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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Vietnam 
  C - D  

C

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

CAIN, JERRY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry A. Cain (US56372685), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Battery, 2d Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Private First Class Cain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 July 1967 while serving as radio operator of an artillery forward observer team supporting infantry operations deep in hostile territory. Early in the morning, his unit was heavily engaged by a large enemy force dug into the ruins of a fortified village. Completely disregarding his own safety, Private Cain braved savage mortar, recoilless rifle, and machine gun fire to relay artillery adjustments sent by the forward observer. He received a serious head wound in the ravaging barrage but ignored his injury and assumed the responsibility of directing the strikes when the observer was severely hit. For more than two hours, he exposed himself to the intense enemy attack to call for artillery and keep his headquarters advised of the critical situation. As the firefight intensified, he called for supporting gunships and moved into the open time after time to direct deadly strafing runs on the fanatical attackers. He momentarily left his radio when he was overcome by his wounds but quickly returned under a hail of bullets to bring the fire closer to his positions. Despite repeated assaults on his position, he fought furiously and inspired the men around him to greater heights in repelling the overwhelming onslaught. His fearless actions in the face of grave danger contributed greatly to the defeat of the numerically superior Viet Cong force. Private First Class Cain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6043 (November 20, 1967)

*CALHOUN, JOHNNY C. (MIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnny C. Calhoun (255-68-2772), Sergeant First Class [then Staff Sergeant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), FOB 1 (Phu Bai), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Calhoun distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 March 1968. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 51 (October 25, 1974)
Born: July 14, 1945 at Roanoke, Alabama
Home Town: Newnan, Georgia
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*CALIBOSO, ROBERT MALUENDA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Maluenda Caliboso (0-89430), Captain (Aviation), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Aviation Battalion, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Caliboso distinguished himself conspicuously by gallantry against an armed hostile enemy force at the cost of his life on 5 March 1966 in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Caliboso was serving as Aircraft Commander of a UH-1D helicopter when he learned that the perimeter of the 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry was surrounded and under heavy attack by a regimental-sized Viet Cong force in the vicinity of Lai Khe, Binh Duong Province. The insurgents had pressed so close to the perimeter of the American units that mortar and supporting artillery fire were relatively ineffective and the defenders had begun to run critically short of small arms ammunition. Though they realized that a delivery of ammunition into the middle of a raging jungle battle was extremely hazardous and call for exposure to withering Viet Cong machine gun fire, Captain Caliboso and his crew voluntarily undertook to deliver fifteen hundred pounds of explosive cargo into the battle area. On the approach to the landing zone the helicopter and crew were hit time and time again by heavy machine gun and small arms fire. Knowing the ammunition was desperately needed to save the besieged Infantrymen, Captain Caliboso and his crew ignored their personal safety and continued through the heavy fire to the landing zone. The crew members began to unload the ammunition even though they were being repeatedly wounded by the ever increasing Viet Cong fire. Though the entire crew had been seriously wounded in their efforts, all the ammunition was successfully unloaded and Captain Caliboso managed to fly the helicopter out of its untenable position. Moments later the helicopter was shot down by a deadly cross fire of .50 caliber machine guns, killing all aboard. The heroic actions of Captain Caliboso and his crew supplied the needed ammunition to turn the tide of battle and save numerous American lives. Because of this ammunition re-supply the heavily outnumbered Infantry units completely routed the insurgent force, killing over 200 Viet Cong and capturing supplies and equipment which included four .50 caliber machine guns. Captain Caliboso's conspicuous gallantry, at the cost of his life, was the mainstay of the successful camp defense. His actions were an inspiration to the American defenders, displaying magnificent leadership and conspicuous bravery. Although wounded, he never relented from his determined effort to re-supply the heavily beleaguered Infantry units. Captain Caliboso's courage and determination, in the face of overwhelming firepower, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 18 (April 18, 1967)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

CAMACHO, ISAAC (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Isaac Camacho, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-21, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Camacho distinguished himself by gallantry in action during the early morning on 2 November 1963, when an estimated reinforced battalion of Viet Cong attacked a Special Forces camp at Hiep Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. Taking the camp by complete surprise, the insurgents began their attack with withering automatic weapons and small arms fire followed within a few seconds by an intense mortar barrage. The heavy volume of high and flat trajectory fire pinned down the entire Vietnamese strike force within the compound. At the beginning of the attack, Sergeant First Class Camacho ran from his sleeping area to a mortar position. Having. successfully maneuvered through a hail of bullets and mortar fragments, Sergeant First Class Camacho calmly manned the mortar and began to concentrate his fire on the Viet Cong who were attempting to breach the wall of the compound. Disregarding his own personal safety and realizing that he was the only man not pinned down by the Viet Cong, Sergeant First Class Camacho valiantly engaged the enemy until he was ordered by his commanding officer to withdraw from the camp. Reluctantly, he gave up his position and moved into the darkness. In the confusion of battle, Sergeant First Class Camacho and his commanding officer became separated. Sergeant First Class Camacho was captured by the Viet Cong only when he no longer had any means to resist. Sergeant First class Camacho's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Department of the Army, General Orders 25 (8 June 2001)
Home Town: Fabens, Texas

CAMPBELL, DARRELL W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Darrell W. Campbell (US54718639), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Campbell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 February 1968 as a medic at a forward operations base in Quang Tri Province. The base came under intense fire from a North Vietnamese Army unit employing small arms, grenades, rockets and satchel charges. In the initial minutes of the attack several men were wounded. Hearing their cries for help, Specialist Campbell rushed from his foxhole to administer medical aid. As he was moving an injured soldier to a protected area, he was wounded in both legs and the face by an exploding charge. Partially blinded and in intense pain from his wounds, Specialist Campbell nevertheless continued to treat his comrades. He went from position to position through the fierce barrage, dragging the more seriously injured to cover in the center of the camp's perimeter. Only after all other casualties had been evacuated, did he allow himself to be removed from the battle area. Specialist Four Campbell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4321 (September 11, 1968)

*CAMPBELL, KEITH ALLEN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Keith Allen Campbell (RA13794184), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Specialist Four Campbell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 February 1967 while serving with elements of the 503d Infantry assaulting a Viet Cong bunker complex. During the initial engagement, the lead company had suffered numerous casualties, including the medical personnel. Specialist Campbell volunteered to assist in treating the wounded, and dauntlessly moved up to the front line. Exposing himself to the intense hostile fire, he began to administer aid to the wounded soldiers. Discovering that one casualty lay fifty meters in front of the friendly lines and next to an insurgent bunker, Specialist Campbell called for covering fire as he maneuvered forward. Disregarding the extreme dangers, he fearlessly ran through a hail of bullets and exploding grenades, but was forced to take cover behind a low mound of dirt. From this position, he killed a Viet Cong sniper who was firing on him from a tree. Undeterred from his mission, Specialist Campbell then crawled the last twenty meters to the stricken man. Dragging the soldier to the cover of a nearby tree, he started to administer first aid. As he fearlessly protected the man from further hostile fire, Specialist Campbell was mortally wounded. His unimpeachable valor and selfless sacrifice against insurmountable odds succeeded in saving a fellow soldier's life. Specialist Four Campbell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1178 (March 17, 1967)
Born: March 3, 1946 at Long Beach, California
Home Town: Arlington, Virginia

*CANAVAN, MARTIN JOSEPH, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Martin Joseph Canavan, Jr. (US56707321), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Staff Sergeant Canavan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 while leading a platoon involved in a mission in enemy dominated terrain in Tay Ninh Province. Having just made a combat assault into the area, Sergeant Canavan's company set up a defensive perimeter prior to constructing a landing zone. As the first supply helicopters approached the site, the enemy opened fire on the company with small arms, automatic weapons and rockets. After the initial barrage, Sergeant Canavan was placed in charge of the third platoon with instructions to assist the first and second platoons, who had received the brunt of the attack. He effectively emplaced his men to lay down protective fire under which the two threatened platoons could withdraw to safety. He then personally led a squad to remove the injured men in the killing zone. When increased bombardment forced his squad to pull back, he called in air strikes and artillery to silence the enemy. After organizing and leading an assault on the wood line, where the foe lay entrenched, he seized the opportunity offered by the advance to evacuate the wounded and dead who were stranded after the first attack. When the bodies had been removed and the wounded given emergency treatment, Sergeant Canavan pulled his troops back to avoid further casualties. In a last minute effort to reach another wounded comrade pinned down in the open by enemy fire Sergeant Canavan was struck down by intense enemy fire. Staff Sergeant Canavan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2028 (June 9, 1969)
Home Town: Barstow, California

CARISTO, FREDERIC J. G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frederic J. G. Caristo, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Major Caristo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism on 24 December 1966, while a member of the Studies and Observations Group, Headquarters, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Major Caristo's mission was to accompany an extremely dangerous and sensitive United States prisoner recovery mission in the Ba Tu area of Cambodia, distinguish the Cambodians from the North Vietnamese and act as an interpreter/translator during any ground negotiations. He was also charged with the security and maximum exploitation of the North Vietnamese Hoi Chanh (military defector) who would accompany the operation. The Hoi Chanh had provided the initial intelligence which prompted the operation, and had revealed two United States prisoners were being held in a isolated hamlet near Ba Tu. The objective area was secured by a reinforced North Vietnamese battalion, surrounded by several minefields, and contained numerous armed/explosive manufacturing shops and caches. The prisoners were being held in a hut bordered on three sides by minefields. Initial planning called for a "nap of the earth" heliborne assault inside the minefield next to the prisoner hut. At 1200 hours, 24 December 1966, the helicopters made their final approach. With Major Caristo aboard, the lead helicopter began inserting on the wrong side of the minefield. Major Caristo immediately exited the lead helicopter, and simultaneously the supporting gunships began their suppression fires into the minefield and surrounding area. The lead helicopter pilot, realizing his navigational error, left the landing zone and attempted to insert the assault troops on the opposite side of the minefield. After their initial surprise, the North Vietnamese defenders rallied and began to place intensive protective fires throughout the area. Major Caristo, realizing the danger to the prisoners, the possibility of their execution, and the fact that he was the only assault troop on the ground, began to move toward the prisoners' hut. With complete disregard for his own safety and realizing the extreme danger, Major Caristo ran fifty meters through the minefield and fusillade of intense friendly and enemy fire. He broke through the back wall of the designated hut, captured three occupants, and discovered the prisoners had been moved the previous night. The North Vietnamese unit was offering heavy resistance, and both sides, were suffering heavy casualties. The assaulting United States unit had become trapped with a second minefield between them and the North Vietnamese defenders. Major Caristo saw the gravity of the United States troops' precarious situation, took one of his prisoners, and directed the captive to lead him and the assault elements through the minefield. Again disregarding his own safety by exposing himself to intense small arms and recoilless weapons fire, Major Caristo began leading the way through the minefield. When the prisoner was killed by small arms fire, Major Caristo demonstrated true leadership and great bravery and continued to lead the way through the minefield. Under an increasing volume of fire, and after knocked to the ground from the blast of a bangalore torpedo, he successfully led the assault elements through the minefield. This valorous action undoubtedly saved many American lives and allowed the assault to continue. Major Caristo returned to the hamlet to locate the prisoners and encountered a North Vietnamese soldier firing a 57 mm recoilless rifle into the rear of the assault elements. Major Caristo fired and wounded the gunner. To obtain further information about the minefields in the area, he captured the wounded gunner. Instead, the prisoner led him to an underground arms/explosive shop and attempted to get Major Caristo to enter. Major Caristo wisely had the prisoner enter first. The entrance was booby trapped and the prisoner was killed. The booby trap also wounded a woman and baby who were occupying the complex. Major Caristo, recognizing the possibility of a second booby trap, crawled into the bunker and pulled the woman and child to safety and medical aid. As the assault unit continued their sweep activities, they discovered a number of bunker complexes. Those United States troops attempting to search the bunkers encountered booby traps and small arms fire which caused a number of casualties. Reluctant to suffer further casualties, the United States troops began throwing hand grenades into the bunker prior to entering. Major Caristo, realizing their were many women and children in the bunkers, voluntarily entered several of them and saved many civilian lives by assuring the bunker occupants of their safety. Major Caristo's command of the Vietnamese and Cambodian languages and their dialects also allowed him to discover forty-six North Vietnamese who were attempting to "blend-in" with the Cambodian civilians. Major Caristo additionally provided translations of numerous documents which led to the uncovering of two large arms caches. Through his heroic and unselfish efforts, Major Caristo saved numerous United States military and noncombatant lives. Although the prisoners were not recovered, Major Caristo's valorous actions were the single outstanding factor of the operation and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (March 24, 1977)

*CARLSON, GARY WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gary William Carlson (019-34-7170), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Carlson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 19 June 1969 as troop commander during a reconnaissance-in-force operation. When the troop came under fire from a well-concealed enemy force, he immediately led his men in an assault on the hostile fortifications. Realizing that the crossfire was impeding the movement of his troop, he single-handedly assaulted and destroyed the most strategic hostile position. He then directed his fire against another enemy position, silencing it with hand grenades and rifle fire. Spotting a wounded comrade lying exposed to the enemy barrage, Captain Carlson braved the fusillade to move the man to safety. He then returned to the center of conflict to evacuate another casualty. As he returned to his vehicle, he was knocked to the ground by a rocket-propelled grenade which rendered his command vehicle inoperative. Braving a hail of fire to reach another vehicle, he resumed control of his troop. It was while he was directing this assault on the enemy that he was mortally wounded by enemy fire. Captain Carlson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3274 (August 23, 1969)
Home Town: West Bridgewater, Massachusetts

CARMICHAEL, PATRICK S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick S. Carmichael (RA18964156), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 227th Aviation Battalion (Assault Helicopter), 11th Aviation Group, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Carmichael distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the night of 11 March 1969 at Quan Loi while serving as a perimeter guard. An enemy soldier infiltrated through two rows of defensive wire and threw a hand grenade at the bunker where Specialist Carmichael was on duty. Reacting instantly, he yelled a warning to his two fellow guards, who were resting, and pushed them to safety. He then grabbed a bundle of empty sand bags and dove toward the grenade in an attempt to smother the explosion. Just as he reached the grenade, it detonated. Specialist Carmichael was wounded seriously but his comrades escaped injury. Specialist Four Carmichael's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1751 (May 15, 1969)

CARNES, EDWARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward L. Carnes (0-5426786), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Carnes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 January 1969 while serving as a forward observer for his company during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Long Hiep in Kien Phong Province. As his unit crossed an open field adjacent to a wood line, a large enemy force opened fire with small arms, automatic weapons and hand grenades, killing the company commander, with their initial volley. Immediately taking command, Lieutenant Carnes braved the fusillade to lead his men in repelling the first wave of the aggressors. After organizing a defensive perimeter, he made repeated attempts to reach his commander, who lay under a hail of bullets. Finally determining that the man was dead, he withdrew back to the perimeter. Intense hostile fire was now coming from three sides, preventing his men from maneuvering. Taking a dangerously exposed position, Lieutenant Carnes directed tactical air and gun ship strikes against the foe. Seeing that one machine gun was situated to sweep his entire company, he maneuvered alone over thirty meters of bullet- swept terrain and slew the enemy gunner with a burst from his rifle. He killed another Viet Cong before returning to his command group and then began leading his force into position as part of a brigade encirclement. Throughout the night, Lieutenant Carnes continued to command his company and expertly adjusted artillery fire within meters of his own location. First Lieutenant Carnes' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2022 (June 9, 1969)

CARPENTER, MICHAEL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael F. Carpenter (RA19607653), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 20 July 1965, Sergeant Carpenter was serving as Communications Sergeant of Detachment A-341, 5th United States Army Special Forces Group (Airborne), at Camp Bu Dop, Vietnam. At approximately 0105 hours, the camp was attacked by a hard-core Viet Cong force estimated to be composed of two infantry battalions. During the initial barrage of insurgent mortar, recoilless weapons, and small arms fire, Sergeant Carpenter positioned himself in the Special Forces mess hall and immediately radioed higher headquarters to request flare aircraft and fighter support to aid the already hard-pressed friendly defensive force. As the hostile barrage increased in intensity, the mess hall and radio equipment were destroyed. With the aid of a wounded comrade, to whom he had previously administered first aid, Sergeant Carpenter left the remains of the mess hall and attempted to enter the camp's communications bunker to continue the vital task of maintaining radio contact with higher headquarters. Despite his valiant efforts, Sergeant Carpenter was denied entrance when incoming mortar rounds ignited highly flammable supplies which had been stored in the bunker's immediate vicinity. With his communications mission temporarily thwarted, Sergeant Carpenter and his companion actively entered the fierce fire-fight, which had raged about them, by the timely destruction of a five-man Viet Cong force which had reached the camp's defenses and were about to commence fighting one of the defensive mortars upon the friendly forces. After insuring that his wounded comrade was attend to, Sergeant Carpenter moved to a machine gun and continued to direct deadly fire upon the attacking insurgent horde. Upon learning that a Special Forces Officer had been wounded, Sergeant Carpenter, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, rushed through the intense hail of hostile fire and successfully carried the wounded officer to the Camp Commander's bunker. Despite a painful wound sustained in his heroic rescue of a fallen comrade, Sergeant Carpenter refused aid and rushed to the camp's west wall, engaging another Viet Cong force with suppressive fire while re-supplying the friendly defenders with much needed grenades and small arms ammunition. As the battle raged on, he twice fought his way to the communications bunker, killing several Viet Cong while en route to obtain weapons and re-establish radio communications with higher headquarters. After repairing the communications equipment, Sergeant Carpenter regained radio contact and directed devastating air strikes upon the hostile forces. Although painfully wounded and nearing physical exhaustion, Sergeant Carpenter refused immediate air evacuation, electing to remain and assist in the establishment of firm communications channel and reorganization of the defensive structure before he was finally evacuated. Sergeant Carpenter's extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 52 (March 7, 1966)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia

CARPENTER, WILLIAM STANLEY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William Stanley Carpenter, Jr. (0-90703), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Captain Carpenter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 June 1966 to 11 June 1966 while serving as Commanding Officer of an infantry company engaged in a blocking mission near Tou Morong Outpost. As Captain Carpenter's company advanced, the lead platoon suddenly received intense fire from an estimated two companies of Viet Cong. Captain Carpenter immediately deployed the company to continue its forward progress, but it soon became pinned down by extremely heavy hostile fire from three directions. After Captain Carpenter organized a hasty defense, it became apparent that the insurgent force was at least of battalion size. The insurgents launched a determined frontal attack and were successful in overrunning one platoon. Realizing the severe consequences if the enemy forces were able to penetrate the entire company area, Captain Carpenter ordered supporting jet aircraft to drop napalm directly on the company's position. The napalm bombs hit the top of the trees in the center of the company position and detonated 25 feet above ground. As a result, the fiery napalm carried directly into the charging insurgents and passed over most of the friendly troops. The skillfully directed air strike completely subdued the Viet Cong attempt to overrun the company. As the insurgents withdrew, Captain Carpenter repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire to reorganize his command and direct supporting artillery fire. Throughout the remainder of the three-day battle and in the face of almost overwhelming odds, Captain Carpenter continued to direct and inspire the company to repulse three additional determined assaults by the enemy battalion. Through Captain Carpenter's heroic actions and courageous tenacity, his company was spared numerous casualties and was able to withstand the repeated attacks of the Viet Cong battalion until reinforcements arrived. Captain Carpenter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4125 (August 14, 1967)
Born: at Woodbury, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Springfield, Pennsylvania

CARR, DONALD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald F. Carr, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Carr distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 February 1969 while leading an eight-man ambush patrol near the hamlet of Ong Nhieu. After he and his men had established an ambush position, they observed several enemy sampans approaching. By detonating their claymore mines, they killed one communist soldier and captured weapons and documents from his boat. A search of the area revealed other sampans, camouflaged near the river bank. Sergeant Carr set up another ambush position across the stream from the boats, but when no one returned by morning, he decided to search the river craft. Swimming back and forth across the stream, he gathered the boats while his men secured the captured enemy weapons, munitions and documents. Suddenly enemy rounds and rocket-propelled grenades began to rain around Sergeant Carr. As his men assumed defensive positions and returned fire, Sergeant Carr took cover behind the single remaining sampan on the enemy's side of the river. He then unleashed a barrage on the hostile force. When his ammunition supply was exhausted, he climbed aboard the captured boat and employed weapons from the communist cache. He quickly silenced one enemy position with a rocket grenade, and once his craft had drifted to shore down-stream, he disembarked to engage the hostile emplacements with an AK-47 rifle. When his accurate fusillade cut down four enemy soldiers, the remainder of the enemy fled. Staff Sergeant Carr's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3886 (October 18, 1969)

CARRIZALES, DANIEL A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Daniel A. Carrizales, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop G, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Staff Sergeant Carrizales distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while leading the scout section of his troop on a mission to search and destroy the abandoned village of Lang Nam near An Loc. On 7 June 1969, as the armored troop began to file across a culvert, a large North Vietnamese force unleashed a barrage of rifle and rocket-propelled grenade fire. As Sergeant Carrizales moved forward to the aid of the lead element, he was wounded by small arms fire; yet he continued his counterassault, riddling the hostile positions with fifty-caliber machine gun fire. As his vehicle over-ran the first line of enemy bunkers, Sergeant Carrizales sustained a second facial wound that necessitated his using hand and arm signals to direct his platoon's movement. Despite this and additional wounds, Sergeant Carrizales refused medical treatment throughout the grueling six-hour engagement with the hostile force, until the enemy's defeat was assured. Staff Sergeant Carrizales' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4037 (October 31, 1969)
Born: at Victoria, Mexico
Home Town: Temple, Texas

*CARROLL, ROBERT HUGH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Hugh Carroll (0-94175), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Carroll distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1968 as an infantry company commander during a search and destroy mission in the vicinity of Lai An, Quang Tri Province. His reconnaissance platoon came under heavy attack by a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army element. Captain Carroll immediately organized a relief force and led it across a thousand meters of open terrain completely exposed to enemy gunners and artillery. Reaching his beleaguered troops, he found that both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant were casualties and quickly re- established order and confidence. With complete disregard for his safety, Captain Carroll maneuvered from man to man through a barrage of North Vietnamese artillery and mortars to inform each soldier of his rapidly devised withdrawal plan. The enemy launched a ground attack before his troops could break contact, but it was successfully repulsed. Captain Carroll then signaled to start the withdrawal and exposed himself to a renewed hostile bombardment to direct his men's movement. As he moved among them he was mortally wounded by an exploding enemy mortar round. Captain Carroll 's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5214 (November 8, 1968)
Home Town: Missoula, Montana

CARTER, HILLIARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hilliard Carter, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 327th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. Staff Sergeant Carter distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the night of 27 - 28 September, 1966. Throughout the night of 27 through 28 September 1966, Staff Sergeant Carter and members of his squad conducted an ambush in the vicinity of Troung Loung, Republic of Vietnam. There was evidence of a large enemy force in the area, since Company B had been overrun on the night of 25 September 1966, suffering numerous dead and wounded. While returning before dawn to friendly positions, the point man hit a booby-trapped grenade. Disregarding his own personal safety and possibly sacrificing his life, Staff Sergeant Carter pushed the point man away and dove for the grenade, absorbing the entire blast. In so doing he saved his men from possible death and wounds. Staff Sergeant Carter lost his hands, arms, and eye sight in this act. Throughout the entire time the medics and executive officer were administering first aid to save his life, all he kept asking was, "Are my men ok?" This gallant deed was truly above and beyond the call of duty and was in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 327th Parachute Infantry Regiment, the United States Army and the United States of America.
Headquarters, Department of the Army, General Orders 9, 18 November 2005

CARTER, TENNIS H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Tennis H. Carter (0-5301737), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam during the period 9 March 1966 to 12 March 1966, while serving with Detachment A-503, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. At 0350 hours on 9 March 1966, Special Forces Detachments A-102 and A-503 positioned in Camp A Shau, Republic of Vietnam, were attacked by two reinforced Viet Cong battalions supported by small arms, recoilless rifles, mortar, and antiaircraft weapons. Captain Carter, commanding Detachment A-503, was asleep when the attack had opened. Several rounds exploded within his quarters, slightly wounding and stunning him. With disregard for his own personal safety, he ran outside some fifteen meters through the intense fire to assume his battle position on the camp's South Wall where he found the friendly defenders shocked and confused by the sudden bombardment. Captain Carter steadied and positioned his men right before the insurgents launched a two-company sized assault. The friendly defenders were able to repulse the attack causing the hostile forces heavy casualties. The attack continued throughout the day. Heavy and accurate small arms fire was not enough to stop Captain Carter from moving about to steady and encourage his men while attending to the many wounded. Early in the afternoon Captain Carter volunteered to accompany a select detail to secure the Camp's airstrip outside the East wall in order that two aircraft might land to assess the situation and evacuate a seriously wounded American. Upon landing, the aircraft and Captain Carter's detail came under heavy small arms fire. Being exposed to the fire, Captain Carter returned fire towards the insurgents until the evacuation and take-off of the two aircraft was completed. At 0400 hours on 10 March 1966, the insurgents launched the main assault at the East and South walls. Captain Carter, with the majority of his men on the North wall, braved the fierce insurgent fire to cross the camp to help the defenders on the South wall hold off the attack. Later on the camp's East wall was overrun by the insurgents putting Captain Carter and his men in a deadly crossfire which caused heavy casualties to the friendly defenders. Captain Carter and his men were able to hold off the Viet Cong for another seven hours until rescue aircraft could airlift a portion of the defenders from the battlefield. With his outnumbered men that remained in the camp, Captain Carter led two counterattacks at the insurgents but was driven back both times. At 1700 hours on 10 March 1966, the remaining defenders were ordered to withdraw from the camp and fight their way some 300 meters north to a helicopter landing zone. Again, personally braving the fire, Captain Carter rushed to help another comrade open a gate outside the North wall so the defenders could get through the camp's wire obstacles. This action caused him to miss the rescue helicopters. He and a small group of defenders were forced to evade the insurgents in the dense jungle until they were rescued on 12 March 1966. Captain Carter's extraordinary heroism and gallantry in action are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters: US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 205 (August 26, 1966)
Born: at Milton, West Virginia

*CASEY, MAURICE ALOYSIUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Maurice Aloysius Casey (RA15018701), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 24 May 1966, Sergeant First Class Casey, in charge of an interpreter, one Vietnamese Special Forces Troop, and thirty-four civilian irregular defense troops was assigned the mission of establishing a radio relay site between a civilian irregular defense group company and Camp Plei Djereng. While moving his radio site to acquire better communications, he observed and attacked five Viet Cong. His force was then attacked by sixty-five North Vietnamese. Realizing this was a major force, he called for and directed air strikes against the insurgents. The engagement continued for two hours. When the first air controller was shot down by small arms fire, a second air controller reported seeing the pilot walk away from the wreck. Despite the intense fire and the fact that they were outnumbered, Sergeant Casey and four other men started forward with the intent of rescuing the pilot. Approximately 200 meters from the wreckage, the small force came under a heavy barrage of small arms fire and Sergeant Casey was wounded in the arm. Despite the painful wound, he used his good arm to fire his weapon and continued to move forward in search of the downed pilot until he was mortally wounded. Sergeant First Class Casey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 222 (September 12, 1966)
Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio

CATHERMAN, ROBERT T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert T. Catherman (RA13990749), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 326th Engineer Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Catherman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 March 1968 while accompanying a convoy west of Hue. The convoy was attacked by a combined North Vietnamese Army/Viet Cong force, and the armored personnel carrier in the lead was struck and immobilized by an enemy rocket. A medic rushed to the vehicle in an attempt to aid the casualties inside, but he became a victim of the withering hail of enemy fire and fell wounded into the track. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Catherman left the security of his position and rushed through the hail of enemy fire to rescue the wounded medic. Firing his rifle and throwing grenades, he personally killed three of the aggressors while maneuvering to the aid of his fallen comrade. Arriving at the carrier, he managed to pull the medic to a relatively safe position where critical first aid was given which saved the man's life. Specialist Four Catherman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5216 (November 10, 1968)

CAVAZOS, RICHARD E.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard E. Cavazos (0-64593), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Cavazos distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 October 1967 while, as battalion commander, he led his unit on a search and destroy operation in a large rubber plantation near Loc Ninh. One of his companies was making a reconnaissance when it suddenly began receiving heavy fire from a Viet Cong battalion in well-entrenched positions on the slope of a hill. Colonel Cavazos immediately led his other elements forward and engaged the enemy forces as they began assaulting the company. Constantly exposed to savage hostile fire and shrapnel from exploding grenades, he moved among his troops directing a counterattack. As the Viet Cong broke contact and fled to their fortified positions on the hillside, Colonel Cavazos called for air strikes and artillery fire on the crest and forward slopes of the hill in order to cut off the insurgents' line of retreat. When the fighting reached such close quarters that supporting fire could no longer be used, he completely disregarded his own safety and personally led a determined assault on the enemy positions. The assault was carried out with such force and aggressiveness that the Viet Cong were overrun and fled their trenches. Colonel Cavazos then directed artillery fire on the hilltop, and the insurgents were destroyed as they ran. His brilliant leadership in the face of grave danger resulted in maximum enemy casualties and the capture of many hostile weapons. Lieutenant Colonel Cavazos' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6479 (December 17, 1967)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

CECIL, GERALD T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald T. Cecil (OF-107533), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). First Lieutenant Cecil distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 November 1967 as a platoon leader of an airborne infantry company conducting a search and destroy mission near Dak To. His platoon was leading the unit's maneuver when it was savagely ambushed by a North Vietnamese Army battalion firing rockets, mortars and automatic weapons. Courageously exposing himself to the intense fusillade, Lieutenant Cecil rallied his troops into a hasty defensive perimeter and directed their fires on the assaulting enemy force. He observed two of his wounded men lying outside the perimeter. Heedless of his safety, he raced through a hail of bullets and carried them from the ambush killing zone to cover. After giving his weapon to a man whose grenade launcher had been destroyed by shrapnel, he picked up an enemy assault rifle and sprayed the advancing ranks, killing three North Vietnamese. When his platoon received the order to withdraw to the company's defensive position, Lieutenant Cecil gallantly remained behind and engaged the hostile force with fierce rifle fire, killing six more enemy soldiers within ten meters of his location. He then rejoined his unit and, although wounded by shrapnel, assisted in placing claymore mines and distributing ammunition. His fearless leadership throughout the seven-hour battle was an inspiration to his men. First Lieutenant Cecil's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on himself and the U.S. Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1410 (March 29, 1968)

CHAMBERLAIN, CRAIG R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Craig R. Chamberlain, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment A-110, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Captain Chamberlain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 May 1967. Captain Chamberlain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as Special Forces advisor to Vietnamese forces during a North Vietnamese attack on Camp Con Thien. At 1230 hours, a force of two enemy battalions assaulted the camp's defenses from two sides with artillery fire and ground attacks. Despite mortar and rocket fire falling around him, Captain Chamberlain directed the manning of key positions of automatic weapons and guided the American and Vietnamese commanders. Although he was wounded in a direct rocket hit on the command bunkers, he remained at his radio in an exposed position from which he could survey the battle's development. The insurgents had breached the outer perimeters and were rushing demolition teams and flame throwers toward the storage and equipment areas. Captain Chamberlain's bunker was engulfed in flames by a flame thrower, but he put out the flames on his clothes with his hands and withdrew to another area to organize Seabees in the defensive trenches. He led a counterattack through exploding mortars and rockets and the burning areas, stopping the human wave attacks of the enemy. Positioning himself in a forward position, Captain Chamberlain fired grenades which so effectively pinned down the insurgent masses that, at dawn, many were trapped and unable to withdraw from the shell craters in which they had taken cover during the night. Captain Chamberlain's courageous fighting prevented the North Vietnamese from cutting the camp in two and inflicted heavy losses upon them. Captain Chamberlain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3633 (July 18, 1967)

*CHAMBERLAIN, HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Chamberlain (RA18550727), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Staff Sergeant Chamberlain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 March 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a search and clear mission near Tien Phuoc. When his platoon came under intense fire from an estimated company-size North Vietnamese Army force in a concealed bunker complex, Sergeant Chamberlain led an assault on the communists. Seeing the point man wounded by enemy fire within ten feet of a bunker, he rushed forward and killed both occupants of the fortification. As the platoon continued to advance, the left flank received a heavy volume of automatic weapons and small arms fire from several concealed positions which wounded two men and trapped them in the hostile killing zone. Sergeant Chamberlain quickly organized an attack, sending one element against another stronghold that suddenly began firing from the right flank and spearheading the assault on the original positions. While fearlessly exposing himself to the enemy so that he could effectively fire into a bunker aperture, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. His men were inspired by his actions and succeeded in overrunning the North Vietnamese. Staff Sergeant Chamberlain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1743 (May 15, 1969)
Home Town: Harlingen, Texas

CHAPMAN, LESLIE A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leslie A. Chapman, Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (North), TF 1 Advisory Element, 5th Special Forces (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Chapman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 16 February 1971 to 18 February 1971. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 6 (March 19, 1976)
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CHARLES, PAUL DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Paul David Charles (US54438462), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Charles distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 October 1967 while serving as squad leader of an infantry unit on a search and destroy operation in War Zone C. While clearing an area surrounding his unit's night bivouac, his men were caught in a deadly crossfire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force firing from trees and concealed spider hole emplacements. When he saw his point man seriously wounded, Specialist Charles sprinted through a curtain of fire to reach an aidman and lead him to the wounded soldier. The medic was hit as they reached the casualty, and Specialist Charles shielded both men with his body while delivering lethal rifle fire into the enemy ranks to cover the evacuation of the injured men. After his ammunition was expended, he secured a machine gun and carried it to the front to continue his fearless fight against overwhelming odds. The insurgents concentrated withering fire on his precarious position, but he completely disregarded his personal safety and remained in the open to battle relentlessly against the determined attackers. He saw muzzle flashes from a nearby bunker, crawled across the bullet-swept battlefield, and destroyed the enemy fortification with grenades. Seeing a wounded man trapped in the open, he ran to the casualty and carried him to safety through a hail of bullets. As his unit began a withdrawal, Specialist Charles took up an extremely vulnerable position, and, with a recoilless rifle, he continued his offensive against the fanatical Viet Cong. Exposing himself to the savage barrage time after time, he fought fiercely, employing machine guns, grenades and the recoilless rifle to protect the movement of his men. Painfully wounded, he refused to abandon his hazardous position until the enemy attack abated. As evacuation helicopters arrived, the landing zone was raked by intense enemy fire. Despite his wound and the heavy fusillade, he moved back into the jungle with a grenade launcher and continued his personal assault until the Viet Cong broke contact. Specialist Four Charles' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters: US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6564 (December 22, 1967)
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam), Purple Heart

CHATELAIN, RONALD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald M. Chatelain, Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Chatelain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 June 1969 while serving as a forward observer in support of an ambush patrol engaged with an enemy force on the Bau Dieu Peninsula. After Captain Chatelain had directed fire on the hostile positions from his helicopter and had succeeded in silencing the enemy, his craft landed to take aboard casualties. Just as the aircraft set down, it was struck by rocket-propelled grenade fire. Despite his own wounds, Captain Chatelain immediately began helping the more seriously wounded crew members to safety. Organizing the remnant of the patrol into a defensive perimeter, he called in and adjusted gunship fire on the hostile positions. He then supervised the medical evacuation of his wounded comrades and directed his men to unleash a barrage of rifle fire on the enemy until a relief unit arrived. Captain Chatelain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3311 (August 29, 1969)
Home Town: , Louisiana

CHEDESTER, DAVID G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David G. Chedester (US56985281), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Chedester distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 April 1968 as a platoon medic on a reconnaissance-in-force mission in War Zone C. Specialist Chedester's platoon had deployed into a night defensive position when it was subjected to intense enemy mortar fire. Following the mortar bombardment, a massive ground assault on the perimeter was launched by the insurgents. The mortar rounds had caught several personnel in the open and had inflicted several casualties. At the first call for a medic, Specialist Chedester unhesitant ran to the aid of his fallen comrades, ignoring the mortar rounds still exploding all about him. Despite the fact that the wounded were lying in open terrain, he proceeded to treat them where they were. As the ground assault gained momentum, he moved across the battlefield through heavy volumes of machine gun fire to treat and give encouragement to the casualties. He then set up an aid station and organized the activities of his fellow medics. He repeatedly moved into the battle area under intense enemy fire to rescue casualties, carrying them back to the aid station. After the friendly forces regrouped, Specialist Chedester was the only medic to go forward with them on a sweep of the area. As ambulance helicopters arrived, he personally organized and supervised the medical evacuation operations. Specialist Chedester's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3919 (August 12, 1968)

*CHERVONY, EDDIE EDWIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eddie Edwin Chervony (US56694812), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery A, 1st Battalion, 77th Field Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Chervony distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 May 1968 at Landing Zone Peanuts, west of Khe Sanh. Late at night he detected the start of an attack against his battery position by an estimated North Vietnamese's Army sapper battalion. He immediately organized his three-man bunker, which was on the portion of the perimeter facing the brunt of the attack, and directed his companions' fire into the assaulting troops. His element's ammunition was soon expended and close fighting developed along the perimeter. Sergeant Chervony led his men across and expanse of unprotected exposed terrain to secure an unmanned machine gun. After directing his men to obtain additional ammunition for the weapon, he began placing withering fire into the aggressors. After exhausting his ammunition for the weapon, he took charge of personnel in adjacent positions and directed their deadly fire into the enemy, blunting the attack. Learning that several positions had been overrun, Sergeant Chervony unselfishly exposed himself to the continuing hostile fusillade to assist in rescuing the casualties in them. On separate trips, he evacuated five seriously wounded across one hundred meters of open terrain to a place of safety. When carrying a sixth man to the friendly lines he was cut off by enemy force and was attacked with grenades and satchel charges. While protecting his wounded companion from the satchel charge by covering him with his own body, he received a mortal wound. Sergeant Chervony's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5164 (November 6, 1968)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

CHILDERS, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard L. Childers (RA15357540), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. First Sergeant Childers distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 May 1967 while serving as First Sergeant of an infantry company on a search and destroy mission forty miles from Pleiku. Sergeant Childers' company was attacked by a battalion of North Vietnamese regulars using automatic weapons, rockets and mortars. He took charge of the company in the early moments of the battle when both the company commander and platoon leader were killed. After immediately forming his men into a defensive perimeter, he established radio contact with battalion headquarters to keep them informed of the situation and setup re-supply points for ammunition and water. On several occasions he braved withering fire to crawl to the aid of his wounded men and assist them to safety. Continually ignoring the extreme danger Sergeant Childers moved throughout the company directing fire and rallying his men. Painfully wounded in the later stages of the battle he refused medical aid as long as the enemy continued to attack. His dauntless courage and remarkable leadership inspired his men to fight fiercely until the reinforcements arrived. First Sergeant Childers' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4468 (September 1, 1967)
Home Town: , Ohio

CHILDRESS, RAYMOND D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond D. Childress (RA52067681), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 77th Artillery, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Childress distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1967 while serving as chief of a firing battery during a massive Viet Cong attack on an artillery base near Suoi Tre. The insurgents had quickly overrun the camp's security perimeter, and the open area around the battery was being swept by intense automatic weapons and small arms fire. Sergeant Childress ignored the explosions and flying shrapnel around him and moved through his area to reconstitute the crews of two batteries which were the focus of the hostile attack. Seeing masses of insurgents converging on a critical howitzer, Sergeant Childress obtained permission to fire anti-personnel rounds. The Viet Cong then made a concerted effort to destroy his howitzer, since it was the main obstacle to their advance. With hostile rounds falling near his position and damaging the gun, he almost single-handedly maintained its steady fire. When the howitzer's sight mechanism was damaged, he sighted through the tube, inflicting devastating losses on the insurgents with more than 200 rounds of direct fire. The weapon was eventually destroyed by a direct hit and Sergeant Childress was seriously wounded. Bleeding badly and with one arm useless, he began moving ammunition from a burning area. As he was withdrawing from the area, another explosion wounded him more seriously. Unable to move his legs, he rolled into a ditch and continued to shout encouragement to the other cannoneers. Only after the Viet Cong had been decisively repulsed did he allow himself to be treated and prepared for medical evacuation. His steadfast and courageous actions prevented the fierce enemy assault from reaching the artillery. Sergeant First Class Childress' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4152 (August 15, 1967)

CHIRICHIGNO, LUIS G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Luis G. Chirichigno, Captain (Signal Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 7th Battalion, 17th Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Chirichigno distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 November 1969, as Platoon Commander of an aero-weapons Platoon while on a reconnaissance mission southwest of Duc Lap, Quang Duc Province. Captain Chirichigno's platoon of two light observation helicopters and two attack helicopters were searching for an enemy force of at least battalion size. One of the helicopters drew unexpectedly intense enemy fire and sustained excessive structural damage, necessitating a crash landing. Its sister ship followed the damaged aircraft down to extract its wounded crew. While attempting takeoff, the second aircraft also was shot down. All four crewmen were wounded. The downed aircraft had come down in an open field directly in the enemy's field of fire and subject to the full force of his reactive capability. Captain Chirichigno arrived overhead at the crash scene and with the other remaining airborne helicopter began to deliver suppressive and protective fire upon the enemy but without much success as the enemy fire both at the circling aircraft and the crash scene continued to increase in intensity. To more fully protect his downed companions, Captain Chirichigno moved his aircraft at low speed and altitude to assault the enemy at the tree-top level, destroying at least one machine gun position and its crew and inflicting significant other casualties among the enemy. Observing that an enemy platoon was advancing to within meters of the crash site, Captain Chirichigno maneuvered his helicopter through the fusillade of ever-increasing enemy fire to hover between the enemy and his comrades. In the presence of devastating enemy fire power and seemingly insurmountable odds and disregarding all personal risk, he challenged the enemy face-to-face at less than 20 meters. He exchanged machine gun and grenade fire with the enemy, killing at least seven of them and forcing the others to withdraw. Although seriously wounded in the exchange, he remained on station to defend his comrades and meet successive onslaughts until his gunship was silenced by overwhelming enemy firepower. Captain Chirichigno's exceptional bravery, determination and courage under fire gave his comrades sufficient time to escape the immediate enemy threat and inflicted vastly disproportionate damage upon the enemy in terms of the relative strengths of the opposing forces.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 44 (December 6, 1973)
Born: at Peru Home Town: San Antonio, Texas

*CHOCK, LINUS GERALD K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Linus Gerald K. Chock (0-5705089), Captain (Signal Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 183d Aviation Company, 223d Combat Support Aviation Battalion. Captain Chock distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 November 1966 while flying a light reconnaissance aircraft escorting a Vietnamese Army convoy near Bao Loc. At 1020 hours, the convoy came under heavy automatic weapons and recoilless rifle fire from a Viet Cong battalion. The troops in the convoy were pinned down by the vicious attack, and were unable to establish a perimeter. Captain Chock called for supporting artillery fire and air strikes, but realized that more immediate action was necessary to save the vulnerable ground force. Although his aircraft was only armed with four marking rockets, he dauntlessly elected to attack an insurgent strongpoint and draw fire from the besieged convoy. Although Captain Chock received intense ground fire, he destroyed the Viet Cong position on his second strike. Despite damage to his plane, he continued to disregard his safety and started a third pass on another insurgent emplacement. As he bravely dove at the hostile position, his aircraft was raked by ground fire, which mortally wounded him, and caused the plane to crash. His unimpeachable valor succeeded in allowing the Vietnamese force to maneuver into an organized defense and repel the Viet Cong force. Captain Chock's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 355 (January 25, 1967)
Home Town: Honolulu, Hawaii

CHRIETZBERG, RANDOLPH T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Randolph T. Chrietzberg, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant Chrietzberg distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March 1969 while serving as leader of a point team on a reconnaissance patrol near Polei Kleng. The team was ascending a ridge when suddenly assaulted by a force of North Vietnamese regulars. The assailants were quickly overcome, but snipers in trees and holes along the ridge continued to place harassing fire on the company's main force to the team's rear and forced it to withdraw, leaving the point team isolated. Several hours later the team began to move back to regain contact with the company. They came upon a bunker and tunnel complex and flushed out what resistance they met. Heavy sniper fire then descended upon them. They hastily scattered, pursued by streams of machine gun fire. Sergeant Chrietzberg dived into a foxhole with the assistant team leader. The two leaders had completely lost contact with their fellow team members. Impacting rockets and small arms fire restricted their movement. They hurled grenades at the machine gun and eliminated its suppressive fire. Together they crawled to the quieted machine gun emplacement and from there overcame three more enemy. The two men then took foot for their unit, but were again blocked by machine gun and small arms fire. They hurled grenades on the machine gun and silenced it, but enemy riflemen continued to harass them. They were both pinned down, and the assistant leader was seriously wounded. Sergeant Chrietzberg called in and accurately adjusted gunship fire on the harassing snipers. At dusk the two soldiers resumed their frustrated withdrawal, Sergeant Chrietzberg carrying his disabled companion until exhausted. After resting they pressed on, Sergeant Chrietzberg plodding along in front and his assistant crawling slowly behind. They covered some distance and were suddenly met with bursts of small arms fire and exploding grenades from a nearby bunker. Sergeant Chrietzberg cut down several enemy but was temporarily blinded from the hostile grenade flashes. His assistant then crawled unnoticed up to the enemy bunker and unleashed his last grenade, suffering critical wounds in the ensuing blast. Sergeant Chrietzberg attempted to administer first aid, but his comrade was failing fast. He made his way back to the unit and returned to the battlefield with medical assistance, but his comrade had already expired. Sergeant Chrietzberg's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3492 (September 13, 1969)

CHRISTIAN, DAVID A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David A. Christian (0-5345884), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Combat Support Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Christian distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 October 1968 while in charge of the lead element of a reconnaissance-in-force mission ten miles northwest of Quan Loi. During an attempt to flank enemy positions, Lieutenant Christian's nine-man unit came under heavy rocket-propelled grenade, small arms and automatic weapons fire. After firing several light antitank weapons, he led an assault on the hostile strongholds, killing three North Vietnamese and causing others to flee. As he and his comrades advanced they again received intense small arms and machine gun fire and three men were wounded. Lieutenant Christian sent the casualties and the medic to the rear, and then led his troops forward until they became pinned down within ten meters of a bunker. Disregarding his safety, he assaulted the fortification single-handedly and destroyed it with hand grenades. The communists were reinforced by approximately thirty men, forcing the reconnaissance team to take cover behind a berm. Despite the enemy's devastating fire superiority, Lieutenant Christian attacked them with two antitank weapons. He was painfully wounded in the hand, but refused medical care and returned to the berm to direct artillery fire. When friendly reinforcements arrived two hours later, he directed them to cover his left flank while he attempted to evacuate his casualties. Although wounded again by an enemy rocket-propelled grenade, he did not permit himself to be treated until the other injured men had been evacuated. Lieutenant Christian's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1192 (April 7, 1969)
Home Town: Turnersville, New Jersey

CIZMADIA, JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Cizmadia (0-98395), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop F, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Captain Cizmadia distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 August 1968, as commander of an armored cavalry troop during the defense of the Special Forces camp and district headquarters at Loc Ninh. Captain Cizmadia's number of combat vehicles had been reduced from sixteen to nine in the previous three days by heavy fighting against a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. As he led his remaining men out to reconnoiter the area northeast of the village, they came under an intense barrage of small arms and rocket propelled grenade fire from entrenched positions in the tree line and jungle, resulting in several casualties. Unable to call for artillery or air strikes because of the proximity of his troops to the enemy, he realized that he must assault the aggressors to prevent further losses. Directing his track through the lines of halted vehicles, he advanced on the enemy. Inspired by his fearless example, his troops rallied and overran the North Vietnamese, killing eighteen and causing the others to retreat. As Captain Cizmadia directed the evacuation of his casualties, his rear guard was again taken under fire and a platoon leader was wounded. Braving the hostile fusillade, he moved his track in front of the platoon leader's vehicle to prevent it from taking further hits, and launched a successful assault which permitted the man to be evacuated. By the end of the day the communists were soundly defeated and left behind sixty of their dead. Captain Cizmadia's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 506 (February 7, 1969)

*CLARK, DOUGLAS MARK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Douglas Mark Clark (US56502925), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Clark distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 October 1968 while serving as a squad leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission northwest of Lai Khe. His platoon was moving through dense jungle when it came upon an apparently abandoned North Vietnamese Army base camp. While moving through the camp, seizing ammunition, food, clothing and enemy documents, Specialist Clark spotted an enemy squad set up for an ambush. After alerting his platoon, Specialist Clark, with complete disregard for his personal safety, single-handedly engaged the enemy with intense rifle fire. His decisive action saved the lives of the other members of his platoon and forced the hostile troops into a nearby bunker. Fearlessly assaulting the enemy with rifle fire and several well-aimed hand grenades, Specialist Clark was mortally wounded by a burst of automatic weapons fire from the bunker. His determined spirit and courageous action served as an inspiration to his comrades and contributed measurably to the success of the platoon's mission. Specialist Four Clark's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 432 (February 7, 1969)
Home Town: St. Paul, Minnesota

CLARK, MICHAEL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael D. Clark, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. First Lieutenant Clark distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1968 while leading a reconnaissance platoon through the mountainous Col De Ho Ho region of Tam Ky Province. When one of his squads happened upon a North Vietnamese hospital base camp, they were soon pinned down under intense hostile fire. Lieutenant Clark, located five hundred meters to the northwest, immediately led his squad to their assistance. As they neared the base camp, they detected movement ahead on the trail and opened fire, thwarting an ambush attempt. Lieutenant Clark's surprising maneuver confused the enemy forces who were assaulting the beleaguered squad, and scattered, allowing the trapped squad to withdraw. Directing his men to occupy several empty bunkers, he proceeded to call in artillery and gun ships on the hostile camp. While supporting fires delivered a devastating barrage, additional troops were airlifted into the combat area, and together with Lieutenant Clark's regrouped platoon, led an assault on the camp. Approaching the communist emplacements with a ten man patrol, Lieutenant Clark charged one of the bunkers alone and killed the occupants with a hand grenade. His patrol meanwhile flanked two additional bunkers and soon destroyed them. After a fierce battle which resulted in the destruction of the camp and the seizure of many weapons and supplies, the platoon retired with no casualties. First Lieutenant Clark's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3043 (August 11, 1969)

*CLAY, CHARLES EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Edward Clay (RA55657964), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 34th Armor, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Clay distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 February 1969 as a squad leader with an ambush patrol composed of nine Americans and seven Popular Force soldiers. Shortly after the small unit set up an ambush near the village of Trung An, an estimated company of North Vietnamese entered their killing zone. In spite of the numerical superiority of the enemy, Specialist Clay initiated contact by detonating claymore mines and firing his machine gun. Although wounded by the communists' return fire, he continued to man the machine gun until a rocket-propelled grenade destroyed the weapon and almost severed his right leg. Disregarding his grievous injury, he crawled to a vantage point from which he directed the fire of the less experienced members of the patrol while reloading magazines and shouting words of encouragement. Another rocket-propelled grenade struck his exposed position, severing his right arm, but Specialist Clay continued to direct and encourage his comrades for the remainder of the battle. When the enemy withdrew an ambulance helicopter arrived and he was taken to a hospital where he succumbed to his wounds. Specialist Four Clay's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1539 (April 30, 1969)
Home Town: East Prairie, Missouri

CLAYTON, JERRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerry D. Clayton (US56826809), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Clayton distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 March 1968 while serving as a rifleman during a search and destroy operation near Hue. His unit came under intense enemy fire which caused several casualties. As medics maneuvered towards two of the wounded, Private Clayton placed fire on hostile positions and stood up to draw the communists' fire upon himself and away from the aidmen. When medics reached the injured soldiers, he joined them in their completely exposed area to provide suppressive covering fire for them as they worked to save their patients. Later, five men including two medics were wounded and pinned down by the fusillade. Exposing himself to the heavy machine gun fire, Private Clayton secured a supply of battle dressings and maneuvered to them to treat their wounds. After dragging a seriously wounded medical officer seventy-five meters to a place of relative safety, he returned through the bullet-swept area to aid another man who was bleeding profusely. He tended his comrade's wounds and then returned to the medical officer to further treat his extensive injuries. Private Clayton next called in mortar and aerial rocket artillery support on the enemy as he shielded his patient from continuing fire. With the help of another man he then dragged the officer seventy-five meters to an evacuation point. Private First Class Clayton's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5217 (November 10, 1968)

*CLEMENT, GREGORY C., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gregory C. Clement, Jr. (0-90723), Captain (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the 1st Infantry Division Advisory Detachment, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Clement distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 February 1967 while serving as senior advisor to a company of Vietnamese Irregular troops. In an attempt to take a well-fortified Viet Cong hamlet, Captain Clement's company was pinned down by intense hostile fire. Three men were seriously wounded in the initial barrage and, when the company withdrew, were left lying in an open field 150 meters away. Despite intense and accurate machine gun fire, Captain Clement fearlessly ran across the field, picking up one of the soldiers and carried him to safety. Turning immediately, he raced back across the ravaged area, ignoring the murderous fire hitting all around him, and brought another stricken man back. Inspired by his heroic actions, two soldiers joined him on the treacherous third trip. Although he was the focus of increasing hostile fire, Captain Clement would not be driven back. Suddenly, he was wounded by a well-concealed Viet Cong machine gun, directly in front of the man he was attempting to save. Ignoring his wounds, he took the first aid kit and crawled toward the fallen soldier. Captain Clement was still trying to reach the man when he was mortally wounded by a second burst of machine gun fire. His unimpeachable valor and profound concern for others inspired the beleaguered Vietnamese company to hold its position and rout the numerically superior enemy. Captain Clement's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1372 (March 27, 1967)
Home Town: Galveston, Texas

CLEMMONS, WILLIAM A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William A. Clemmons, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army (Retired), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Master Sergeant Clemmons, Retired, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Xuan Loc, Vietnam, on 14 June 1971, while serving as Commander of Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Company D, while on a reconnaissance mission east of Xuan Loc, encountered an undetermined superior size force which opened fire with 40-mm. rockets, automatic weapons fire, claymores, and 60-mm. mortars. During the initial contact he front platoon suffered immediate heavy casualties. Sergeant Clemmons maneuvered the two uncommitted platoons to provide supporting fire on both flanks where the casualties were located, while directing gunship and artillery fire to suppress the enemy's fire superiority. While the flank platoons provided supporting fire, Sergeant Clemmons advanced to the enemy's killing zone to bring back his wounded men. He pulled one man back and carried him to a safe location. Upon his return, he was wounded in the chest by AK-47 fire. Bleeding severely and crawling, he reentered the killing zone and brought back two other wounded men. His men, inspired by his action, increased the tempo of aggressiveness and their fire while maneuvering and closing in on the enemy. Sergeant Clemmons, in pain and bleeding profusely, crawled a third time into the killing zone and retrieved a fourth wounded man. Rejoining the closing and flanking platoons, Sergeant Clemmons directed air and artillery fire on the bunker complex occupied by the larger enemy force and continued to direct the platoons closing in on the enemy, forcing them to withdraw and abandon their fortified bunkers which saved the lives of several of his seriously wounded men still caught in the enemy's killing zone. Master Sergeant Clemmons' extraordinary heroism, exemplary leadership, and interest in the welfare of his men were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (1984)

*CLINE, PAUL HAROLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul Harold Cline, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Cline distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while leading a rifle squad against hostile forces near Phan Thiet, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 February 1968. Sergeant Cline was serving as a rifle squad leader in an infantry rifle platoon during a search-and-destroy operation. Late in the afternoon, his entire company became pinned down by intensive enemy automatic weapons, rocket, machinegun, and mortar fire. Sergeant Cline was immediately wounded in both legs and fell in the open, completely exposed to hostile fire. Another sergeant moved out to help him but, upon reaching Sergeant Cline, was also cut down by automatic weapons fire as the enemy concentrated their fire on the two paratroopers. Realizing that both of them would probably be killed, Sergeant Cline, with an act of indomitable courage, dragged himself on top of his wounded comrade in order to shield him from the hail of enemy bullets. He was then struck several times and killed by the fusillade, but his complete disregard for his own personal safety resulted in his comrade surviving and being able to crawl back to friendly elements. Sergeant Cline's conspicuous gallantry was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States of America.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 33 (May 23, 1969)
Home Town: West Palm Beach, Florida

*COBB, HUBBARD DON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Hubbard Don Cobb (RA18533582), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Platoon Sergeant Cobb distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 January 1968 while leading his platoon in an attack near Dai Luong. A scout helicopter, performing a reconnaissance at Sergeant Cobb's request, made contact with elements of a Viet Cong regiment in a rock and cave complex in which the platoon was operating. Sergeant Cobb deployed his troops for an assault and immediately received sporadic but deadly rifle and grenade fire. The initial burst wounded the two point men. Sergeant Cobb quickly directed counter fire which accounted for two enemy dead. He then placed himself on the point as the platoon maneuvered around a series of openings in the rocks. Sergeant Cobb spent the next hour creeping forward to hurl explosive charges into the caves. Disregarding his safety, he repeatedly engaged the enemy, personally killing three Viet Cong. At dusk, as he was approaching a cave, an enemy soldier suddenly appeared and, with a burst of automatic rifle fire, mortally wounded Sergeant Cobb. Although he was dying, Sergeant Cobb assaulted the position carrying an explosive charge and plunged headfirst into the hole, killing his foe in the resulting blast. Platoon Sergeant Cobb's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3264 (July 10, 1968)
Born: October 21, 1940 at Athens, Texas
Home Town: Odessa, Texas

*CODY, WILLIAM DEBRECE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William DeBrece Cody (0-5352323), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 11th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). First Lieutenant Cody distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 March 1969 as a platoon leader during an attempt by his company to capture a hill just south of the Demilitarized Zone which was the key terrain feature overlooking the infiltration route of a North Vietnamese regiment. Encountering an intense barrage from enemy bunkers while leading his men up the right side of the hill, Lieutenant Cody called for artillery and air strikes. Under cover of this supporting fire, he again advanced and continued to spearhead the attack even after receiving wounds from hostile mortar fragments. When an enemy machine gun emplacement opened fire, inflicting several casualties, he single-handedly assaulted through a hail of bullets and killed all three communists at the position with accurate bursts from his rifle. Inspired by his leadership, his troops overran the entrenched forces on the forward edge of the objective. As Lieutenant Cody and his men made their way through increasing hostile fire, he was fatally wounded by enemy mortar fragments. First Lieutenant Cody's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1934 (June 2, 1969)
Home Town: Robinson, Illinois

COEHLO, ANTONIO J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Antonio J. Coehlo, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Special Operations Augmentation, Command and Control Detachment (North), 5th Special forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Sergeant First Class Coehlo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10, 11, 14 and 15 August 1970 while serving as team leader during two rescue operations deep within enemy controlled territory. Shortly after being inserted by helicopter into the landing zone, Sergeant Coehlo's three- man rescue team engaged a large hostile force. The enemy fire was so intense that the small American patrol was pinned down until the sergeant could direct tactical air strikes upon the adversary. During allied movement from the contact area, Sergeant Coehlo engaged and eliminated an enemy sniper preparing to fire at his comrades. Upon reaching the pickup site, an extraction helicopter returned the team to their base camp. In the following days, Sergeant Coehlo's element was again inserted into hostile territory in an attempt to rescue three wounded American soldiers. After disembarking in the landing zone, his patrol came under intense enemy fire. Observing an allied soldier fall to the ground, the sergeant immediately raced through the barrage of bullets to assist his downed comrade and to administer emergency first aid to his wounds. Realizing the gravity of their exposed position, Sergeant Coehlo summoned helicopter gunships and medical helicopters to the embattled area. Once again braving the enemy fusillade, the sergeant moved the injured soldiers from their insecure location to defensive cover within the allied perimeter. Then, the determined sergeant remained in the open while coordinating the friendly gunship fire at the belligerents. Through the sergeant's daring actions, the persistent foe was effectively repelled and all personnel were safely extracted from the combat area. Sergeant First Class Coehlo's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 195 (January 10, 1971)

*COFFROTH, ALFRED PATRICK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred Patrick L. Coffroth (RA19844301), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 506th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Coffroth distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 as an infantry squad leader on a search and destroy mission in the village of Dong Loch. A large enemy force had moved into the village and set up heavily fortified positions. Sergeant Coffroth's company was moving up to sweep the hamlet when it encountered intense automatic weapons and small arms fire from numerous enemy emplacements. Under a curtain of fire, Sergeant Coffroth immediately moved his squad to a more protected position. Upon reaching it, his element came under heavy grazing fire from a flanking bush line. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Coffroth maneuvered to the edge of the brush, killed five of the enemy, and captured three automatic weapons and a rocket launcher. As he led his squad into the bush line, it received automatic weapons fire from a fortified bunker. Again exposing him self to a hail of bullets, Sergeant Coffroth destroyed the position with a rocket launcher, killing thirteen more insurgents. Ordering his men to withdraw, he provided covering fire for them, killing two snipers. Before he could reach a protected position for himself, Sergeant Coffroth was mortally wounded by small arms fire. Sergeant Coffroth's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3255 (July 10, 1968)
Home Town: Seattle, Washington

*COLEMAN, DONALD HUSTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald Huston Coleman (RA19677245), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 4th Battalion (Mechanized), 23d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Coleman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 February 1968 during combat operations near Tan Pha Trang. His platoon was part of a force given the mission to assault a well-entrenched Viet Cong regiment. As his element charged the bunker complex, it was subjected to a savage enemy rocket and automatic weapons barrage, and several of his men fell wounded in front of the Viet Cong positions. Sergeant Coleman quickly organized a rescue squad. With bullets striking all around him, he moved to the casualties, shielded them with his body and treated their injuries. His squad suppressed the hostile fire momentarily, and he directed that the wounded be evacuated. One of his team was hit when the insurgents resumed their devastating fusillade on the withdrawing troops. Firing his weapon at the enemy as he maneuvered, Sergeant Coleman completely disregarded his personal safety and moved back through withering fire to reach the fallen soldier. He was mortally wounded while gallantly and unselfishly attempting to rescue a comrade in the heat of battle. Staff Sergeant Coleman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1746 (April 16, 1968)
Home Town: Healdsburg, California

*COLLAZO, RAPHAEL LORENZO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raphael Lorenzo Collazo (US56707940), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as the point man of the lead squad of the Aero Rifle Platoon of Troop C, 3d Squadron, 17th Air Cavalry, in support of the United States 9th Infantry Division Operations in Dinh Tuong Province, Republic of Vietnam on 17 March 1968. Private Collazo's platoon came under heavy enemy automatic weapons fire as it moved along a canal in search of enemy elements. Private Collazo immediately returned fire to cover his fellow platoon members as they maneuvered into the canal. Having located the source of the enemy fire, he moved around the left flank of his platoon and into another canal which ran directly beside the heavily defended enemy position. Private Collazo then, with utter disregard for his own personal safety, assaulted and single-handedly destroyed the enemy bunker with grenade and rifle fire. As he did, another enemy position on the other side of the canal began firing in the direction of his platoon. Realizing that this weapon too, was a threat to the lives of the men of his platoon, he again began moving toward a heavily defended hostile position. Using a small sampan as cover, he was able to advance to within a few feet of the enemy before being seen. Then, while receiving fire from both sides of the canal, Private Collazo fought in two directions and was able to advance to within inches of his objective before being killed by the murderous crossfire. Through his resolute fearlessness, intense concern for his fellow soldier, and total disregard for his own personal safety, Private Collazo enabled the platoon to complete its mission and effect a successful extraction without further losses. His extraordinary heroism, uncommon valor, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Armed Forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 57 (October 17, 1968)
Home Town: Gardena, California

*COLLIER, NOAH CHANDLER, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Noah Chandler Collier, Jr. (RA14933490), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Collier distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 October 1966 while serving with elements of the 8th Cavalry on a search and destroy mission along the Song An Loa River. After his squad had flushed out several Viet Cong from tunnels along the river bank, Private Collier and two other men escorted the prisoners back to the platoon. Returning to continue the search, he heard a burst of hostile machine gun fire which severely wounded his squad leader, knocking him under the swift current. Undaunted, Private Collier swam twenty meters through a barrage of bullets to where the soldier had fallen. Disregarding his safety, he then discarded his weapon and fearlessly dove under water in an attempt to save his stricken comrade. Surfacing amid devastating enemy fire splattering the water around him, Private Collier shouted that he could not find the wounded man. As he started to diver under the water again he was fatally wounded by Viet Cong machine gun fire. Demonstrating boundless courage and selfless concern for the welfare of the others, he sacrificed his own life in a valiant effort to save a fellow soldier. Private First Class Collier's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1177 (March 17, 1967)
Home Town: Wiley, Georgia

COLLINS, KENNETH G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth G. Collins (0-5320557), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Collins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 June 1966 while serving as a platoon leader with a company of the 327th Infantry attempting to relieve a besieged unit near Dak To. As his company moved up a densely vegetated hill, it was suddenly pinned down by a murderous barrage of automatic weapons fire from insurgent positions along the ridge. Unmindful of the dangers, Lieutenant Collins unhesitatingly exposed himself to the hail of bullets and led his platoon in an attack up the slope. Forced to the ground by enemy fire from a nearby bunker, he quickly silenced the position with a grenade. Hostile emplacements all around him opened fire and, seconds later, Lieutenant Collins was severely wounded in the left eye by an exploding grenade. Dazed, but undaunted, he rallied his men and mounted a savage assault which swept through three Viet Cong positions, before being halted by intense machine gun fire from both flanks. Shouting orders and encouragement, Lieutenant Collins withdrew the platoon to more defensible terrain. Determined to recover his dead and wounded, he regrouped his men and charged back up the hill. Making repeated trips through the darkness, torrential rain and hostile fire, Lieutenant Collins ensured that all casualties were secured before leading his weary platoon back to the company perimeter in the valley below. Although he was nearly blind, he continued to display boundless courage which inspired his fellow soldiers to repulse numerous hostile attacks throughout the next day. First Lieutenant Collins' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1214 (March 20, 1967)

COLON, HECTOR E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Hector E. Colon (0-5338231), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Colon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 January 1968 as a platoon leader of an infantry company during a helicopter extraction operation in War Zone C. Lieutenant Colon's platoon had just completed a reconnaissance-in-force mission and was awaiting extraction when it came under heavy rocket, mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire from an estimated four hundred Viet Cong. He quickly positioned his men to repel the advancing enemy. His radio operator was wounded and the radio damaged. Lieutenant Colon secured another set and directed artillery fire and air strikes on the insurgents, sometimes to within five meters of the friendly positions. He personally killed five enemy soldiers who tried to overrun the platoon's perimeter. As the firing subsided, he supervised the evacuation of the casualties, saw that the remainder of his men were extracted, and insured that all weapons and equipment were recovered. His exemplary leadership was directly responsible for routing the numerically superior and determined Viet Cong. Second Lieutenant Colon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3422 (July 17, 1968)
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

COMER, BILLY R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy R. Comer, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Comer distinguished himself while serving as a senior medical aidman during combat operations in Cambodia on 22 June 1970. On this date, Specialist Comer's company was engaged by a large, well concealed enemy force firing small arms, automatic weapons, and rocket grenade launchers. Observing a wounded comrade lying in a forward, exposed position, Specialist Comer left his defensive position and ran through the enemy fire to the casualty. While enemy bullets struck all around him, the specialist calmly treated the soldier's wounds and carried him to a covered position within the allied perimeter. Later, during an emergency helicopter re-supply operation, the specialist again moved forward through the intense hostile fire to rescue a soldier seriously injured during the operation. When an evacuation helicopter finally arrived on the scene to rescue the wounded soldiers, Specialist Comer secured one of the casualties to a litter to be hoisted to the hovering helicopter. However, the intense enemy fire directed at his exposed position snapped the cable attached to the litter causing the casualty to fall approximately ten feet into the open area. Without hesitation, the specialist ran to the litter and dragged the casualty to a position of relative safety. Throughout the entire engagement, Specialist Comer exposed himself to the fusillade as he moved from one position to another treating the numerous allied casualties. His determined actions served as a constant inspiration to his companions and contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the position. Specialist Four Comer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5230 (December 9, 1970)

COMERFORD, STEVEN WARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Steven Ward Comerford, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Command and Control (Central), FOB 2 (Kontum), 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Comerford distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 January 1968 while serving with an indigenous platoon-size force operating in enemy-held territory. The platoon had been assigned the mission of performing a bomb damage assessment. During its conduct the platoon was ambushed by a superior force and Sergeant Comerford formed his men into a hasty perimeter from which to direct heavy suppressing fire and call in tactical air support. Upon being notified of his machine gunner being killed in the initial action, Sergeant Comerford, with total disregard for his own personal safety, ran through deadly heavy automatic and grenade cross-fire to retrieve the machinegun and the body of the machine gunner. Upon his return to the perimeter Sergeant Comerford positioned the gun at a point not more than 25 meters from the hostile force. Sergeant Comerford, noticing the indigenous troops pulling back, again exposed himself to hostile fire, this time on purpose, calming the indigenous troops and leading them in repelling the enemy, who had gotten to within hand grenade range. Upon the arrival of the Tactical Air Command aircraft, Sergeant Comerford directed them in bombardment of the enemy. He repeatedly called in air strikes to within 25 meters of the friendly position. With the enemy attacking through the air strikes, Sergeant Comerford called the air strikes in as close as 10 meters from his own position, driving the enemy back and leaving many dead in their retreat. With more than half of the friendly platoon casualties, the enemy made another attack, and this time Sergeant Comerford was hit in the head with small arms fire. Seriously wounded, but recovering almost instantly from the shock of being hit, Sergeant Comerford again called in TAC aircraft this time to drop on his own position. Taking the point, he led the troops out of the ambush to an acceptable landing zone for extraction of the wounded. Sergeant Comerford refused to be medically evacuated until all the wounded troops had been lifted out. Master Sergeant Comerford's heroism and outstanding courage were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1971)
Born: April 24, 1934 at Plattsburg, New York

*CONDE-FALCON, FELIX M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Felix M. Conde-Falcon (RA29145792), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 82d Airborne Division. Staff Sergeant Conde-Falcon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 April 1969 while serving as platoon leader during a sweep operation in the vicinity of Ap Tan Hoa. Entering a heavily wooded section on the route of advance, the company encountered an extensive enemy bunker complex, later identified as a battalion command post. Following tactical artillery and air strikes on the heavily-secured communist position, the platoon of Sergeant Conde-Falcon was selected to assault and clear the bunker fortifications. Moving out ahead of his platoon, he charged the first bunker, heaving grenades as he went. As the hostile fire increased, he crawled to the blind side of an entrenchment position, jumped to the roof, and tossed a lethal grenade into the bunker aperture. Without hesitating, he proceeded to two additional bunkers, both of which he destroyed in the same manner as the first. Rejoined with his platoon, he advanced about one hundred meters through the trees, only to come under intense hostile fire. Selecting three men to accompany him, he maneuvered toward the enemy's flank position. Carrying a machine gun, he single-handedly assaulted the nearest fortification, killing the enemy inside before running out of ammunition. After returning to the three men with his empty weapon and taking up an M-16 rifle, he concentrated on the next bunker. Within ten meters of his goal, he was shot by an unseen assailant and soon died of his wounds. His great courage, his ability to act appropriately and decisively in accomplishing his mission, his dedication to the welfare of his men mark him as an outstanding leader. Staff Sergeant Conde-Falcon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2027 (June 9, 1969)
Home Town: Chicago, Illinois

CONNER, DEFOREST S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to DeForest S. Conner (RA16931966), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Private First Class Conner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 February 1968 as a rifleman of an airmobile infantry company conducting a search and clear operation in the Hai Lang area. His platoon was advancing toward a village believed to be an enemy stronghold when it was suddenly taken under intense hostile automatic weapons fire from the right flank. Private Conner noticed that the fire seemed to be coming from a large enemy bunker adjacent to the concrete house. He jumped up and ran to a position ten meters from the enemy emplacement. He was wounded in the side during this maneuver, but he refused aid and began to fire into the fortification, allowing his platoon time to deploy for the engagement. He next attempted to throw a grenade into the bunker to destroy it. He was shot in the right arm. Disregarding his safety, he switched the grenade to his left hand and made an accurate throw. The explosion stunned the North Vietnamese Army soldiers in the bunker. Private Conner continued to place suppressive fire on the position and was wounded a third time. Realizing that the bunker would have to be completely demolished to eliminate its fire, he dashed forward, exposed to a hail of bullets, and tossed a grenade inside the emplacement which killed all its occupants. Unassisted, he then crawled to the rear for medical treatment. Private First Class Conner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3645 (July 29, 1968)

*CONNER, EUGENE JOSEPH
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene Joseph Conner (0-4009459), Major (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 100, Capital Military District Advisory Detachment, United States Army Advisory Group, United States Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Major Conner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while serving as a member of an advisory team during enemy attacks on Saigon. When he was informed that a truck carrying twenty military policemen had been savagely ambushed in an alley in Gia Dinh and all of the soldiers had been killed or wounded, Major Conner immediately moved to the battle site and volunteered to assist in rescuing the trapped victims. The Viet Cong were firmly entrenched in buildings along the alley and had set up a fierce crossfire with rockets and automatic weapons. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Major Conner led a small party through the curtain of fire to reach the trapped men. Ignoring bullets striking all around him, he helped carry the wounded men to safety and then volunteered to lead a sweeping force to clear the hostile positions. Intense enemy fire erupted from a nearby building and stalled the advance of the friendly troops, so Major Conner and one other man fearlessly charged the fortifications alone. As he neared the building, he was instantly killed by a Viet Cong rocket. His gallant and fearless leadership in the face of great odds was responsible for saving several lives and inspired his men to fight furiously in the heat of battle. Major Conner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 737 (February 19, 1968)
Home Town: Cumberland, Iowa

*CONNORS, DAVID THOMAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to David Thomas Connors (US54964256), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Specialist Four Connors distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 April 1968 at radio operator of an infantry platoon during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. While moving through an enemy-controlled area, one member of the patrol detonated a booby-trapped rocket. Immediately upon hearing the explosion, Specialist Connors ran forward to aid his comrades who had been wounded. After he had moved an injured man to a nearby berm and administered first aid to him, he noticed that another soldier was about to trip a second boob trap. Specialist Connors shouted a warning for the other patrol members to take cover. He then threw himself over his wounded comrade to protect the man from the blast that followed. He was mortally wounded by shrapnel from the explosion. His courageous actions, at the cost of his life, were responsible for saving the lives of several fellow soldiers. Specialist Four Connors' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3035 (June 24, 1968)
Home Town: Cheboygan, Michigan

*CONTREROS, ALBERT DIONISIO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Albert D. Contreros, Jr. (11821119), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 58th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Sergeant Contreros' distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 November 1968, while leading a reconnaissance patrol southwest of Hue. Once inserted deep within enemy-infiltrated territory, Sergeant Contreros located a trail, apparently heavily-traveled, and established an ambush position. The following morning the team sprang the trap on an enemy squad, killing nine and capturing documents. Later, when the team commenced to move to the landing zone to be extracted, a concealed enemy force opened fire and wounded one American before the team could find cover. Sergeant Contreros immediately directed his men to return fire while he radioed for an ambulance helicopter. When gunships arrived over the conflict area, he pointed out enemy targets for them. At the same time, he medical helicopter had lowered a hoist rig through the jungle canopy and was pulling the casualty up when the communists renewed their assault. In an effort to protect the wounded man, Sergeant Contreros exposed himself to the hostile fusillade to direct the suppressive fires both of his men and the gunships. Suddenly, an enemy anti-personnel mine was detonated, inflicting fatal wounds on the heroic team leader. Sergeant Contreros' outstanding heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 476 (February 20, 1970)
Home Town: New York, New York

*CONWAY, JAMES BENNETT (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Bennett Conway (0-94578), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 12 April 1966, Captain Conway was serving as the Senior Special Forces Advisor to a reconnaissance patrol operating in the Ia Drang Valley in the Republic of Vietnam. As the patrol screened their assigned area, they came under hostile automatic weapons fire which wounded several and halted their progress. After insuring the safety of the wounded, Captain Conway led the friendly forces in an assault which routed the Viet Cong from their positions of concealment. As the friendly forces pursued the hostile contingent, they came upon a well-positioned insurgent force of company size. Despite the hostile force's numerical and positional advantage, Captain Conway led the patrol in successful attacks claiming many insurgent lives. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Captain Conway courageously engaged a well-fortified insurgent machine gun position at extremely close range with grenades and small arms fire. Throughout this action, he continually exposed himself to murderous fire to insure the success of the assault. When the Viet Cong maneuvered to encircle the hard-pressed patrol, Captain Conway planned and led an evasion route in order to regroup the force and continue the attack. As the hostile machine gun fire increased, Captain Conway again exposed himself to heavy Viet Cong fire and directed effective suppressive fire with effective results. During the final stages of the friendly evasive action, Captain Conway was mortally wounded while engaging friendly troops positioned about him. Captain Conway's extraordinary heroism and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 164 (July 19, 1966)
Home Town: Franklin, Tennessee

*COPAS, ARDIE RAY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ardie Ray Copas (262-94-7677), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Copas distinguished himself while serving as a machine gunner aboard an armored personnel carrier during operations near Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia. In the early morning hours of 12 May 1970, Specialist Copas' company was suddenly attacked by a large hostile force firing recoilless rifles, rocket propelled grenades, and automatic weapons. After the specialist began returning fire, his armored car was struck by an enemy recoilless round, knocking the specialist to the ground and injuring four American soldiers beside the vehicle. Ignoring his own wounds, the specialist quickly remounted the burning vehicle and commenced firing his machine gun at the belligerents. Braving the hostile fire directed at him and the possible detonation of the mortar rounds inside the track, Specialist Copas maintained a heavy volume of suppressive fire on the foe while the wounded Americans were safely evacuated. Undaunted, he continued to place devastating volleys of fire upon the adversary until he was mortally wounded when another enemy round hit his vehicle. His daring action resulted in the safe evacuation of his comrades and prevented injury or death to fellow Americans. Specialist Four Copas' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 119 (January 13, 1971)
Home Town: Fort Pierce, Florida

COTTO, PEREZ E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Perez E. Cotto (RA50145800), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 4th Engineer Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Cotto distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 March 1969 while serving as an engineer squad leader in support of an infantry unit at Landing Zone Swinger. Immediately upon disembarking, the landing force encountered a hail of hostile small arms fire. Seeing a wounded soldier in need of assistance, Sergeant Cotto attempted to retrieve him, until enemy fire from a well-concealed bunker halted his advance. With complete disregard for his own safety, he charged the fortification, destroying it with hand grenades. He then pulled the wounded man to safety. During another foray into the terrain around the perilous landing zone to search for wounded infantrymen, he observed a North Vietnamese soldier taking aim at a wounded American lying in a ditch. Sergeant Cotto rose to his feet and shouted, distracting the communist who turned to fire. Sergeant Cotto instantly shot the enemy soldier with a burst from his M-16 and then proceeded to remove the wounded American. Throughout the battle to secure the landing zone, Sergeant Cotto constantly exposed himself to the hostile fusillade to rescue and evacuate wounded soldiers. Staff Sergeant Cotto's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2157 (June 19, 1969)

COVER, WINSTON A. L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Winston A. L. Cover, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Airborne Division Assistance Team, Army Advisory Group. First Lieutenant Winston A. L. Cover distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period 25 April 1972 to 20 May 1972 while serving as Senior American Advisor to the 8th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam, which was assigned the task of helping defend the provincial capital of An Loc. Undergoing one of the most intensive and deadly assaults of the Vietnam war, Lieutenant Cover consistently displayed exceptional courage, sound judgment, and calmness under fire that inspired his unit and those that came in contact with him to brave the withering fire and defend their positions. After his deputy was severely wounded, Lieutenant Cover braved the enemy fire and administered first aid while in a fully exposed position, and arranged for his evacuation from the battle area. Immediately thereafter, he continued directing air strikes against the enemy and was responsible for numerous enemy losses. Subjected almost daily to regimental attacks supported by armor, Lieutenant Cover moved from one position to another, directing fire and inspiring the friendly troops to hold their positions, while directing extremely accurate air strikes that were responsible for eliminating many enemy positions and the thwarting the enemy assaults. Lieutenant Cover's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great upon himself and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 2441 (October 17, 1972)
Born: at Kingston, Jamaica

COX, TIMOTHY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Timothy J. Cox (US52855988), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Mechanized), 22d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Cox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 March 1969 while serving as a platoon sergeant in command of an element sent to lend support to a beleaguered ambush patrol After the patrol had reported enemy contact and then broke communication, the command track and Sergeant Cox with two vehicles from his platoon moved out rapidly from their defensive night position. Arriving at the area of conflict, Sergeant Cox directed a lethal volume of fire on the enemy force. Frequently he purposely drew fire on himself to locate and destroy hostile emplacements. Maneuvering through an onslaught of exploding anti-tank rockets, he and his men finally recovered the ambush patrol, including five dead and several critically wounded. On departing, his track was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade. Determining the site of the launcher, Sergeant Cox dismounted and crawled to the flank of the well-concealed position. Unleashing a fusillade with his M-16 rifle, he instantly killed the crew. Remounting his vehicle, he then guided his element to a nearby fire support base. Twice he was blown from his vehicle when anti-tank mines exploded, but he ignored his injuries in his persistence to return his men to safety. Staff Sergeant Cox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2050 (June 11, 1969)

*COYLE, GARRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Garry Coyle (RA127022151), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 14 February 1966, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private Coyle was serving as a medical aidman attached to an infantry rifle company. During an assault on Viet Cong positions, Private Coyle, though wounded and refusing evacuation, repeatedly exposed himself to insurgent fire in order to treat and evacuate other wounded personnel. While placing wounded man in a covered position, he saw another wounded soldier lying in the midst of hostile fire. Leaving the cover of his position, Private Coyle ran through insurgent fire and attempted to aid his fallen comrade. While carrying this wounded man to safety, the hostile fire increased and Private Coyle was mortally wounded. His extraordinary heroism and supreme sacrifice were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Unites States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 123 (May 27, 1966)
Home Town: Clayton, New Jersey

*COYLE, JAMES MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Michael Coyle (0-93643), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Captain Coyle distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 August 1964 as an Assistant Advisor to a battalion of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Coyle demonstrated fortitude, professional skill, and determination while accompanying the friendly units on a military mission. When the Vietnamese battalion was suddenly ambushed by hostile elements, he bravely exposed himself to the heavy gunfire to cover the withdrawal of the friendly forces. During the ensuing engagement in which the enemy launched several vicious assaults, he displayed complete disregard for his own personal safety by remaining in an exposed position to defend the friendly troops. Although a severe wound forced him to take cover in a ditch temporarily, he ignored his own wound, climbed back up the bank, and continued to annihilate a great number of enemy troops during a violent battle that lasted one hour and forty minutes. Despite the overwhelming onslaught, he continued his courageous efforts until he succumbed to his mortal wound. Captain Coyle's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroic actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 8 (March 9, 1965)
Home Town: Camp Kilmer, New Jersey

COZZALIO, ALAN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alan A. Cozzalio (0-5241198), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Cozzalio distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 January 1969 as a helicopter pilot near Phu My Village in Dinh Tuong Province. An infantry company was crossing an open field when one of the elements suddenly received fire from an enemy bunker complex, killing five men and wounding several others. The proximity of the Americans to the communists and the difficulty of pinpointing the hostile strongholds made it nearly impossible for supporting helicopters to attack the foe. Lieutenant Cozzalio landed his Cobra gun ship and switched to a light observation helicopter to increase his maneuverability. Despite intense small arms, machine gun and anti-aircraft fire, he hovered ten feet above the bunker and made a nose dive, destroying the fortification with mini gun fire and fragmentation grenades. After landing to brief the ground commander on the best route of assault, he returned to his Cobra and kept the enemy troops pinned down until the ground unit overran them. First Lieutenant Cozzalio's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1618 (May 7, 1969)

CRABTREE, ORMAND B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ormand B. Crabtree, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company I (Ranger), 75th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Sergeant Crabtree distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 and 12 May 1969, while serving as Team Leader of a six-man Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Operating northeast of Quan Loi Base Camp. On this date, while his team and another six-man team were set up in a rubber plantation, the friendly force observed approximately thirty enemy soldiers moving on all sides of its position. Realizing that he and his men were outnumbered, Sergeant Crabtree directed them to hold their fire and called in and adjusted artillery fire to within fifty meters of his position. Nevertheless, the hostile troops, under the cover of heavy rain, began advancing on the friendly position. Undaunted, Sergeant Crabtree moved his men into three shallow ditches and adjusted artillery to within twenty-five meters of his position. He then directed a team of helicopter gunships in assaulting and neutralizing the enemy force. Early the next morning he observed an enemy soldier approaching the friendly position and engaged and killed him. Later, when ten hostile troops were spotted, Sergeant Crabtree initiated an ambush which resulted in three of the enemy killed and one wounded. However, the other six hostile troops moved to a covered position and began placing intense fire on the friendly force. While leading an element to flank the hostile position, he came under fire from another enemy emplacement. Disregarding the hostile fusillade, Sergeant Crabtree crawled toward the position and eliminated it and its two occupants with hand grenades. Later in the afternoon, four more enemy troops were spotted. While he was leading his element toward the hostile positions, two of his men were wounded by enemy fire. Again disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Crabtree crawled forward and silenced one of the enemy positions with hand grenades. While still under enemy sniper fire, he led the evacuation of the friendly casualties and was the last man to leave the contact area. Although the friendly force was almost out of ammunition when it again came under intense enemy machine gun fire, he directed supporting fire which subdued the enemy, allowing the wounded to be picked up by a helicopter after which he and his men withdrew safely. Sergeant Crabtree's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4343 (1969)

CRAIN, CARROLL V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Carroll V. Crain (RA18432362), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery B, 2d Battalion, 19th Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Sergeant First Class Crain distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1966 while serving as chief of an artillery element during a massive Viet Cong attack in Binh Dinh Province. The two insurgent battalions began their attack with a mortar, recoilless rifle, and machine gun barrage which swept the camp. Although he sustained serious wounds in his left hand and right leg, Sergeant Crain raced through the intense fire to a howitzer position and began firing high explosive shells directly into the onrushing waves of insurgents. Fearlessly working while silhouetted against the flames of an ammunition blaze, he shouted rallying cries heard throughout the battery position. Exposing himself again to the hostile barrage, Sergeant Crain encouraged the men fighting the ammunition fire, then returned to the howitzer and resumed his fire. Although he was losing blood constantly and gradually weakening, when the men were forced to withdraw to another defensive point, Sergeant Crain helped evacuate other casualties, then seized a rifle and killed three insurgents in close fighting. He again refused medical treatment, assisted in rallying the men for a counterattack, and moved back into the unit's forward positions to clear them of Viet Cong. Sergeant First Class Crain's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2389 (May 25, 1967)

CREWS, GARY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gary E. Crews (US54823457), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Crews distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 July 1968 as a rifleman during a search and destroy mission in Hai Lang District. Private Crews' company encountered heavy automatic weapons fire from well-concealed bunkers, pinning the men down and inflicting numerous casualties. Braving the enemy fusillade, he immediately went to the aid of his injured comrades. He was hit first by grenade fragments, temporally blinding him in the eye, and then by small arms fire in the arm. Ignoring his painful wounds, he continued on to the casualties and applied vital first aid. After carrying one seriously injured soldier to safety, Private Crews returned to the battle and was wounded again, but remained to aid his companions until he was ordered to the rear for medical treatment. Private First Class Crews' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1148 (April 3, 1969)

*CROW, EDWARD DAVID
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward David Crow (US53450463), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry, 3d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Crow distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 April 1968 while serving with an infantry company during an enemy attack on its position. His unit was in a night defensive position when it became the target of a mortar and ground assault. Initially, the intensity of the enemy fire forced Sergeant Crow to abandon his mortar position, but he quickly regrouped his men and personally led a counterattack to regain it. His men began receiving enemy machine gun fire when they had advanced to within fifteen meters of the weapon site. Ignoring the fusillade, Sergeant Crow continued towards his objective and destroyed the machine gun with hand grenades. After successfully regaining the mortar emplacement, he fired illumination rounds to expose the enemy in the darkness and placed effective suppressive fire upon the insurgents which forced their withdrawal. Sergeant Crow's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3815 (August 6, 1968)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia

*CROWELL, ROGER BRIAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Roger Brian Crowell (US52687737), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop C, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Crowell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while serving as a tank driver of an armored platoon on a reaction mission during the communist Lunar New Year offensive. His platoon was called to reinforce friendly elements engaged in a fierce firefight with a regimental size force of Viet Cong and North Vietnamese Army soldiers who had penetrated the Tan Son Nhut Air Base perimeter. While moving into the battle site, the platoon was subjected to savage enemy rocket, automatic weapons and small arms fire. Specialist Crowell's tank was struck by three anti-tank rockets, and his commander directed the crew to evacuate the disabled vehicle. Heedless of his safety amid withering hostile fire, Specialist Crowell unhesitatingly left the driver's compartment and climbed inside the tank. Alone, he quickly loaded and fired eighteen devastatingly accurate cannon rounds on the attacking insurgents. When continuing enemy rocket fire rendered the main gun inoperable, Specialist Crowell fearlessly exposed himself to the relentless fusillade and raked the hostile positions with a hail of bullets from the tank's machine gun until he was struck by enemy small arms fire and instantly killed. Specialist Four Crowell's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2182 (May 11, 1968)
Home Town: Belleville, New Jersey

CRUZ, ENRIQUE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Enrique C. Cruz (RA50010125), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Infantry Division. On 30 June 1966, Staff Sergeant Cruz was serving as a track commander of the last vehicle in a column movement during a search and destroy mission along Highway 13. When his unit received intense hostile fire from a Viet Cong regiment, Staff Sergeant Cruz observed that the insurgents were closing in from the rear in an attempt to cut off the column. He immediately swung his track around and delivered suppressive fire onto the attacking Viet Cong. For more than an hour, he prevented the insurgent force from breaching the rear of the column. When a nearby tank was hit by hostile fire which killed the tank commander and wounded the three crew members, Staff Sergeant Cruz, with complete disregard for his safety, rushed to the burning tank, pulled out all three stricken crewmen, and carried them to the cover of his armored personnel carrier. He then administered first aid to his wounded comrades and took them to the evacuation area. Although he was wounded while pulling the wounded soldiers from the vehicle, Staff Sergeant Cruz refused to be evacuated. Instead, he re-supplied his carrier with ammunition and returned to the front of the battle area to provide covering fire for the evacuation of the wounded. When his machine gun barrel melted due to the intense rate of fire, he jumped from his tank and secured another weapon from a disabled carrier. He refused to be evacuated when wounded a second time. When the Viet Cong fire subsided, Staff Sergeant Cruz maneuvered his vehicle to the rear and evacuated his wounded comrades. He then re-supplied his track with ammunition, returned to the battle area, and remained there until the end of the engagement. Staff Sergeant Cruz's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5937 (October 6, 1966)

*CULPEPPER, ALLEN ROSS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Allen Ross Culpepper (435-62-6409), Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Battery C, 7th Battalion, 9th Artillery, 54th Field Artillery Group. Captain Culpepper distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1969 while serving as commander of a 105 millimeter howitzer battery. Soon after midnight a Viet Cong force launched a mortar and rocket attack, followed by a ground assault on the perimeter. Without hesitation, Captain Culpepper moved through the battery area to organize his troops. He quickly deployed a reaction force and directed the retaliatory fusillade of his men. When one of the howitzer emplacements was struck by rocket-propelled grenade fire wounding the section members, Captain Culpepper immediately proceeded to the damaged gun section to assist in removing the casualties. As he left his vehicle and heroically ran through the hostile barrage toward a wounded soldier, he was fatally wounded by enemy fire. Captain Culpepper's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2949 (August 4, 1969)
Home Town: Minden, Louisiana

CUNDIFF, BRIAN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Brian H. Cundiff (0-94378), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Cundiff distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1967 while serving as company commander during an attack by a numerically superior Viet Cong force near Ap Gu. At 0500 hours the Viet Cong began a barrage of 400 mortar rounds on Captain Cundiff's company. As the devastating shelling decreased, the insurgents launched a ferocious human wave attack which outnumbered the American battalion three to one. Wave after wave of insurgents penetrated the battalion with mortars, machine gun and rifle fire. Captain Cundiff, unrelenting to the overwhelming firepower of the enemy, engaged in fierce hand-to-hand combat, killing six Viet Cong. Although he was wounded three times, he continued to fight and rally his force. He moved among his men and mustered and effective defense which finally succeeded in repelling the enemy. Still refusing medical aid, Captain Cundiff called for artillery support and air strikes, then commanded a massive counterattack that pushed the Viet Cong back into a barrage of artillery and deadly air strikes. Captain Cundiff's inspiring leadership and dauntless courage were an inspiration to his men and led to one of the most decisive actions of the Viet Cong conflict. Captain Cundiff's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2395 (May 25, 1967)

CUNNINGHAM, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John H. Cunningham (RA14361273), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 588th Engineer Battalion, 79th Engineer Group, 20th Engineer Brigade. Staff Sergeant Cunningham distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 February 1968 in the vicinity of Thien Ngon. His platoon was ambushed by an estimated company of Viet Cong occupying concealed positions on both sides of a road. Disregarding his safety, Sergeant Cunningham moved from position to position to direct his men's fire as the enemy troops began a ground assault. As the fire fight continued two of his three machine gunners were wounded, and Sergeant Cunningham held the attackers off by hurling hand grenades. When his troops ran low on ammunition, he exposed himself to a barrage of enemy bullets to re-supply them. The battle grew more intense and his platoon leader was killed. Sergeant Cunningham immediately took complete command of the unit, encouraging his men's defense and administering first aid to the injured. When the Viet Cong were finally driven back and contact was broken, he organized and supervised the evacuation of the wounded. Staff Sergeant Cunningham's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4522 (September 28, 1968)

*CUNNINGHAM, LARRY LAMONT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry LaMont Cunningham (12868960), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company F, 51st Infantry, II Field Force. Staff Sergeant Cunningham distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 December 1968, as the team leader of a long range patrol in Phuoc Vinh Province. Sergeant Cunningham's team was conducting a reconnaissance mission when it was suddenly ambushed by a company-size, well entrenched enemy force. Although wounded in the leg during the initial barrage, he determinedly provided defensive fire for his men and directed their withdrawal to a nearby landing zone. Realizing that the aggressors' murderous fire would endanger the security of the pickup site, Sergeant Cunningham courageously exposed himself to the fusillade and provided covering fire so that the team could reach the extraction point. While insuring the safe evacuation of his comrades, he was mortally wounded by hostile rifle fire. Staff Sergeant Cunningham's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 280 (January 24, 1969)
Home Town: Louisville, Mississippi

*CURRAN, JOHN DEHAAS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Dehaas Curran (527-76-4640), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with A/227th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Curran distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 May 1971 while serving as co-pilot on an emergency medical evacuation mission near Dac To. His helicopter was embarked on a mission to rescue a seriously wounded survivor of a U.S. helicopter which had crashed the day before. This involved braving intense enemy anti-aircraft fire since an estimated two enemy regiments surrounded the besieged firebase. Captain Curran realized the enemy situation and strength, but his concern for the life of a fellow American soldier overshadowed this knowledge. It was further learned that two ARVN soldiers were also critically wounded and in dire need of medical evacuation. Captain Curran's aircraft proceeded through the hail of fire to the firebase and picked up the seriously wounded American as well as the allied soldiers. Upon departing the firebase, his helicopter received heavy enemy fire and lost its motor before it burst into flames and crashed. Captain Curran's personal bravery and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3411 (December 2, 1971)
Home Town: Phoenix, Arizona

D

DABNEY, JAMES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James F. Dabney (0-5320138), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Captain Dabney distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action from 6 to 10 May 1968 in Quan Binh Chanh. On 6 May his company engaged a combined North Vietnamese Army / Viet Cong force. After four hours of combat, during which Captain Dabney repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to direct light fire team, artillery and air strike support, he led his company in an assault. Discovering a North Vietnamese mortar position, he charged the emplacement, killing two enemy soldiers with grenades and taking two prisoners. In the early morning hours of 7 May the perimeter of his company's night position was attached by a large enemy force. Moving to the edge of the perimeter Captain Dabney fearlessly adjusted air strikes to within fifty meters of his units position. He then directed a counteroffensive and sweep off the area. Another heavy engagement occurred on 9 May when Captain Dabney sprung an ambush on the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong, He moved among his men, encouraging them and directing their fire, and at one point personally manned a machine gun to kill three Viet Cong who were less than twenty-five meters from his position. By afternoon enemy soldiers were fleeing in all directions. During the rest of the afternoon and the next day Captain Dabney conducted a sweep of the area which crushed the remaining pockets of resistance. Captain Dabney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4525 (September 28, 1968)
Home Town: Columbus, Georgia

*DACEY, BERTRAND JAHN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bertrand Jahn Dacey (066-36-1934), Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Captain Dacey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 April 1969 while flying a reconnaissance mission in a light observation helicopter seven miles southwest of Quan Loi in Tay Ninh Province. An Infantry company was pinned down by a North Vietnamese force, and another helicopter had proceeded to the conflict area but was shot down. Captain Dacey immediately flew to the battle site and began making low passes over the hostile force, marking them for air strikes. On his seventh pass, his aircraft was struck by a burst of machine gun fire and crashed in flames, killing him instantly. Captain Dacey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2674 (July 17, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

*DAHR, JOHN WESLEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Wesley Dahr (US52643156), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Dahr distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 January 1967 while serving with elements of the 27th Infantry on a search and destroy operation near Cu Chi. As the company advanced across an open ride paddy it came under intense fire from fortified Viet Cong positions to its front. Pinned down and unable to maneuver, the company sustained many casualties at the outset. Unmindful of the extreme peril, Specialist Dahr deliberately exposed himself to the hail of bullets and waded through the waist-deep water to assist a wounded comrade. Carrying the stricken soldier 100 meters across the ravaged paddy to safety, he dauntlessly repeated this gallant act two more times to save his fellow soldiers. Returning to the center of the battle, Specialist Dahr stationed himself behind a small dike. Spotting another wounded man lying exposed to the Viet Cong fire, he again left the cover of his position and trudged through the mud in the face of mounting danger. Unable to carry the stricken soldier alone, he stopped and called for assistance. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Dahr stood upright to hold his comrade above the water. In his fourth attempt to save another soldier, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Dahr's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 464 (January 31, 1967)
Home Town: Dillsburg, Pennsylvania

DALY, JEROME R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jerome R. Daly (W-2215549), Chief Warrant Officer (W-2), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 121st Assault Helicopter Company, 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Chief Warrant Officer Daly distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while serving as commander of a smoke dispersing helicopter during the rescue of three downed helicopter crews that were threatened by two Viet Cong battalions near Vinh Long. Three helicopters had been shot down in the contested landing zone and all rescue attempts had been thwarted by intense enemy fire from fortified emplacements in a treeline 100 meters from the aircraft. Although it was imperative to rescue the men before nightfall, ground armor reinforcing units were unable to reach the besieged men in time. It was decided that Warrant Officer Daly's aircraft would place a smoke screen between the insurgents and the rescue aircraft. Although he knew that he would be required to fly less than 100 meters from a treeline which contained incredible Viet Cong firepower, he readily gave his consent to the plan. With the pickup aircraft right behind him, Warrant Officer Daly descended, flew in front of Viet Cong automatic weapons and concealed the rescue operation with thick smoke. Although the pickup operations were expected to last a very short time, the downed men were spread throughout the landing area and more evacuation aircraft were needed. Unhesitatingly, Warrant Officer Daly circled and once again placed a smoke screen while passing through the hail of enemy fire. By the time all of the men had been recovered from the field, he had placed himself before the enemy weapons twelve times. Although he and his crew escaped unscathed, his aircraft was so damaged that it was judged beyond repair. Chief Warrant Officer Daly's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3146 (June 25, 1967)

*DANIEL, ROBERT G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert G. Daniel (RA14454709), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Master Sergeant Daniel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 March 1969 in the vicinity of Ben Het Special Forces Camp as operations sergeant of a mobile strike force company during an attempt to capture a hill held by a heavily armed, well-entrenched enemy force. While exposing himself to intense hostile automatic weapons and machine gun fire, Sergeant Daniel relayed valuable information to the battalion headquarters, called in gun ship strikes and secured a landing zone for re-supply. He then led an assault to secure a portion of the bunker complex, personally killing an enemy soldier. Shortly afterwards his company commander was killed and he took charge of the unit, leading it through the communists' fusillade until heavy enemy mortar fire threatened to pin his men down. Realizing that his company could be annihilated if the attack stalled because the enemy covered all avenues of escape, Sergeant Daniel single-handedly assaulted a bunker to the front. Although wounded by enemy grenades, he continued to advance. As he hurled grenades into the fortification, killing six communists, he was mortally wounded by small arms fire from another bunker. His men were inspired by his courage and succeeded in overrunning the remaining positions. Master Sergeant Daniel's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1421 (April 23, 1969)
Home Town: Bridgeport, Alabama

DARNELL, JOHN E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John E. Darnell, Jr. (RA13809976), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Staff Sergeant Darnell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 January 1968 as squad leader of an infantry company on a mission to evaluate the results of a friendly air strike in the Que Son Valley. As the company neared the top of a hill, its lead squad was pinned down by savage automatic weapons fire from a North Vietnamese Army unit occupying well concealed rock bunkers. Heedless of the hail of enemy bullets, Sergeant Darnell engaged the bunkers with a heavy and accurate barrage of shotgun fire. His fierce attack enabled the beleaguered troops to withdraw and evacuate their casualties. After carrying one of the wounded to safety, Sergeant Darnell organized a machine gun team and led it in a second assault on the entrenched enemy force. Hurling hand grenades and firing his shotgun, he killed at least two North Vietnamese and captured their weapons. His sudden, furious attack overwhelmed the hostile soldiers, and the team overran and captured the fortified positions. Learning that his company's second platoon was heavily engaged with another portion of the North Vietnamese unit, Sergeant Darnell unhesitantly maneuvered to its location and charged the insurgents, firing his shotgun until his ammunition was expended. He grabbed two automatic rifles from enemy soldiers he had killed and continued his aggressive assault. Raking the hostile positions with devastating fire, he forced most of the North Vietnamese to temporarily withdraw. Sergeant Darnell began to evacuate his wounded comrades, but the enemy quickly resumed his withering fusillade. Sergeant Darnell again picked up his two captured assault rifles and, with bullets striking all around him, charged the enemy bunker complex. He threw grenades and delivered deadly fire on the North Vietnamese until all members of the platoon had successfully withdrawn from the raging battle area. His gallant and determined actions in close combat saved the lives of many fellow soldiers and were responsible for an overwhelming victory. Staff Sergeant Darnell' s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2249 (May 14, 1968)

DAUGHERTY, MILTON C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Milton C. Daugherty, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Captain Daugherty distinguished himself while serving as company commander west of Kontum City. On 5 March 1969 his unit came under a devastating barrage of intense and concentrated enemy mortar fire and was subsequently subjected to prolonged and vicious ground attacks by a North Vietnamese force. Although his beleaguered American force suffered heavy casualties, Captain Daugherty raced through areas receiving incoming rounds to direct and assist those sectors of his perimeter under the heaviest assault and in danger of being overrun. As the enemy shot round after round of mortar fire on the perimeter and concentrated on vulnerable defensive outposts, Captain Daugherty immediately crawled through shell-riddled areas to reach three severely wounded comrades. With one man in urgent need of medical attention, Captain Daugherty again braved the fusillade to drag the critical casualty and assist two other wounded comrades to safer areas. Twice more he returned to the outlying perimeter to direct counterfire and to carry wounded to safety. Captain Daugherty's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4372 (December 6, 1969)

*DAVAN, BENEDICT MAHER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Benedict Maher Davan (RA11426391), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-55, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Davan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 March 1969 as company commander of a mobile strike force company during a search and clear operation against the enemy strongholds of Coto Mountain in Chau Doc Province. Sergeant Davan's company came under intense sniper, machine gun and B-40 rocket fire from a well-camouflaged site located among the tall boulders and cave complexes. Seeing that his troops were confused and becoming disorganized, he exposed himself to the hostile fusillade to encourage them and then led a small element through withering machine gun fire to a vantage point. After instructing these men to lay down covering fire, he single-handedly assaulted the communists and placed such deadly fire on them that their position was destroyed and eleven of them surrendered. Sergeant Davan's company regrouped and continued on until they again came under heavy machine gun fire, wounding three men and pinning them down. Sergeant Davan courageously rescued two of the casualties and was approaching a third when he was shot and killed by an enemy sniper. Staff Sergeant Davan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1692 (May 13, 1969)
Home Town: Westbrook, Maine

DAVID, KENNETH J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth J. David, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Private First Class David distinguished himself while serving as radio-telephone operator during combat operations at an allied fire support base. During the early morning hours of 7 May 1970, Private David's company came under an intense attack from a large hostile force. Supported by intense small arms and automatic weapons fire, the enemy inflicted numerous casualties upon the allies and left Private David alone to defend his portion of the defensive perimeter. Unleashing a barrage of automatic weapons fire, he bitterly resisted all enemy efforts to overrun his position. When the enemy began to toss satchel charges in the direction of the wounded allied soldiers, Private David began to shout in a manner which attracted the enemy's attention away from the allied casualties. Refusing to withdraw in the face of the concentrated fire now directed toward him, he continued to resist the attackers in a determined manner. Although wounded by an exploding satchel charge and running perilously low on ammunition, he tossed hand grenades toward the attackers to effectively counter their fire. Then after allied reinforcements fought their way to his position, Private David carried a wounded comrade to a sheltered position and returned to the contact area to engage the enemy until they broke contact and fled. Private First Class David's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5165 (November 26, 1970)
Home Town: Girard, Ohio

DAVIDSON, DONALD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald F. Davidson, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 1st Infantry, Americal Division. Sergeant Davidson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 March 1969 while serving as a platoon leader during a combat sweep operation near Tap An Bac. As his platoon was moving toward the village, Sergeant Davidson spotted five North Vietnamese soldiers through the thick bamboo thickets. He shouted a warning to his platoon and led an assault against the enemy. After eliminating the hostile troops, he continued to flush out additional enemy soldiers, killing several and capturing weapons and documents. Seeing a contingent of North Vietnamese attempting to reach a bunker, he rushed in to cut off their approach. He then directed his men in destroying the fortification. Regrouping his element, he continued the assault toward the hamlet. When he was wounded in the shoulder, he refused to let any of his men evacuate him and remained to rally his platoon until the enemy forces were completely defeated. Sergeant Davidson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2708 (July 17, 1969)

DAVIDSON, THOMAS A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas A. Davidson, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 47, Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support (Cords) Military Region 3. Major Davidson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 5 April 1972 to 11 April 1972 while serving as District Senior Advisor, Loc Ninh District, Binh Long Province, Military Region 3, Republic of Vietnam. On 5 April 1972, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces launched a major offensive with the objective of capturing Binh Long Province in Military Region 3. The 5th Viet Cong Division was targeted against Loc Ninh, the capitol of Loc Nin District in northern Bin Long Province. The 5th Viet Cong Division launched a massive coordinated ground attack against Loc Ninh beginning early in the morning of 5 April 1972. The attack was supported by artillery and tanks. Major Davidson skillfully directed tactical air strikes and helicopter gunships in support of the District Headquarters Compound which was the objective of the enemy attack. During the period 5 April to 7 April the enemy launched repeated human wave attacks supported by tanks and artillery in an effort to overrun and capture the district headquarters. All the remainder of the district was already in enemy hands. Major Davidson's skillful use of numerous air strikes beat off attack after attack by enemy forces. Numerous enemy tanks and artillery pieces were destroyed in these air strikes. However, the weight of the massive enemy attacks was so great that despite extremely heavy losses, enemy forces finally overran the District Headquarters Compound. At this point Major Davidson called in tactical air strikes on his position. Only after his bunker was set afire did he relocate his party in a nearby rubber grove and continued to direct air strikes on the enemy, without regard for his personal safety. Only after darkness, with failing communications when it was impossible to influence the action further did he begin his incredible escape back to friendly forces. Major Davidson's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 784 (April 13, 1972)

D'AVIGNON, GEORGE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George C. D'Avignon (0-5315074), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Captain D'Avignon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 April 1968 as commanding officer of an infantry company on a reinforcement mission near Kontum City. As his unit moved to the aid of a sister company, it came under sudden and intense enemy fire from all directions. Captain D'Avignon quickly positioned his men to relieve pressure on the trapped unit. While leading his third platoon in an attack on the enemy, he was struck twice by hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire. Despite his severe wounds, he continued to lead the counterattack and single-handedly destroyed an enemy machine gun bunker, killing the four crew members. Captain D'Avignon spotted several wounded soldiers and moved to their aid. As he treated a fallen comrade, he was hit in the shoulder. Still ignoring his wounds, he continued to aid the casualties. Only after his mission was completed and all the wounded had been treated did he allow himself to be evacuated. Captain D'Avignon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3688 (August 1, 1968)

DAVIS, EUGENE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eugene R. Davis (RA18334696), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as 3d Platoon Sergeant, Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. On 7 July 1965, Company B was engaged in a search and destroy operation in an area approximately fifteen miles northeast of Bien Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. Moving in a company wedge formation, the 3d platoon led the point. At about 1000 hours, the forward element of the platoon encountered heavy hostile fire from an automatic weapon and small arms which emanated from a concealed insurgent position. In the initial burst, the 3d Platoon Leader and another platoon member were killed. Due to the heavy concentration of fire that followed, the point squad of the platoon was pinned down. Realizing the importance of locating and destroying the insurgent position, Sergeant Davis, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, exposed himself to the hostile fire and charged forward, firing his weapon and lobbing grenades, in a desperate attempt to pinpoint and destroy the hostile gun position. His weapon jammed and grenades expended, Sergeant Davis was forced to halt the assault. Rearmed with a weapon and more grenades, he charged twice again through the murderous hail of insurgent fire, falling back only after expending his ammunition and grenades. However, as a result of his efforts during the third assault, he was able to pinpoint the exact location of the hostile machine gun. Notwithstanding the fact that he was completely exhausted and dazed from a projectile which damaged his helmet and web equipment, Sergeant Davis mustered fantastic courage and fanatic determination and assisted by two others, assaulted the Viet Cong position for the fourth time, inflicting heavy casualties and silencing the deadly automatic weapon. His heroic actions and courage served to inspire the men of Company B to gain the initiative and successfully complete their assigned mission. Sergeant Davis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 302 (October 15, 1965)

DAVIS, LEROY L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leroy L. Davis, Jr., Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Davis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 April 1970 while defending his bunker against an aggressive enemy assault. As the sergeant began placing heavy automatic weapons return fire toward the aggressors, an enemy rocket struck his bunker and seriously wounded him. Although his wounds rendered him almost blind, he reassumed his fighting position, fully exposed to the enemy fire, and continued to place suppressive fire on the enemy. Soon thereafter, a second enemy rocket struck the bunker, seriously wounding Sergeant Davis a second time. Refusing to yield to his multiple wounds, the sergeant remained in his exposed position and placed fire on the enemy until he collapsed. His determined actions prevented the enemy from overrunning his position and contributed immeasurably to the success of the allied defensive effort. Sergeant First Class Davis' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4684 (October 3, 1970)

DAVIS, MITCHELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mitchell Davis, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Davis distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman during a reconnaissance patrol in Tay Ninh Province. As his platoon was crossing a clearing, it was ambushed by a hostile force firing B-40 rockets, automatic weapons, and claymore anti-personnel mines. the initial onslaught was concentrated primarily at the lead squad, inflicting numerous friendly casualties. Braving the barrage of enemy bullets, Private Davis darted across the fire-swept area to the location of the downed men. Immediately the private began administering first aid to his comrades' wounds. Then, amid the unrelenting spray of hostile bullets, Private Davis dragged several of the severely wounded troops to a nearby position of relative safety. Meanwhile, the private's platoon had established a defensive perimeter around the casualties and were fighting to repel the repeated belligerent charges. As the determined enemy attempted to overrun the allied position, Private Davis continued to treat his patients despite the hazards surrounding him. Private Davis's intrepidity in the face of the enemy served as an inspiration to his comrades and rallied the friendly force in its successful resistance of the hostile assault. Private First Class Davis's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 871 (March 10, 1971)

*DAY, STEPHEN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen W. Day (RA55706337), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Air Cavalry Division. Private First Class Day distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 December 1966 while serving as acting squad leader with elements of the 7th Cavalry during a ground engagement against fortified hostile positions near Phu Huu. A fierce battle had ensued all day and Private Day's company was ordered to make a final assault under cover of growing darkness. As the unit slowly advanced across the open rice paddy it suddenly received intense sniper fire. Spotting the Viet Cong positions, Private Day maneuvered two of his men forward to gain better firing positions, while he dauntlessly provided covering fire. When both men fell wounded, he realized his left flank was exposed and, disregarding the extreme danger, charged forward to help his comrades. In this gallant effort, Private Day was seriously hit in the chest and arm by hostile fire. Unmindful of his wounds, he continued to crawl to a covered position, from which he directed friendly fire on the insurgent emplacements. Each time he raised up to shout orders to his men, he came under a hail of Viet Cong fire. Unable to fire his weapon, Private Day courageously threw grenades into the insurgent positions until he was fatally wounded. His unimpeachable valor and profound concern for others enabled his company to finally defeat the numerically superior hostile force. Private First Class Day's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 465 (January 31, 1966)
Home Town: Hygiene, Colorado

*DE MARCHI, FRANK, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank De Marchi, Jr. (US51552670), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 5 April 1966. Private De Marchi was serving as an assistant machine gunner in a twelve-man patrol, part of Company A, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division, when they discovered an estimated 300 Viet Cong insurgents moving in three columns toward the company's defensive perimeter. Realizing that a force of this size could result in disaster for the company, the small patrol attacked one of the columns consisting of approximately 100 Viet Cong. Private De Marchi's machine gun crew became the insurgents' target of determined assaults. Besides tending the machine gun, Private De Marchi assisted in holding off the assaults with his individual weapon. Disregarding his own personal safety, he left his position two times in the face of hostile fire to beat off the assaults. With the machine gun jammed, seven Viet Cong charged his position. Private De Marchi ran forward to block the assault and courageously killed three with his weapon, two more with a hand grenade, then fiercely engaged two in hand-to-hand combat. Returning to his position after the gunner had cleared the stoppage in the machine gun, he continued to fight until he was mortally wounded by small arms fire. Private First Class De Marchi's extraordinary heroism and supreme sacrifice are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 220 (September 12, 1966)
Home Town: Woodside, New York

DEANE, JOHN R., JR.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Deane, Jr. (0-24835), Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Infantry Division. Brigadier General Deane distinguished himself from 5 November 1966 to 18 November 1966 during combat operations near the Michelin Rubber Plantation. Upon learning that elements of a light infantry brigade were receiving intense hostile fire from a numerically superior Viet Cong force, Brigadier General Deane immediately flew into the battle area, conducted low level passes while receiving hostile fire and identified the positions of each ground element. After landing in an insecure landing zone, Brigadier General Deane walked with his leg in a cast to the command post of the forward infantry elements which were about 30 meters from the main Viet Cong force. Brigadier General Deane repeated this process four times on 5 November and was present with forward infantry elements during four major Viet Cong attacks which carried to within yards of his position. His presence with the forward infantry troops and his repeated flights over the battle area contributed immeasurably to the successful conclusion of the operation and extraction of the American forces involved. On 12 November, Brigadier General Deane was flying over combat operations when the battalion command group was hit with a claymore mine that immobilized it and caused difficulty for the command group in controlling the movement of their subordinate elements through the jungle. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Brigadier General Deane, while receiving intense hostile fire, assumed command and control of the battalion from his helicopter. Brigadier General Deane landed in an insecure landing zone near an infantry element and personally directed its movements. When Brigadier General Deane observed that a flanking patrol was approximately 1,000 meters behind the Viet Cong force and on the flank, he personally directed this small group into a clearing and, while receiving intense hostile fire, landed on four separate occasions and extracted all members of the group. Later in the day, he again landed under fire and extracted a wounded Sergeant Major and an Operations Officer from a nearby jungle clearing. On 18 November, Brigadier General Deane was flying at low level over the battle area when he monitored a radio message that a lieutenant and a small patrol were receiving hostile fire about 1,500 meters from the battalion landing zone. Brigadier General Deane immediately established radio contact with the patrol, determined that they had multiple casualties, utilized his helicopter as a gunship and conducted fifteen to twenty low-level passes while firing his personal weapon and door guns on the Viet Cong. After t he insurgents withdrew, he remained in the area, vectored a company into contact with the patrol and skillfully directed the medical evacuation. Later Brigadier General Deane landed his helicopter deep in hostile territory to extract a helicopter crew which had been shot down by hostile ground fire near the headquarters of a Viet Cong division. Through the entire battle in Tay Ninh Province, Brigadier General Deane was present on or over the battlefield whenever any unit was in contact. He utilized his aircraft weapons system against the Viet Cong, personally directed innumerable small engagements, inflicted heavy casualties on the Viet Cong and saved countless American lives. Brigadier General Deane's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters: US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6470 (November 23, 1966)
Born: June 8, 1919 at San Francisco, California
Home Town: Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

DEANE, JOHN R., JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to John R. Deane, Jr. (0-24835), Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Brigadier General Deane distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions from 9 to 25 January 1967, while Commanding the 173d Airborne Brigade during Operation CEDAR FALLS. Throughout this period, he boldly directed the brigade on search and destroy operations against fortified Viet Cong strongholds in the Iron Triangle. Unmindful of the dangers, General Deane flew daily missions in the immediate area of the most intense conflict to monitor the action from his command and control helicopter. Time and again, he selflessly exposed himself to hostile sniper fire and automatic weapons fire by landing on the ravaged battlefield to extract casualties, offer encouragement and provide tactical advice to his commanders. On one occasion, General Deane fearlessly ordered his pilot to land in a heavily booby trapped field to evacuate a wounded soldier. As the situation required, he personally directed artillery and air strikes in close support of his troops. Then, with complete disregard for his safety, he flew low over the insurgent positions to assess the damage and ensure that the enemy was not withdrawing undetected. Unrelenting in his determination and courage, General Deane would hover at treetop level to guide the ground units through the dense enemy-held jungle and often marked targets with smoke grenades. His unimpeachable valor and dynamic leadership immeasurably bolstered the morale of his men and inspired them to decisively defeat the Viet Cong in every engagement throughout Operation CEDAR FALLS. Brigadier General Deane's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his command, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1853 (1967)
Born: June 8, 1919 at San Francisco, California
Home Town: Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Vietnam)

DEIBERT, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles L. Deibert (0-2306116), Captain (Aviation), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 220th Reconnaissance Airplane Company, 212th Combat Support Aviation Battalion, 17th Combat Aviation Group, 1st Aviation Brigade. Captain Deibert distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 September 1967 while serving as pilot of a reconnaissance aircraft on a mission near Con Thien. While flying a routine surveillance mission, Captain Deibert was called to support a Marine battalion engaged in battle with an estimated two-regiment North Vietnamese Army force. At the time he approached the beleaguered force, enemy fire was so intense that badly needed resupply and medical evacuation helicopters could not reach their landing zones. Despite the extreme dangers of being shot down by friendly artillery barrages and hostile anti-aircraft fire, Captain Deibert flew into the area. He made several low passes through a curtain of fire to locate enemy troop concentrations and routes of movement. After advising the Marines of the enemy situation, he called for tactical air support and continued making low level flights over enemy strongpoints. Ignoring warnings from the ground to leave the area, Captain Deibert marked targets for the strike planes. One of his marking rounds was so accurate that it detonated in the center of three North Vietnamese machine gun positions and caused heavy casualties to the gun crews. When air support for the operation arrived, he continued to face concentrated enemy fire to direct ravaging bombing runs on enemy positions. Captain Deibert then discovered a route to the helicopter landing zones that was in defilade to the murderous enemy barrage and directed the resupply and medical evacuation helicopters to safe landings near the besieged battalion. His fearless actions in the face of grave danger turned a possible defeat into a rout of the enemy and prevented numerous casualties to the Marines. Captain Deibert's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 929 (February 29, 1968)
Born: at Longview, Washington
Home Town: Hood River, Oregon

DELAVAN, PATRICK N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Patrick N. Delavan, Major (Transportation Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism on 4 April 1964 in connection with military operations involving conflict with an opposing force in the Republic of Vietnam. Major Delavan was serving as a Helicopter Company Commander and leading eight armed helicopters on a mission to provide support to a Vietnamese ground force under heavy attack when he encountered the hostile battalion which had overpowered a strategic hamlet and had the remaining friendly forces surrounded. As the support force arrived in the combat zone and was met with a great volume of enemy automatic and small arms fire, Major Delavan completely disregarded his own personal safety, ordered the other helicopters to stay out of range, and bravely placed his aircraft in the most precarious positions to estimate the tactical situation. Then, with fortitude and professional skill, he led five separate helicopter maneuvers against the insurgents which neutralized part of the enemy force. After he refueled his aircraft and returned to lead the second operation, the enemy had set up a 50 caliber machinegun as an antiaircraft weapon. Major Delavan then undauntedly elected to approach the area alone instead of sending in an unarmed medical evacuation aircraft when a seriously wounded American ground advisor with the besieged Vietnamese unit requested medical evacuation. Although his helicopter was damaged by the 50 caliber gun fire which wounded him and three crew members, he continued the approach, landed in view of the enemy and, ignoring his own injury, personally loaded the casualty. After transferring the wounded advisor to the medical evacuation aircraft, he courageously returned to the scene of action and directed the support operations. Through his decisive leadership, determination, and brave actions, the company of the armed forces of the Republic of Vietnam was saved from annihilation. Major Delavan's gallantry and extraordinary heroic conduct are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 5, 1965)
Born: at Utah Home Town: Fort Bragg, North Carolina

DELEO, JOSEPH D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph D. Deleo (US53812152), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Deleo distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 July 1968 while serving as a medic on a reconnaissance patrol near Hue. His platoon came under intense hostile fire from a well entrenched enemy force. One man was seriously wounded and lay in the open only twenty meters to the front of a hostile automatic weapons emplacement. attempts to rescue the man by other members of the unit were unsuccessful. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Deleo advanced twenty-five meters through a hail of enemy fire to his injured comrade and administered first aid. A rocket then exploded to his rear, seriously wounding another man. Specialist Deleo unhesitantly moved through the continuing fusillade to the second casualty, treated his wounds and supervised his evacuation. Almost immediately another cry for a medic came, this time to assist a soldier who had tried to extract the first casualty and was wounded only a few feet from him. As Specialist Deleo neared the position occupied by the two men, the enemy suddenly unleashed a particularly savage barrage on their location. He sprang forward, pulled the two soldiers close together and covered them with his body. He was hit in both legs and in the hand by the murderous fire, completely immobilizing him. Later, member of his element overran the aggressors and evacuated all three wounded men. Specialist Four Deleo's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5218 (November 10, 1968)

*DEMPSEY, JACK TAYLOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Taylor Dempsey (0-37816), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 13th Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Colonel Dempsey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while flying in support of an airmobile assault near Tam Binh. As Commander of the 13th Aviation Battalion, Colonel Dempsey was observing the progress of one of his units conducting an airlift of Vietnamese troops into a besieged landing zone. Enemy fire around the ravaged area was devastating, and one of the troop helicopters was shot down during the first lift. As a medevac aircraft attempted to effect a rescue, it was also hit and crashed. Unmindful of the extreme dangers, Colonel Dempsey dauntlessly chose to go to the aid of the downed crews himself. He radioed for gunships to provide support and, disregarding the advise of his mission commander, started the treacherous approach. Flying under the cover of an air strike, Colonel Dempsey fearlessly ordered his pilot to dive through the hail of Viet Cong bullets. Despite the hostile fire that was hitting the helicopter, he would not be deterred from his mission. Even when the downed crews waved him off, Colonel Dempsey ignored their warning and flew on into the landing zone. In this gallant effort to save his men, he was fatally wounded when hostile fire raked the helicopter just before landing. His unimpeachable valor and profound concern for the welfare of others will serve as a source of lasting inspiration to all those who knew him. Colonel Dempsey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1633 (April 12, 1967)
Home Town: Coalgate, Oklahoma

DEMPSEY, MICHAEL O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael O. Dempsey (US54666123), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Dempsey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 5 September 1968 as a team leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Can Giuoc, Long An Province. As his company entered a woodline, the point element was suddenly hit by intense automatic weapons fire and one man fell wounded directly in front of an enemy bunker. Immediately volunteering to rescue the casualty, Specialist Dempsey led four comrades toward the hostile emplacement. They were halted by intense automatic weapons fire and entered the woodline to flank the enemy stronghold. Coming upon a second bunker, Specialist Dempsey unhesitatingly charged it and threw a grenade which killed both its occupants. When two more bunkers were spotted, he returned with his team to the platoon's position and informed his platoon leader of the additional hostile locations. Artillery fire was quickly plotted but could not be employed because of the wounded man's proximity to the bunkers. With only tall grass to conceal his movements, Specialist Dempsey crawled alone to within a few feet of the communists and found that the man was dead. After returning to his platoon's position, he came back with a rope which he attached to the dead man's web gear, enabling his comrades to pull the body to safety. Specialist Four Dempsey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1083 (March 31, 1969)

*DENISOWSKI, STANLEY GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stanley George Denisowski (US52967821), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Denisowski distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 October 1968 as a team leader during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Cu Chi. Specialist Denisowski's company came under heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire from a fortified Viet Cong base camp. During the initial barrage, the point man was wounded in an open, unprotected field. Specialist Denisowski quickly deployed his fire team to a location from which effective covering fire could be rendered while his squad leader attempted to rescue the wounded man. Ignoring a hail of bullets, he then maneuvered across the field and placed accurate and effective fire on the communists which permitted his stricken comrade to be evacuated. Wounded in the leg during the exchange of fire, Specialist Denisowski ignored shouts from his comrades to withdraw and continued to defend his position, inflicting heavy casualties on the Viet Cong until he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. Specialist Four Denisowski's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 420 (February 6, 1969)
Home Town: Utica, New York

DENNARD, DANNY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Danny Dennard (RA14897083), Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). Specialist Five Dennard distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 March 1968 as a medic with a recondo force near Hue. When contact was made, Specialist Dennard raced through the bullet-swept terrain, crossing the enemy's field of fire, to treat and evacuate two wounded comrades. Returning to the battle after taking them to the landing zone, he maneuvered to within fifty meters of the hostile trench line and evacuated to within fifty meters of the hostile trench line and evacuated four more casualties. Carrying an ammunition resupply on his way back to the contested area, he saw another wounded trooper. While attempting to get to the man, Specialist Dennard was knocked to the ground by an enemy grenade and wounded in the head. Disregarding his wound, he rushed to the man's side and treated him before tending his own injury. He then continued to the front lines to distribute the desperately needed ammunition. When another soldier was wounded during an effort to recover the bodies of two men who had been killed by enemy fire, Specialist Dennard fearlessly exposed himself to the communist' barrage to treat him and bring him to safety. A second assault was attempted and another man was wounded. He rescued his stricken comrade and carried him three hundred meters to the evacuation site, also helping a casualty whom he discovered along the way. Specialist Dennard then joined in a third assault, which again proved futile and produced another casualty. After treating the man he took part in a final charge which overran the enemy fortifications. Knowing that if he allowed himself to be evacuated his unit would be left without a medic, he refused to board the ambulance helicopter and remained with his comrades at their night position, going without treatment until the following morning. Specialist Five Dennard's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 513 (February 13, 1969)

*DENNEY, WILLIAM HERMAN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Herman Denney, Jr. (0-5242585), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Captain Denney distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 February 1969 while leading his company in an attack on enemy troops occupying a well-concealed, fortified bunker complex in the vicinity of Phu Hoa Dong, approximately nine miles northeast of Cu Chi. Throughout the day, Captain Denney repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved about the battlefield to direct and encourage his men, frequently spearheading assaults and destroying several bunkers single-handedly. Seeing an element of his company pinned down by automatic weapons fire, he ran through a hail of bullets to a machine gun crew and led it to a position where suppressive fire could be delivered. When one of his soldiers was wounded during an assault, he braved the communists' barrage to rescue the man, but was struck by hostile machine gun fire and fell backwards into a ditch. Leaving the protection of the ditch, he again tried to reach the casualty and was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade. Captain Denney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1422 (April 23, 1969)
Home Town: Moorefield, West Virginia

*DENT, WILLIAM LORANCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Lorance Dent (0-5351389), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 502d Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). First Lieutenant Dent distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 March 1969 while conducting a reconnaissance-in-force mission near the A Shau Valley in the province of Thua Thien. As his company moved along a mountain ridge, the point element encountered hostile sniper fire. He at once set up a defensive formation, ordering two machine guns to be brought forward. Suddenly the enemy opened fire with automatic weapons, rocket-propelled grenades, and small arms. Lieutenant Dent moved out under the intense fusillade to retrieve several casualties. When a machine gunner fell wounded, he manned the weapon, providing suppressive fire as he directed his men to move back. He operated the machine gun until it malfunctioned. Then he grabbed his M-16 rifle and continued to deliver lethal volleys on the enemy, until he was wounded in the head. Having supervised the withdrawal of his men to safety, he followed but was wounded again. Only after all of his men had reached a secure position, he relinquished command and later succumbed to his wounds. First Lieutenant Dent's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2284 (June 27, 1969)
Home Town: Hillsboro, North Carolina

DENTINGER, DAVID D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David D. Dentinger (US51942572), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Dentinger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 February 1968 while leading a squad against four heavily fortified North Vietnamese Army bunkers near the city of Hue. Two of the positions were successfully destroyed, but the remaining fortifications continued to pour an intense volume of fire on Specialist Dentinger and his men. He and another soldier advanced to cover afforded by a partially destroyed house to come within close range of the enemy. When his comrade attempted to throw a white phosphorous grenade through a window in the building at the communists' positions, he was severely wounded by sniper fire and fell senseless to the floor. The armed grenade landed beside him. Unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own life, Specialist Dentinger dove toward the live grenade. Grasping it in his hand, he rolled over to an opening in the wall and threw the deadly missile toward the bunker. As he released the grenade it detonated, critically burning him. His quick action, however, caused the primary force of the explosion to be outside the building, and his wounded comrade was not harmed by the blast. Specialist Four Dentinger's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5429 (November 24, 1969)

DEPUY, WILLIAM EUGENE
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to William Eugene DePuy (0-34710), Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division. Major General DePuy distinguished himself by repeated exceptionally valorous actions during the period 4 November 1966 to 16 November 1966 while serving as Commanding General, 1st Infantry Division. On 4 November during Operation ATTLEBORO, General DePuy flew to the sites of two large-scale armed clashes between U.S. Forces and numerically superior Viet Cong Forces. With complete disregard for his own safety, he repeatedly braved intense hostile fire to observe the disposition of the battle, to direct the tactical moves necessary to outmaneuver the enemy and to solidify friendly positions. On 5 November he assumed command of Operation ATTLEBORO which involved eighteen U.S. combat battalions and five ARVN battalions. Throughout the period of this operation General DePuy performed repeated heroic acts. On 7 November, ignoring the dangers of landing in the middle of a pitched battle, General DePuy personally picked up a captured enemy prisoner and flew him to a battalion command post for immediate interrogation. This act proved invaluable as the information gleaned from the prisoner revealed the battle plan of the enemy and enabled U.S. Forces to maneuver and catch the Viet Cong off guard at the inception of a major campaign. His command of the operation, both from his command and control helicopter and on the ground, involved frequent exposure to hostile fire. He repeatedly made numerous low-level passes through intense hostile fire to direct the battle, to gain first-hand knowledge of the disposition of enemy and friendly forces and to observe the progress of the battle. This enabled him to make tactical decisions which resulted in Operation ATTLEBORO becoming one of the major victories of the counterinsurgency efforts in the Republic of Vietnam. Major General DePuy's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 588 (February 7, 1967)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

DETTMAN, DOUGLAS A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Douglas A. Dettman (US54815372), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Dettman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 and 11 November 1967 while serving as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Dak To. On 9 November the company was savagely attacked by a large North Vietnamese Army force and sustained several casualties in the initial moments of the fight. The wounded were trapped in the open, and Private Dettman completely disregarded his personal safety to move through a fierce curtain of fire and reach his fallen comrades. He ignored hostile bullets striking all around him and went from man to man to skillfully administer aid throughout the duration of the battle. On 11 November the company again became heavily engaged with the enemy and received numerous casualties as the battle progressed. One platoon was particularly hit hard, and Private Dettman courageously went to their aid. After crawling fifty meters through intense machine gun and mortar fire to the unit's position, he quickly began treating the wounded. An enemy mortar round burst nearby and seriously wounded him, but he continued applying his lifesaving skills. His fearless actions and selfless devotion to the welfare of his fellow soldiers were responsible for saving several soldiers in the heat of the battle. Private First Class Dettman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 746 (February 19, 1968)

DEVLIN, GERARD M.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerard M. Devlin, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as American Advisor to the 44th Ranger Battalion, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Devlin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 and 14 October 1965. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 346 (1965)
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*DEXTER, HERBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Herbert J. Dexter (OF-104408), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 18 September 1965, Major Dexter, the S3 Officer of the 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, was accompanying his battalion on a search and destroy mission in the vicinity of Binh Khe, Republic of Vietnam. The battalion was airlifted to the operational area and upon arriving encountered increasingly heavy hostile fire from various insurgent positions. A friendly platoon, which had landed in a previous life, was forced to withdraw from a tactically important hill along the landing zone perimeter. Realizing the importance of the hill as a defensive position, Major Dexter, with complete disregard for his personal safety, voluntarily rushed to the now heavily infested hostile area and successfully reorganized the friendly forces positioned there. He quickly issued competent instructions and personally led the left flank element up the hill, despite the intense hostile small arms and mortar fire being directed at the platoon. While securing the crest, Major Dexter personally killed two insurgents who were at a deadly close range and sustained a leg wound from the murderous Viet Cong fire. Realizing that his leadership and encouragement were needed to inspire the members of the besieged platoon to hold the hill position, Major Dexter, although in great pain from his wound, continually refused to be evacuated. As the battle raged on, he was mortally wounded. Major Dexter's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6275 (November 4, 1966)
Home Town: Decatur, Illinois

DIAMOND, JAMES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James A. Diamond (RA16297699), First Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Light Infantry Brigade. First Sergeant Diamond distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 6 February 1967 while serving with a company command group during a search and destroy mission near Thu Duc. When lead platoon of his company lost its platoon sergeant and three other men in an ambush by a Viet Cong company, First Sergeant Diamond immediately moved into the battle area to maintain the fighting effectiveness of his unit. While the Viet Cong were seizing weapons from the casualties lying on the field, he organized the friendly element and set up a base of fire which drove the insurgents back. Under intense fire, he moved to where the dead and wounded lay, covering and directing the evacuation from an exposed position. After all the wounded had been rescued, First Sergeant Diamond remained in his bullet swept location to guide air strikes into the hostile bunkers, although he himself was within range of the exploding aircraft shells. By his directions from this perilous position, First Sergeant Diamond was able to prevent greater losses by his own company, save the wounded that lay exposed to the Viet Cong weapons, and inflict many casualties on the insurgent force. First Sergeant Diamond's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2715 (June 7, 1967)

DIETRICH, FRANK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank L. Dietrich (0-78799), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Colonel Dietrich distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions during the period 9 to 11 November 1966 while commanding the 2d Battalion, 502d Infantry on a search and destroy operation near Tuy Hoa. On the morning of 9 November, he was informed that contact had been made with an entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion. Quickly assessing the situation from a command and control helicopter, Colonel Dietrich brilliantly maneuvered his troops, and by nightfall the hostile force was surrounded. As the battle raged on into the next morning, he boldly joined his men on the ground. Unmindful of the extreme danger, he moved throughout the battlefield to assist his subordinate commanders and comfort the wounded. On 11 November Colonel Dietrich dauntlessly climbed to the top of a tree with a radio to direct the conflict. Remaining exposed in this perilous position for two hours, he courageously deployed the ground elements and supervised the broadcast of surrender appeals. As the battle progressed, he completely disregarded his safety by running across 100 meters of bullet-swept terrain, and led a successful assault on a stubborn North Vietnamese position. Then, accompanied only by his radio operator, Colonel Dietrich moved through 800 meters of dense jungle to another engaged platoon. Moving to the front, he again braved the intense insurgent fire to encourage his men forward. His unimpeachable valor and aggressive leadership under fierce hostile fire contributed immeasurably to the defeat of a determined hostile force. Lieutenant Colonel Dietrich's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 496 (February 1, 1967)

DIMSDALE, ROGER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roger Dimsdale (0-5324904), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 46th Infantry, 198th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. Captain Dimsdale distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 13 September 1968 while commanding an infantry company and cavalry troop on a search and clear operation near the village of Quang Ngai. An estimated reinforced North Vietnamese Army battalion occupying well entrenched positions unleashed a devastating attack with rockets, recoilless rifles, automatic weapons and small arms on Captain Dimsdale's advancing force. Several armored personnel carriers were hit by rocket-propelled grenades in the initial barrage. Quickly regrouping his unit, Captain Dimsdale led an assault against the aggressors. Seeing an enemy soldier jump into a trench, he fearlessly charged and killed him with a hand grenade. Suddenly the communists opened up on one flank with a heavy concentration of grenades and automatic weapons fire. Captain Dimsdale was painfully wounded by shrapnel, but refused treatment and charged the hostile position. Maneuvering through the withering hail of enemy fire, he tossed a grenade into the bunker which killed three North Vietnamese and made it possible for his men to continue their advance. As the enemy began to withdraw, he again maneuvered through the hostile fire to help carry the wounded from the battlefield and supervised their evacuation. When contact was broken he set up a night position, submitting to treatment for his own injuries only after security was established. Captain Dimsdale's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 87 (January 9, 1969)

*DINGMAN, MILFRED HAROLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Milfred Harold Dingman (RA55020025), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Dingman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 March 1969 as a platoon sergeant during a combat mission approximately twenty kilometers west of Polei Kleng, Kontum Province. An estimated company of North Vietnamese equipped with grenades, small arms and rockets unleashed a vicious attack and threatened to overrun Sergeant Dingman's platoon. He immediately organized his men and led them down the hill where he established an effective defensive perimeter. He then made repeated trips to the top of the hill to administer first aid to the wounded and rescue the casualties from under the hostile fusillade. Braving a hail of bullets, Sergeant Dingman next moved among his troops to provide encouragement and distribute ammunition. As he was returning fire from a threatened sector of the perimeter, he was killed by an exploding enemy rocket. Sergeant First Class Dingman's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2223 (June 24, 1969)
Home Town: Ottawa, Illinois

DINKINS, CLIFFORD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clifford Dinkins (RA10823686), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 502d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Dinkins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 May 1967 while serving with an airborne infantry unit on a search and destroy mission near Duc Pho. While moving along a jungle trail, the patrol was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of enemy automatic weapons fire which inflicted several casualties. Observing a wounded comrade lying in the killing zone of the savage fusillade, Specialist Dinkins unhesitantly raced through a withering hail of bullets to the casualty, pulled him to the safety of an abandoned enemy bunker and administered emergency medical aid. He then saw two Vietnamese troops fall under the intense Viet Cong fire. Heedless of his safety, Specialist Dinkins began to move across the bullet-swept battlefield to their aid but was knocked to the ground and wounded by an enemy grenade. Disregarding his wounds, he gallantly continued his rescue attempt through a curtain of hostile fire. He reached the fallen men, discovered one was dead, and pulled them both back to the bunker. While treating the wounded trooper, he detected three Viet Cong advancing toward his position. He jumped from the bunker and fired deadly bursts from his rifle, killing one insurgent and forcing the others to withdraw. Unnoticed, a fourth enemy soldier had flanked his position and had crawled close enough to throw a hand grenade into the shelter. Specialist Dinkins leaped for the grenade, picked it up and threw it back at the insurgent. The grenade exploded in midair, killing the Viet Cong and seriously wounding Specialist Dinkins a second time. His fearless action in close combat saved the lives of two fellow soldiers. Specialist Four Dinkins' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1050 (March 9, 1968)

*DIXON, PATRICK MARTIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Patrick Martin Dixon (326-38-6529), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Dixon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 May 1969 while serving as a platoon leader during an airmobile operation in Long An Province. As soon as the element disembarked from the insertion helicopter, it came under intense enemy crossfire. Without hesitation, Lieutenant Dixon directed his men to return fire, which forced the hostile forces to disperse. In following the retreating foe, the platoon encountered machine gun fire from a concealed bunker. Lieutenant Dixon pushed one of his men out of the direct line of fire and was wounded as a result of his selfless action. He proceeded to crawl through the heavy barrage toward the hostile emplacement until he could silence the fortification with a fragmentation grenade. Though seriously wounded himself, he crawled to one of his wounded comrades to administer first aid and remove the man to safety. As he started out to retrieve another injured man, he succumbed to his fatal wounds. First Lieutenant Dixon's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3272 (August 23, 1969)
Home Town: Dixon, Illinois

DOBBINS, RAYMOND H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond H. Dobbins (0-5325237), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division. Captain Dobbins distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 November 1967 while serving as Commanding Officer of an infantry company on a battalion search and destroy operation near Loc Ninh. While maneuvering in pursuit of enemy snipers, his company was attacked by a large hostile unit firing automatic weapons, small arms and rockets. Captain Dobbins quickly deployed his main force into an effective defensive perimeter and then fearlessly moved seventy-five meters across the bullet-swept battlefield to lead his flank elements back into the perimeter. He was seriously wounded as the enemy concentrated fire on the command group, but he refused aid and assumed command of the battalion since his commander had been killed by the savage barrage. He exposed himself to withering fire time after time to reorganize the defenses and direct treatment of the wounded. The enemy force intensified its attack, and he skillfully directed artillery and air strikes to within thirty meters of his lines to repel the vicious assaults. For two hours, Captain Dobbins continually exposed himself to hostile weapons to move among his men, encouraging them and directing their fire. When the insurgents finally broke contact, he directed one platoon to secure a landing zone and organized search parties to cover the battleground and moved the wounded to the evacuation site. Weak from loss of blood, he resolutely led his men until he was no longer able to continue. Captain Dobbins' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 6703 (December 30, 1967)
Born: at Smyrna, Georgia
Home Town: Smyrna, Georgia

*DOBRINSKA, THOMAS EARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Earl Dobrinska (0-5337688), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Dobrinska distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 9 February 1968 as a platoon leader of an airmobile infantry company on a combat mission near Than Bon Pho. His unit had successfully obtained two objectives of its three goal assault, and Lieutenant Dobrinska, realizing the importance of the momentum of his platoon's attack, continued charging the hostile emplacements. His platoon sustained several casualties and he repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy fire as he personally carried the casualties to safety. He then returned to his unit leading the attack against the well entrenched insurgents. As his platoon was temporarily driven back, he pulled two more wounded soldiers to a covered position. Twice more he led his men forward, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy forces, only to be forced to withdraw each time by the intensity of the hostile fire. Disregarding his personal safety, Lieutenant Dobrinska then single-handedly charged the enemy automatic weapons position blocking his unit's advance and succeeded in destroying it. During this assault, he was mortally wounded, but his courageous actions enabled his unit to seize the final objective and permitted the quick evacuation of the injured personnel. Second Lieutenant Dobrinska's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3201 (July 6, 1968)
Home Town: Antigo, Wisconsin

DOEZEMA, FRANK, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank Doezema, Jr. (US54957418), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisor Team 3, United States Army Advisory Group, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. Specialist Four Doezema distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 31 January 1968 while defending his unit's compound in the city of Hue against a savage enemy attack. The insurgents unleashed an intense barrage of rocket, mortar and automatic weapons fire on the installation during the early morning hours, Specialist Doezema raced to his assigned defensive post, a twenty-foot wooden tower, and sprayed the assaulting enemy with deadly accurate machine gun fire. Heedless of the hostile fusillade directed at his exposed position, he directed his comrades' fire from the vantage point. A rocket exploded on the tower roof, and Specialist Doezema was seriously wounded by flying shrapnel. He determinedly remained at his post and continued firing at insurgents who were advancing in defilade behind a cement wall on the far side of the street. While shouting words of encouragement to his fellow soldiers and directing their fire, Specialist Doezema was mortally wounded by the explosion of a second enemy rocket. His fearless and gallant actions in close combat accounted for at least eighteen enemy killed and were responsible for the successful defense of the com-pound. Specialist Four Doezema's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1469 (April 1, 1968)

*DOLAN, JAMES EDWIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Edwin Dolan (014-36-8793), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Specialist Four Dolan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 May 1970 while serving as lead man of a combat patrol in the Crescent Mountains. When his patrol encountered an enemy bunker complex, Specialist Dolan and his team leader assaulted the position. The enemy immediately countered with a barrage of fire which forced the two aggressors to withdraw. During the withdrawal, Specialist Dolan was seriously wounded by the enemy but continued to place suppressive fire on the enemy to cover his comrades. Suddenly, an enemy grenade landed between Specialist Dolan and two other team members. Shouting a warning to his companions, he threw himself toward the grenade and shielded them from the blast. Although quickly evacuated to nearby medical facilities, Specialist Dolan expired a short time later. Specialist Dolan's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4504 (September 22, 1970)
Home Town: Scituate, Massachusetts

DOLBIN, DOUGLAS R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Douglas R. Dolbin, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Dolbin distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 October 1966 while serving with a company being evacuated from a combat zone. When his helicopter was shot down, Sergeant Dolbin, while receiving intense hostile fire, moved the wounded pilots to safety. He organized his squad members to form a defensive perimeter, then crossed an open rice paddy to prevent the insurgents from boarding another downed aircraft. After treating the wounded, Sergeant Dolbin took a machine gun and climbed to the top of the cockpit. From there, while clearly outlined and an easy target for the Viet Cong, he placed effective fire on the insurgents. When several insurgents entered another helicopter, he killed two of them with his first burst of fire. However, their return fire hit his equipment and knocked him off of the cockpit. Undaunted, he returned to this previous position and engaged the enemy. Again, he was knocked down by hostile fire into a rice paddy. Again, he returned to his perch. After the initial assaults were repulsed, Sergeant Dolbin took a position on his unit's perimeter and, while standing in waist deep water, maintained his vigil through the night. Sergeant Dolbin's extraordinary heroism was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 822 (1967)

DORCH, MICHAEL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael E. Dorch, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 501st Infantry, 2d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Sergeant Dorch distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 April 1968 while serving as a fire team leader during a search and clear operation north of Hue. As his unit moved across a rice paddy a North Vietnamese force opened fire from their bunker complex. Although the hostile barrage of rocket grenades and machine gun fire made movement virtually impossible. Sergeant Dorch immediately began to maneuver about the rice paddy to check on each of his men. Spotting an enemy trench which approached a bunker, he leaped into it and began advancing toward the enemy. Coming upon one of his comrades who had been shot and had fallen into the trench, he paused to administer first aid and then pressed on. The occupants of the hostile fortification observed his actions and emerged to fire on him. Sergeant Dorch adroitly jumped to his feet and unleashed a burst from his rifle killing the occupants. He then rushed forward and threw two grenades into the bunker, completely destroying it. Retracing his path, he picked up the wounded soldier and carried him back to the unit's position. After resupplying himself with ammunition, he proceeded to recover additional casualties for evacuation. Sergeant Dorch's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2892 (July 29, 1969)

DORLAND, GILBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gilbert Dorland (0-87089), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 31st Infantry, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light) (Separate). Major Dorland distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 November 1967 while serving as commander of a two-company task force on a combat operation near Dong Son. While moving toward a suspected enemy location, the infantry elements suddenly received intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire. Major Dorland immediately maneuvered his mechanized element in front of the beleaguered infantry troops and directed lethal machine gun fire on the North Vietnamese positions. The armored personnel carrier in which he was riding received a direct hit from an enemy anti-tank weapon. The round killed the track commander and threw Major Dorland to the ground. He was run over and severely wounded by the vehicle as it backed into a defilade position. Although in great pain, he refused to be evacuated and accepted first aid as he continued to direct the deployment of his troops. Braving an increasingly savage hail of bullets and rocket fire, Major Dorland gallantly moved throughout the battlefield to adjust friendly artillery and air strikes and commit reinforcements to critical locations. His fearless and inspiring leadership in close combat with a determined enemy force was responsible for an overwhelming victory. Major Dorland's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 890 (February 27, 1968)

D'ORLANDO, MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael D'Orlando, First Lieutenant (Air Defense Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Advisory Team 87, United States Army Advisory Group, U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. First Lieutenant D'Orlando distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 December 1969 while serving as assistant advisor to a battalion of Vietnamese troops during a reconnaissance operation in Long Khanh Province. One company of the battalion was moving toward an area of reported enemy movement when it sighted several North Vietnamese soldiers walking southeast on a jungle trail. After pursuing the hostile soldiers for several hundred meters, the company suddenly dame under barrages of rocket, mortar and heavy machine gun fire from a well-concealed enemy force. Undaunted by the ferocity of the enemy ambush, Lieutenant D'Orlando moved about under the storm of enemy fire deploying his men into a defensive perimeter and directing return fire on the attackers. As the intensity of the fighting and the number of friendly casualties increased, Lieutenant D'Orlando radioed for helicopters to evacuate the wounded and helicopter gunships to deliver concentrated fire on the adversary. At that time, while coordinating the company's defenses, Lieutenant D'Orlando received a serious head wound when enemy machine gunners opened up on his command position. Although weakened by his wound, he took up a position completely exposed to hostile fire when the gunships arrived in order to direct their fire on the adversary. Later, while moving among his men under heavy enemy fire offering them encouragement and directing their return fire, Lieutenant D'Orlando was hit in the leg by an enemy round. Ignoring his wounds, Lieutenant D'Orlando remained a the center of the heaviest contact and places suppressive fire on the advancing enemy while his men pulled back to more defensible positions. He then directed artillery and gunship fire on the enemy onrush. Despite the severity of his wounds, Lieutenant D'Orlando led his troops in repulsing repeated enemy thrusts against their positions and in finally forcing the enemy to retreat. First Lieutenant D'Orlando's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 545 (February 26, 1970)

*DOUGLAS, CLARK ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clark Robert Douglas (187-40-5539), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Four Douglas distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman at Fire Support Base Jerri in Phuoc Long Province. During the early morning hours of 11 November 1969 a massive enemy shelling broke the silence, raining destruction on the compound and inflicting severe casualties among the men manning the perimeter bunkers. Without hesitation, Specialist Douglas moved immediately from the safety of his bunker toward cries for assistance. Although thrown to the ground by the burst of an impacting round only meters from his position, he crawled persistently forward into the fusillade. As soon as he reached the first wounded man, he began rendering assistance in a calm, professional manner. Just then, an enemy mortar round struck the ground nearby, inflicting mortal wounds to Specialist Douglas. His extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 103 (January 12, 1970)
Home Town: Corning, New York

*DOWNING, LESTER EARL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lester Earl Downing (245-78-1353), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Downing distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 April 1969 while serving as a rifleman on a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Ap Than Hue in Long An Province. When his platoon came under ambush, he immediately alerted the rest of the unit and proceeded to lay down suppressive fire on the enemy entrenchments. Spotting a wounded comrade, Private Downing ran across a bullet-swept rice paddy to give medical treatment, disregarding the grenades that exploded nearby. Although his rifle had been struck by an enemy bullet and rendered inoperable, he took the wounded man's weapon and charged the hostile fortification, killing two of its occupants. He plunged into the bunker and attacked a third communist in hand-to-hand combat. During the ensuing struggle he was shot, but managed to overcome his enemy before succumbing to his wounds. Private First Class Downing's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2524 (July 12, 1969)
Home Town: Roper, North Carolina

DOZER, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert L. Dozer (US52637350), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Light Infantry Brigade. Specialist Four Dozer distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 December 1966 while serving with an infantry company during a search and destroy mission in Tay Ninh Province. Specialist Dozer's company discovered two well fortified base camps in a thickly wooded area. While the rest of his platoon was given the mission of destroying the camps, Specialist Dozer led his squad into the jungle to provide security for them. Prior to reaching the assigned posts, the security element received a burst of fire from Viet Cong in hidden positions. Specialist Dozer received severe facial wounds and was bleeding profusely. Nevertheless, he ignored medical aid and immediately returned the insurgents' fire. Unable to fire effectively on the enemy from his position, he leaped to his feet and maneuvered through exposed areas to a better vantage point. He then placed such disrupting fire on the Viet Cong, that they were unable to prevent the advance of the rest of the squad. He enabled his men to gain fire superiority and led them in an assault on the hostile positions. Only after driving the insurgents off and seeing this his men had received medical aid, did he allow himself to be treated. Specialist Four Dozer's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3677 (July 20, 1967)

*DRAKE, STEVEN COLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Steven Cole Drake (0-5334054), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action while leading the 3d Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, against a vastly superior enemy force near Hiep Duc, Republic of Vietnam, on 5 and 6 January 1968. On the morning of 5 January 1968, his platoon became engaged in heavy combat with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Lieutenant Drake immediately organized a five-man fire team and courageously maneuvered this element into a supporting position near an enemy fortification. With complete and utter disregard for his own life, he left the cover of the base of fire, fearlessly charged the enemy fortified bunker, and destroyed an enemy machine gun and its crew. This daring action enabled his company to drive off the enemy. Late in the evening of the same day, the enemy launched a savage attack with overwhelming force. The first round fired by the enemy seriously wounded the company commander, who was evacuated immediately. Lieutenant Drake assumed command and inspired his men to repel the enemy's attack. The enemy, positioned on three sides of the company, began a murderous crossfire. Although disaster seemed imminent, Lieutenant Drake calmly and adeptly led his men through the withering fire to more defensible terrain. Realizing that his company was becoming dispersed, Lieutenant Drake courageously exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to consolidate his company. At this time he was severely wounded; nevertheless, he valiantly continued to move through the bullet-swept area and succeeded in re- establishing the company defensive perimeter. He organized and directed his company in repelling four human wave assaults on his position. Fearlessly he exposed himself to fire time and time again to direct the fire of his men. In order that gunships and artillery could locate his perimeter, Lieutenant Drake shot hand flares 10 feet in front of his position. At 0100 hours on the following morning, the infuriated enemy launched another savage mortar attack and again seriously wounded Lieutenant Drake. Unable to move from his position, he continued his relentless efforts to halt the enemy horde. In spite of the heroic defense of the perimeter, the overwhelming strength of the enemy permitted a few insurgents to maneuver within hand grenade range. A volley of hand grenades was thrown into the company's position. Thinking only of the safety of his men, Lieutenant Drake lunged for the threatening grenade and attempted to throw it out. The resultant explosion mortally wounded Lieutenant Drake. His heroic action saved the lives of all others in the area. Through his indomitable courage, complete disregard for his own safety, and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, Lieutenant Drake prevented additional casualties and inspired his men to successfully engage and repel the enemy. Lieutenant Drake's conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces of his country.
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 50 (September 26, 1968)
Home Town: Kirkwood, Missouri

DUFFY, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Duffy, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Major Duffy distinguished himself while serving as the Senior Advisor, 11th Airborne Battalion, Airborne Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam at Fire Support Base Charlie, Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam during the period 14 and 15 April 1972. Beginning with the morning of the 14th and continuing for a period of approximately twenty-four hours, Major Duffy repeatedly made heroic contributions to the defense of the fire base. When attempts at resupplying the base were still being considered, Major Duffy exposed himself to the effects of the continuous bombardment the base experienced as he targeted anti-aircraft weapons and adjusted airstrikes on them. When the resupply attempts were abandoned Major Duffy moved about the base, continuing to expose himself to the enemy fire, treating and finding shelter for wounded Vietnamese defenders. During the early evening initial ground assault, Major Duffy ignored the massive small arms fire as he adjusted gunships and artillery on the advancing enemy formations. When the enemy finally gained control of a portion of the base and advanced to within ten meters of his position, Major Duffy had the supporting gunships make a run directly on him. Eventually the fire base had to be abandoned. Major Duffy was the last man off the base, remaining behind to adjust the covering gunships until the last possible moment. After the Battalion Commander was wounded, Major Duffy assumed command and lead (sic) the formation through the night. Finally, when the battalion was ambushed and the unwounded soldiers abandoned their wounded comrades, Major Duffy remained with the wounded and eventually was able to arrange for their extraction. Major Duffy's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, MACV Support Command General Orders No. 2557 (December 1, 1972)

*DUNLOP, JOHNSTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnston Dunlop (51433339), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E (LRRP), 50th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Staff Sergeant Dunlop distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 16 April 1968 as a leader of a ten- man long range reconnaissance ambush team operating near Binh Son. Sergeant Dunlop deployed his team along a main Viet Cong supply route and triggered a claymore mine ambush on a heavily armed enemy platoon which was walking down the trail. During the ensuing battle, he fearlessly exposed himself to enemy weapons to deliver a devastating volume of fire which inflicted many causalities on the numerically superior insurgent force. Seeing a wounded comrade close to the enemy positions, Sergeant Dunlop unhesitantly ran to the man's aid. During this maneuver, he was struck in the legs by a burst of automatic weapons fire and knocked to the ground. Continuing to fire, he crawled the last twenty meters to his wounded teammate, all the while shouting commands for fire support to his men. Finding his comrade dead, Sergeant Dunlop directed his team to continue its covering fire while he extracted the body. As he neared safety, Sergeant Dunlop was again struck by enemy fire and mortally wounded. Staff Sergeant Dunlop's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3337 (1968)
Home Town: Auburn, New York

*DUNSMORE, LEO PAUL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leo Paul Dunsmore (RA11903314), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Dunsmore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 February 1968 as a medic accompanying an infantry company during a search and destroy operation in Quan Huong Tra Province. The unit was moving toward a treeline on the far side of a rice paddy when it was subjected to heavy mortar, recoilless rifle and small arms fire from a North Vietnamese Army force occupying entrenched and fortified positions in the woods. Private Dunsmore's platoon, the lead element, was temporarily pinned down behind earthen grave mounds, but soon began to assault the enemy across the one hundred meters of open rice paddy. The platoon engaged the North Vietnamese at close range, but was forced to withdraw from the increasingly intense enemy fusillade. Seeing many casualties lying fully exposed to the enemy weapons, Private Dunsmore unhesitant moved back into the open terrain to aid his comrades. He repeatedly crossed the bullet-swept rice paddy to skillfully treat the casualties and carry them to safety. While administering aid to one fallen soldier, Private Dunsmore was mortally wounded by the relentless enemy fire. Private First Class Dunsmore extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1570 (April 8, 1968)
Home Town: Warwick, Rhode Island

DURAN, JESUS S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jesus S. Duran, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Duran distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 April 1969 as a machine gunner on a search and clear operation. The reconnaissance platoon was moving into an elaborate enemy bunker complex when the lead elements began taking concentrated ambush fire from every side. With M-60 machine gun blazing from his hip, Specialist Duran rushed forward and assumed a defensive position near the command post. As the hostile forces stormed the post, he stood tall in a cloud of dust being raised by impacting rounds and bursting grenades aimed at him and thwarted the chargers with devastating streams of machinegun fire Learning that two seriously wounded troopers lay helplessly pinned down under harassing fire, he assaulted the suppressive enemy positions, firing deadly bursts on the run. Mounting a log, he fired directly into the enemy's foxholes and eliminated four of them and several others as they fled. He then continued to pour effective fire on the disorganized and fleeing enemy. Specialist Four Duran's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3397 (September 4, 1969)

*DURAND, DENNIS CHARLES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dennis Charles Durand (372-56-4889), Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with A/227th Assault Helicopter Company, 52d Combat Aviation Battalion, 1st Aviation Brigade. Specialist Four Durand distinguished himself on 25 May 1971 while serving as doorgunner on an emergency medical evacuation mission near Dac To. His helicopter was embarked on a mission to rescue a seriously wounded survivor of a U.S. helicopter which had crashed the day before. This involved braving intense enemy anti-aircraft fire since an estimated two enemy regiments completely surrounded the besieged firebase. Specialist Durand realized the enemy situation and strength, but his concern for the life of a fellow American soldier overshadowed this knowledge. It was further learned that two ARVN soldiers were also critically wounded and in dire need of medical evacuation. Specialist Durand's aircraft proceeded through the hail of enemy fire to the firebase and picked up the seriously wounded American as well as the Allied soldiers. Upon departing the firebase, his aircraft received heavy enemy fire and lost its motor before it burst into flames and crashed into the jungle. It was during this period that Specialist Durand was killed. Specialist Durand's personal bravery and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3423 (December 6, 1971)
Home Town: Allen Park, Michigan

DYDASCO, VINCENTE T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Vincente T. Dydasco (RA10106217), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Dydasco distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 October 1967 as platoon sergeant with an infantry battalion on a search and destroy mission in the Boi Loi Woods. While clearing a night defensive position, a sister company became heavily engaged by an unknown sized enemy force. As Sergeant Dydasco's platoon moved to aid the beleaguered force, an enemy complex consisting of sixty well-fortified bunkers connected by fighting trenches was encountered. Immediately deploying his unit to provide covering fire, he and three others advanced to locate the insurgents. He observed three Viet Cong moving to another bunker and wounded one before his weapon jammed. Armed only with grenades, he crawled after the enemy. Upon reaching the bunker they occupied, he hurled his grenades into it, destroying the fortification and killing the insurgents. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he maneuvered among the hostile fortifications and destroyed seven bunkers with well-placed grenades. He then moved back to his men and led them into the enemy complex. His force encountered intense automatic weapons fire, and he fearlessly advanced alone to find the location of the emplacement. With bullets striking all around him, he crawled through the complex. A sniper in a tree opened up on him, and he killed the insurgent with a deadly burst from his rifle. He continued his tenacious advance, located the enemy gunner and destroyed his position with a grenade. He then led his platoon in an orderly withdrawal to allow artillery strikes to soften the enemy positions. Sergeant First Class Dydasco's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Headquarters, US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2599 (May 30, 1968)

 

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