Born: May 20, 1948 at Battle Creek, Michigan
Home Town: Minneapolis, Minnesota

MILLER, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard L. Miller, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-333, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Miller distinguished himself while serving as an advisor to a Vietnamese strike force during a reconnaissance-in-force operation deep in enemy territory. During the period 5 June through 10 June 1969, Sergeant Miller's force was in almost constant contact with Vietcong and regular North Vietnamese Army units as it swept through the villages and surrounding areas of Hung Phat and Soc Trauh. In every contact and pitched battle, Sergeant Miller was always at the forefront of the heaviest fighting, exhorting his strike force troopers to hold their ground amid fierce enemy onrushes and leading them in daring assaults against superior numbers of the enemy. Sergeant Miller boldly exposed himself again and again to intense enemy fire as he rushed to forward positions to direct his force's return fire and to coordinate tactical and artillery air strikes against the communists. Even a painful shrapnel wound to the head late in the operation could not deter Sergeant Miller from being among his men and commanding their every maneuver against the adversary. Day and night for six days, he drove himself with little sleep or food as he pressed his small force onward in relentless quest for victory over the enemy. The success of this extended operation, pitting a small but determined strike force against overwhelming numbers of the enemy, was a tribute to **** and undaunted fighting spirit of Sergeant Miller. Sergeant first class miller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1083 (May 6, 1970)
Home Town: Nampa, Idaho

MILLER, ROBIN K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robin K. Miller (0-97164), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 114th Assault Helicopter Company, 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 164th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Miller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 December 1967 as leader of an armed helicopter platoon supporting Vietnamese infantrymen near Vi Thanh. The Vietnamese units were savagely attacked and pinned down by devastating fire as they advanced toward suspected Viet Cong positions in a treeline. Called to aid the beleaguered soldiers, Captain Miller flew to the battle site and launched a deadly rocket and grenade attack on the enemy bunkers and weapons emplacements. His ship was heavily damaged by withering ground fire, but he continued his relentless assaults until he had expended his ammunition and two of his crew members had been wounded. After securing another aircraft, he flew back to the scene and made a series of low passes into a fierce enemy barrage to lay a smoke screen for incoming troop transport helicopters. Bullets tore into his ship as he orbited the firefight, courageously drawing fire to himself while fresh troops were inserted into the battle area. He was forced to obtain another aircraft, but he quickly returned to resume his support of the friendly forces. Evacuation helicopters arrived to pick up casualties, and Captain Miller made repeated passes over enemy positions to draw fire away from the rescue operation. He then renewed his assault role, raining deadly ordnance on the insurgents and destroying many of their positions. The Vietnamese ground commander decided to extract one of his units that had been in heavy contact since the early morning. In the total darkness of night, the evacuation helicopters could not find the landing zone they were to use. Captain Miller located the site which was close to the Viet Cong positions. Landing, he fearlessly turned on all his ship's lights and guided the evacuation craft to the pickup point. His fearless actions contributed greatly to inflicting a decisive defeat on the determined enemy and saved many lives in the heat of battle. Captain Miller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2271 (May 15, 1968)

MILLER, TOMMY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Tommy L. Miller (RA17727595), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Miller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 and 2 January 1968 while helping defend a fire support base in Tay Ninh Province. Assigned to a listening post outside the compound's perimeter, Sergeant Miller was the first to detect the enemy's presence in the area and quickly alerted the camp's defenses. A combined Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army force launched a devastating rocket, mortar and automatic weapons attack on the area around the listening post, and he and two comrades were wounded in the initial volley. Sergeant Miller quickly treated his fellow soldiers. Remaining at his post without aid for himself, and without assistance from his seriously wounded companions, he continued to report enemy movements. He fearlessly performed his mission despite increasing numbers of enemy soldiers moving closer to his position. Calmly relaying information to the base camp as the insurgents passed by, he was instrumental in accurately directing artillery strikes on the attackers which repelled their determined assault on the compound. Sergeant Miller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2688 (June 4, 1968)

MILLSAP, WALTER G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Walter G. Millsap, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). Specialist Four Millsap distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 4 June 1971 while serving at an isolated radio relay site surrounded by the enemy. When his outpost received enemy small arms, automatic weapons, rocket and mortar fire, from a superior-sized enemy force, Specialist Millsap repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire as he moved about the camp's perimeter firing his rifle and throwing hand grenades at the assaulting enemy. When his supply of grenades was exhausted, he moved to a machinegun and directed accurate, suppressive fire upon the enemy. Disregarding rocket and mortar rounds impacting about him, Specialist Millsap continued to man his machinegun and inflict severe losses upon the enemy until an enemy rocket detonated beside his emplacement and threw him from his position. Receiving emergency medical treatment, Specialist Millsap returned to the machinegun despite fire directed at him as he moved to his former position. Once again, he directed intense fire at the enemy. His emplacement sustained yet another rocket hit which this time destroyed his machinegun and wounded him for the second time. Disregarding his wounds, Specialist Millsap fired his rifle and threw hand grenades at the enemy until advised to withdraw from the perimeter and await extraction from the outpost. Assisting a wounded officer, he was wounded for a third time by an incoming rocket round. He shielded the officer with his body and absorbed the blast that would have wounded the officer. Specialist Millsap continued to assist his wounded fellow soldiers until all men on the outpost could be evacuated. His calmness, determination and extraordinary concern for this companions served as an inspiration to those that were with him. His heroic actions resulted in significant losses among the enemy and prevented the death or possible capture of those on the outpost. Specialist Millsap's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1149 (May 23, 1972)

MINATRA, JOHN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John D. Minatra (RA14493353), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Airborne Division Advisory Detachment (Airborne), Advisory Team 162, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Minatra distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 17 November to 19 November 1967 as advisor to a Vietnamese airborne infantry battalion on combat operations near Dak To. During this period the battalion was involved in an attack on Hill 1416. In the initial assault on the objective Sergeant Minatra's Vietnamese counterpart was wounded and disabled. He immediately rallied the remainder of the unit and directed their movement and fire until the company executive officer assumed command. When the attack lost its momentum, Sergeant Minatra unhesitatingly moved forward under intense fire to an exposed position and directed air and artillery strikes against the enemy. On 19 November, while being briefed at the battalion command post, he was subjected to an intense enemy mortar barrage. Although wounded in the initial minutes of the attack, he refused medical evacuation and assisted the other casualties to safety. As the fusillade subsided, the enemy assaulted the battalion's flank. Without regard for his safety Sergeant Minatra moved to the point of heaviest contact. He quickly and accurately directed close air support against the attackers. At one point, the bombs and napalm fell only thirty meters from his own position. As the enemy assault was beaten back the battalion counterattacked. Murderous enemy rocket, mortar and small arms fire threatened to halt the advance just short of the hill's crest. Refusing to let the attack stall, Sergeant Minatra charged the hostile positions alone, killed a number of the enemy, and caused others to flee. The weary paratroopers, inspired by his actions, charged up the hill and completely overran the insurgents. Sergeant First Class Minatra's extraordinary heroism and devotions to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1514 (April 4, 1968)

MINES, ERNEST G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ernest G. Mines, First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. First Sergeant Mines distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 October 1969 while participating in a search and clear mission in the mountainous terrain northeast of An Khe. While exploring a cavern located near an enemy camp site, he discovered a cache containing rifles, baskets of rice, and salt. First Sergeant Mines summoned other team members to aid him in removing the supplies. As his companions gathered around and he began to remove the items, he activated a concealed booby trap which caused an armed grenade to fall to the cavern floor. Reacting quickly, First Sergeant Mines warned his comrades and then threw himself directly on the grenade. After an agonizing period during which the grenade failed to explode, he carefully moved off the grenade and ran from the cave. A subsequent examination of the grenade revealed that the pin had been pulled, but the safety release had not been removed when the booby trap had been emplaced. First Sergeant Mine's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3732 (August 13, 1970)

*MINOGUE, THOMAS FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Francis Minogue (51608891), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 March 1967, while serving as Platoon Medic for the Third Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. His unit was conducting a search and destroy operation in Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam, and engaged a numerically superior enemy force. When the company commander was seriously wounded, Private Minogue ran through thirty meters of intense enemy fire to shield his commander with his body and treat his wounds. As the enemy charged the position, he ignored the intrinsic peril and threw himself across his leader and consequently received multiple gunshot wounds. His selfless actions also provided protection for the radiotelephone operator, who used his rifle and hand grenades to repulse the enemy and communicated with the platoons and battalion headquarters. Private Minogue continued to shield his commander as he and the radiotelephone operator moved him to a safer position. When the enemy assaulted their new position, he again covered the commander's body with his own and protected the radiotelephone operator. The company commander occasionally regained consciousness long enough to encourage his men and adjust air and artillery support. Private Minogue continued to treat him until overcome by his own mortal wounds. His extraordinary heroism not only saved the lives of the radio operator and company commander, but also made it possible for them to continue to operate the command post. The tactical and valorous significance of his heroism is highlighted by the fact that, without the operation of the command post, the company would not have survived until a relief force arrived to force the enemy to break contact. Private Minogue's supreme effort and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 7 (February 14, 1968)
Home Town: New York, New York

*MITCHELL, THOMAS PETER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Peter Mitchell (0-94492), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 60, 9th Infantry Division Advisory Detachment, IV Corps Advisory Group. Captain Mitchell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while serving a senior advisor to a Vietnamese battalion during a mission to aid a beleaguered unit in Vinh Long Province. Captain Mitchell flew into the besieged landing zone with the first half of a heliborne battalion. Although the area had been recently swept by air strikes to destroy some of the enemy firepower, the helicopters were raked by devastating fire as they touched down. The man sitting next to Captain Mitchell was killed, and he himself was hit in the side of the face by shrapnel. Heedless of his wound, he left the aircraft and urged the Vietnamese Commander to lead his troops toward the woodline containing the Viet Cong fortifications. At this point, another helicopter flew in to pick up a previously downed crew and was hit and crashed. Faced with the decision to take cover behind a dike or enter the hail of fire to rescue the helicopter crew, Captain Mitchell selflessly ignored his own safety and led a small group toward the burning aircraft. With bullets striking all around him, he waded 25 meters through knee-deep mud to where an injured crew member was crawling to safety. Braving the heat of the flames and gas from the burning wreckage, he grabbed him and pulled him to a nearby dike. Captain Mitchell placed himself between the man and the Viet Cong weapons and had dragged him 15 meters when he was struck and killed by an outburst of fire. His gallant sacrifice enabled other men to complete the rescue of the injured crew member. Captain Mitchell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1732 (April 15, 1967)
Home Town: Sarasota, Florida

*MOEHRING, DEAN WARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dean Ward Moehring (US54822349), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Sergeant Moehring distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 March 1969 as leader of a platoon on a combat patrol approximately two kilometers southwest of Fire Support Base Liz near Duc Pho. While his element was crossing a cultivated field, Sergeant Moehring observed movement in a nearby hedgerow and called out the word "stop" in Vietnamese. Suddenly a North Vietnamese Army company unleashed intense machine gun, rocket-propelled grenade and automatic weapons fire on the platoon from three sides, killing three men instantly and wounding eleven others. Seeing a casualty who was unable to craw to cover because of the seriousness of his wounds, Sergeant Moehring dashed from his secure position onto the open field to the side of his stricken comrade. Despite the fierce enemy fusillade, he began to work feverishly to stop the man's bleeding, while glancing to the rear and shouting commands to his troops to direct their return fire. As he was calling to his radio-telephone operator to obtain reinforcements and an ambulance helicopter, he was struck in the chest by enemy rounds and mortally wounded. Sergeant Moehring's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1554 (May 2, 1969)
Home Town: Naperville, Illinois

*MONCAVAGE, DAVID JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David John Moncavage (US56910377), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Moncavage distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 February 1968 as medical corpsman of a mechanized infantry battalion conducting a search and destroy mission near Cu Chi. The battalion was savagely attacked by an enemy force of unknown size firing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades from entrenched positions. Braving an intense hail of bullets and flying shrapnel. Private Moncavage moved throughout the battlefield and rendered emergency medical treatment to wounded soldiers. When he had aided all the casualties in his platoon, he continued to exposed himself to the enemy's raking fire as he administered skillful aid to wounded comrades of other platoons in his company. Private Moncavage then raced across a wide, open area of bullet- swept terrain and resumed his lifesaving mission for another company which had suffered heavy casualties. After all the wounded had been treated, he rejoined his platoon and gallantly volunteered to serve as an infantryman to help suppress the relentless enemy fire. Private Moncavage was mortally wounded while destroying a fortified enemy bunker with a hand grenade. His fearless and dedicated efforts in close combat saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Private First Class Moncavage's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1738 (April 15, 1968)
Home Town: Scottsdale, Arizona

MONNICK, EDWARD W., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward W. Monnick, III (RA12887228), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Monnick distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 May 1968 as a squad leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission south of Song Be. His squad received heavy automatic weapons fire while advancing through an abandoned rubber plantation. Several assaults were made on the enemy position, but each of them was unsuccessful. Specialist Monnick then maneuvered alone through dense jungle to the source of the hostile barrage, which he discovered to be a bunker with heavy overhead cover. Coming within inches of the emplacement's firing port, he threw grenades inside, but the enemy fire continued. Again braving a hail of bullets coming from the bunker, he threw two more grenades into it which caused one side of the fortification to collapse. Still its weapons were not silenced. Specialist Monnick next employed a grenade launcher against the bunker, firing rounds into it from an exposed position. This was also unsuccessful, so he engaged the enemy with his rifle. In a final assault, Specialist Monnick tossed another grenade into the bunker which completely destroyed its overhead structure. Then, with the aid of two of his comrades, he eliminated the remaining resistance with rifle fire. Specialist Four Monnick's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4330 (September 11, 1968)

MONTGOMERY, DONALD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald B. Montgomery (0-5341469), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Montgomery distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 September 1968 as platoon leader during a combat operation near Phuoc Loc. While advancing in two columns, his element came under intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Lieutenant Montgomery crawled across two hundred meters of open rice paddy to join the column which was under heaviest attack. There he learned that two soldiers had been killed and lay extremely close to the hostile positions. He and his platoon sergeant succeeded in reaching their fallen comrades, but as they were returning with the bodies the platoon sergeant was mortally wounded by sniper fire. Ignoring the communists' fusillade, Lieutenant Montgomery recovered all three casualties. He then directed armed helicopters to place suppressive fire on the aggressors, and after withdrawing his troops, skillfully directed air strikes which silenced the enemy position. While organizing helicopter extraction for his troops, he discovered that three soldiers were missing. Lieutenant Montgomery immediately left to search for the men and succeeded in locating them, but was severely wounded by enemy fire as he was leading them back to the platoon. Despite his wounds he engaged the aggressors with his rifle, killing three of the communists. Separated from his three companions during the fire fight, he again went to look for them but lost consciousness due to loss of blood and exhaustion. He was found several hours later after reinforcements arrived and forced the enemy to break contact. First Lieutenant Montgomery's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5635 (December 7, 1968)

*MOORE, CHARLES THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Thomas Moore (487561838), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 5 January 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On that date, when the First Platoon of Company D made contact with a determined enemy force located in a well-fortified bunker complex, a friendly trooper to the front was severely wounded. Despite his own wrist wounds, Private Moore, medical aidman for the First Platoon, moved through the intense hail of enemy fire to treat and evacuate the wounded soldier. Subsequently, a rocket impacted which strafed the area with shrapnel, wounding the First Platoon leader and further injuring Private Moore. Again with complete disregard for his own welfare, Private Moore moved to the aid of his platoon leader and evacuated the officer to safety. Then, noticing that his first patient had stopped breathing, Private Moore untiringly, and singularly performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until life and unassisted breathing were restored. As he was constructing a bamboo stretcher on which to carry this critically wounded trooper, Private Moore was shot in the hip and rendered unconscious. Minutes later, he regained consciousness, and although his many wounds now completely incapacitated his movement and his position was exposed, he began shouting valuable instructions concerning the necessary and vital treatment for the wounded. Even when he knew that death was imminent, Private Moore unselfishly ignored his pain and continued to give valuable medical instructions. Private Moore succumbed to his wounds before he could be medically evacuated, but not before he had saved the lives of many of his comrades through his conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism. Private Moore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)
Born: July 15, 1948 at Ottumwa, Iowa
Home Town: Memphis, Missouri

*MOORE, DENNIS FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dennis Francis Moore (12764642), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Senior Aidman with Company D, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division which was actively engaged in ground combat against enemy forces in the vicinity of Tan Uyen, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 March 1968. As the lead element of the company came under intense hostile small arms, rocket, grenade and machinegun fire, Specialist Moore left the security of the company headquarters element voluntarily to go to the aid of the wounded in the front element. As he approached the first of eight wounded comrades, he was seriously wounded in the leg and stomach. Completely ignoring his own wounds and safety he pushed ahead into the enemy fire. He discarded his personal weapon so as to better aid the wounded. In the course of moving from the first to the sixth man who lay only ten feet from an enemy machinegun bunker, Specialist Five Moore was wounded repeatedly. Not once did he stop to tend his own wounds but continued to crawl to the front, treating the wounded as he moved. He courageously moved to the lead man and began treating him, when he was mortally wounded by machinegun fire. Specialist Five Moore's extraordinary heroism and willing self-sacrifice are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the Armed Forces of the his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 33 (May 23, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

MOORE, DOUGLAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Douglas E. Moore (0-86539), Major (Medical Services Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade. Major Moore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 and 11 December 1968 as commander of an ambulance helicopter near Trung Lap. Responding to a request to evacuate a critically wounded infantryman, Major Moore found that the ground unit was pinned down by enemy fire from a treeline one hundred meters away. Braving a hail of bullets, he maneuvered his ship down through trees and bushes into a tiny pickup site and successfully extracted the casualty. At twilight the same unit was in heavy contact with the communists, but was short on men and ammunition and was unable to secure a landing zone. While the infantrymen placed as much suppressive fire on the hostile positions as he could, Major Moore exposed his helicopter to the enemy snipers and rescued four more seriously wounded soldiers. During the night the North Vietnamese launched a heavy mortar, rocket-propelled grenade and automatic weapons attack. Early in the morning, after flying missions for several other units, Major Moore agreed to evacuate a number of casualties although illumination rounds would silhouette his aircraft and incoming small arms fire was still being received. A fierce enemy fusillade erupted as the ship touched down, but he calmly waited until eight casualties were aboard before departing the landing zone. He had barely cleared the perimeter when the North Vietnamese fusillade hit his ship from both sides and one round tore through his helmet, knocking him from the controls and sending the aircraft into a steep bank. Despite being wounded and unable to see out of one eye, Major Moore righted the helicopter and aided his pilot in reporting the enemy locations to the command and control ship and the ground elements. Major Moore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1328 (April 16, 1969)

MOORE, HAROLD G., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold G. Moore, Jr. (0-27678), Colonel (Infantry), [then Lieutenant Colonel], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 14 through 16 November 1965, Colonel Moore, Commanding Officer, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), was participating with his unit in a vital search and destroy operation in the la Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. Upon entering the landing zone with the first rifle company, Colonel Moore personally commenced the fire-fight to gain control of the zone by placing accurate fire upon the Viet Cong from an exposed position in his hovering helicopter. Throughout the initial assault phase, Colonel Moore repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to insure the proper and expedient deployment of friendly troops. By his constant movement and repeated exposure to this insurgent fire, Colonel Moore, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, set the standard for his combat troops by a courageous display of "leadership by example" which characterized all his actions throughout the long and deadly battle. Inspired by his constant presence and active participation against the overwhelming insurgent hordes, the friendly forces solidified their perimeter defenses and repulsed numerous Viet Cong assaults. On 15 November 1965, the embattled battalion was again attacked by a three-pronged insurgent assault aimed at surrounding and destroying the friendly forces in one great advance. With great skill and foresight, Colonel Moore moved from position to position, directing accurate fire and giving moral support to the defending forces. By his successful predictions of insurgent attack plans, he was able to thwart all their efforts by directing barrages of small arms, mortar, and artillery fire in conjunction with devastating air strikes against Viet Cong positions and attack zones. As the grueling battle continued into the third day, another large Viet Cong strike was repulsed through Colonel Moore's ability to shift men and firepower at a moment's notice against the savage, last-ditch efforts of the insurgents to break through the friendly positions. Colonel Moore's battalion, inspired by his superb leadership, combat participation, and moral support, finally decimate the well-trained and numerically superior Viet Cong force so decidedly that they withdrew in defeat, leaving over 800 of their dead on the battlefield, and resulting in a great victory for the 1st Battalion. Colonel Moore's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 126 (June 1, 1966)

MOORE, JOSEPH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph W. Moore (RA15619786), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-218/219, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Moore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1966 while advising and leading a company of Irregulars on a heliborne assault near Bong Son. Upon infiltration the unit received hostile fire in the landing zone. Sergeant Moore quickly rallied his men into an attack against the enemy positions on an adjacent hill. When automatic weapons fire was received from an insurgent emplacement, he ordered his troops to fix their bayonets and dauntlessly led them in a savage assault up the slope. Although he was knocked down and wounded twice by exploding mortar rounds, Sergeant Moore continued to spearhead the charge and, on six different occasions, pulled stricken comrades to cover and treated their wounds. Upon reaching the summit, he fearlessly leaped into the Viet Cong trenches, killed four insurgents and captured four others. When one of his prisoners threw a previously hidden grenade into a group of friendly troops, Sergeant Moore lunged for the explosive and threw it out of the area. Later, during a subsequent enemy counterattack, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire and gallantly directed a stout defense which repulsed the assault. As his casualties were being evacuated in helicopters, the landing zone was again raked by sniper fire. Sergeant Moore immediately set out after the insurgents with only one soldier, returning an hour later after killing two Viet Cong. After refusing medical aid for himself, he led the company through four more contacts with the enemy. Staff Sergeant Moore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3148 (June 25, 1967)

MORDUE, NORMAN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norman A. Mordue (OF-108795), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Mordue distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 May 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an Airmobile platoon on a search and clear operation in the village of An Qui. when another platoon was pinned down by heavy machine gun and grenade fire from a numerically superior and well entrenched insurgent force, Lieutenant Mordue immediately led his platoon on a fierce attack to relieve the pressure on the engaged unit. Seeing two of his men wounded and pinned down, he grabbed a machine gun and braved withering enemy fire to rescue them. He then moved to the front of his platoon, completely ignoring his own safety, and personally destroyed two enemy bunkers and killed five hostile soldiers in the ensuing offensive. Severely wounded and unable to walk, Lieutenant Mordue refused medical aid and directed the withdrawal of his men as deadly artillery strikes were called in on the Viet Cong positions. His bravery and gallant leadership contributed greatly to the defeat of the enemy. First Lieutenant Mordue extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4667 (September 14, 1967)

MORGAN, MICHAEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael J. Morgan (US56827903), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Morgan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 May 1968 as leader of an eleven-man observation team conducting a mission on Hill 1124. During the early morning hours, an enemy force of undetermined size initiated a ground assault on the squad's position. Specialist Morgan alerted his men and began throwing grenades to repulse the attack. Despite his efforts, the enemy element breached the perimeter and employed a flamethrower against him and his troops. Reacting immediately, he disregarded a hail of enemy bullets directed at him, maneuvered to an advantageous position, and took the flamethrower crew under fire, killing two enemy soldiers and destroying their weapon. As he moved to rejoin his men, he was wounded by small arms fire. Ignoring his own wounds, he led his men to a fortified bunker and then adjusted supporting artillery fire on the enemy. The battle continued throughout the night and Specialist Morgan successfully directed countering measures against all fanatical enemy attempts to overrun his squad. His personal courage inspired his men to fight relentlessly until a relief force was able to reach them. Specialist Four Morgan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4067 (August 22, 1968)

MORRIS, MELVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Melvin Morris, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-403, Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Morris distinguished himself while serving as commander of a strike force on a mission north and east of Chi Lang. Sister companies of his battalion had encountered an extensive enemy mine field and were subsequently engaged by a hostile force. By radio Sergeant Morris learned that a fellow team commander had been killed and had fallen near an enemy bunker. Immediately reorganizing the strike forces into an effective assault posture, he advanced them and then moved out with two men to recover the body. Observing the maneuver, the hostile force concentrated their fire and wounded both men accompanying Sergeant Morris. After he assisted the two back to the lines of the main force, he again charged into the hail of fire to approach the nearest enemy bunker, throwing grenades into it. As his men laid a base of suppressive fire, he neared the position of the team leader's body. When a machine gun emplacement directed it strafing fusillade at him, he annihilated the position with hand grenades and continued his assault, eliminating three additional bunkers. Driving the enemy from the entrenchment nearest the fallen team leader, he retrieved his comrade and started to his troop's position. As he neared the strike force he was wounded three times, but he struggled forward until he brought his fallen comrade to the friendly position. Staff Sergeant Morris' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 105 (January 12, 1970)

MORRIS, WAYNE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wayne H. Morris (0-5334779), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). First Lieutenant Morris distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 6 December 1967 as platoon leader of an infantry unit on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Phuoc Loc. Enemy mortars had pounded his base camp the previous night, and he led his men to locate the weapons emplacement. Moving through dense jungle, his platoon was hit by claymore mines, automatic weapons and rocket fire from a well entrenched Viet Cong battalion. The violence of the attach disorganized his men and pinned them down, but Lieutenant Morris, disregarding the intense fire, moved through the ravaging fusillade to rally and reorganize them. After establishing a base of fire, he moved to the front of his troops and led a fierce assault on the hostile fortifications. The overwhelming enemy firepower threw his men back three times, and he was ordered to withdraw and reorganize. Repeatedly braving withering fire, he moved across the battlefield to locate friendly casualties and carry them to safety. After reaching the evacuation site with the wounded, he returned to assure that none of his men were left behind. When reinforcements arrived, Lieutenant Morris led his men through raging enemy fire to attach the determined Viet Cong. With bullets striking all around him, he fought furiously and encouraged and inspired his men to overrun and defeat the enemy forces. First Lieutenant Morris's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2722 (June 6, 1968)

*MOSES, WALTER LEWIS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Lewis Moses, Jr. (US51835754), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Infantry Regiment, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Specialist Four Moses distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 March 1969 while serving as leader of a machine gun team on a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Quang Tin Province. As the company traveled down a trail, from well-concealed bunkers an enemy force initiated an ambush, wounding several men of the point element. Braving the onslaught of machine gun, mortar, and rocket-propelled grenade fire, Specialist Moses rushed to assist the pinned down men. Despite a fragmentation wound received while retrieving one of his wounded comrades, he refused medical attention and again exposed himself to the intense hostile barrage to recover another casualty. As he courageously attempted to rescue a third man, he was mortally wounded in the head by enemy rifle rounds. Specialist Four Moses' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2296 (June 28, 1969)
Born: March 8, 1947 at Wooster, Ohio
Home Town: Wooster, Ohio

*MOUSSEAU, LLOYD FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lloyd Francis Mousseau (RA19712162), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Mousseau distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1968 as assistant team leader of a twelve-man Special Forces/Vietnamese reconnaissance patrol operating in enemy territory. The patrol was heavily attacked by enemy forces firing grenades, small arms and automatic weapons. Although Sergeant Mousseau was seriously wounded in the initial barrage, he ignored his injuries and braved the devastating fire time after time to deploy his men in a tight defensive perimeter. While fighting furiously to repel the determined attackers, a cartridge ruptured in his rifle, wounding him again and rendering the weapon inoperative. He quickly secured another rifle from a fallen comrade in time to engage and kill three enemy troops who had reached his defensive lines. The patrol leader was killed and Sergeant Mousseau immediately assumed command. Using a radio, he directed gunship strikes on the insurgents which forced them back. As an extraction helicopter attempted to land, it was hit by a renewed enemy fusillade and crashed. Sergeant Mousseau continued to direct close air support. Despite grenade wounds to his legs, he maneuvered under a curtain of fire to locate enemy positions and strong points. He then adjusted napalm and bombs to within thirty meters of his perimeter, forcing the enemy to withdraw. When a rescue helicopter arrived, he directed his men aboard before mounting the craft himself. As he entered the ship, he was killed by an enemy sniper. His fearless and selfless leadership in the heat of battle prevented his unit from being overrun. Staff Sergeant Mousseau's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2893 (June 18, 1968)
Home Town: Cudahy, California

MUELLER, ARNDT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Arndt L. Mueller (0-34700), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Colonel Mueller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 27 to 29 June 1967 while serving as Senior Advisor, United States Army Advisory Group, III Corps Tactical Zone near Suoi Long Creek. When advised that a Vietnamese Ranger battalion was engaged in a fierce battle with a well-entrenched end determined hostile force, Colonel Mueller immediately flew to the area to evaluate the situation. Flying low into the face of heavy ground fire, he fixed the positions of the enemy although hampered by a dense canopy. He then directed devastating air strikes while calling in other units to reinforce the outnumbered Rangers. Several times during the three-day battle, he landed within the battle area to gather intelligence, aid the ground commanders and keep informed of the changing situation. On numerous occasions he released his own helicopter to evacuate wounded. As the conflict increased, intense enemy fire was placed near Colonel Mueller until an air strike within 300 meters of his position silenced the hostile weapons. Informed that a Viet Cong soldier had been captured, he directed his immediate interrogation, gaining information which aided immeasurably in routing the enemy. His personal bravery and calm presence bolstered the morale of his men and contributed greatly tot heir victory. Colonel Mueller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4648 (September 12, 1967)

MULLEN, WILLIAM J., III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William J. Mullen, III (0-87282), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Mullen distinguished himself on 25 August 1966 while serving as a company commanding officer during a combat operation in Binh Duong Province. when a long range reconnaissance patrol discovered the perimeter defense of a Viet Cong battalion, it immediately received intense hostile fire, sustained casualties and radioed for reinforcements. Captain Mullen's company and a platoon from another company were immediately dispatched to the aid of the reconnaissance team. As the combined armor and infantry reaction force neared the objective, they received intense hostile fire from a Viet Cong force entrenched in an interconnecting bunker and trench network. During the initial assault, the outnumbered American units sustained numerous casualties, including the entire command group except Captain Mullen. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Mullen fearlessly moved around the perimeter to organize and coordinate the evacuation of the wounded and to assure effective command and communication links were maintained. Observing that there was mortar ammunition in a partially destroyed armored personnel carrier, he moved forward of the perimeter and recovered the vital ammunition. Captain Mullen continued to expose himself as he resupplied a forward machine gun emplacement which was critically low on ammunition. When an armored carrier exploded and filled an occupied trench with burning fuel, Captain Mullen extracted a soldier trapped by the fire and burning debris. In the early afternoon after a unit had lost its commander and was in danger of being overrun, Captain Mullen moved fully exposed to the front of the unit and led the in attack. After assisting and directing the evacuation of the wounded from the heart of the battle, Captain Mullen organized the remainder of his command. When darkness approached, he personally directed his diminishing force of approximately 20 men into an expanded perimeter that closed within 50 meters of the Viet Cong emplacements. Despite numerous friendly casualties, Captain Mullen maintained battle discipline and effectively reestablished the chain of command when reinforcements and the new battalion commander arrived. In the final moments of the battle, Captain Mullen led his drastically diminished units in an assault that completely overran and destroyed the Viet Cong fortifications in his sector. Through his courage and outstanding leadership, he converted a potentially disastrous situation into a decisive victory. Captain Mullen's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6469 (November 23, 1966)

MURPHY, KENNETH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth E. Murphy (RA6800817), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Murphy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 November 1966 while serving as a squad leader with a recondo platoon on a search and destroy mission near Tuy Hoa. The unit had covered several thousand meters of terrain with negative results, until the point man finally came upon, and killed, a North Vietnamese soldier. When sporadic hostile fire was received from the left flank, Sergeant Murphy immediately led his squad in an assault on the insurgent positions. Suddenly, the entire hillside was raked by a devastating barrage, as North Vietnamese positions opened fire all around him. Seeing several soldiers fall wounded, Sergeant Murphy fearlessly ran through a hail of bullets to try and help them. Unable to reach his comrades on the first two attempts, he moved forward a third time, but was wounded in the head. Dazed, but undaunted, Sergeant Murphy succeeded in carrying one stricken soldier fifty meters to safety. When another man was hit, he again disregarded the extreme dangers to race back across the bullet-swept area. As sergeant Murphy returned with the man, he was again wounded by insurgent fire, but continued on until reaching friendly lines. Unmindful of his painful wounds, he then organized his men and led them in a fierce assault on the entrenched enemy. Dizzy from loss of blood and able to use only one arm, Sergeant Murphy gallantly crashed forward through dense foliage and personally killed three hostile soldiers with his rifle. His unimpeachable valor and boundless determination enabled his men to break out of the trap and overwhelm the insurgent force. Sergeant Murphy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1376 (March 27, 1967)

MURPHY, ROBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert C. Murphy (0-91468), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while Commanding Company C, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. On 6 February 1966, Captain Murphy, his command group, and one reinforced rifle platoon were deployed by helicopter to complete an encirclement of an entrenched Viet Cong company in the village of Canh-Tinh, Republic of Vietnam. On two occasions en route to their objective, this unit was subjected to intense and accurate sniper fire. Captain Murphy remained exposed to direct airstrikes and artillery fire into the insurgent positions in order to enable his unit to complete their objective. As Captain Murphy and his comrades approached the village, they came under deadly grazing machine gun fire. Upon coordinating with the other unit commander to launch a company attack, he led his troops in an assault through a murderous hail of bullets to storm the insurgent trenches. The Viet Cong fell back upon facing the attacking force. A vicious house- to-house battle followed. The Viet Cong, defending a series of fortified bunkers, pinned down one of the leading elements. Realizing that the momentum of the assault was faltering, Captain Murphy seized the initiative and charged through the intense hail of fire to destroy a bunker and kill two insurgents. Inside the village, a machine gun began firing at Captain Murphy. With great courage, and under the covering fire of another man, he again charged the hostile position, destroying the bunker and killing four more Viet Cong. He then recognized and consolidated his forces. The success of the operation was marked by his professional ability and courage. Captain Murphy's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 161 (July 14, 1966)

MURRAY, MICHAEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael J. Murray (US51836889), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Murray distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 February 1969 as a rifleman on a reconnaissance-in-force mission approximately seven miles west of Ben Cat. His company received intense rocket-propelled grenade, automatic weapons and small arms fire while moving into an enemy base camp. The unit immediately suffered several casualties and withdrew to regroup. When a flanking movement was sent against a series of hostile bunkers and spider holes, Specialist Murray volunteered to maneuver with this element, laying suppressive fire during his advance. As he neared a well-concealed bunker, a nearby patrol member was shot in the chest. Specialist Murray twice charged the fortification, placing fire into its gun ports until he was forced by concentrated enemy fire to rejoin his element. After a call was issued for three volunteers to rescue the wounded, Specialist Murray moved forward, pointing out the communists' firing lanes and bunker complexes. Faced with a hail of bullets from a bunker, he stopped in the midst of the fusillade to fire a light antitank weapon and hurl hand grenades which eliminated the fortification. The men came within twenty meters of the casualties, but were again forced back. Recovering an M-60 machine gun, Specialist Murray advanced to provide covering fire and, when the enemy continued their fierce resistance, stood and charged the bunker. He silenced it with fragmentation grenades, permitting his wounded comrades to be safely evacuated. Specialist Four Murray's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2249 (June 25, 1969)

*MURREY, TRACY HENRY (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Tracy Henry Murrey (0-5331649), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade (Separate). First Lieutenant Murrey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 November 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an airborne infantry unit during a search and destroy mission on Hill 875 at Dak To. A sister company had been pinned down by fierce enemy rocket, mortar and automatic weapons fire while assaulting the heavily fortified hill and Lieutenant Murrey fearlessly led his platoon through a curtain of fire to strengthen the right flank of the beleaguered force. Repeatedly exposing himself to the withering barrage, he positioned his men and directed a deadly fusillade against the enemy bunkers. He quickly determined the location of the heaviest fire and led his men in an aggressive assault on the hill. Inspiring his men by his calmness and determination in the face of the murderous enemy fire, he succeeded in leading his force across seventy-five meters of open ground toward the Viet Cong trenches before he was forced to momentarily withdraw under overwhelming hostile firepower. Quickly regrouping his forces, he led another fierce assault which swept to within fifteen feet of the enemy positions. He then hurled two hand grenades inside the nearest bunker. Other North Vietnamese soldiers, in nearby fortifications, saw his devastating attack and concentrated their fire on him. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men in the heat of battle. First Lieutenant Murrey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 400 (January 27, 1968)
Home Town: Miles City, Montana

MYERS, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard J. Myers (RA67026035), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Private First Class Myers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early hours of 13 August 1968 near Tam Binh Village. While Private Myers' platoon was waiting at an ambush location it suddenly came under a mortar barrage, followed by a ground attack from an estimated company-size Viet Cong force. The communists concentrated their assault against the right flank position being defended by Private Myers and six other men. Enemy rocket-propelled grenades, automatic weapons and grenade fire caused severe casualties, and soon only two men besides himself were able to fight. Private Myers fired his grenade launcher, threw hand grenades and gave instructions to his two comrades, while courageously holding off the communists. When another man was seriously wounded and after it was discovered that the M16 rifle could not be employed because the muzzle flashes and tracer rounds pinpointed the position, Private Myers was left with the responsibility of stopping the foe. Although he was himself wounded in the shoulder and hand by fragments, he continued to fire his grenade launcher at the aggressors and repelled repeated assaults. During lulls in the battle, he set up claymore mines and collected hand grenades from the casualties to use against the enemy. With the aid of artillery, gun ships and two other platoons, the Viet Cong were finally forced to flee and the wounded were evacuated. Private First Class Myers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1750 (May 15, 1969)

N

NEDOLAST, DANIEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel A. Nedolast, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Specialist Four Nedolast distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 April 1969 while serving as a medical aidman for a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the jungles northwest of Dau Tieng. In the first moments after a North Vietnamese force launched an attack on his troop, the foremost tank was hit by an enemy rocket. Observing that the explosion had halted the vehicle and wounded the entire crew, Specialist Nedolast dashed forward through the hostile barrage to assist the casualties. As he was mounting the track, a second rocket struck the vehicle and knocked him to the ground. He remounted the vehicle and pulled the wounded driver from his compartment carrying him to a safe location. Twice he returned through the fierce fusillade to remove injured crew members from the hazardous area. As the battle raged, Specialist Nedolast moved about the combat zone, treating wounded soldiers and assisting in their evacuation. Through his endeavors, thirteen men were successfully extracted and many lives were saved. Specialist Four Nedolast's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2947 (August 4, 1969)

*NEELY, DAN LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dan Lee Neely (RA12937819), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Neely distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions n 1 March 1968 as radio-telephone operator of an airmobile infantry company on a search and destroy mission northwest of Hue. One of the company's platoons made contact with an estimated company of North Vietnamese Army regulars and immediately suffered several casualties. A reinforcement platoon moved up to assist and became pinned down behind a small bush line. Several medics attempted to crawl forward to give aid to the wounded who were lying in exposed positions, and they were hit by the enemy fire as they advanced. Private Neely began to move from position to position, exposing himself to the fusillade to collect hand grenades. Discarding his equipment and carrying only grenades and medical bandages, he then crawled forward toward the casualties. He maneuvered to within a few meters of a Viet Cong bunker and threw grenades at it in an attempt to silence its weapons. The attempt failed and he was driven back by a fierce enemy barrage. While the reinforcement platoon concentrated covering fire on the enemy position, Private Neely again moved forward, this time succeeding in reaching one of the wounded medics. After applying first aid to the man, he dragged him back to the relative safety of the friendly force's p perimeter. Private Neely secured a further supply of grenades and attempted to return to the remaining wounded. While crawling forward in the face of withering fire, throwing hand grenades at the enemy, he was mortally wounded. Private Neely's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3338 (July 15, 1968)
Home Town: Birmingham, Alabama

NELSON, CHARLES EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles Edward Nelson (RA55380871), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 10 January 1969 while serving as a platoon leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1969 as a platoon leader in Don Luan Province during a mission to destroy a bridge which was a known enemy infiltration route. Sergeant Nelson was under the bridge preparing to demolish it when his company was suddenly subjected to intense automatic weapons fire from bunkers across the river. Seeing that the company commander was pinned down, he began to place covering fire, killing one North Vietnamese soldier, and remained in his exposed position until the commander had reached safety. As he was leading a withdrawal so that air strikes could be conducted, his platoon came under a heavy barrage from another group of bunkers. After positioning his men, he advanced alone toward the bunker, but was wounded in the chest by fire from a previously undetected fortification. Disregarding his painful injury, he crawled to within one meter of the bunker and hurled a grenade inside, killing the two occupants and relieving the pressure on his platoon. His men then reorganized and, with the help of another platoon, routed the communists. Sergeant First Class Nelson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1587 (May 3, 1969)

*NELSON, HUGH REAVIS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Hugh Reavis Nelson, Jr. (0-99098), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 5 June 1966 while serving as a member of the 114th Aviation Company (Airmobile Light), 1st Aviation Brigade, engaged in military operations in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Nelson was acting as Aircraft Commander of a Cobra aircraft when it was struck by hostile gun fire, downed in the middle of many insurgent positions, and had all weapons destroyed in the crash. Upon the initial impact, all persons aboard the aircraft were unconscious. As the first person to regain consciousness with the physical ability to aid the other three crew members, Captain Nelson ignored his own injuries, debarked the aircraft, and started to evacuate his fellow soldiers. Proceeding to the left side of the aircraft, he ripped off the door with his bare hands and removed a dazed Specialist who had been pinned in the cargo compartment. After placing the Specialist on the ground and observing that the injured pilot had managed to get out of the aircraft, Captain Nelson climbed into the Cobra to assist another Specialist who was still trapped in the aircraft. Although the insurgents began a heavy volume of automatic and small arms fire at a range of approximately thirty feet from the aircraft, he continued his brave efforts until he freed the trapped crew member. He then forced the Specialist to the ground and, using his own body as a human shield to cover his comrade, saved the life of his fellow soldier at the sacrifice of his own. Through his gallant efforts, he enabled a crew member to send a signal with a smoke grenade to supporting aircraft which responded immediately and resulted in the successful evacuation of the survivors. Captain Nelson's extraordinary heroism on the battlefield, at the cost of his life, reflects great credit upon himself, the United States Army, and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 45 (December 1, 1966)
Home Town: Rocky Mount, North Carolina

*NELSON, LARRY DOUGLAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry Douglas Nelson (US54968767), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 6th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 August 1968 during combat operations east of Can Giuoc. While his platoon was receiving fire from a Viet Cong bunker system, Specialist Nelson spotted an approaching enemy soldier armed with a grenade. With complete disregard for his safety, he charged the advancing foe and wrested the grenade from him. During the struggle the pin on the grenade was pulled. Specialist Nelson immediately retrieved the deadly explosive and threw it away from the platoon so that it detonated harmlessly. As a squad began to assault the bunkers, one of the men fell seriously wounded. Specialist Nelson unhesitatingly crawled through the intense hostile fire to the injured man and returned him to safety. His platoon continued its efforts to destroy the fortified enemy bunker complex, and he began to move toward a bunker which was the source of heavy fire. Exposing himself to a hail of bullets, he stood up to hurl a hand grenade into the emplacement and was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Nelson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5003 (October 29, 1968)
Home Town: Royal Oak, Michigan

*NELSON, WILLIAM DEWITT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William DeWitt Nelson (US56711052), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 as a medic on a search and clear operations near Landing Zone Billie. His company made contact with a large well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force and during the initial barrage, was pinned down by the intense enemy fire and sustained heavy casualties. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Nelson ran across the open terrain to his injured comrades, treated their wounds, and carried them to an ambulance helicopter. Returning to the battle, he began to lay down an accurate volley of fire on the Communists' positions. During a brief lull in the fighting, he secured vital medical supplies and as the enemy renewed their attack, again moved unhesitatingly through the bullet-riddled area in response to a call for a medic. Seeing the company commander lying near a hostile bunker, Specialist Nelson placed himself between the fortification and the officer. Although wounded severely in the leg, he rapidly discharged an intense volume of fire as a fellow medic feverishly treated the injured commander. While Specialist Nelson was carrying the officer to the rear, a rocket landed inches from him, instantly taking his life. Specialist Four Nelson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 426 (February 7, 1969)
Home Town: Long Beach, California

NEWMAN, JAMES T.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James T. Newman, Major, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division. Major Newman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 February 1971. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 23 (May 30, 1972)
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NICHOLAS, GLENN R.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Glenn R. Nicholas, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Nicholas distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 July 1971. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 23 (May 30, 1972)
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NICHOLS, PHILIP L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Philip L. Nichols (RA13795234), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Nichols distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 June 1966 while serving as a medic with a company conducting a heliborne assault on Hill 258, near Trung Luong. While debarking the helicopters, the first assault wave received intense hostile fire from entrenched Viet Cong on the higher portion of the hill. On several occasions, Specialist Four Nichols, with complete disregard for his safety while exposed to hostile machine gun fire, treated many wounded and carried them from the killing zone. When Specialist Four Nichols learned that one of the other platoons had suffered several serious casualties in an effort to outflank the Viet Cong positions, he immediately went to the aid of the platoon. Again, he braved intense hostile fire while treating and evacuating his fallen comrades. On his fourth trip into the killing zone, he was struck in the thigh by a hostile bullet. Despite his wound, he dragged a wounded man to safety. When he crawled back into the killing zone to aid another wounded comrade, he was hit in the same leg by two more bullets. Although bleeding profusely, he continued to treat the wounded until ordered to return to the medical extraction point. Refusing any assistance, he hobbled to the evacuation area. While awaiting medical evacuation, Specialist Four Nichols continued to administer first aid to his wounded comrades. Through his unimpeachable valor, he personally carried or dragged 10 wounded men from the killing zone and administered life saving first aid to many comrades while receiving intense hostile fire. Specialist Four Nichols' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5952 (October 6, 1966)

NICOL, LON D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lon D. Nicol (RA17366849), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Platoon Sergeant Nicol distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 February 1969 while on a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the vicinity of a small rubber plantation northwest of Go Dau Hau. About noon his troop discovered a large enemy bunker complex hidden along the hedgerows. On assaulting the enemy bulwark, the entire unit came under an enfilade of small arms and machine gun fire as well as rocket-propelled antitank grenades. Suddenly the lead armored personnel carrier drew a hit from extremely close range. Seeing that the entire crew was wounded, Platoon Sergeant Nicol leaped from his vehicle and rushed forward through and intense hail of fire to aid the injured. As he pulled the wounded from the burning track, he spotted a small enemy team preparing to launch grenades on the friendly position. He stormed the hostile emplacement, throwing grenades until he demolished his target. Then he carried the wounded to the medic and re-armed himself with more grenades. Pinpointing more enemy fortifications, he silenced them with precisely-delivered grenades. Later, while directing recovery operations and medical evacuation, he sighted two North Vietnamese soldiers. One had a hand grenade, and the other threatened to fire a rocket-propelled grenade at the recovery crew. Acting quickly, Sergeant Nicol shoved three of his comrades to the ground and shielded them with his own body. Fragmentation from the blast wounded him in the head and arms, while the others escaped unscathed. Platoon Sergeant Nicol's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2048 (June 11, 1969)

NOEL, JOHN M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John M. Noel (US55854077), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 17th Armored Cavalry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Light) (Separate). Specialist Four Noel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 6 December 1967 while serving with an armored platoon supporting and infantry battalion on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Saigon. When his force was heavily engaged by a numerically superior Viet Cong force firing from heavily fortified positions, Specialist Noel braved the savage enemy barrage and directed withering machine gun fire on the attackers, enabling the infantry battalion to withdraw. When his vehicle commander was seriously wounded by a claymore mine, he immediately assumed command of the vehicle. While he directed the fires of his men, the carrier took a direct hit from a hostile antitank weapon that detonated grenades and ammunition in the vehicle. Although Specialist Noel's arm was severed by the blast, he completely disregarded the pain and continued to deliver withering fire on the attackers until his position became untenable. He received another severe wound in the abdomen but refused evacuation until his wounded comrades were safe. His gallant actions and selfless devotion to the safety of others at the risk of his life were instrumental in saving several lives in the heat of battle. Specialist Four Noel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2637 (June 1, 1968)

*NOELDNER, DANIEL MORRIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Daniel Morris Noeldner (56565196), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a senior medical aidman assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, near Pleiku, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 March 1969. On that day Sergeant Noeldner was serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, when it was ambushed by a force of the North Vietnamese Army. Several men in the point element were hit by the initial volley of fire and the cry for "Medic" was heard. Completely disregarding the intensity of the enemy attack and his own safety, Sergeant Noeldner rushed forward to the side of his wounded comrades. While treating the first man that he reached, he was wounded in the thigh. Refusing medical treatment for himself, he continued to assist the wounded while repeatedly exposing himself to the fire of the enemy force. Shortly thereafter he was again hit by enemy rounds while assisting his fellow soldiers. While attempting to bandage himself to stop the profuse bleeding another medic came to his aid, but Sergeant Noeldner directed him to check the other injured men. Although the crippling effect of his wounds prevented him from continuing his gallant mission, Sergeant Noeldner had significantly contributed to saving the lives of two men at the sacrifice of his own. His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon him and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 85 (December 15, 1969)
Home Town: South Shore, South Dakota

NORTHRUP, RALPH A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph A. Northrup, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Captain Northrup distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 January 1970 while serving as pilot of a Light Observation Helicopter operating in support of a Ranger patrol pinned down by an enemy force in Quang Tri Province. Upon arrival at the embattled patrol's location, Captain Northrup discovered that there was no landing zone. Despite heavy enemy fire and inclement weather, which had hindered previous extraction attempts by larger helicopters, Captain Northrup chose to cut a swath through the thick jungle canopy. Using his skids and rotor blades to part and chop several trees, he was able to hover about two meters above the ground. He remained in this position for three minutes while a critically wounded patrol member was strapped to the helicopter's skids. He then extracted the man from the jungle and flew him to a makeshift landing zone about two thousand meters away. He repeated this action three more times under intense enemy fire. Each time he maneuvered close enough to the ground so that the stranded patrol members could cling to the skids and be lifted free. As Captain Northrup extracted the last patrol members could cling to the skids and be lifted free. As Captain Northrup extracted the last patrol member, an estimated twenty-five man enemy force swarmed over the patrol's former position. Captain Northrup's helicopter was so battered by damage to the rotors and from enemy fire that he was later forced to make a successful emergency landing. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty and keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1930 (June 19, 1970)

NOWICKI, JAMES ERNEST (POW)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Ernest Nowicki, Chief Warrant Officer, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as a helicopter pilot. Chief Warrant Officer Nowicki distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 November 1969. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 30 (September 18, 1973)
Home Town: Winter Park, Florida
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*NUNEZ, RUDOLPH ALGAR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Rudolph Algar Nunez (RA56316818), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Nunez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 June 1966 near Saigon, Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Nunez served as point man for a five-man Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol that had been helilifted into a landing zone approximately 50 miles north of Saigon, Vietnam. While searching the jungles for suspected insurgent concentrations, Sergeant Nunez' unit was engaged in a vicious fire fight with a well-entrenched and fully-armed Viet Cong force. Although he was mortally wounded during the first moments of battle, Sergeant Nunez fearlessly held his position and engaged several well-fortified insurgent emplacements. As he lay dying, Sergeant Nunez removed a transmitter from his back and pulled the antenna to the transmit position to guide fighter aircraft onto his location. Although this meant certain death, Sergeant Nunez attempted to bring further fire power on his position to provide his comrades a better chance for escape. Through his courage, he prevented the remainder of his patrol from being overrun. Sergeant Nunez' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5885 (October 3, 1966)
Home Town: Wilmington, California

*NUSSBAUMER, STEVE OWEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Steve Owen Nussbaumer (US56826973), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as a Medic with the 2d Platoon, Troop C, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry, 1st Armored Division, near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. On 25 August 1968, Specialist Nussbaumer's troop was heavily engaged with an estimated North Vietnamese Army battalion. The infantry unit working with his troop was pinned down due to intense fire. Specialist Nussbaumer noticed that several infantrymen were wounded and not behind any type of cover. Without hesitation, Specialist Nussbaumer jumped off his armored cavalry assault vehicle and charged through the deadly enemy fusillade to a point within 20 meters of the enemy positions to give the severely wounded men aid and carry them back to the relative safety of his vehicle for medical evacuation. Observing several more wounded men lying in exposed positions, Specialist Nussbaumer braved the intense small arms, automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire to reach his helpless comrades. Specialist Nussbaumer was fatally wounded during this selfless act of courage and devotion to his fellow soldiers. His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life saved the lives of two wounded soldiers and inspired his comrades to eventually annihilate the numerically superior enemy force. Specialist Nussbaumer's actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 36 (June 6, 1969)
Home Town: Hayward, California

*NUTT, WALTER LEE, III
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Lee Nutt, III (483-54-2369), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Nutt distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 April 1969 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Fire Support Base Danger in Giao Duc District in Kien Phuong Province. As his platoon maneuvered through ad densely vegetated area, Private Nutt walked behind the leading members of the file. Suddenly an enemy force initiated an ambush with a volley of shots that killed the first two men in the patrol and wounded four more. When he saw his fallen comrades, Private Nutt rushed through a hail of hostile fire and began to administer lifesaving aid to the injured. As he heroically made his way toward a third injured man, he was struck by enemy rounds which mortally wounded him. Private First Class Nutt's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2500 (July 11, 1969)
Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa

NUTTER, RAYMOND T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond T. Nutter (0-79407), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 121st Assault Helicopter Company, 13th Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Major Nutter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 October 1966 while serving as platoon leader of an armed helicopter team supporting combat operations near Vi Thanh. Major Nutter led his aircraft in strikes at heavily fortified Viet Cong positions that were threatening a small friendly force. When two evacuation helicopters were forced to abandon attempts to reach the ground unit because of intense fire, Major Nutter decided to fly in for the pickup himself. As he brought his helicopter down, it was hit by a burst of fire which riddled the cabin, shot away the controls, and killed the other pilot. In the crash, Major Nutter suffered a large gash in his leg, but led the two crew members out of the aircraft and deeper into the swamp as the Viet Cong closed in on the wreckage. With the hope of escaping to friendly territory, they decided to move stealthily through the enemy positions, which were not under air and artillery assault. Hampered by his injury and beset by leeches and mosquitoes, he hacked his way through the swamp growths with a knife. On two occasions, when an armed insurgent attacked them, Major Nutter killed them with his knife. Suffering from cold, mosquitoes, and the pain of his wounds, and endangered by artillery fire all night, Major Nutter hid until morning in a rice paddy. Early the next day, he made contact with a friendly Vietnamese force. Major Nutter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3512 (July 12, 1967)
Born: January 24, 1930 at Georgetown, Kentucky
Home Town: Nicholasville, Kentucky

 

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