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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
  E - G  

E

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

EDWARDS, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James L. Edwards (RA53085482), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 82d Airborne Division. Platoon Sergeant Edwards distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 August 1968 as First Sergeant of his company while it was on a search and destroy mission in Nam Hoa District, Thua Thien Province. During a battle with a well-entrenched enemy force, Sergeant Edwards was directed to take command of a platoon which was heavily engaged with the communists. Braving a hail of bullets, he reached the platoon and discovered that the point squad and platoon sergeant had become separated by the initial burst of hostile fire and were trapped in the enemy killing zone. He quickly reorganized the platoon to bring maximum fire power against the foe, and then crawled alone to the beleaguered element. Finding the point squad out of ammunition and about to be overrun, he placed heavy fire on the communists, single-handedly forcing them back and enabling the squad to withdraw. When his comrades had reached the defensive perimeter, he crawled back and continued to exposed himself to the hostile barrage for the next three hours to direct his men. When another platoon managed to reach the rear of the enemy, he led an attack making a one-man assault on the first fortification which blocked his troops' advance and killed its two occupants with hand grenades. After he had destroyed a second bunker with hand grenades and annihilated both its defenders with rifle fire, his men stood up and overran the enemy positions. Platoon Sergeant Edwards' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1310 (April 15, 1969)

*EISENHOUR, JAMES DOYLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Doyle Eisenhour (W-3160336), Warrant Officer, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the 240th Assault Helicopter Company, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer Eisenhour distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action while flying as an aircraft commander of a UH-1H helicopter against hostile forces near Hiep Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 August 1968, in an attempt to rescue a member of a long range reconnaissance patrol who was reported fallen from the extraction helicopter. Three other aircraft had attempted the rescue operation at the expense of two killed and six wounded. Warrant Officer Eisenhour, realizing that survival chances were small, nevertheless volunteered to take his aircraft and crew into the hotly contested landing zone to attempt the rescue. While hovering in the landing zone looking for the lost man, Warrant Officer Eisenhour's aircraft sustained multiple hits from numerous automatic weapons positions. Warrant Officer Eisenhour was fatally wounded. Through his indomitable courage, complete disregard for his own safety, and profound concern for a fellow soldier, he attempted to rescue this individual at the cost of his own life. Warrant Officer Eisenhour's extraordinary heroism and intrepidity are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 13 (March 6, 1969)
Home Town: LaCrosse, Kansas

ELLIOTT, ARTICE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Artice W. Elliott, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while a Major serving as Senior Advisor to the 3d Battalion, 42nd Infantry Regiment, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 21 April to 26 April 1971, the 3d Battalion was engaged in combat with elements of the 28th North Vietnamese Army Regiment in the vicinity of Dak Seang Special Forces Camp. Despite heavy direct and indirect fire barrages at the onset of each attack, Lieutenant Colonel Elliott would move to a position where he could direct air strikes, gunships, and artillery strikes, disregarding his own safety. He continued to expose himself on numerous occasions taking the enemy under fire with his own rifle and hand grenades. With all of his advisory team either dead or wounded he assumed an even greater share of the advisory effort, moving about the position advising the Vietnamese Battalion Commander, comforting the wounded, and inspiring the soldiers by his courage and stamina. As the situation became more desperate he took command of the unit and planned an executed breakthrough of the enemy encirclement, staying behind to inspire and orderly withdrawal. He was last seen firing his weapon in an attempt to held off the enemy so the others could escape. Lieutenant Colonel Elliott's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with highest traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 30 (September 18, 1973)
Home Town: , Texas

EMERSON, HENRY E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Henry E. Emerson (0-50868), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Colonel Emerson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 April 1968 as commander of an infantry brigade during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in Dinh Tuong Province. One of his brigade elements came under intense automatic weapons fire when it enter an unmarked mine field. Because of the fire, its advance was halted and the momentum of its attack was imperiled. Upon hearing of this, Colonel Emerson directed his command aircraft to land in the battle area where, completely disregarding his own safety, he took command of the beleaguered element. His presence on the battle field under intense fire quickly inspired his men to redouble their efforts and gain fire superiority over the enemy. After assuring that the insurgents were well under control, he returned to his helicopter and was informed that another battalion was engaging a large insurgent force and was having trouble in determining the exact deployment of the enemy. He directed his craft to fly over the battle area to assess the situation. His ship was flying at a low level, and it was immediately subjected to fierce enemy fire. Using the muzzle flashes to detect the location of the Viet Cong, he ordered his battalion into a position where it could encircle the insurgents and begin their methodical destruction. Observing five Viet Cong fleeing the conflict area, he directed his pilot to land. He immediately leaped from the aircraft, and, using only his pistol, killed one of the enemy and captured another.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3361 (July 15, 1968)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

EMERSON, HENRY E.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Henry E. Emerson (0-50868), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as Commanding Officer of the 1st Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Colonel Emerson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 30 May to 4 June 1968 in the Plain of Reeds while leading his brigade against the Viet Cong. Two days of ground sweeps failed to uncover the communists. Colonel Emerson boarded his helicopter on 1 June and directed that he be taken on a low-level reconnaissance through the operation area. He located a Viet Cong base camp and ordered an air assault against it. Ignoring heavy antiaircraft fire which was directed at and struck his ship, he circled above the battle area at less than three hundred feet and called air strikes on the enemy. Frequently he landed to personally direct the maneuver of his troops. As evening came a severe thunderstorm lashed the battle site, but he stayed in the air until he was told that his craft was flying on emergency fuel. During the night the enemy units fled, and although Colonel Emerson located their escape route the next day, they disappeared before his troops could re-engage them. Flying at tree-top level on 3 June, he discovered a massive Viet Cong bunker complex and immediately committed his forces in a series of air assaults. His men came under devastating automatic weapons fire, and by late afternoon the situation was critical. By landing at strategic points in the midst of the enemy fusillade and repeatedly flying low over the communists' positions, Colonel Emerson was able to skillfully coordinate his troops' maneuvers and direct air and artillery bombardments on the hostile emplacements. As he conducted a bitter night assault which completely encircled the Viet Cong, his helicopter was hit six times by enemy machine gun fire and disabled. After landing to obtain another ship and a fresh crew he returned to the fight, staying with his men until long after midnight to insure that the wounded were evacuated, all units were resupplied and arrangements were made for continued air and artillery strikes. The struggle ended the next morning and two first line Viet Cong battalions had been shattered. General Emerson's heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and on the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5021 (October 29, 1968)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

*ENNERS, RAYMOND JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond James Enners (OF-111531), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Enners distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 September 1968 while serving as a platoon leader during a combat sweep near the village of Ha Thanh. While moving across a small valley, his platoon was ambushed by a reinforced North Vietnamese Army squad firing machine guns, automatic weapons and small arms from camouflaged positions on a hillside. A squad leader was severely wounded and fell within twenty meters of the communists. Helplessly trapped by raking fire from the enemy gunners, the badly bleeding squad leader called for help, but the deadly hostile fire kept anyone from reaching him. Lieutenant Enners, hearing his cries, began moving forward to rescue him. From his position one hundred meters back, he crawled forward through the rice paddies and leaped across the intervening dikes, dodging through continuous bursts of enemy fire until he reached his forward squad trapped behind a dike twenty meters from the fallen squad leader. With the aid of one of the other squad leaders, he dispersed his men and signaled for covering fire. He and the squad leader then jumped over the dike and ran forward through the blistering fire to within ten meters of the wounded man, but were forced to turn back when the North Vietnamese began throwing grenades. Calling for a second burst of cover fire, the two men again raced across the bullet-ridden paddies, only to be halted again by the shrapnel of exploding grenades. Returning to the scant cover of the dike, Lieutenant Enners reorganized his men, maneuvering one squad twenty meters to the right of the enemy emplacements and directing the remainder of the platoon to areas from which they could lay down the most effective cross fire. Signaling a third time for his men to open up on the aggressors, he and the squad leader vaulted the dike and again attempted to reach the wounded man. Braving rounds scorching the air around them, they raced to the injured man's position and took cover behind the dike, After applying first aid to the man's wounds while the squad leader fired at the North Vietnamese, Lieutenant Enners picked up the injured man, again disregarding the risk to his own life to carry him back across the battlefield to the care of medical aidmen. Moving the squad on the right through a hail of fire, he moved to within fifteen meters of the enemy before he was fatally wounded by hostile machine gun fire. First Lieutenant Enners' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 403 (February 5, 1969)
Home Town: Farmingdale, New York

ESHER, BRIAN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Brian R. Esher, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Esher distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 September 1968 during a mine sweep operation south of First Support Base Santa Barbara in Tay Ninh Province. As his unit proceeded along Route 4, a North Vietnamese unit sprang an ambush employing rocket-propelled grenades. In the initial barrage, the first three armored personnel carriers were struck and disabled. Specialist Esher along with four other men who survived the salvo scrambled aboard the following vehicle as the platoon attempted to move out of the ambush site. When their armored vehicle was stalled by an exploding rocket grenade, they quickly dismounted and established a defensive perimeter around the personnel carrier. Setting up a machine gun position, Specialist Esher unleashed a suppressive barrage on the hostile force who sought to close in on the element now cut off from the rest of the platoon. Twice he returned to the smoking vehicle to obtain ammunition and once more to call in and direct gunship fire on hostile positions. Receiving orders to rejoin the platoon, Specialist Esher positioned his men advantageously on the vehicle and set off in the badly damaged vehicle at a painfully slow speed. After finally reaching the location of his unit, he helped supervise the evacuation of the more seriously wounded. Only after he and his comrades had retraced their paths through the ambush site and returned to the fire base did Specialist Esher accept medical care for his wounds received in the initial attack. Specialist Four Esher's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3794 (October 7, 1969)

*ESTRADA, ESTEBAN PENA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Esteban Pena Estrada (US54404330), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Estrada distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 January 1968 as machine gunner of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation in hostile territory. While moving through dense woods, his unit came under ravaging enemy fire from well-fortified and concealed positions. The fire was so intense it forced his comrades to take immediate cover. Disregarding his personal safety, Private Estrada ignored the bullets striking all around him and took up an exposed position. Although the Viet Cong focused their fire on him, he unflinchingly retained his position and delivered a devastating fusillade on the determined attackers. His withering fire prevented the insurgents from mounting a sustained assault on his unit. He was critically wounded by enemy fire but continued his fierce fight until his company regrouped and successfully counterattacked against the numerically superior Viet Cong. Private First Class Estrada's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1745 (April 16, 1968)
Home Town: Poteet, Texas

ESZES, JOSEPH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph W. Eszes, First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 16th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade. First Lieutenant Eszes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 December 1971 when his troop was conducting a visual reconnaissance in search of a North Vietnamese battalion. Two helicopters had imitated low-level reconnaissance when both were shot down by a deadly barrage of enemy fire. Captain Eszes, monitoring the situation from an outpost, started for the battle site. A command and control helicopter had successfully evacuated one crew but was unable to reach the other ship due to intense enemy fire. Captain Eszes three times tried to unsuccessfully to reach the downed helicopter crew. When his ship was gushing fuel due to a bullet damage, he returned to the outpost, got another ship and resumed rescue attempts. His fourth attempt was thwarted when his windshield was shattered by a hail of fire. A fifth time he attempted an approach and was successful in getting to the downed helicopter. However, after a quick visual search of the area, the magnitude and proximity of the enemy fire forced him to depart. As they were lifting off, an explosion around the downed helicopter quelled any hope of the two crewmen surviving. Captain Eszes's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 19 (June 18, 1974)
Home Town: Lawton, Oklahoma

*EUTSLER, JOHN WESLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Wesley Eutsler (US51883582), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Eutsler distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1969 as a point man during a search and clear mission in Tay Ninh Province. As Private Eutsler was leading his squad down a narrow path, he came upon a well camouflaged bunker complex manned by two companies of the North Vietnamese Army. He immediately signaled a warning to his comrades and, disregarding his safety, advanced on the forward enemy position. Although met by intense hostile fire, he killed one of the communists and continued across an open field to the bunker, which he destroyed with hand grenades. He then engaged a squad of enemy troops who were placing deadly fire on his element, enabling his comrades to withdraw to a more secure location. While moving back to rejoin his unit and report the North Vietnamese positions, he was fatally wounded by a burst of hostile fire. Private First Class Eutsler's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1146 (April 3, 1969)
Home Town: Spencerville, Ohio

EVANS, BILLY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy D. Evans (RA18268313), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control Detachment (Central), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 29 to 31 March 1967 while serving as a Special forces advisor to a Vietnamese Army unit on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. Attacked by a numerically superior Viet Cong force during infiltration, part of the force was unable to land because of heavy automatic weapons fire. Sergeant Evans quickly organized the remaining men and led them to a defensive position through a hail of machine gun fire. Throughout the night he disregarded his own safety to direct the fire of his men on repeated enemy probes. Early in the morning a mass assault by the Viet Cong disabled all of the men in his sector. Receiving a severe wound, Sergeant Evans continued to repel the assault single-handedly until reinforcements could be shifted to his position. When a determined attack broke through the perimeter, he refused medical aid and fiercely charged the onrushing insurgents killing several and destroying a machine gun position from which deadly fire was inflicting numerous friendly casualties. His actions inspired his men to greater heights to defeat the enemy and allow exfiltration of the unit. Sergeant First Class Evans' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4718 (September 17, 1967)

EVANS, DANIEL EDWARD, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel Edward Evans, Jr., Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Evans distinguished himself with exceptionally valorous actions on 25 March 1969 while serving as medical aidman on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Fire Support Base Danger in Kien Phong Province. Air-inserted elements of his company were approaching a densely vegetated woodline when they were suddenly enveloped in a barrage of hostile automatic weapons fire from well-camouflaged bunkers. Seeing a trooper downed by the initial bursts, he crawled through ditches and dashed over open terrain to the wounded soldier. After dressing the soldier's critical chest wound, he dragged the casualty on a makeshift litter with the help of another infantryman through volleys of exploding rocket-propelled grenades to a rear area. Following artillery and air strikes on the enemy fortifications, a second assault was initiated on the hostile positions and immediately checked by suppressive enemy fire. Again Specialist Evans responded to the needs of a downed trooper. Dodging machine gun fire, he crawled and sprinted thirty meters to the wounded man and treated him while enemy fire saturated the area. Seeing yet another soldier hit in the storm of bullets, he attempted several times without success to crawl to him. Undaunted by the suppressive fire, he finally reached the casualty, dressed his severe chest wound, and dragged him to rear safety. Specialist Evans then darted from position to position to aid two other wounded troopers, crawling within fifty meters of the enemy bunkers to aid one man. Lying prone he bandaged the soldier's wound and enlisted fellow infantrymen to drag the man to the rear. For more than five hours he exposed himself to hostile fire to bring prompt medical attention to his fallen comrades. Specialist Evans' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3293 (August 26, 1969)

*EVANS, DONALD PATRICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Patrick Evans (US54979872), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 November 1968 while serving as a point man during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in a dense bamboo jungle near Landing Zone Jake. Private Evans detected an enemy ambush and immediately warned his company. The unit attempted to flank the North Vietnamese Army soldiers, who were entrenched in a well camouflaged and heavily fortified bunker complex. Fearlessly leading one of the flanking elements and braving the automatic weapons fire, he spearheaded an aggressive assault against the hostile positions. Moving ahead of the other troops, Private Evans single-handedly destroyed four bunkers with rifle fire and grenades, allowing the balance of the company to advance until it became pinned down by three adversaries in an expertly camouflaged bunker. unmindful of his safety, he immediately charged the position and forced the North Vietnamese to retreat. As he continued to pursue the communists, he was mortally wounded by an enemy sniper. Private First Class Evans' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 425 (February 6, 1969)
Home Town: Lake Orion, Michigan

EVANS, DONALD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald R. Evans (RA18867804), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 February 1969 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the Boi Loi Woods. Private Evans' troop came under intense recoilless rifle and rocket-propelled grenade fire from an enemy force in well-concealed, fortified bunkers. As they advanced on the hostile emplacements, they were caught in a cross fire which threatened to stop their progress and divide them in half. Disregarding his safety, Private Evans sprang to his feet and assaulted a bunker, firing his rifle and hurling grenades which destroyed the fortification and killed its five occupants. The troop moved forward until it received heavy fire from another bunker. Private Evans again ran toward the bunker, firing his weapon and silencing the position with hand grenades. While his unit continued its penetration of the stronghold, he checked numerous enemy spider holes, and then voluntarily remained behind to provide covering fire with a machine gun when the troop withdrew to permit the use of artillery. Private First Class Evans' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1619 (May 7, 1969)

*EVANS, JERRY DEWAIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerry Dewain Evans (US52966929), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Evans distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1968 as a rifleman of the an airmobile infantry company conducting an assault on a series of well fortified enemy bunker positions near Hue. Specialist Evans' company was immobilized by heavy enemy sniper fire from one of the bunker complexes. Realizing his unit would suffer heavy casualties unless it moved, he maneuvered across the bullet-swept terrain, attacking the bunker from which the company was receiving the most intense fire. Without regard for his personal safety, he mounted the fortification's roof and fired inside the emplacement, eliminating four enemy troops. Moving from the bunker, Specialist Four Evans was mortally wounded by sniper fire from another fortified position. Specialist Four Evans' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3202 (July 6, 1968)
Home Town: Holland Patent, New York

*EWING, JERRY LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jerry Lee Ewing (RA67154815), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private Ewing distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early hours of 21 March 1969 while serving as a perimeter guard at Landing Zone White in Tay Ninh Province. The base came under rocket and mortar fire, followed by attacks by North Vietnamese Army sappers. A rocket exploded against the side of Private Ewing's bunker, collapsing it and forcing him and another guard to seek shelter from the communists' barrage. As they made their way to a trench, Private Ewing noticed one of the enemy throwing a grenade at his companion. Yelling a warning, he pushed his comrade into the trench, jumped on top of him, and used his own body to shield him from the explosion. By absorbing the full impact of the grenade, he saved his fellow soldier from injury. Private Ewing's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1941 (June 3, 1969)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

F

*FACTORA, DOUGLAS GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Douglas George Factora (ER50010756), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Sergeant Factora distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 May 1968 while serving as an assault vehicle commander during an attack upon a well fortified enemy position in the vicinity of Cu Chi. Directing highly accurate suppressive fire with his vehicle's machine gun and hurling hand grenades a the enemy, he was personally responsible for the elimination of several of the hostile emplacements. During the final stages of the assault, Sergeant Factora was seriously wounded and thrown from his vehicle when it was struck by an enemy antitank rocket. Despite the intense pain of his wounds, he remounted the carrier, rallied his crew members, and continued his fierce assault upon the insurgents, destroying several additional enemy positions. Again Sergeant Factora's vehicle was hit by an enemy antitank round, seriously wounding several of his crew members and causing the vehicle to burst into flames. Disregarding his own safety and critical injuries, Sergeant Factora removed his disabled comrades from the burning carrier. Only after he was assured that they had been treated and evacuated did he allow evacuation for himself. He died en route to the hospital. His fearless actions in the face of intense enemy fire were instrumental in the complete overpowering of the insurgent forces. Sergeant Factora's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4092 (August 23, 1968)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

FALCK, DOUGLAS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Douglas M. Falck (0-5350552), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Second Lieutenant Falck distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 May 1968 as a platoon leader of an infantry company during a combat mission on Hill 352. Lieutenant Falck volunteered to lead a six-man patrol up the northwest side of the hill to probe an enemy mortar position. While moving up the hill, the team encountered three barricades of concertina wire around the entrenched enemy's bunker line. Lieutenant Falck spread his men out and advanced alone to cut a path through the wire. The team then crawled between two enemy bunkers and set up a small defensive perimeter while Lieutenant Falck again moved out alone to reconnoiter the hostile positions. When he was fired on by an enemy guard in one of the bunkers, he charged the soldier's position and killed him with small arms fire. He then assaulted through a hail of point-blank machine gun fire to silence two weapons in a second bunker and was wounded. Ignoring his wounds, he continued his assault and killed another enemy soldier. He then returned to his team and reported to his company which was attacking the enemy's outer defensive perimeter. The North Vietnamese troops began firing their mortars to turn the company back. Lieutenant Falck maneuvered his team into position and silenced the weapons, eliminating two more hostile positions. Second Lieutenant Falck's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4060 (August 22, 1968)

*FALDERMEYER, HAROLD JOHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold John Faldermeyer (123-36-1302), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with 21st DCAT, Advisory Team 51, Military Assistance Command Vietnam. Captain Faldermeyer distinguished himself on 11 May 1972 while serving as Advisor, 2d Battalion, 32d Regiment, 21st Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On this date the 2d Battalion, which had been in heavy contact for two days without re-supply, was on an offensive operation against a firmly entrenched North Vietnamese Army Regiment to open Highway 13 to relieve the tightening ring of enemy forces around the beleaguered friendly forces at An Loc. Captain Faldermeyer, with disregard for his own safety, repeatedly throughout the day, exposed himself to enemy fire to direct a series of deadly effective tactical airstrikes against the enemy positions. At approximately 1030 hours the 2d Battalion was attacked by at least one NVA reinforced battalion. Captain Faldermeyer, as the ground controller for U.S. air assets, with single minded determination to accomplish the mission and at great risk to his life, moved under heavy enemy mortar fire across Highway 13, to a vantage point from which to direct and coordinate friendly airstrikes. His position was extremely perilous as he was exposed on three sides with the remainder of his unit across Highway 13. Despite intense enemy mortar and rocket fire, Captain Faldermeyer remained at this position. Captain Faldermeyer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 1924 (August 19, 1972)
Home Town: Rockland, New York

FANESI, DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David Fanesi, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Fanesi distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 October 1969 while serving as a platoon sergeant during a unit combat operation against a large enemy force in fortified positions. When the platoon leader was fatally wounded during the initial exchange of fire, Sergeant Fanesi immediately assumed command of the platoon and led his men in an assault on the enemy stronghold. As the element maneuvered toward the enemy bunkers, four of the men were wounded and pinned down by the intense hostile fire. Quickly organizing a medical rescue team, he moved to the aid of the wounded soldiers. As the team was evacuating the casualties, three enemy soldiers opened fire, wounding the medical aidman. Sergeant Fanesi moved without hesitation to an exposed position and killed three hostile troops with accurate automatic weapons fire. While moving the casualties to a safe area, the rescue team encountered two more of the enemy in a concealed bunker. Sergeant Fanesi quickly assaulted the bunker, and although wounded himself, he killed the two soldiers with several well-placed hand grenades. Staff Sergeant Fanesi's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 72 (January 8, 1970)

FANT, ERNEST L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ernest L. Fant, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Fant distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 November 1969, while serving as company commander of a Vietnamese strike force during a search and clear mission in Phuoc Long Province. While sweeping a hillside area, Sergeant Fant's unit encountered intense rocket, mortar, and machine gun fire from well- concealed enemy bunkers. Seeking to destroy an enemy machine gun bunker directly to his front, Sergeant Fant and two comrades maneuvered to a position where they could accurately fire on the bunker. As they prepared to assault the bunker, the enemy threw a tear gas grenade at their position and forced them to withdraw. Sergeant Fant and his companions exposed themselves to intense enemy fire as they raced across an open rice paddy to return to their unit. Determined to destroy the enemy machine gun bunker, Sergeant Fant reorganized his scattered unit so that they could provide effective fire support for his next assault. Sergeant Fant again threaded his way through the intense enemy fire toward the bunker position. The enemy machine gunner, now fully aware of the impending danger to his position, unleashed a steady concentration of fire toward Sergeant Fant. Escaping the enemy machine gunner's line of fire, Sergeant Fant threw a grenade through the bunker's aperture and destroyed the machine gun position. Although Sergeant Fant was now the focal point of enemy attention, he maneuvered to a second bunker and destroyed it in the same manner. Sergeant Fant's efforts allowed his unit to assume control of the area and soon forced the eventual retreat of the enemy. Sergeant First Class Fant's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3245 (June 3, 1970)

*FARMER, NEIL PHILIP
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Neil Philip Farmer (RA16333431), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry, Americal Division. Sergeant First Class Farmer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 11 April, 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a search and clear mission near the village of Bao Binh Ha. While he was destroying an unoccupied enemy bunker, his platoon came under heavy automatic weapons fire from a well fortified ambush position. Sergeant Farmer immediately returned to his vehicle, crawling seventy five meters through open rice paddies, receiving wounds in his right arm from the hostile fusillade. Although wounded he directed three tracks in an assault which over ran the communists' strongholds. Enemy fire however, soon erupted from a second location and the lead vehicle sustained several direct hits from antitank and recoilless rifle rounds, wounding or killing the entire crew. Leaving the safety of his own vehicle, Sergeant Farmer crossed the bullet-swept rice paddies to assist the injured in the other vehicle. As the communists intensified their barrage, he mounted the disabled track and was beginning to place suppressive fire on the foe when a rocket-propelled grenade struck the gun shield of his weapon, wounding him fatally. Sergeant First Class Farmer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1951 (June 3, 1969)
Born: October 4, 1931 at Saltsburg, Austria
Home Town: Guilford, Indiana

FARRELLY, HUBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hubert Farrelly (RA51513471), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division. Private First Class Farrelly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 July 1966 as a medical aidman in an armored ambulance in support of a unit conducting a reconnaissance-in-force operation near Xa An Hoa. While moving toward their objective, the armored troop carriers were suddenly attacked by a large Viet Cong force employing recoilless rifle, mortar and machine gun fire. Almost immediately after the battle began, calls for aid were heard over the radio from the lead tank of the column which had received a direct hit from a Viet Cong recoilless rifle. With complete disregard for his safety, Private First Class Farrelly picked up his aid bag and, without a weapon, jumped from his carrier and ran approximately 200 meters through the bullet swept area to the disabled tank. While exposed to the intense Viet Cong fire, he mounted the tank, administered first aid to the seriously wounded crew and carried them to a covered position. As the hostile fire intensified, several vehicles were hit by the deadly Viet Cong recoilless rifle fire. Private First Class Farrelly continued to brave the hostile fire as he dauntlessly moved among the disabled vehicles, administering first aid and evacuating his fallen comrades. He then returned to the carrier and, although near total exhaustion, began to supply the entire crew with ammunition. Shortly after this, the vehicle directly to the front of his was hit and burst into flames. Unhesitatingly, Private First Class Farrelly rushed to the aid of the stricken victims of the blazing carrier. He climbed over the side of the blazing carrier and disappeared into the flames. In a few seconds, he dragged three wounded comrades from the carrier which threatened to explode at any moment. Although his clothes were on fire, he went back into the carrier to insure that all the crew members were extracted. After this, he attempted to climb out, but fell back into the flames. Struggling against exhaustion, fatigue and painful wounds, he managed to climb out. While performing this heroic act, Private First Class Farrelly suffered first and second degree burns over 60 percent of his body. Private First Class Farrelly's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5895 (October 3, 1966)
Home Town: Bronx, New York

FAVREAU, ROBERT A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert A. Favreau, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry, Americal Division. Private First Class Favreau distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 August 1969 while participating in a search and clear operation near Nuoc Luc. His company was descending a ridge when the lead platoon was fired upon from the front and flanks by a company of North Vietnamese regulars occupying fortified bunkers. In an attempt to lessen the effectiveness of the enemy's suppressive fire, Private Favreau made his way under cover fire within meters of one bunker on the right flank and attacked the fortification with hand grenades. When suppressive fire continued from the emplacement, Private Favreau assaulted it a second time, but he enemy fortification again withstood the blasts of hand grenades. Later on in the fighting, Private Favreau saw two comrades fall wounded in an area exposed to hostile fire and quickly moved under fire to their assistance. As he began to move the wounded soldiers to cover, an enemy grenade was thrown into their midst. Without hesitation, Private Favreau gathered up the grenade and hurled it back at the enemy before it exploded. He then dragged his wounded comrades to a safer position where they were given medical assistance. Private Favreau then maneuvered on an enemy bunker to the platoon's left flank. As he rose up to toss a grenade inside the fortification, he was hit in the abdomen by a burst of enemy rifle fire. Despite the severity of his wounds, Private Favreau stubbornly raised himself up and destroyed the bunker's four defenders with a well-placed grenade. Not wanting to endanger his comrades by having them make their way under fire to retrieve him, Private Favreau then crawled some fifteen meters to a position where he could be safely given emergency first aid. Private First Class Favreau's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 866 (April 15, 1970)

FEINBERG, MARK M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mark M. Feinberg, Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 170th Aviation Company, 52d Aviation Battalion, 17th Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer Feinberg distinguished himself while piloting a helicopter troop carrier during a rescue operation in the vicinity of Dak To. After monitoring an urgent request for evacuation of a five-man reconnaissance team engaged in heavy enemy contact, Warrant Officer Feinberg and his crew sped to the embattled area. The entire site was enveloped by triple canopy jungle vegetation with no suitable landing zone. As Mister Feinberg's helicopter approached the location of the besieged patrol it encountered intense enemy resistance. Mister Feinberg descended his helicopter until it hovered just above the trees, then lowered ropes for the ground troops. Although the enemy was now concentrating B-40 rockets and machine gun fire at his aircraft, Mister Feinberg chose to remain in this vulnerable position until the men could reach the ropes. Suddenly, an enemy round struck the transmission of the aircraft and necessitated a quick departure with the ground troops dangling from the ropes. Maintaining control of his crippled aircraft, Mister Feinberg guided his airship out of the firing area and flew to the nearest available clearing. After lowering the men to the ground, he successfully landed his damaged craft. Shortly thereafter, an extraction helicopter arrived and rescued the crew members and the survivors of the besieged patrol. Warrant Officer W1 Feinberg's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 965 (March 20, 1971)

*FERENCE, EDWARD PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward Paul Ference (RA33941719), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Ference was serving as assistant patrol leader of a thirteen-man patrol operating in the vicinity of Ap Bau Bang, Republic of Vietnam, forward of the 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division's defensive perimeter. In the early morning hours of 12 November 1965 the patrol was surrounded by approximately sixty well-armed Viet Cong. Rather than be ambushed, the patrol leader, using the element of surprise, immediately engaged the vastly superior force in a fierce firefight. During the ensuing battle, Sergeant Ference, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to the murderous insurgent automatic weapons and mortar fire to move among the members of his patrol and direct deadly fire upon the advancing Viet Cong, which resulted in the annihilation of at least twenty insurgents. When the patrol was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Ference disregarding his own safety, again exposed himself to the murderous hail of hostile fire and covered the withdrawal to the 2d Battalion's defensive perimeter. Sergeant Ference, without personal regard, again rushed through the intense insurgent fire to aid two fallen patrol members, only to find the men mortally wounded and on the verge of death. Upon reaching the defensive perimeter, Sergeant Ference noticed that another comrade was wounded and lying in the midst of the advancing hostile horde. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Ference left the relative safety of his position, and went to the aid of his stricken comrade. During this heroic and valorous attempt, he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Ference's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 42 (February 28, 1966)
Home Town: Ayer, Massachusetts

FERGUSON, KENNETH D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth D. Ferguson, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as American Advisor with Provisional Reconnaissance Unit and Revolutionary Development Cadres, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. Major Ferguson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during an enemy attack on 31 January 1968. Immediately after the initial enemy assault, Major Ferguson moved through the streets under hostile fire with another American officer to search for wounded personnel. Seven wound persons were recovered and transported to the hospital. On returning to his compound, he was informed that fifty to sixty Viet Cong had captured and occupied the Province Chief's compound. Major Ferguson, armed with an M-79 grenade launcher, moved quickly to the Provincial compound with three other Americans and four Vietnamese soldiers, providing protective covering fire and resupplying ammunition. For almost two hours, under intense hostile machinegun and rocket fire, Major Ferguson maneuvered from one position to another and fired grenades through windows of the various buildings of the Provincial compound that were occupied by Viet Cong until he was seriously wounded. His aggressiveness, tenacity, and decisive leadership resulted in the enemy being driven from the compound. Major Ferguson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 15 (March 30, 1972)

*FERGUSON, WILLIAM GLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Glen Ferguson (RA23043779), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Ferguson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 August 1967 while serving as platoon leader of a Mobile Guerilla Task Force on a combat mission deep in hostile territory. When another company of the same unit came under attack from a numerically superior Viet Cong force, Sergeant Ferguson immediately volunteered to lead his men to their aid. Upon reaching the scene of the battle, he moved freely among his men directing their assault although exposed to withering automatic weapons fire. An enemy grenade seriously wounded him as he attacked a hostile position, but he refused medical aid and continued to press the offensive. With complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Ferguson directed deadly fire on the insurgents and hurled numerous grenades into their positions. He moved openly through the bullet-swept area time after time to inspire his men to greater efforts. He was mortally wounded while leading his men with dauntless courage in the face of grave danger. Sergeant First Class Ferguson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4466 (September 1, 1967)
Home Town: Bluffton, Indiana

*FERGUSSON, ROBERT C. L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert C. L. Fergusson (OF-108572), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 2d Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Fergusson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 October 1967 while serving as artillery forward observer for an infantry company on a search and destroy mission near Tam Ky. While moving near a dry rice paddy, one platoon of his company was savagely attacked and pinned down by a reinforced North Vietnamese company firing automatic weapons, rockets, and mortars. The fierce attack inflicted heavy casualties on the friendly force, but Lieutenant Fergusson ignored his own safety and moved to relieve the hostile pressure on the beleaguered unit. The enemy soldiers were overrunning the friendly positions when his platoon arrived, but he braved withering fire and fought furiously to regain the positions. He moved into the open to adjust artillery fire on the advancing enemy and treat the wounds of nearby comrades. He assumed command when the other officers were seriously wounded. He was wounded himself while moving among his men to rally them and direct their fire against the determined onslaught, but refused medical aid. He detected several enemy soldiers attempting to capture the wounded company commander and raced through the savage hostile fire to drive them off. He was seriously wounded again but succeeded in repelling the determined Viet Cong with a deadly volume of fire. Although unable to fight on himself because of his wounds, his aggressive leadership inspired his men to fight gallantly until a relief force arrived and routed the enemy after inflicting heavy casualties upon them in a fierce battle. First Lieutenant Fergusson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5862 (November 13, 1967)
Home Town: Monterey, California

*FESKEN, WILLIAM P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William P. Fesken (US51973970), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Fesken distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1967 while serving as squad leader during combat with a numerically superior Viet Cong force near Ap Bac. Private Fesken led his squad as point element on his company's right flank. As his men advanced, insurgents struck with a tremendous barrage of machine gun, rifle, and grenade fire, leaving only Private Fesken unwounded. After pinning the friendly squad down, the Viet Cong assaulted the squad and attempted to overrun it. Private Fesken refused to withdraw and poured such a volume of fire into their ranks that they retreated. On a second attack, he again stood his ground, driving them off with grenade fire. When the insurgents attempted a third attack, Private Fesken killed two Viet Cong with a grenade and other in hand-to-hand combat. Anticipating further assaults, he crept forward to place a claymore mine in the path of the enemy. While he was mounting the firing device, however, Private Fesken was mortally wounded. Because of his valiant, selfless attempts to protect his fallen comrades, the right flank of the friendly company withstood the hostile assaults. Private First Class Fesken's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2280 (May 21, 1967)
Home Town: Hoboken, New Jersey

FIACK, PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul Fiack, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-415, Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. First Lieutenant Fiack distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 November 1969 while serving as senior advisor to a company of Vietnamese civilian irregulars during operations near Chau Kem Caves in the Seven Mountains region of Chau Doc Province. After pounding the irregulars with over two hundred mortar and rocket rounds, two companies of North Vietnamese troops stormed the allies' night positions. Before the enemy bombardment had ceased, Lieutenant Fiack made his way through the hail of fire among his men readying them for the expected ground attack. Although inflicted with multiple fragmentation wounds in the hour and a half barrage, Lieutenant Fiack maintained his position and effectively employed his radio to direct tactical air strikes against the onrushing enemy. Shortly after, another rocket impacted near Lieutenant Fiack's position, wounding him again and destroying his radio. Ignoring his wounds, he immediately secured another radio and continued directing support helicopter gunships and fighter bombers to hostile targets. When the enemy fell back under heavy bombing, Lieutenant Fiack quickly arranged for helicopter ambulances to evacuate his wounded. He carried the assistant advisor, who had suffered critical wounds, to an emergency landing zone. The evacuation helicopter came under heavy ground fire, however, and taking many hits, was forces to lift off without the wounded. Lieutenant Fiack then struggled back to his command post carrying his comrade over the treacherous mountain terrain through persistent enemy sniper fire. When night fell, Lieutenant Fiack began moving his battered force down the mountain toward a prearranged landing zone. Although weakened considerably by his wounds, he took charge of his comrade and carried him down the mountain slope under continuous sniper fire. At one point in their downhill trek, both advisors were again severely wounded when an enemy grenade exploded just feet from them. With uncommon perseverance and devotion to his fellow soldier, Lieutenant Fiack trudged on to the pickup site with his comrade. Once there, he continued to direct air strikes on the advancing enemy until he was persuaded to permit himself to be evacuated. First Lieutenant Fiack's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1292 (May 21, 1970)

FIELDS, ELIJA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Elija Fields (RA14569489), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Sergeant First Class Fields distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 February 1967 while serving as platoon leader during his company's mission to secure a new helicopter landing zone in War Zone D. As the company moved through thick jungle, it was struck suddenly by intense fire from a well entrenched Viet Cong force. Several men were wounded, and the order was given to withdraw. When it was discovered that a severely wounded man lay only ten feet from a hostile emplacement and was unable to move, several attempts were made to save his life. However the insurgents had control of the fields of fire and every attempt was to no avail. At this point, Sergeant Fields volunteered to make the rescue. Having directed his men to place continuous machine gun fire just above him, he crawled and ran to the wounded man's position. He then located and killed the insurgent manning the closest weapon. Disregarding the hostile fire that was still striking all around him, Sergeant Fields rolled the casualty onto a poncho and dragged him to safety. By his calm, clearheaded actions while under intense fire, he saved the life of a wounded comrade who was in critical danger. Platoon Sergeant Fields' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4454 (September 1, 1967)

*FIELDS, LLOYD, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lloyd Fields, Jr. (RA13562235), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 13 April 1966, Sergeant Fields was serving as Lead Scout, Troop E, 17th Cavalry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate), while on the assigned mission of clearing an important road ten miles northwest of Song Be. In the early part of the day, the platoon encountered hostile forces resulting in the destruction of several insurgent sniper nests and breaking up of one Viet Cong ambush. As he started up a small hill, Sergeant Fields spotted several Viet Cong in a position for a carefully planned ambush. He immediately fired on them and while his men were moving up to his position they were pinned down by heavy automatic and small arms fire. Realizing that his men could not move until the closest insurgent machine gun was put out of action, Sergeant Fields, without regard for his own personal safety, stood up and shouted for his comrades to cover him while he assaulted and destroyed the machine gun crew and suppressed much of the small arms fire which enabled his men to catch up with him. Again attempting to move up on the Viet Cong, Sergeant Fields was mortally wounded by a sniper. Sergeant Fields' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 219 (September 12, 1966)
Home Town: Blackstone, Virginia

*FIGUEROA-MELENDEZ, EFRAIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Efrain Figueroa-Melendez (581-78-0894), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Figueroa-Melendez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 March 1969 while on a mission to recover several wounded soldiers from an enemy-infiltrated area west of Kontum. En route to the objective area, his company encountered hostile machine gun and small arms fire and were pinned down. In order to withdraw and regroup successfully, Sergeant Figueroa-Melendez moved forward and laid a devastating suppressive barrage on the enemy bunkers. Three times he purposely drew communist volleys on himself to permit his men to draw back to protected positions. Noticing a wounded soldier dangerously exposed and unable to move, Sergeant Figueroa-Melendez maneuvered to the downed man and proceeded to administer medical aid. Then, when he attempted to evacuate the casualty, he was struck by sniper fire and killed. Staff Sergeant Figueroa-Melendez's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2464 (September 8, 1969)
Home Town: Catano, Puerto Rico

FITZPATRICK, JAMES M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James M. Fitzpatrick (US56713088), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Fitzpatrick distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 December 1968 while serving as a driver on a re-supply mission near Vinh Kim. A numerically superior enemy force armed with rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons ambushed his vehicle, killing one man and wounding the others. Ignoring his own injuries, Specialist Fitzpatrick pulled eleven wounded men from his vehicle, through the raking hostile fire, to a ditch which protected them from further harm. He then moved among his comrades, treating their wounds and organizing those who were able to fight the aggressors. After skillfully applying tourniquets to three men who were in danger of bleeding to death, he ran to his truck and radioed for help. Because of a severe ear injury he was unable to hear, but he stayed in the exposed position and repeated the message to insure it was being transmitted. Observing that the communists had increased their fire and were preventing another man from administering first aid, he stood up in full view of the enemy and engaged them with his pistol. When help arrived, he refused treatment for his wounds and continued to assist other casualties. Specialist Four Fitzpatrick's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 738 (March 3, 1969)

FLEENER, LARRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry D. Fleener (OF-112123), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 508th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 82d Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Fleener distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 August 1968 as a platoon leader during a search and destroy operation in Nam Hoa District, Thua Thien Province. When his company became pinned down by intense mortar, rocket, small arms and automatic weapons fire from well-entrenched, numerically superior North Vietnamese Army troops, Lieutenant Fleener led his platoon in an envelopment of the enemy. Despite steep, rocky terrain covered with thick underbrush and sniper fire which wounded four more of his men, he succeeded in maneuvering to the rear of the hostile positions. His force was discovered by an enemy security element and began to receive a heavy automatic weapons barrage. Reacting immediately, Lieutenant Fleener directed rifle fire on the security element and, closing on the nearest bunker with two other men, silenced it with two hand grenades. Led by their valiant commander, who demolished three additional bunkers single-handedly, the platoon systematically destroyed fortification after fortification. His heroism permitted the remainder of the company to sweep forward and annihilate the North Vietnamese. First Lieutenant Fleener's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1245 (April 10, 1969)

FLETCHER, LARRY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry A. Fletcher (RA15607302), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Staff Sergeant Fletcher distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 September 1967 while serving as platoon leader of an airborne infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Chu Lai. The company's forward platoons were savagely attacked and pinned down by a large Viet Cong force, and Sergeant Fletcher immediately led his men forward to reinforce the embattled elements. After advancing five hundred meters, his force came under a murderous enemy barrage from sell-concealed bunkers to the front. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant Fletcher, accompanied by one of his squad leaders, attacked the hostile emplacements with rifles and grenades. Enemy grenades landed all around him as the assaulted, but he refused to take cover, picked up the grenades, and hurled them into the insurgents' bunkers. Fighting his way through a withering hail of bullets, he succeeded in destroying four fortifications. As he again led his men forward, they were hit a second time by intense automatic weapons fire from the front. Once more ignoring his welfare, Sergeant Fletcher charged the enemy position. Despite bullets striking all around him, he reached hand grenade range and destroyed the hostile bunker with a deadly throw. As they neared the trapped platoons, his troops came under heavy fire a third time. Armed with enemy grenades captured earlier, Sergeant Fletcher and his squad leader assaulted the last bunker complex through a curtain of fire. Maneuvering from bunker to bunker while the Viet Cong concentrated fire on him, Sergeant Fletcher demolished four positions with grenade and rifle fire and forced the remaining enemy to flee the battlefield. His fearless actions in the heat of battle resulted in the destruction of nine bunkers and the elimination of eighteen enemy soldiers. Staff Sergeant Fletcher's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 886 (February 27, 1968)

FLOODY, HAROLD V., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold V. Floody, Jr. (OF-109544), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 4th Battalion, 42d Artillery, 2d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Captain Floody distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 11 to 13 November 1966 while commanding a battery of the 42d Artillery supporting an engaged infantry battalion. After being helilifted into a landing zone with an advance reconnaissance team on 11 November, Captain Floody saw another helicopter shot down by nearby enemy emplacements. Unmindful of the danger, he dauntlessly exposed himself to direct the landing of two howitzers, and immediately engaged the hostile positions, knocking them out of action. Despite sporadic enemy attacks during the next day, he coordinated the establishment of the artillery fire base and the infantry command post. Early that night, the base suddenly came under intense mortar attack from a reinforced North Vietnamese battalion. When the initial barrage disrupted communications, Captain Floody left his covered position and ran through the exploding mortar rounds to the command post. Determining the location of the hostile positions, he fearlessly charged back across the ravaged area to his battery and began directing the return fire. Contemptuous of the fierce enemy attack, Captain Floody moved among his howitzers, encouraging the crews, redistributing ammunition, and organizing the treatment of the casualties. Seriously wounded twice in the back by shrapnel, he ignored the extreme pain and continued to direct the defense throughout the remainder of the thirteen-hour battle. His unrelenting courage and inspiring example enabled his men to hold their positions against overwhelming odds and inflict heavy casualties on the fanatic enemy. Captain Floody's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1377 (March 27, 1967)

*FLOYD, ALVIN WINSLOW
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alvin Winslow Floyd (260624471), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Team 38, Company F (Ranger), 75th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Floyd distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 April 1970, while serving as team leader of a ranger team inserted deep within enemy territory. Upon insertion, the team came under intense small arms fire from a numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant First Class Floyd took charge of his scattered elements and directed them against the enemy. Through his efforts, an enemy machine gun bunker was destroyed and the enemy was forced to retreat. After moving about eighty-five meters from the landing zone, the team encountered the enemy again and became pinned down by accurate hostile rocket and machine gun fire coming from three sides. Discovering that enemy small arms fire had severed the radio headset cord, Sergeant First Class Floyd exposed himself to enemy fire as he stood up and directed friendly gunship fire on the enemy positions. When another ranger was wounded and required medical treatment, Sergeant First Class Floyd and another comrade moved to his side. As the enemy fire intensified and became concentrated on the three figures, Sergeant First Class Floyd arose and advanced toward the enemy in an apparent effort to shield his comrades. As he moved forward, he was mortally wounded by an enemy rocket propelled grenade. Sergeant First Class Floyd's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3244 (July 14, 1970)
Home Town: Augusta, Georgia

*FLOYD, ROBERT GENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Gene Floyd (267-74-9134), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Specialist Four Floyd distinguished himself while serving as a member of a night offensive position in Phu Yen Province. During the late evening hours of 31 March 1970, specialist Floyd and his squad were positioned outside a small Vietnamese village when they were attacked by a numerically superior force of enemy soldiers. During the initial attack, the friendly machine gun position was heavily damaged by the enemy fire. Specialist Floyd disregarded the devastating enemy fire to run to the aid of the disabled machine gun crew. After administering to the wounded crew, Specialist Floyd carried the machine gun to the heaviest point of enemy contact. From his exposed position, Specialist Floyd placed devastating fire on the enemy elements forcing them to retreat. The enemy regrouped and launched a second attack and advanced to within thirty meters of Specialist Floyd's position. However, the determined defensive fire of Specialist Floyd and his comrades again repulsed the enemy. The enemy regrouped and launched a third attack on the position from a different direction. Specialist Floyd moved through the intense enemy fire again to position his machine gun at the heaviest point of enemy contact. As his comrades fell wounded beside him, Specialist Floyd refused to withdraw. He continued placing devastating machine gun fire on the enemy until he was killed instantly by a barrage of enemy rocket fire. Specialist Floyd's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2067 (June 26, 1970)
Home Town: Fort Myers, Florida

*FONTAINE, MICHAEL ARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Arthur Fontaine (RA12870319), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Fontaine distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 January 1969 as a medic during a search and clear mission northeast of Quan Loi. His company made contact with an estimated reinforced company sized North Vietnamese Army force which was concealed in the underbrush and was armed with rockets, mortars, and both semiautomatic and automatic weapons. Repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fire, Specialist Fontaine treated the members of his platoon who were wounded and brought them to a central location where they could be evacuated. When the communists launched a massive ground assault, he fearlessly moved to the area of the fiercest fighting and continued to care for his suffering comrades. Suddenly a enemy mortar round exploded near an automatic weapon position, wounding three soldiers. Despite the heavy concentration of hostile fire directed at the site, he rushed forward to their aid. After he had bandaged two of the men and was nearing the third, the aggressors' fire suddenly intensified. Specialist Fontaine threw himself on the man to protect him and was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade, but saved the life of his stricken comrade. Specialist Four Fontaine's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1413 (April 23, 1969)
Home Town: New Orleans, Louisiana

FORD, RUBEN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ruben H. Ford (RA12685046), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Military Advisory Detachment, 23d Infantry Division, United States Army Advisory Group, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Ford distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 August 1967 as assistant operations advisor to an armored unit on a reaction mission in the hamlet of Vinh Phu. His unit was called upon to reinforce an infantry unit engaged in combat with a North Vietnamese Army battalion. Arriving at the raging battlefield, Sergeant Ford's armored personnel carrier was subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons, recoilless rifle, rocket and mortar fire. Although seriously wounded by the fusillade, he fearlessly continued to expose himself to the savage barrage to maintain the momentum of his unit's attack. Unhesitatingly moving into the area of heaviest contact, Sergeant Ford pinpointed North Vietnamese troop concentration and crew-served weapons, enabling accurate air strikes and artillery fire to be placed on the enemy positions. His personnel carrier received a direct hit from a recoilless rifle, wounding half of the crew members. Heedless of the relentless attack directed to his disabled vehicle, he manned one of his mounted machine guns and raked advancing North Vietnamese soldiers with a deadly hail of bullets. Refusing medical attention for himself, Sergeant Ford administered skillful first aid to his wounded comrades and supervised their evacuation. He then continued to brave withering enemy fire to load machine guns and place fierce fire on the hostile force until the remaining crew members had withdrawn to defensive positions. His gallant and inspiring leadership in the head of battle saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Staff Sergeant Ford's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2649 (June 1, 1968)

*FOREMAN, JAMES LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Lee Foreman (US55843405), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Foreman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1967 while serving as squad leader of a weapons platoon during a search and destroy mission in Pleiku Province. Sergeant Foreman's platoon was sent forward of his company to provide security for the main force. As the unit was passing through a small river draw, Viet Cong opened fire from all sides. During the ensuing battle, Sergeant Foreman began seeking the hostile emplacements most dangerous to his men. Spotting an enemy machine gun, he used only the cover of small trees to move in on the weapon, then rushed into an open area and threw two grenades into the position, silencing it. Continuing on, he attempted to cross a small stream, but was hit in the thigh. Nevertheless, he crawled downstream through sniper fire and succeeded in making it to the other side. Again using only light cover, he moved up to a position which revealed three Viet Cong machine guns in a heavily constructed bunker. Sergeant Foreman scored a direct hit with an antitank weapon and demolished that hostile position. He then returned to his men, giving them encouragement and treating the wounded, although ignoring his own wound. In an attempt to overrun his squad, the insurgents wounded the radio operator who lay forward of the friendly perimeter. Sergeant Foreman immediately moved from his position to get him. In this attempt to save his comrade, he was mortally wounded by intense sniper fire. Sergeant Foreman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3827 (July 26, 1967)
Home Town: Warsaw, Indiana

FRAKER, WILLIAM W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William W. Fraker (0-4010786), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 145th Combat Aviation Battalion. After an attack which took place at approximately 0100 hours, 10 June 1965, the Vietnamese hamlet of Dong Xoai was overrun by a Viet Cong force of approximately regimental size and a nearby military compound was being subjected to a heavy barrage of insurgent fire. At about 1000 hours, Captain Fraker and two other American pilots were assigned the mission of flying their armed UH-1B helicopters to the battle area; conducting a low level reconnaissance to determine the Viet Cong strength, fire capability and effectiveness; and selecting and marking troop landing zones. Two different helicopter troop lifts of Vietnamese army personal, whose forces totaled approximately battalion size strength, were dispatched to the selected landing sites which were previously flare marked by Captain Fraker and the other two Americans. After being at the battle site for only a few minutes, the friendly Vietnamese troops were completely annihilated due to the manpower superiority of the insurgent force. Word was received that several Americans and Vietnamese were still holding the besieged compound. Plans were then initiated to evacuate the besieged force. Captain Fraker volunteered to fly his aircraft to escort three rescue helicopters. Upon reaching the embattled compound all aircraft became subjected to a heavy volume of hostile fire and each received hits from the insurgent barrage. After landing, only two of the three rescue craft were able to evacuate the personnel from the compound. The third was badly damaged and grounded during the operation. One American and three Vietnamese soldiers remained in the compound to cover the airlift of the heavily overloaded and damaged evacuation helicopters. Realizing the fate of the gallant defenders and the fact that his was the only aircraft immediately available for any further evacuation attempt, Captain Fraker with complete disregard for his own personal safety, maneuvered his helicopter through the thick hail of hostile fire to a landing between two earth mounds within the compound. Once on the ground, the UH-1B became the subject of all insurgent fire and a group of Viet Cong made a suicidal charge to the airship. Captain Fraker then rallied his crewmen in a desperate attempt to ward off the onrushing horde while he expertly piloted the dangerously overloaded helicopter precariously and slowly once again through the heavy concentration of hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. Despite the superior Viet Cong firepower, Captain Fraker successfully piloted his helicopter through the murderous barrage and effected the safe and final evacuation of all personnel from the besieged compound. Captain Fraker's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 310 (October 22, 1965)

*FRANKLIN, EUGENE DELANO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene Delano Franklin (0-4062708), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 24 June 1965, Captain Franklin was serving as Senior Advisor to the 1st Battalion, 45th Infantry Regiment, 23d Infantry Division, army of the Republic of Vietnam, whose mission was to locate and destroy a hostile contingent which had earlier seized a civilian convoy. As the 1st battalion proceeded in convoy along National Highway 21, they were ambushed by a well-concealed and strategically located Viet Cong unit which had secured control of over two miles of the highway and neighboring terrain. Immediately upon receiving the initial barrage of hostile mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, Captain Franklin, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, moved forward to locate hostile positions and evaluate the over-all situation. After personally accounting for the destruction of two insurgent positions, he moved among the friendly troops, giving advice, encouragement, and accurate fire direction guidance. After achieving a stabilization of his forces, Captain Franklin rallied the embattled battalion to move forward, take the offensive, and dislodge the hostile force from their tactically superior positions. As Captain Franklin moved forward with the maneuver elements of the attacking friendly force, he was mortally wounded by a hail of hostile fire which had been directed towards his advanced position for more than forty-five minutes. Captain Franklin's extraordinary heroism, gallantry in action, and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 255 (August 11, 1965)
Home Town: Johnson City, Tennessee

*FRANKLIN, JAMES ANTHONY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Anthony Franklin (421-66-7229), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Franklin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1969 while serving as assistant leader of a point team on a reconnaissance patrol near Polei Kleng. The team was ascending a ridge when suddenly assaulted by a force of North Vietnamese regulars. The assailants were quickly overcome, but snipers in trees and holes along the ridge continued to place harassing fire upon the company's main force to the team's rear and forced it to withdraw, leaving the point team isolated. Several hours later the team began to move back to regain contact with the company. They came upon a bunker and tunnel complex and flushed out what resistance they met. Heavy sniper fire then descended upon them. They hastily scattered, pursued by streams of machine gun fire. Specialist Franklin dived into a foxhole and was followed by the team leader. The two leaders had completely lost contact with their fellow team members. Impacting rockets and machine gun fire restricted their movement. They hurled grenades at the machine gun and eliminated its suppressive fire. Together they crawled to the quieted machine gun emplacement and from there overcame three more enemy. The two men then took foot for their unit, but were again blocked by machine gun and small arms fire. They pitched grenades on the machine gun and silenced it, but enemy riflemen continued to harass them. Specialist Franklin was pinned down and severely wounded in the knee. Ignoring his wound, he radioed in and accurately adjusted helicopter gunship fire on the harassing riflemen. At dusk, he and his comrade resumed their frustrated withdrawal, the team leader carrying Specialist Franklin until exhausted. After resting they pressed on, the exhausted team leader plodding along in front and Specialist Franklin crawling slowly behind. They covered some distance and were suddenly met with bursts of small arms fire and exploding grenades from a nearby bunker. Seeing that his comrade had been temporarily blinded by the grenade flashes, Specialist Franklin crawled unnoticed up to the enemy bunker and unleashed his last grenade. The ensuing blast wounded him severely. Knowing that there was nothing his comrade could to for him, he selflessly encouraged the soldier to return to the unit and safety. Specialist Four Franklin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3299 (August 26, 1969)
Home Town: Prichard, Alabama

*FREPPON, JOHN DENNIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Dennis Freppon (RA11654412), Staff Sergeant [then Sergeant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Freppon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 February 1969 as a squad leader for a platoon which was conducting a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Lai Khe. Sergeant Freppon was serving as point man when he was suddenly pinned to the ground by fragmentation and rocket- propelled grenades and automatic weapons fire from well-concealed North Vietnamese Army troops. Fearing that his men would be trapped by the devastating hostile fire, he stood up to warn them of the entrenched enemy. Then, with complete disregard for his safety, he charged through the fusillade toward a North Vietnamese bunker. Although he was wounded repeatedly, he continued his assault on the fortification. He succeeded in destroying the bunker, and was stopped only when the was mortally wounded by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade. His courage and self-sacrifice prevented many of his comrades from being killed or wounded. Staff Sergeant Freppon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1424 (April 23, 1969)
Home Town: Cincinnati, Ohio

*FRERICKS, LOUIS WAYNE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Louis Wayne Frericks (326-38-8213), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Frericks distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a night ambush operation near Lai Khe. As his element moved toward a rendezvous point, an enemy force assaulted the patrol with claymore mines, automatic weapons, and rocket-propelled grenades. Lieutenant Frericks quickly deployed his men into defensive positions to return fire on the hostile force. Learning that two of his flank security men had been wounded in the initial enemy barrage, he immediately braved the intense fusillade to assist the two casualties to safety. While he was heroically administering lifesaving first aid to one of the injured men, he was critically wounded by small arms fire. First Lieutenant Frericks' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2525 (July 12, 1969)
Home Town: Kings, Illinois

FRIEDRICH, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Friedrich, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 187th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Captain Friedrich distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 September 1968 while serving as company commander of a combat operation near Trung Lap. When one platoon came under enemy fire at their landing zone, Captain Friedrich disembarked from his command and control helicopter to lead another platoon to the assistance of the beleaguered men. Receiving light fire upon landing, they soon overpowered the resistance and proceeded toward the area of conflict. Having established a position in a hedgerow, Captain Friedrich and two radio-telephone operators moved out toward the pinned-down men. Immediately they came under intense fire which wounded one of the radio men. Captain Friedrich applied first aid to the injured man, but to no avail. Pressing on to the imperiled element, he reorganized his men and led them back to the hedgerow. He then employed artillery and air strikes as near as fifty meters from his position to force the enemy back, thus allowing the dead and wounded to be evacuated. As darkness approached, he led his men to the safety of a defensive position which was being prepared by other elements of the battalion. Captain Friedrich's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2893 (July 29, 1969)

FRIEND, RICHARD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard E. Friend (US52642163), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 595th Engineer Company, 86th Engineer Battalion, 34th Engineer Group, United States Army Engineer Command, Vietnam. Specialist Four Friend distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1967 while traveling with a convoy on a re-supply mission near Soui Cat. As the convoy moved down the highway toward a base camp, it was savagely attacked by a large Viet Cong force firing mortars, recoilless rifles and automatic weapons from the undergrowth on both sides of the road. Specialist Friend was thrown to the ground when a recoilless rifle round hit his jeep, killed the driver, and spun the vehicle into a ditch. He lost his weapon when the vehicle overturned, and was pinned down by heavy fire from the advancing insurgents. As the assault intensified, he saw an enemy soldier moving toward an armored personnel carrier with a satchel charge. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Friend stood up in the withering barrage and dashed to the carrier under a hail of bullets. Armed only with a knife, he leaped on the insurgent and fought a fierce hand-to-hand battle with the enemy soldier, killing him before he could destroy the carrier. His fearless action, at great risk to his life in the heat of battle was responsible for saving the lives of several comrades in the carrier. Specialist Four Friend's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6371 (December 11, 1967)

FRY, JERRY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry R. Fry, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 101st Aviation Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Captain Fry distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 April 1968 while serving as commander of a fire team helicopter assault north of Ap Nam Phu in Thua Thien Province. While moving toward the village, a friendly element came under heavy fire from enemy automatic weapons, mortars, and rocket-propelled grenades and incurred several casualties, including the platoon leader. Medical evacuation was difficult because of darkness, fog and the intense fusillade. Captain Fry relieved the pressure on the besieged ground elements by directing gun ship fire onto enemy positions which he pinpointed by the use of a searchlight. While suppressive fire was being delivered, the company pulled the wounded to safety. An ambulance helicopter arrived, but the pilot missed the landing zone in the darkness and set down near the enemy who forced the craft away. At this time, Captain Fry volunteered to attempt the mission, and although heavy fire from the village imperiled his attempt, he succeeded in making two extractions. Captain Fry's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3125 (August 13, 1969)

FUGERE, OLIVER J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Oliver J. Fugere, Jr., Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 5 December 1965 while serving as Squad Leader, Company B, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry Division during a military operation near Ap Nha Mat, Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Fugere's battalion had been conducting a search and destroy operation in the jungle for seven days and had sustained many casualties when it contracted a well-entrenched Viet Cong force, estimated four battalions in size. As the forward elements of the squad were hit by .50 caliber machine gun fire of the Viet Cong to direct his squad's actions against the insurgents. After repelling the initial onslaught and inflicting heavy casualties on the insurgent force, he again exposed himself to the intense gun fire, moved his squad forward to relieve the mortar section, and personally set up a machine gun and delivered a devastating barrage of gun fire into the counterattacking Viet Cong. The effectiveness of his timely support resulted in the repulsion of three insurgent attacks and approximately fifty Viet Cong casualties. Although these hostile forces were driven off, hidden snipers continued to cause friendly casualties and pinned down his squad. Then, with complete disregard for his own safety, he walked up and down a roadway to draw the Viet Cong fire and to detect their positions. While moving on the roadway and using his rifle and grenades, he destroyed the sniper positions and at least two automatic weapons positions. He also marked the position of his unit with smoke to enable accurate airstrikes, and then administered first aid to the wounded and assisted in their evacuation to safety. His indomitable courage, determination, and devotion to duty contributed to the success of the search and destroy operation. Staff Sergeant Fugere's extraordinary heroism on the battlefield is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 42 (October 4, 1966)

FUJII, DENNIS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dennis M. Fujii, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 237th Medical Detachment, 61st Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group. Specialist Five Fujii distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 18 to 22 February 1971 while serving as crew chief aboard a helicopter ambulance during rescue operations in Laos. The team's mission was to evacuate seriously wounded Vietnamese military personnel from the midst of a raging battlefield. The aircraft's primary approach to the bullet-infested landing zone was thwarted by heavy volumes of enemy fire directed at the specialist's helicopter. As the pilot made a second landing attempt, the enemy concentrated a barrage of flak at the air ambulance which damaged the craft and caused it to crash in the conflict area, injuring Specialist Fujii. Moments later, another American helicopter successfully landed near the wreckage of the specialist's airship and extracted all the downed crewmen except for Specialist Fujii, who was unable to board due to the intense enemy fire directed at him. Rather than further endanger the lives of his comrades aboard the second helicopter, Specialist Fujii waved the craft out of the combat area and remained behind as the only American on the battlefield. Subsequent attempts to rescue the specialist were aborted due to violent anti-aircraft fire. Specialist Fujii finally secured a radio and informed the aviators in the area that the landing zone was too hot for further evacuation attempts. During the night and all though the next day, Specialist Fujii disregarded his own wounds as he administered first aid to the allied casualties. On the night of 19 February the allied perimeter came under ruthless assault by a reinforced enemy regiment supported by heavy artillery. Once again obtaining a radio transmitter, Specialist Fujii called in American helicopter gunships to assist the small unit in repelling the attack. For a period of over seventeen consecutive hours, Specialist Fujii repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire as he left the security of his entrenchment to better observe enemy troop positions and to direct air strikes against them. At times the fighting became so vicious that Specialist Fujii was forced to interrupt radio transmittal in order to place suppressive rifle fire on the enemy while at close quarters. Though wounded and severely fatigues by 20 February, the specialist bore the responsibility for the protection and defense of the friendly encampment until an American helicopter could land and attempt to airlift him from the area. As his air ambulance left the still blazing battlefield, it received numerous hits and was forced to crash land at another South Vietnamese Ranger base approximately four kilometers from the specialist's original location. The totally exhausted Specialist Fujii remained at he allied camp for two more days until yet another helicopter could return him to Phu Bai for medical assistance on 22 February. Specialist Five Fujii's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 964 (March 20, 1971)

FULLER, SHERMAN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sherman G. Fuller (RA13680571), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Fuller distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 December 1966 while serving as squad leader with an element of the air cavalry division during a combat air assault near Bong Son. Immediately upon arrival, the friendly unit was engaged by a heavily armed North Vietnamese force. In an attempt to eliminate a prime machine gun position, Sergeant Fuller advanced with a recoilless rifle team to provide covering fire while the weapon was being sighted. Before the crew would reach a favorable position, the North Vietnamese delivered accurate, withering fire into the area, wounding two men and killing two. Sergeant fuller realizing the critical condition of his comrades, fearlessly rushed along the battle line to obtain help. After organizing a rescue team and directing them to the two soldiers, he went to the assistance of a wounded medical aidman. Undaunted by the increasing firefight activity and devastating air strikes in close proximity, he began administering first aid to the man. A North Vietnamese machine gunner then began raking the area with voluminous fire. In a selfless display of dedicated courage, Sergeant Fuller covered his wounded comrade with his own body and was hit. Despite his painful wound, he continued to engage the enemy until he was forced to be evacuated. Sergeant Fuller's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4030 (August 8, 1967)

FULTON, WILLIAM B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William B. Fulton (RA16786115), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 5 October 1965, Specialist Fulton was attached as a medical corpsman to the 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade which was participating in a battalion-sized search and destroy mission in the vicinity of Hill 55, War Zone "D", Republic of Vietnam. During the course of action, the second platoon of Company A had accumulated approximately twenty casualties while acting as the assault force on the Viet Cong left flank and were now in dire need of medical assistance. Notwithstanding the fact hat he had sustained a painful shoulder wound earlier in the battle, Specialist Fulton refused to be evacuated and continued to aid wounded men of the embattled platoon. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he exposed himself on numerous occasions to the intense hostile automatic weapons and mortar fire to administer first aid to the wounded and curtain certain death. While performing these critical duties, he sustained a second wound but still refused medical aid and evacuation until the battle had subsided and all the wounded personnel were evacuated. Upon arriving at the casualty collection point, Specialist Fulton's professional competence and devotion to duty, despite his own painful wounds, were determining factors in saving the lives of at least ten men. Specialist Four Fulton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 17 (January 27, 1966)
Born: December 27, 1941 at San Bernardino, California

FURLONG, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James J. Furlong (US54817801), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Furlong distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 January 1969 as a squad leader on a reconnaissance-in-force mission during an engagement with a platoon of enemy troops. When his company commander was struck by a flying missile, Sergeant Furlong immediately moved to a position from which he could provide covering fire for several men who went to assist the injured officer. Suddenly one of the communists threw a grenade that landed in the midst of the group gathered around the commander. Completely disregarding his safety, Sergeant Furlong shouted a warning and lunged on the grenade in an attempt to save the lives of his comrades. By allowing himself to be grievously wounded, he prevented serious injury to his fellow soldiers. Sergeant Furlong's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1112 (April 1, 1969)

FURROW, GAIL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gail W. Furrow, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Furrow distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 June 1972 while serving as Senior Advisor, 11th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 22 June 1972, Captain Furrow's unit was attacked by a tank regiment and a battalion of infantry while occupying a defensive position in the vicinity of Quang Tri, Military Region I. Completely disregarding a wound he received early in the fight, Captain Furrow moved onto a burning friendly tank and dragged two wounded crewmen to safety. He then fought his way to an exposed observation point, stopping only long enough to personally move an antitank weapons system to a more safe position. He then defended the position against the swarming troops until tactical air support arrived. Once air assets became available, Captain Furrow repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to place accurate airstrikes on the enemy assault waves. Relentlessly applying pressure, Captain Furrow caused the enemy to break off the attack and withdraw. His actions saved the battalion from almost certain devastation. Captain Furrow's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 88 (January 28, 1973)

G

*GABRYS, STEPHEN MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen Michael Gabrys (0-5331739), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special forces. Captain Gabrys distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 April 1969 as commander of a mobile strike force company during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near the Ben Het Special Forces Camp in Kontum Province. Two North Vietnamese Army platoons approached within fifty meters on one side of the unit's defensive perimeter. Exposing himself to the enemy fire in the ensuing struggle, Captain Gabrys skillfully directed his men in enveloping a portion of the hostile force. He exchanged fire with three North Vietnamese whom he saw trying to escape and killed one, but was struck in the chest by an enemy small arms round. After binding his serious injury with battle dressing from his first aid pack, he gave no further attention to his wound and led a small element in pursuit of the fleeing foe. Encountering several of the enemy, he killed another of them before he was mortally wounded by their return fire. Captain Gabrys' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1935 (June 2, 1969)
Born: June 17, 1942 at Bellerose, New York
Home Town: Bellerose, New York

GALLO, JOSEPH A., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph A. Gallo, Jr. (0-5023445), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gallo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as a platoon leader of an armor unit fighting against the communist Tet Offensive on Tan Son Nhut Air Base. His unit was directed to assist in repelling a fanatical enemy force which was attempting to overrun the base. Lieutenant Gallo's armored vehicle was immediately attacked by intense automatic weapons, rocket and antitank fire as it arrived in the battle area. Courageously exposing himself to the insurgent's fire, he led his men through a human wave of Viet Cong to establish blocking positions which would prevent the enemy force's withdrawal. Lieutenant Gallo observed several enemy soldiers escaping to his rear, and he positioned additional elements of his platoon in a location to seal off that escape route. He then called gunships to bring fire on the enemy and continued to direct the actions of his men until he was seriously wounded and lost consciousness. As a result of his efforts, one hundred and thirty Viet Cong were killed. First Lieutenant Gallo's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3363 (July 15, 1968)

*GALLOWAY, SAM HARRIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Sam Harris Galloway (0-5346771), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Second Lieutenant Galloway distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while leading the First Platoon of Company A on a search and destroy mission in the village of Dong Loch, Bien Hoa Province, Republic of Vietnam. Intelligence had indicated that a large, well-equipped enemy force had established heavily fortified positions in and around the village of Dong Loch, dangerously threatening the United States Forces complex at Bien Hoa. Lieutenant Galloway's company was moving on line to sweep through the village when the First Platoon, the lead element of the friendly force, was subjected to intense, raking small arms and automatic weapons fire from the village. Lieutenant Galloway immediately brought his platoon on line and commenced returning fire. He personally exposed himself to the withering fusillade to direct his men, marking targets with a rocket launcher and with machine gun fire. As the battle raged, several men in the platoon were hit and unable to protect themselves. Lieutenant Galloway moved forward and about the battlefield, disregarding personal danger, pulling and carrying wounded men to positions of relative safety, treating those who required immediate life-saving attention. While evacuating these threatened comrades Lieutenant Galloway himself was wounded but refused evacuation, remaining with his men. As the battle grew in intensity, the field commander directed a limited withdrawal to permit the delivery of an airstrike on the enemy. Lieutenant Galloway, with total disregard for his own safety, moved from position to position alerting his men to the order. As the men pulled back, two were wounded by the accelerating rate of enemy fire. Lieutenant Galloway stayed with them, encouraging their movement to safety and personally providing protective fire and acting as a covering shield for the wounded men. It was during this selfless act, manifesting the greatest degree of loyalty for his men and extraordinary gallantry in close combat with the enemy, that Lieutenant Galloway was struck down. Lieutenant Galloway's exceptional display of gallantry and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 7 (March 8, 1974)
Born: August 2, 1944 at Vidalia, Georgia
Home Town: Vidalia, Georgia

*GANDY, MICHAEL LEE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Michael Lee Gandy (0-5339978), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Second Lieutenant Gandy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1968 as a platoon leader during a search and clear mission on the west bank of the Song Bo River. A three-man scout team was crossing the river in a sampan when it came under an intense barrage of enemy fire, killing one man instantly. The other two men were wounded and sought protection in a bamboo thicket on the river bank. Lieutenant Gandy moved from squad to squad, encouraging his men and directing their fire against the communists. Six of his troops attempted to cross the river to rescue the two casualties by pushing a sampan before them for protection, but were carried downstream by the strong current. Despite the vicious enemy fire, Lieutenant Gandy dropped his equipment, made his way to the river's edge, and swam the seventy-five meters to the other side. Upon reaching the river bank, he found that only one of the scouts was alive. Grabbing hold of him, he began the hazardous swim back through intense hostile small arms and automatic weapons fire. As he approached mid-stream, the scout was hit and disappeared beneath the water. A few seconds later, Lieutenant Gandy was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade. Second Lieutenant Gandy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, and the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 436 (February 7, 1969)
Born: October 15, 1945 at Dexter, Kansas
Home Town: Dexter, Kansas

GARCIA, CANDELARIO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Candelario Garcia (RA54341906), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Garcia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 December 1968 as a team leader during a company-size reconnaissance-in-force mission west of Lai Khe. Sergeant Garcia's platoon discovered communication wire and other signs of an enemy base camp leading into a densely vegetated area. As they advanced they came under intense fire, causing several men to be wounded and trapped in the open. Ignoring a hail of hostile bullets, Sergeant Garcia crawled to within ten meters of a machine gun bunker, leaped to his feet and ran directly at the fortification, firing his rifle as he charged. He jammed two hand grenades into the gun port and then placed the muzzle of his weapons inside, killing all four occupants. Continuing to expose himself to intense enemy fire, Sergeant Garcia raced fifteen meters to another bunker and killed its three defenders with hand grenades and rifle fire. After again braving the communists' barrage to rescue two casualties, he joined his company in an assault which overran the remaining enemy positions. Sergeant Garcia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1166 (April 4, 1969)

GARCIA, EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward Garcia, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Four Garcia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 and 23 November 1967 while serving as engineer demolition specialist attached to an airborne infantry company during the battle for Hill 875. While assaulting the hill's enemy bunker and trench complex on 21 November, his unit was pinned down by a withering barrage of mortar, rocket and automatic weapons fire. Specialist Garcia completely disregarded his safety and charged the position delivering the heaviest volume of fire on his comrades. Armed with a flamethrower, he advanced through a curtain of small arms fire and exploding grenades until he reached a suitable position to attack the bunker. His weapon failed to work, and he sprinted back through the fusillade to secure a second flamethrower and then returned to the front. The second weapon's fuel failed to ignite, so he sprayed it into the enemy bunker and set it afire with a grenade. The fortification was totally destroyed. On 23 November, Specialist Garcia led a furious assault which reached the top of the hill and forced the enemy to pull back. Armed only with a pistol, he ignored mortar rounds detonating all around him and inspired his comrades to advance in the face of the determined hostile barrage. As he reached the crest, he saw enemy mortars firing from a second hill and remained exposed to a hail of incoming rounds to skillfully direct deadly counter-mortar fire on the hostile emplacements. Specialist Four Garcia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 873 (February 26, 1968)

*GARCIA, GREGORIO M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gregorio M. Garcia (RA56296200), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Garcia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 July 1966 while leading a reconnaissance and security element to his platoon's front during a search and destroy mission. While executing their mission, Staff Sergeant Garcia's unit received intense hostile fire from a Viet Cong company. To prevent the insurgents from executing a flanking maneuver to his right, Staff Sergeant Garcia skillfully maneuvered his men to the left. Although the Viet Cong fire became increasingly intense he led his men forward. As a result, he gave the rest of his platoon and company time and space to organize and maneuver. Throughout the movement forward, Staff Sergeant Garcia continually moved from position to position, giving instructions and encouragement to his comrades. As the platoon maneuver began to take form, an insurgent antitank grenade launcher began to deliver accurate fire to the immediate front of Staff Sergeant Garcia's unit. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Staff Sergeant Garcia immediately organized and personally led his team toward the hostile emplacement. While the remainder of his team provided a base of cover, Staff Sergeant Garcia, with complete disregard for his safety, single-handedly charged the Viet Cong position. Throwing hand grenades with accuracy, he killed one Viet Cong and forced the insurgents to withdraw and abandon their antitank weapon. As his platoon pressed the attack, they again became pinned down by intense hostile fire, Staff Sergeant Garcia immediately led. his team and employed fire and maneuver tactics. Although he was seriously wounded, Staff Sergeant Garcia continued to aggressively attack until he was mortally wounded. Through his courage and outstanding leadership, he contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission, Staff Sergeant Garcia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United Stated Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6143 (October 25, 1966)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*GARCIA, JOSEPH ANDREW (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joseph Andrew Garcia (US56648165), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Garcia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as a member of an infantry unit conducting search and destroy operations near Tan Son Nhut Air Base. His platoon, the lead element of the company, was suddenly subjected to intense machine gun, automatic weapons and small arms fire from an insurgent force of unknown size. Serving as point man, Specialist Garcia remained completely exposed to the ravaging enemy fusillade to provide covering fire for his comrades as they deployed in defensive positions. During the ensuing firefight, he located a Viet Cong machine gun emplacement that had inflicted several casualties to his unit. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Garcia armed himself with a light anti-tank weapon and crawled across an open field toward the hostile position. He was severely wounded by a burst of enemy automatic weapons fire as he maneuvered forward. Heedless of the hail of bullets continually striking around him, he fearlessly rose to one knee and fired his weapon from point-blank range at the machine gun, destroying it and killing its crew. As he fired his weapon, Specialist Garcia was mortally wounded by an enemy sniper's bullet. Specialist Four Garcia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2410 (May 21, 1968)
Home Town: Ely, Nevada

GARRETT, CHESTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chester Garrett (0-5318178), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-341, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Captain Garrett distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 February 1967 while serving as Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese strike force on a search and destroy mission near the Cambodian border. Early in the morning, his unit was savagely attacked and pinned down by a North Vietnamese battalion firing machine guns, mortars and small arms. Completely disregarding his own safety, Captain Garrett dashed to the point of heaviest fighting to assess the situation and coordinate the defenses. He saw an enemy position manned by four hostile soldiers placing heavy fire on his men and charged through a hail of bullets, killing the insurgents with accurate hand grenade and rifle fire. He quickly established a hasty perimeter and moved back to bring reinforcements to the forward positions. His Vietnamese counterpart was killed by the intense barrage and the men began to withdraw, but he stood up in the midst of the raging firefight and rallied his men to fight furiously against the determined attackers. Seeing two men fighting against a numerically superior element, he dashed to their side and helped kill ten enemy soldiers within ten meters of his position. Supporting aircraft were unable to pinpoint his location in the dense jungle, so he moved into the open to direct them with a hand-held smoke grenade. Under cover of artillery and air strikes, he led a withdrawal to a landing zone and personally carried a wounded comrade more than six hundred meters on his back. Again, disregarding the savage fire, he led a carrying party back to the battle site and recovered all friendly casualties before leaving the area. Captain Garrett's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5961 (November 18, 1967)

GARZA, ANDRES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andres Garza, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 52d Infantry, Americal Division. Sergeant First Class Garza distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 and 18 April 1969 in the mountainous area northwest of Landing Zone Baldy in Quang Ngai Province. As his company traversed an open valley on 17 April, the enemy launched a devastating attack upon both flanks and the rear of the unit. Sergeant Garza quickly moved to an exposed position and began to lay down suppressive fire on the enemy enabling his company to organize an assault which overran the hostile force. Although wounded in the conflict, he refused medical attention until his comrades were treated. On the following day his unit was again ambushed as they moved through dense vegetation. When the point and second man were wounded in the first volley, Sergeant Garza carried each man through the fusillade to safety. In three additional maneuvers he retrieved weapons and ammunition. During the firefight, he was seriously wounded by shrapnel from impacting mortar rounds, but he refused to be evacuated until the mission was completed. Sergeant First Class Garza's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2494 (July 11, 1969)

GASDEK, BARRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Barry D. Gasdek (OF-101921), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 4th Battalion, 21st Infantry, 11th Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Gasdek distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 September 1968 while commanding an infantry company during a combat sweep near Duong Da. When his unit came under intense enemy fire, Captain Gasdek exposed himself to the hail of bullets to encourage his men, fire his weapon and hurl hand grenades at the aggressors. Informed there was an armored cavalry, troop nearby that could assist him, he took two men and went to direct the armored personal carries to the battle site. As he returned with the carriers, they came under accurate small arms and mortar fire which wounded him in the leg. Despite his painful injury, he continued on to his men and organized the evacuation of the wounded to the tracks. Carrying the most seriously injured man on his back, he crawled more than a hundred meters through a murderous barrage to the vehicles and placed him in the medic track. He then returned to his unit to make sure all casualties were evacuated and gather weapons and radios to keep the enemy from capturing them. When one of his radio operators was killed and the other wounded, Captain Gasdek administered first aid to the injured man and carried the radio equipment himself. He next directed helicopter fire ten to twenty-five meters from his position, enabling his men to withdraw and establish a night location. The following morning he led an attack on the enemy, forcing the aggressors from the area. During the engagement he received a shrapnel wound in the back, but again refused evacuation to remain with his troops. Captain Gasdek's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5903 (December 30, 1968)

GASKIN, GORDON W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon W. Gaskin (RA15843739), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Gaskin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 January 1968 while serving as a medical aidman at Landing Zone Leslie in the Que Son Valley. His unit's perimeter was hit by a North Vietnamese barrage of rocket, mortar, recoilless rifle, automatic and semiautomatic weapon fire, followed by a vicious ground assault which resulted in fierce hand-to-hand combat in many areas. Specialist Gaskin exposed himself to the heavy volume of hostile fire as he moved to the perimeter in search of wounded soldiers. Although he was frequently fired on by the enemy, he fearlessly rescued his injured comrades and brought them to his aid station. During the seven-hour battle Specialist Gaskin treated over fifty casualties, sterilizing pieces of clothing to construct makeshift bandages after he had exhausted all his medical supplies. By repeatedly quitting his protected position to help his fellow soldiers, he saved many lives. Specialist Four Gaskin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5179 (November 6, 1968)

GEORGE, ROBERT A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert A. George, First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop G, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. First Lieutenant George distinguished himself while serving as first platoon leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near the Ho Bo Woods in Binh Doung Province. Amid intense enemy fire during contact with a hostile force, Lieutenant George went to the assistance of a disabled armored cavalry assault vehicle. Mounting the burning vehicle, he began to place machine gun fire on the enemy positions in order to cover the crew's withdrawal. While he was returning fire, a rocket propelled grenade struck the vehicle and exploded, knocking him into the crew compartment with a painful fragmentation wound in his right eye. Although without vision in one eye and in great pain, Lieutenant George returned to his vehicle, braving small arms fire, and withdrew his elements so that artillery fire could be placed on the enemy. He refused medical evacuation and accepted only first aid treatment and remained in the battle. When his troops commander was seriously wounded, Lieutenant George assumed command and led a successful assault on the hostile positions. As a result of his actions, G Troop defeated the enemy in battle and friendly casualties were kept to a minimum. First Lieutenant George's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2264-411 (June 29, 1971)

*GERMAN, BROMLEY HOWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bromley Howard German (0-5424552), First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 3d Battalion, 82d Artillery, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light) (Separate), Americal Division. First Lieutenant German distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 and 6 January 1968 as artillery forward observer with an infantry company on combat operations in Quang Tin Province. The company was savagely attacked in the early evening of 5 January by a North Vietnamese Army force and suffered numerous casualties. Lieutenant German quickly took command of a platoon that had become separated from the main body and had lost its leader, organized a tight defensive perimeter, and directed ravaging artillery strikes on the attackers. Despite a wound received in the initial attack, he continually exposed himself to enemy weapons and coordinated defensive fires which repelled repeated assaults by the determined North Vietnamese. He realized the necessity of rejoining the company's main body and he brought savage artillery fire to within thirty meters of his platoon's position to cover its movement to the company perimeter. The company commander had been seriously wounded and evacuated, so Lieutenant German assumed command. Shortly before midnight, he moved the unit to a more tenable position in a nearby trenchline and established a defensive perimeter. Despite bullets striking all around him, he moved among his troops to encourage them and direct their fire. He fearlessly exposed himself to the withering enemy fusillade time after time throughout the morning hours and continued to repulse the insurgents' wave assault with skillfully directed artillery strikes. He was mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men in the face of numerically superior enemy force. His courageous leadership prevented the attackers from overrunning the company and inspired his men to fight on until reinforcements arrived. First Lieutenant German's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1249 (March 22, 1968)
Born: July 31, 1944 at Waterbury, Connecticut
Home Town: Waterbury, Connecticut

GETZ, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles E. Getz, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 52d Infantry, 198th Infantry Brigade, 23d Infantry Division. Major Getz distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 October 1970 while commanding a combat air assault operation near Thach An Dong, Son Tinh. Prior to troop insertion, Major Getz was reconnoitering the area in his control helicopter when an enemy force was observed near a small hamlet. While flying at low altitude in order to mark the first landing zone for the delivery of his troops, his helicopter began receiving enemy ground fire. Ignoring the heavy volume of fire concentrated at his aircraft, Major Getz directed his pilot to the second landing zone, marking it with smoke grenades. Moments later, his helicopter landed so that he could personally direct the ground movements of his two platoons against the opposing force. To coordinate the advance of both platoons, Major Getz raced two-hundred meters across an open rice paddy although enemy fire was directed almost entirely at him. Advancing to an enemy emplacement through a barrage of fire, Major Getz eliminated the position and its three occupants. As he continued forward, he discovered an enemy tunnel. He unhesitatingly entered the tunnel and captured a North Vietnamese soldier and his weapons. Continuously exposed to hostile fire, he effectively maneuvered his two platoons in a successful assault against the well-fortified enemy emplacements. Throughout the entire engagement, Major Getz's aggressive and determined efforts boosted the morale of his troops, inspired them to maintain the offensive, and defeat the hostile enemy force. Major Getz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1567 (May 8, 1971)

GIBSON, SAMUEL T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel T. Gibson (ER14570982), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 1st Infantry Division Advisory Detachment, I Corps Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Gibson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 January 1968 as a psychological operations/civic actions advisor during an attack on the Phu Loc District Headquarters. Enemy forces launched a devastating night mortar barrage on the compound, and sappers entered it through a break in the defensive perimeter wire. As Sergeant Gibson secured his weapon and equipment to move a bunker, the door was blown off his quarters and he was thrown across the room by the blast. Although shaken, he picked himself up, crossed the open compound and manned a machine gun position atop the command bunker to repel the furious hostile attack. An exploding satchel charge threw him to the ground and wounded him. Refusing aid, he climbed back to his position through a curtain of fire and hurled hand grenades at the assaulting insurgents. When the Viet Cong moved to defilade positions, he braved the barrage of small arms fire and exploding grenades to reach a place from which he could direct more effective fire on them. The enemy launched another fierce ground attack, and he engaged a sapper in deadly hand-to-hand fighting until an insurgent's satchel charge detonated nearby, killing the Viet Cong soldier and rendering Sergeant Gibson unconscious. After regaining his senses, he crawled to a nearby building and secured a rifle. Firing it as he maneuvered, he moved throughout the compound to locate his fellow advisors. After aiding a wounded man from the rubble of a demolished bunker, he noticed an ammunition truck parked beside a burning building. Sprinting to the vehicle, he started it rolling, jumped inside and drove it to safety. His aggressive and fearless actions throughout the fierce three hour battle were instrumental in repelling the determined Viet Cong forces. Sergeant First Class Gibson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2651 (June 1, 1968)

*GILBERT, JAMES CAROLL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Caroll Gilbert (RA44041639), Sergeant Major, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Major Gilbert distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1969 while flying in a command and control helicopter with his brigade commander near Kontum. An ambulance helicopter evacuated a load of casualties from an infantry company in heavy contact with a battalion-size North Vietnamese Army force, but it was so badly damaged by enemy fire that it was unable to return for the remaining wounded. Realizing that the ground unit would be unable to maneuver until the injured men were extracted, Sergeant Major Gilbert urged the brigade commander to use his aircraft to complete the evacuation. He fired at the communists from tree-top level and directed the fire of the door gunners on two flights to the landing zone. On both attempts, however, the infantrymen were pinned down by hostile fire and unable to reach the ship. Although the helicopter had received a number of hits in the fuselage, Sergeant Major Gilbert directed the pilot to fly over the North Vietnamese nearest the pickup site and exposed himself to a hail of bullets by leaning out and firing into the enemy positions. During an approach to the landing zone, automatic weapons fire wounded the pilot and door gunner, forcing the co-pilot to wrench the ship into a series of evasive actions. Sergeant Major Gilbert detached his seat harness and braced himself in the doorway to shield the brigade commander and bring the most effective fire against the North Vietnamese. He succeeded in silencing one emplacement and was engaging another as the helicopter was nearing safety when he was struck and killed by the hostile fusillade. Command Sergeant Major Gilbert's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1723 (May 14, 1969)
Home Town: Butler, Tennessee

*GIPSON, ROBERT PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Paul Gipson (RA14837548), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Four Gipson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 March 1966 while serving as a member in a company conducting a search and destroy operation in the Republic of Vietnam. During the morning hours, Specialist Four Gipson's company was attacked by a large Viet Cong force employing numerous automatic weapons, small arms, mortars and recoilless rifles. Because of the intensity of the battle, available ammunition supplies were rapidly expended. At this time, Specialist Four Gipson unhesitatingly carried ammunition to the front line platoons. Moving up and down the heavily engaged front lines, he repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile machine gun fire while resupplying the platoons with vitally needed ammunition. He then made a second trip through the bullet swept area to obtain additional ammunition, and again braved the intense hostile fire as he returned to the front lines with it. During the course of action, Specialist Four Gipson maneuvered to the battalion landing zone which was under constant .30 and .50 caliber machine gun fire. With complete disregard for his safety, he dauntlessly moved into the open while securing ammunition for the front lines, and then took up a firing position there. In the closing hour of the five-hour battle, he was mortally wounded by a burst of Viet Cong machine gun fire. Specialist Four Gipson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5951 (October 6, 1966)
Home Town: Athens, Georgia

GLEMSER, JAMES P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James P. Glemser, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Glemser distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1969 while serving as a radio telephone operator during a search and clear operation near the city of Tan Ky, Quang Tin Province. While maneuvering against well-fortified North Vietnamese bunker complexes, his patrol came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. As his platoon advanced, an enemy soldier hurled a grenade from his spider hole towards Specialist Glemser and his platoon sergeant, seriously wounding the sergeant. Amid intense enemy fire, Specialist Glemser crawled towards the casualty. After reaching the wounded man, he applied a dressing to his wounds and dragged him to a safer position. Then, Specialist Glemser assaulted the enemy soldier's spider hole, successfully eliminating the foe. Returning to the wounded sergeant, Specialist Glemser carried him 100 meters across a fire-swept rice paddy to the safety of his team's perimeter. Specialist Four Glemser's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2033 (June 12, 1971)

*GLENN, RICHARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard J. Glenn (OF-108600), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 18th Division Advisory Detachment, Advisory Team 87, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. First Lieutenant Glenn distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 February 1968 while serving as advisor to a Vietnamese battalion conducting a search and destroy mission in the village of Long Dien. Following friendly artillery strikes, the battalion and its advisory team began to move through the Viet Cong infested village. Intense enemy automatic weapons fire erupted from two directions, forcing the battalion to withdraw fifty meters and establish a defensive perimeter. During the withdrawal, the rest of the advisory team became separated from the battalion command group, and Lieutenant Glenn quickly assumed the responsibilities of senior advisor. The insurgents suddenly unleashed a savage ground attack. Lieutenant Glenn's radio operator was wounded by the advancing Viet Cong and was lying in an exposed area. Completely disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant Glenn raced through a curtain of fire, picked up his stricken comrade and carried him to the cover of a building. The enemy pinpointed his position and directed a hail of bullets at it. Quickly removing the radio from the wounded man's back, he instructed the soldier to move to the rear with the other members of the command group while he covered the withdrawal. Against overwhelming odds, Lieutenant Glenn courageously remained at his position and engaged the enemy with rifle fire. He was mortally wounded while gallantly placing the welfare of his fellow soldiers above his own. First Lieutenant Glenn's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1151 (March 16, 1968)
Home Town: Florence, Alabama

*GLINES, ALLEN BRUCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Allen Bruce Glines (US56648514), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Glines distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 January 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy mission in Hoi An Province. Private Glines was the point position for his unit, moving ahead of his platoon as it advanced across a series of open rice paddies. Suddenly a large, well armed enemy force placed heavy fire on the Platoon from concealed positions in a woodline. Private Glines immediately charged the enemy despite the fusillade. He moved forward in the open, intent only on destroying the enemy and aiding those elements of his platoon which were pinned down in the rice paddy. His accurate automatic rifle fire permitted his trapped comrades to reach cover. Assaulting the nearest bunker, he destroyed it, killing its three defenders. He then placed flanking fire on the enemy positions in his vicinity, drawing the insurgents' fire to himself as he assaulted a second bunker. He was mortally wounded before he reached it. Private First Class Glines' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3476 (July 19, 1968)
Home Town: Layton, Utah

GODLEWSKI, LARRY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Larry E. Godlewski (RA11678082), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Godlewski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 as a team leader during a search and clear operation near Landing Zone Billie. In the initial contact with a large, well-armed North Vietnamese Army force, part of Specialist Godlewski's company was pinned down and eight men in the point squad were wounded. Rushing forward through the deadly barrage, he placed suppressive fire on the aggressors which killed two of them and enabled his comrades to extract the casualties. During a lull in the fighting, he and another man volunteered to accompany the company commander on a reconnaissance and the three men advanced into the thick underbrush. Spotting an enemy bunker, they charged the position and succeeded in destroying it, but the company commander was hit by hostile fire. As Specialist Godlewski and his companion ran to their fallen commander, heavy fire erupted from a second enemy emplacement. Specialist Godlewski used his body to shield the stricken officer, receiving wounds from a hostile rocket, and after two medics arrived, he positioned himself in front of them to place effective protective fire. The commander was declared dead and was being moved to the rear when another rocket suddenly exploded, killing one of the medics and wounding the others. Suffering from multiple fragmentation wounds, Specialist Godlewski crawled to one of his injured comrades and managed to drag him from under the communists' fusillade to the evacuation site. Specialist Four Godlewski's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1651 (May 9, 1969)

*GODSEY, JAMES FREDERICK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Frederick Godsey (0-5329196), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-351, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. First Lieutenant Godsey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 May 1967 while serving as Special Forces advisor to a Vietnamese company on a blocking mission in Hau Nghia Province. Informed that boats of the River Assault Group stationed near his base camp were under heavy attack, Lieutenant Godsey maneuvered his men to block the escape of the Viet Cong force. He led a squad in pursuit of two fleeing insurgents who quickly joined with a larger force and engaged his men in a fierce firefight. As the battle progressed, a still larger Viet Cong force attacked with mortars, machine guns and recoilless rifles. Greatly outnumbered, he rallied his men bravely to repel the determined hostile assaults while he waited for reinforcements and air support. He was severely wounded while running fifty meters across the bullet-swept clearing to rescue a wounded comrade, but he ignored his injury and led his men in a furious assault against the numerically superior insurgents. He quickly overran the front enemy positions and then called for ammunition re- supply. He was wounded again while unloading ammunition from the supply helicopters, but he exposed himself time after time to direct the distribution of ammunition to his men. When reinforcements arrived, he deployed them and personally led the pursuit of the now beaten Viet Cong Force. First Lieutenant Godsey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4945 (1967) (September 27, 1967)
Home Town: Humboldt, Kansas

*GODWIN, HARRY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harry M. Godwin (0-100706), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Godwin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 March 1966, while serving as a platoon leader with elements of the 327th Infantry on a search and destroy operation near My Phu, Republic of Vietnam. When the lead company became heavily engaged with an entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion, First Lieutenant Godwin maneuvered his platoon for an assault on the hostile flank. After artillery and air strikes failed to dislodge the insurgents, he dauntlessly led his men across the bullet-swept rice paddies. Just short of its objective, the platoon was pinned down and sustained heavy casualties from intense hostile fire. Unmindful of the dangers, First Lieutenant Godwin raced forward and dragged two of his wounded comrades to cover. Then with complete disregard for his safety, he jumped up and charged into a North Vietnamese automatic weapons emplacement. Firing his rifle as he ran, First Lieutenant Godwin killed all five insurgents in the bunker. Inspired by his outstanding courage, the platoon immediately assaulted the surrounding hostile positions and overran them. As they entered the main insurgent trench, First Lieutenant Godwin was fatally wounded. His unimpeachable valor contributed immeasurably to the defeat of a numerically superior hostile force, in which 119 insurgents were killed. First Lieutenant Godwin's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 406 (January 29, 1967)
Home Town: El Dorado, Arkansas

GOFF, STANLEY C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stanley C. Goff (US56835616), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Private First Class Goff distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1968 as a machine gunner with his infantry company during a sweep and clear operation being conducted jointly with an armored cavalry troop eight miles northwest of Tam Ky. As his platoon emerged from a wooded hill into an open rice paddy, it came under intense recoilless rifle, machine gun, automatic weapons and small arms fire from North Vietnamese Army troops thirty meters to its right. Realizing that his company was in danger of suffering heavy casualties, Private Goff courageously exposed himself to the communists and advanced on the recoilless rifle. Braving a hail of bullets he reached a vantage point, stood up, and eliminated the position with a burst from his machine gun. Completely disregarding his safety, he then charged the hostile emplacements while providing a continuous base of fire for his fellow soldiers to follow. Before the force of approximately one hundred and eighty enemy troops were driven from their entrenched positions, he was personally responsible for killing thirty communists and capturing a large number of weapons. Private First Class Goff's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 714 (February 28, 1969)

GORMAN, PAUL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul F. Gorman (0-62379), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Gorman distinguished himself from 25 to 27 August 1966 while two battalions were on a mission to secure Highway 16 for passage of a large re-supply convoy. When a fifteen-man patrol inadvertently advanced into a Viet Cong base camp and came under intense enemy fire, an entire battalion was committed to their assistance. Lieutenant colonel Gorman prepared his battalion for battle and, upon request, sent his lead company to the relief of the engaged battalion. As the casualties mounted during the intensity of the battle, the acting battalion commander and several other key officers were killed. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman committed his second company and assumed command of the combined battalions. His aggressive and courageous leadership turned the tide of battle in favor of the American forces. Later when two companies from a third battalion, separated from their commander, joined the encounter, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman assumed command of these units as well. His presence became the unifying force which transformed the divergent efforts of all these companies into a strong unified command. As the battle progressed into darkness, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman repeatedly exposed himself to the heavy volume of enemy fire and personally inspected his troops, readjusted battle positions and organized the defense for the remainder of the night. At dawn the next day, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman called in artillery and air strikes on insurgent positions to within 50 meters of his own lines. Although one napalm container was accidentally dropped on his command post, burning him and several others. Lieutenant Colonel Gorman, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continued to direct close-in air strikes until the Viet Cong force withdrew. Through his professional knowledge, composure under conditions of great physical and mental stress, and inspired leadership during critical combat conditions, Lieutenant Colonel Gorman brought discipline, organization and command to eight companies of three battalions. Through his courage and determination under fire, he minimized the friendly casualties and contributed immeasurably to the eventual success of the mission. Lieutenant Colonel Gorman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters: US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6100 (October 20, 1966)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam), Army Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star (Korea), Distinguished Flying Cross, 2@ Bronze Star w/V, Air Medal w/V, Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart

*GORTON, GARY BRUCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary Bruce Gorton (RA51447475), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On 17 February 1966, Sergeant Gorton, serving as mortar squad leader, was accompanying his unit to establish a blocking position when they contacted and attacked a Viet Cong heavy weapons battalion. Moving his squad to some nearby shell craters, Sergeant Gorton immediately engaged the insurgents and delivered deadly and accurate mortar support to his company until his ammunition was expended. Under his direction he employed his squad as riflemen and successfully averted the Viet Cong assault against their sector defenses. The insurgents regrouped and again charged the American perimeter. With compete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant Gorton, exposed himself to an intense hail of automatic and small arms fire, throwing grenades and firing his weapon at the advancing Viet Cong forces. Sergeant Gorton killed five of the insurgents and personally captured a machine gun. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 158 (July 14, 1966)
Home Town: New York, New York

GOURLEY, GUY H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Guy H. Gourley, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Sergeant First Class Gourley distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 while serving as a platoon sergeant of a company involved in a combat sweep operation southwest of Duc Pho. Suddenly Sergeant Gourley's platoon began to receive a heavy enfilade from enemy fortifications among the hedgerows. Having escaped the initial outburst of the hostile ambush, his element immediately proceeded to regroup. At this time, Sergeant Gourley learned that another squad was pinned down and drawing heavy fire. As his men laid a base of suppressive fire, he crawled within hand grenade range of an enemy emplacement. Although he sustained a leg wound, he managed to destroy the hostile bunker with a grenade. He and his men continued to press toward the beleaguered squad. Another North Vietnamese position opened fire, wounding Sergeant Gourley in the stomach and cutting him off from his troops. He directed retaliatory fire while a radio was brought to him. Immediately calling in air and ground support, he exposed himself to the hostile fusillade while he marked communist emplacements with smoke grenades. Soon gun ships arrived and, under Sergeant Gourley's direction, began to deliver a devastating barrage of fire on the enemy. Then, when several armored personnel carriers appeared, he supervised the evacuation of the wounded. Not until all of his men had been safely recovered did he allow himself to be evacuated and treated. Sergeant First Class Gourley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2704 (July 17, 1969)

GRAHAM, MICHAEL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael F. Graham, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Graham distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 5 through 7 March 1969 while leading a platoon on military operations west of Kontum in the Central Highlands. For three days while his platoon acted as a blocking force on the eastern slope of the hill his company occupied, Lieutenant Graham directed and deployed his men to counter the constant hostile mortar and rocket attacks and ground assaults on his platoon's position. Once, after a concentrated enemy push had forced his men to fall back, Lieutenant Graham personally led a counterassault to regain the lost ground. Crawling forward through a tempest of automatic weapons and grenade fire, he approached a hostile emplacement and threw a grenade on target. Receiving small arms fire from the position, he immediately tossed another grenade and charged the entrenchment firing an automatic burst from his rifle which silenced the enemy. Then, seeing one of his men lying wounded and exposed to hostile fire, he maneuvered across the bullet-strafed field to drag his comrade to safety. First Lieutenant Graham's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4308 (December 1, 1969)

GRANT, GERALD V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald V. Grant, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control Detachment, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Grant distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions near Phu Bai. At 0700 on 30 March 1967, Sergeant Grant's section of the perimeter came under fire from an estimated six automatic weapons. The first burst gravely wounded the unit commander, but supported by Sergeant Grant, he retained command for another hour before losing consciousness. The acting commander called for medical evacuation, but the enemy launched another attack which penetrated the perimeter. Sergeant Grant organized a counterattack and drove the enemy from the perimeter. Upon arrival of the medical evacuation helicopter, he was attempting to place the commander on the jungle penetrator but enemy fire mortally wounded the pilot causing the aircraft to crash on him and the commander. Despite his injuries, he extracted the wounded co-pilot and the commander, shielding their bodies with his as a misdirected airstrike hit the friendly forces. Subsequently, he was placed in command of the decimated force and through inspiring leadership was able to move it to a landing zone by means of a diversionary attack which enabled the evacuation of all the wounded. Exposing himself to enemy fire, he continued to direct airstrikes against the enemy throughout the evacuation. After insuring that all living personnel had been evacuated, he boarded the last helicopter. Sergeant Major Grant's conspicuous heroism and actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 12 (June 8, 1976)

GREEN, ALEX C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alex C. Green (0-5334550), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Combat Support Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Green distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 August 1968 while serving as an infantry platoon leader during a battalion-sized reconnaissance-in-force operation near Loc Ninh. He was leading his platoon through a dense grove of rubber trees when he spotted two North Vietnamese soldiers in an erosion ditch to his front. Deploying his men to both flanks, he caught the enemy in a cross fire which killed them both. Seconds later the lead company began receiving heavy automatic and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Captain Green quickly organized an assault and led his men through the intense enemy fire, personally killing four of the aggressors. At one point he stopped his charge to rescue a wounded man who lay exposed to the deadly hostile barrage. He next regrouped his platoon and then he initiated another attack, during which he was fiercely engaged by three of the communists. As he fired and killed one, another tossed a grenade at him which struck the stock of his rifle and fell a few feet to his front. Captain Green jumped backwards into a ditch, and immediately after the blast rose up and killed the enemy soldier. Although wounded in the neck he refused to be evacuated and continued to direct the assault until contact was broken. Captain Green's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5041 (October 31, 1968)

GREEN, DANIEL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel R. Green, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Green distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a rifleman at First Support Base Mahone II during a North Vietnamese rocket and ground attack on 23 February 1969. After concentrated hostile ordnance had been placed on the perimeter fortifications, an enemy element charged through the wire barrier and launched five rocket grenades at Private Green's bunker. Three of his comrades were killed and Private Green was seriously wounded and temporarily rendered unconscious. Two of the six sappers rushed to the rear door of the bunker and sprayed the interior with rifle fire and made a hasty search of the bodies. They then rejoined their element outside to signal for a mass penetration. Realizing the enemy's intent, Private Green secured a fragmentation grenade and, crawling outside the bunker, threw it into the middle of the group killing all six. Despite additional wounds received in the blast, Private Green inched his way to the dead enemy, secured one of their rifles and propped himself against the forward blast wall of the emplacement. Although weakened by loss of blood and intense pain, he fired on the hostile troops who were nearing the wire perimeter until the probe was repelled. Only after the vital fortification had been resupplied and re-manned did he allow himself to be medically treated. Private First Class Green's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3903 (October 18, 1969)

GREEN, GERALD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald D. Green, Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop A, 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Chief Warrant Officer W2 Green distinguished himself while commanding a helicopter gunship during a visual reconnaissance mission in the Republic of Laos. While reconnoitering the area for location of enemy supply routes, the lead helicopter was shot down in close proximity of a large enemy force. Realizing that the North Vietnamese would capture the downed pilots, Warrant Officer Green attempted a rescue. After firing his rockets upon the onrushing enemy troops, he lowered his aircraft to the ground amid intense enemy fire. As the enemy soldiers approached to within fifteen meters of the crash site, Mister Green commenced firing his turret guns, suppressing their advance until the two injured pilots were aboard. Although sustaining several hits, Mister Green maintained control of his crippled aircraft and flew his wounded comrades to safety. Chief Warrant Officer W2 Green's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1719 (May 19, 1971)

GREEN, JEFFREY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jeffrey S. Green, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Specialist Four Green distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 10 to 12 May 1970, while advising a group of Vietnamese soldiers in the defense of a strategically located hill near Nui Ek Mountain. After initial enemy contact inflicted several casualties on the allies, Specialist Green quickly moved among his troops to organize a defensive perimeter and direct the fire of his men against the onrushing enemy. Observing a fallen comrade lying forward of his position, he advanced through the enemy fire to his comrade and carried him back to the defensive position. Although the enemy fire intensified, the specialist continued to encourage and direct the fire of his men. As the allies received additional casualties and the defensive perimeter was decreased to a radius of twenty-five meters, Specialist Green accurately directed air support elements to within fifteen meters of his position to repulse attacking enemy troops. That night, the enemy launched a final aggressive assault in an attempt to completely overrun the position. Specialist Green then skillfully directed allied mortar fire to within a few meters of his own fighting position thereby repulsing the enemy attack and causing the hostile troops to flee the area. The following day, the specialist again moved through intense enemy fire to prepare a helicopter evacuation site. Although painfully wounded as he worked, he directed the rescue ships into the landing zone and loaded the wounded on board for evacuation. Specialist Four Green's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4466 (September 21, 1970)

*GREEN, JIMMIE RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jimmie Ray Green (54668104), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Corporal Green distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while in a night defensive position in the vicinity of Long Thanh, Republic of Vietnam on 27 November 1968. Corporal Green was serving as a rifleman with the 2d Platoon, Company A, 4th Battalion, 3d Infantry, 11th Infantry Brigade when the friendly force was subjected to an intense and accurate hand grenade attack, followed by heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire. While grenades were exploding throughout the friendly position, Corporal Green noticed two live grenades land within a few feet of one of the perimeter positions. With complete disregard for his own safety and braving a hail of enemy fire, he ran from his own position and knocked one of his comrades to the ground, covering him with his own body to shield the soldier from the devastating blast of the grenades. Two explosions followed immediately and fatally wounded Corporal Green. His unselfishness and his concern for others saved the life of one man and possibly the lives of others. Corporal Green's conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism and intrepidity at the cost of his own life are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and upon the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 58 (September 24, 1969)
Home Town: Keota, Oklahoma

GREEN, RICHARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard A. Green (US51570473), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 196th Light Infantry Brigade. Specialist Four Green distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 May 1967 while serving as radio operator of an infantry platoon on a village pacification mission at An Loc. A numerically superior Viet Cong force launched a savage attack on his camp early in the morning, but Specialist Green ignored the intense barrage of machine gun, recoilless rifle and grenade fire and dashed across open ground to a nearby machine gun position. He was seriously wounded by an enemy grenade but refused aid and fought furiously against the determined onslaught. He saw that the withering Viet Cong fire was preventing his comrades from reaching the radio and immediately moved into the open under a hail of bullets to call for air strikes and reinforcements. Completely disregarding his own safety, he remained in the open to direct gunships and ordnance on the advancing attackers. With bullets and shrapnel flying all around him, he stood up in the midst of the savage firefight to guide the strafing runs using a burning hut as a reference point. He exposed himself to the Viet Cong weapons time after time to inform his commander of the rapidly changing situation and bring air strikes closer to his lines. He repeatedly refused to take cover and stayed on the radio until the insurgents were defeated and withdrew after suffering heavy casualties. His fearless actions in the face of grave danger contributed greatly to the successful defense of the village and the rout of the Viet Cong. Specialist Four Green's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5949 (November 17, 1967)

GREENE, STANLEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stanley E. Greene (US55985271), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Greene distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 October 1967 while serving with an airmobile infantry platoon on a search and destroy mission in the Bong Son Plains. While sweeping through a village, his squad observed a man attempting to escape through the window of a hut. Specialist Greene provided cover to another soldier who immediately dashed to halt the man. He then saw a second man trying to hide in a large basket beside the hut and moved in to capture him. As other members of his unit came around the hut to assist in the capture, the man jumped from his hiding place and threw a grenade. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Greene shouted a warning to his fellow soldiers and then wounded the fleeing insurgent with an accurate burst from his rifle. Heedless of the grave threat to his life, he dashed to the grenade, picked it up, and attempted to hurl it out of range of his comrades. He was seriously wounded when the grenade exploded as it left his hand. His unselfish devotion to the safety of his fellow soldiers without regard for his own welfare was responsible for saving three of their lives. Specialist Four Greene's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6348 (December 10, 1967)

GREER, EARL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earl D. Greer (0-5241025), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 34th Armor, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Greer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 26 to 29 February 1968 as a platoon leader of a task force on a mission near Tan Hoa. On 26 February, Lieutenant Greer's personnel carrier was struck during an enemy attack by an anti-tank rocket and he was painfully wounded. He refused medical evacuation, quickly assessed the situation and directed fire into the insurgents' positions. When one of his platoon's vehicle commanders was severely wounded by the hostile fire, he dismounted his vehicle and, disregarding his safety, ran through a withering hail of enemy bullets to render aid to the man and move him to a place of safety. The following morning, Lieutenant Greer spearheaded the task force's attack by destroying several bunker complexes. During the continuous fighting that followed near the village of Ap Ban Tram, one of his personnel carriers was struck by a rocket which seriously wounded the vehicle's driver. Lieutenant Greer immediately returned the fire, killing the enemy gunner. While under intense fire from several other concealed positions, he dismounted his vehicle and attached a tow cable to the disabled armored personnel carrier to extract it from the battle area. After the vehicle had been removed, he led his platoon in an assault on the enemy, killing three and capturing four North Vietnamese soldiers. Later, infantry elements east of the village were pinned down by intense hostile automatic weapons fire. He maneuvered his vehicle into position and directed counterfire on the entrenched insurgents positions which allowed the beleaguered units to disengage the enemy. The movement exposed his armored personnel carrier to the insurgents and it was struck by anti-tank fire which resulted in the entire crew being wounded. With his carrier in flames and painfully wounded himself, Lieutenant Greer personally extracted the other crew members before allowing himself to be given medical treatment. Throughout the entire four days of fighting, his personal acts of courage were a constant source of inspiration to his troops. First Lieutenant Greer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3884 (August 9, 1968)
Home Town: Kansas City, Kansas

*GREGORY, BOB LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bob Leroy Gregory (0-69663), Lieutenant Colonel (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Gregory distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 and 3 January 1968 as commanding officer of an airmobile cavalry battalion conducting operations against a North Vietnamese Army division in the Que Sons Valley. During the afternoon of 2 January, one of his companies on a search and destroy mission became heavily engaged with an enemy force of undetermined size. Colonel Gregory immediately boarded his command and control helicopter and flew to the battle site. Disregarding a hail of hostile ground fire tracking his aircraft, he remained over the raging firefight and directed gunship fire and aerial rocket artillery on enemy positions. When the ground commander attempted to move his main force to relieve one platoon that was surrounded by the North Vietnamese, Colonel Gregory instructed his pilot to descend, leaped from the helicopter amid intense automatic weapons fire and rallied the troops in their maneuver. As darkness approached, he directed the helicopter evacuation of wounded and supervised the extraction of the beleaguered company. During the early morning hours of 3 January, the battalion fire base was attacked by two North Vietnamese Army regiments. Braving savage rocket, mortar and automatic weapons fire, Colonel Gregory unhesitantly moved from the relative safety of his bunker to the tactical operations center, where he quickly organized his defenses to repel the attack. He repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fusillade as he moved among his troops and encouraged their fierce fight against the determined attackers. His fearless and inspiring leadership was responsible for the successful defense of the base and over two hundred North Vietnamese killed. Lieutenant Colonel Gregory's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1535 (April 5, 1968)
Home Town: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

GRIGGS, LESLIE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leslie D. Griggs (0-5320308), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving an opposing force in the Republic of Vietnam on 22 February 1965. As the Senior American Advisor to a Strike Force Unit, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, Lieutenant Griggs was traveling with a convoy when the unit was suddenly ambushed by a vicious Viet Cong force that greatly outnumbered the Strike Fore unit as it approached an area six kilometers east of the Mang Yang Pass in Binh Dinh Province. As the hostile element struck them with mortars, machine gun and small arms fire, the members of the Strike Force jumped from their trucks and took cover in a ditch. To direct the fire of the escorting armed helicopters against the concealed Viet Cong, Lieutenant Griggs bravely left his covered position, exposed himself to the onslaught, and was struck in the arm by a grenade which bounced to the ground causing a fragment wound in his leg. Undaunted by his wounds, he proceeded at once to rally the Strike Force to assault the Viet Cong positions. Inspired by his example, the Strike Force pressed forward about twenty meters until Lieutenant Griggs received a severe neck wound and others were wounded, including an American sergeant. Ignoring his profuse bleeding and multiple wounds, Lieutenant Griggs moved through withering small arms fire and exploding grenades to assist his wounded comrade. After administering first aid to the wounded sergeant and pulling him to a protective position beside the road, he quickly annihilated two Viet Cong who were approaching the fallen soldier. Having used all his ammunition, he dropped his rifle, took a Browning automatic rifle from a dead Strike Force soldier, and killed two more Viet Cong who were crossing the road. Then, while attempting to reorganize his forces, he was shot in the back and fell unconscious. When he regained consciousness, the Viet Cong had completely overrun the position and were withdrawing from the ambush site with the Strike Force weapons they had gathered. Despite his critical physical condition, Lieutenant Griggs managed to crawl to a radio which had been hidden from the Viet Cong by the body of the dead operator. Although experiencing extreme difficulty in breathing, he succeeded in directing the fire of the armed helicopters against the withdrawing Viet Cong. When the firing subsided, he guided helicopters into a landing zone to evacuate the wounded and refused aid for himself until the wounded sergeant was placed on board. His indomitable courage, fortitude, and dynamic leadership not only inspired his Vietnamese counterparts but sustained the tide of battle until he fell unconscious from wounds in action. Lieutenant Griggs' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroic actions, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (January 12, 1966)

*GRIGSBY, JOE WALTER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joe Walter Grigsby (RA17747706), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Grigsby distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1968 as machine gunner of an armored personnel carrier on a reaction mission. An Infantry unit had been heavily engaged by a Viet Cong force, and Private Grigsby's troop was called to reinforce the beleaguered soldiers. As his vehicle arrived at the battle site, it received a direct hit by an enemy anti-tank rocket and burst into flames. Private Grigsby was wounded by flying shrapnel from the exploding rocket, but fearlessly remained on the burning personnel carrier and delivered a devastating hail of machine gun fire into hostile positions. As another track drew near to evacuate the casualties, he removed a seriously wounded crew member from his disabled vehicle and administered skillful first aid. He was assisting the casualty into the second personnel carrier when it was also struck by rocket fire. Private Grigsby, with his own body, unhesitatingly shielded his wounded comrade to protect him from the explosion and ravaging enemy small arms fusillade which followed. He was mortally wounded while gallantly and unselfishly placing the welfare of a fellow soldier above his own in the heat of battle. Private First Class Grigsby's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2000 (May 2, 1968)
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri

GRIMM, MICHAEL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael C. Grimm (0-5338999), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Grimm distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 March 1968 as a platoon leader of an infantry company during an air assault near My Tho. Enemy fire on the landing zone was so intense that one helicopter was shot down and five were unable to land, leaving Lieutenant Grimm's platoon and the company's command group alone in the clearing. During the initial contact, Lieutenant Grimm and ten men were wounded, and several other troops were killed, including the platoon sergeant and the platoon medic. Under a withering hail of enemy fire, Lieutenant Grimm moved to his right flank and eliminated several enemy positions, enabling his men to maneuver out of the open rice paddy into more protected positions. Although painfully wounded, he exposed himself to rocket and mortar fire to extract two other casualties from the clearing. When the insurgents attempted to flank his unit, Lieutenant Grimm directed artillery to within fifty meters of his own position which enabled his men to maneuver to another rice paddy dike. Under the cover of darkness, he led a group of volunteers outside the perimeter to secure all the wounded and move them to safety. When the Viet Cong attempted to capture the downed helicopter's armament, he led a small group to the wreckage and successfully stripped it of all weapons, electronic equipment and medical supplies shortly before the enemy seized the craft. Second Lieutenant Grimm's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3887 (August 3, 1968)

GRIMMER, JACK E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack E. Grimmer (W-3154024), Warrant Officer (W-1), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 336th Assault Helicopter Company, 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Warrant Officer Grimmer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 February 1967 while flying a helicopter during the airlift of Vietnamese troops into an unsecured landing zone near Vi Thanh. As the flight of troop ships started to land, it came under intense hostile fire which crippled Warrant Officer Grimmer's aircraft. Exiting the helicopter, he noticed that the lead ship had also crashed and was only fifty meters from the Viet Cong positions. After directing his men to safety, he fearlessly ran and crawled through a hail of bullets and exploding mortar rounds to extract the surviving crew members from the wreckage. As they moved back, one of the men was seriously wounded in both legs. Unmindful of the extreme dangers, Warrant Officer Grimmer helped carry the stricken man to cover behind a low dike and administered first aid to him. He then dauntlessly began to engage the enemy with all available weapons, including a machine gun he retrieved from a dead Vietnamese soldier. Moving throughout the ravaged area to coordinate the defense, Warrant Officer Grimmer continued to provide accurate suppressive fire, allowing a relief force to land. Once the insurgent positions had been practically silenced, he again returned to the lead aircraft to put out a fire and removed the dead pilot from the wreckage. After being evacuated to the staging field, Warrant Officer Grimmer volunteered to fly a perilous mission back into the landing zone. During the remainder of the afternoon and into the night, he repeatedly flew through hostile sniper and mortar fire, until all the downed helicopters were properly rigged for recovery. His unimpeachable valor and composure were instrumental in preventing further death or injury to his comrades, and insured the immediate salvage of valuable equipment. Warrant Officer Grimmer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1749 (April 17, 1967)

GROF, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Grof (0-5513249), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 9th Infantry Division. Captain Grof distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 June 1967 as an aircraft commander during an evacuation mission for the 9th Infantry Division. Hearing an urgent radio request to evacuate over one hundred casualties from a heated battle, Captain Grof flew to the unsecured area and landed to load the wounded. Intense machine gun fire raked the aircraft and wounded him in the face. Despite the pain of his injury, impairment of his sight and a crippled ship, he successfully flew out of the area to a treatment center. Upon reaching the hospital, Captain Grof volunteered to stay in his aircraft and returned to the beleaguered unit for more casualties. While patients were being loaded, the helicopter was rendered inoperative by numerous additional hits, one of which wounded Captain Grof a second time. Despite the incredibly intense fire directed on his craft, he remained aboard to radio other helicopters in the area to move to a more secure area. Seeing another ship crash nearby, he rushed to the scene and made repeated trips through an open rice paddy to help the survivors to safety. He then recovered vital ammunition from the downed craft and established a perimeter defense. He and his men successfully repelled the enemy until medical evacuation helicopters could land and evacuate them. Captain Grof's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3228 (July 8, 1968)

GROGAN, TIMOTHY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Timothy J. Grogan (0-98734), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 69th Armor, 4th Infantry Division. Captain Grogan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 and 6 May 1968 as the commander of an armor/infantry task force during a fierce battle with a North Vietnamese regiment near An Bao. Throughout four major contacts in a sixteen-hour period, Captain Grogan repeatedly exposed himself to heavy enemy fire by leaving the relative security of his tank to personally direct the fire of ground units and to supervise the evacuation of wounded personnel. His masterful coordination and direction of tanks, personnel carriers, artillery, and air support subdued the enemy on all four occasions and inflicted heavy casualties upon the insurgents. When his troops became depressed and weary from the constant combat, he moved through a hail of heavy mortar and rocket fire to each of their positions and encouraged them to continue fighting. His physical presence and courageous actions inspired his men to rally and place such a heavy volume of fire on the insurgents that they completely decimated the enemy forces. Captain Grogan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3663 (July 30, 1968)

GROSS, LYNN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lynn J. Gross, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry, 11th Brigade, Americal Division. Private First Class Gross distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1969 while serving as a security guard on a bridge near Duc Pho. During the early morning hours, a North Vietnamese platoon armed with machine guns and grenade launchers penetrated the perimeter around the bridge and destroyed two bunkers with satchel charges. Believing himself to be the only survivor, Private Gross attempted to retake some of the enemy-held positions at the other end of the bridge. Halfway across the bridge he was wounded by a satchel charge and fell in the open, exposed to the hostile barrage. Not being able to move, he used his field radio to call in gun ships to fire on the enemy troops who had taken shelter in nearby bunkers. While calling in fire he kept the North Vietnamese pinned down with his rifle until a rescue team was inserted on the bridge. Private First Class Gross' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3182 (August 16, 1969)

GUEVARA, JESUS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jesus H. Guevara (US54720906), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Guevara distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 September 1968 while serving as a radio telephone operator on a five man listening and observation patrol southeast of Duc Lap. North Vietnamese Army troops occupying a well camouflaged bunker complex opened fire on his small element, instantly killing the patrol leader. Specialist Guevara immediately took command, directing the men into a defensive position while providing covering fire. He also contacted his company, giving details of his unit's location and the strength of the enemy. The communists assaulted and killed another member of the patrol, but were driven back. After a second attempt to overrun the Americans, during which Specialist Guevara killed two North Vietnamese, the aggressors withdrew slightly and unleashed a barrage of automatic weapons fire and grenades. A grenade landed in his position and he fearlessly picked it up and threw it back at the enemy. When a second grenade fell amid the three patrol members, he again grabbed it and attempted to throw it, but the deadly missile exploded before he released it. Specialist Guevara absorbed most of the impact from the grenade and received further injuries from a smoke grenade which was detonated by the explosion. Despite his grievous wounds, he tried to reach his radio to report the action. Through his efforts, he and his two comrades were able to hold off the aggressors until relief arrived. Specialist Four Guevara's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 82 (January 9, 1969)

GUTIERREZ, ANDRES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Andres Gutierrez (0-5350413), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Gutierrez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1969 during a rocket, mortar and ground attack on the Dau Tieng base camp by two North Vietnamese Army battalions reinforced with sapper elements. When the bombardment began shortly after midnight, Lieutenant Gutierrez organized a reaction force and led it to the perimeter, which had been broken through by the enemy. Spotting three North Vietnamese preparing to fire a rocket-propelled grenade into a bunker, he killed all three with his pistol. He then began to rescue casualties from under the deadly hostile fire and carry them to the aid station. While resupplying his men with ammunition, he encountered two infiltrators trying to enter the battalion ammunition supply point and shot both of them with his pistol. Lieutenant Gutierrez made fifteen trips to the supply point, repeatedly exposing himself to the communists' fire and the danger of an ammunition explosion. As morning approached, he and a comrade maneuvered against a sniper and silenced him. First Lieutenant Gutierrez' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1753 (May 15, 1969)

GUY, CORNELIUS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Cornelius Guy, Jr. (RA14809920), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Guy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 August 1968 as a platoon sergeant during a helicopter combat assault on Hill 1258 in Kontum Province. When only a small portion of his company had landed, the men were subjected to an intense volume of rocket, mortar and automatic weapons fire from a North Vietnamese Army force in well-entrenched positions. As Sergeant Guy was laying down a base of fire on the enemy soldiers, a hostile rocket impacted near his position seriously wounding him and knocking him unconscious. After regaining consciousness, he moved across the open ground to where his troops were pinned down by a cross fire. Ignoring his painful wounds, he rallied his largely demoralized men and pointed out targets to them while constantly exposing himself to the deadly fusillade. Armed with a grenade launcher, he then attempted to reach the bunkers on the crest of the hill. He was driven back by the devastating fire, but reorganized his men and again crawled into the face of the enemy barrage. As he neared the first fortification he routed its occupants with a gas grenade. Jumping to his feet, Sergeant Guy charged directly at a second position and destroyed it with grenades. His men were inspired by his actions and followed him along the crest of the hill until the entire area was secured. When more helicopters entered the landing zone, he organized the defense and insured that all other casualties were treated before he received medical aid. Staff Sergeant Guy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 84 (January 9, 1969)

 

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