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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Korea 

 N - R 

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

*NABORS, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John H. Nabors (RA14324471), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company D, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Nabors distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Namchi-hyon, Korea, on 8 February 1951. On that date, the 1st Battalion launched an attack against Hill 392 with the mission of breaking the enemy defenses to the approaches to the Han River. The hill was defended by a large hostile force well-entrenched in sand-bagged and camouflaged positions. The fighting was made more difficult by the preponderance of automatic weapons emplaced by the enemy force. As the attacking companies advanced up the steep, ice covered slopes, the fighting became more bitter and casualties to the friendly forces began mounting rapidly. Private Nabors, a medical aidman attached to Company D, advanced with the foremost elements of the attack, seemingly heedless of the intense enemy fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved form one wounded man to another, administering first aid and comforting and encouraging them. When a friendly flanking machine-gun position was hard it and under heavy enemy automatic-weapons fire, Private Nabors moved across the face of the hill through a veritable hail of machine-gun and small-arms fire to the position. There he gave immediate first aid to nine seriously wounded men despite the merciless enemy fire on the position. After he had exhausted his medial supplies, he realized that it was imperative that he obtain more supplies and continue to give medical attention to the more seriously wounded casualties if their lives were to be saved. While attempting to return for supplies down the fire-swept slope, he was killed by an enemy grenade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 462 (June 26, 1951)
Home Town: Shelby, Tennessee

*NAKAMURA, WATARU
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Wataru Nakamura (ER36467531), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Nakamura distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at P'unch'on, Korea, on 18 May 1951. Private Nakamura's unit sustained a vicious attack on the night of 17 May 1951, which neutralized communications facilities between the 1st platoon and the Company Command Post. At approximately 0430 hours on 18 May 1951, with intermittent rain and fog increasing the darkness of early morning, Private Nakamura volunteered to check and repair the damaged line. Unaware that the enemy had infiltrated and captured heavily fortified friendly positions, he moved forward until he came under a withering hail of hostile fire. Disregarding his safety, he made a one-man assault, silencing a machine-gun and its crew with his carbine and bayonet and destroying two other enemy positions with grenades. When his ammunition was expended, he was forced to withdraw in the face of overwhelming odds. After falling back, he met a carrying party, briefed the officer in charge, and replenishing his ammunition, returned to engage the hostile force. Supported by rifle fire, he wiped out an enemy position and attacked the remaining bunker, killing one and wounding another enemy soldier before he was mortally wounded by grenade fire.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 5 (January 15, 1952)
Home Town: Cook County, Illinois

NAKATA, AKIRA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Akira Nakata, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Nakata distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tumyong-dong, Korea, on 13 June 1952. On that afternoon Corporal Nakata was moving forward with his company in an assault against an enemy-held hill when an enemy artillery round landed near him, covering him with debris and rendering his automatic weapon inoperable. Undaunted, Corporal Nakata obtained a carbine from a messenger and continued to spearhead the attack. Suddenly the friendly advance was halted by intense automatic-weapons fire from a group of hostile troops entrenched in a strategically located cave. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Nakata dashed forward alone through a murderous fusillade and single-handedly neutralized the enemy position, enabling the friendly troops to continue their advance. Even after running out of ammunition for his carbine, Corporal Nakata continued to lead the attack, hurling grenades with deadly accuracy and inflicting casualties on the foe. When his supply of grenades was expended, he still charged forward and, with savage fury, killed several hostile troops with his bayonet. Then shouting encouragement to the men behind him, he pressed the attack, on one occasion saving his platoon leader's life by killing an enemy soldier about to throw a grenade at the officer. Inspired by Corporal Nakata's aggressive charge, the friendly troops swept forward and routed the demoralized foe.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 580 (September 26, 1952)

NAKATA, HAROLD I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold I. Nakata (US50004057), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Nakata distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Surang-ni, Korea, on 6 and 7 October 1952. On that date, Corporal Nakata's unit, manning an outpost approximately five hundred yards forward of the main line of resistance, was battered by heavy concentrations of mortar and artillery fire and when the bombardment lifted, enemy troops attempted to overrun friendly positions. Corporal Nakata, engaged in fortifying a bunker, left the covered emplacement, raced through the fire-swept impact area to his machine-gun, leaped in position, and poured deadly accurate fire into the onslaught, thereby inflicting numerous casualties. During the bitter fighting which ensued, he was severely wounded but, refusing evacuation, remained steadfast and raked the hostile attackers with crippling fire. As enemy action increased in tempo and fury and the determined foe pressed nearer, Corporal Nakata was struck by fragments from an exploding grenade. Dazed and shaken, he continued to defy the enemy, and maintained his determined stand until removed by comrades to the comparative safety of a nearby bunker.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 59 (August 4, 1953)
Home Town: Hawaii

*NALL, RAYMOND E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond E. Nall (RA38339146), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company M, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Nall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sansong-ni, Korea, on 16 February 1951. On that date, Corporal Nall was attached to Company M during an attack on enemy occupied Hill 287. During the attack a tremendous concentration of mortar fire fell in the area, and all personnel in the vicinity were instructed to take cover. Corporal Nall hesitated, saying that he might be needed to render medical aid, but nevertheless moved to cover only when assured he would be called if needed. A few minutes later a second barrage of mortar fire and intense enemy small-arms fire raked the positions. The cry "medic" passed down the line. Corporal Nall grabbed his aid kit, sprang from his foxhole, and started toward the wounded soldier. His comrades called to him to wait until the incessant fire subsided, but he replied, "They need me, I must go." With complete disregard for his personal safety, he plunged into the midst of the enemy mortar fire and proceeded toward the fallen soldier. He had advanced only one hundred yards when he was killed by a mortar round.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 246 (April 27, 1951)
Home Town: Motley, Texas

NAPLES, SAMUEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Samuel Naples (RA33411206), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Tank Commander with Company B, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Naples distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 9 September 1950. Sergeant First Class Naples' company was assigned a mission to take an infantry squad to eliminate some enemy suspected of being in a nearby village. Upon approaching the village he dismounted the infantry from the tank and sent them forward into the village. After waiting a short period he followed the infantry squad and found them pinned down by enemy fire. Returning to his tank, he obtained a carbine and some grenades. He then moved to the rear of a building from which the enemy was firing and threw a grenade in the window, killing one enemy. He then shot another with his carbine. He then proceeded to another house, from which the enemy was firing. He opened the door and received machine- gun fire from the inside and was wounded in the leg. With his carbine he shot and killed the enemy gunner. This sharp, heroic action of Sergeant Naples permitted the infantry squad to proceed through the village with Sergeant Naples, despite his serious leg wound, leading the way. In the ensuing action two more enemy were killed and six prisoners were captured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)
Home Town: Cattaraugus, New York

NEGRON, JUAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Juan E. Negron (RA10406243), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Negron distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kalma-Eri, Korea, on 28 April 1951. On that date, Sergeant Negron took up the most vulnerable position on his company's exposed right flank after an enemy force had overrun a section of the line. When notified that elements of the company were withdrawing, Sergeant Negron refused to leave his exposed position, but delivered withering fire at hostile troops who had broken through a road block. When the hostile troops approached his position, Sergeant Negron accurately hurled hand grenades at short range, halting their attack. Sergeant Negron held the position throughout the night, while an allied counter attack was organized and launched. After the enemy had been repulsed, fifteen enemy dead were found only a few feet from Sergeant Negron's position. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Sergeant Negron on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 588 (June 21, 1953)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

NEHLS, EDWIN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edwin E. Nehls, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. Sergeant First Class Nehls distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pau-gol, Korea, early in the morning of 15 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Nehls was on an outpost position which was subjected to a heavy enemy barrage after which a reinforced battalion assaulted the United Nations sector. In spite of the heroic defense, the enemy was successful in seizing the area. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Sergeant Nehls organized a patrol of five men and led them into the midst of the enemy element, encouraging his followers to direct accurate and effective small arms fire into the enemy ranks. Sergeant Nehls rose to a standing position and fired rifle grenades into the enemy group, refusing to withdraw until superior number and firepower made withdrawal inevitable. He then led an element of the counterattacking forces into enemy positions and engaged in hand- to-hand combat. Although wounded, Sergeant Nehls refused to leave the area until the enemy force had been completely repulsed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 40 (January 31, 1954)

*NEHOWIG, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James B. Nehowig (US55141720), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Nehowig distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taptong-ni, Korea, on 20 September 1952. Spearheading as assault to secure "Old Baldy," Corporal Nehowig led his squad up a barren, rocky approach toward the objective. As the valiant soldiers attacked through the narrow communications trenches, they came under intense hostile fire. Corporal Nehowig moved forward throwing grenades and firing his carbine with deadly accuracy. He destroyed five enemy bunkers and their manning crews. Reaching the military crest of the hill, he ordered his men to ready defensive positions for imminent counterattack. He the moved out to reconnoiter the forward slope of the hill. Encountering the enemy, he engaged and killed four and dispersed the remainder. Ignoring wounds sustained in this action, Corporal Nehowig made his way back to the friendly perimeter, alerted his platoon leader of the impending attack, and returned down the forward slope, assumed a firing position to stem the assault. Maintaining his stand, he poured crippling fire into the ranks of the foe and engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat as they closed in on his position. Although mortally wounded in this encounter, his courageous actions contributed greatly to retarding the onslaught and, after the attack was repulsed, many enemy dead were found in the wake of his action.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 49 (June 9, 1953)
Home Town: Cass, North Dakota

*NELSON, JOHN HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Henry Nelson (0-974417), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Nelson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Majen-ni, Korea, on the night of 14 - 15 February 1951. On that night, Company F was assigned the mission of recapturing Hill 325. After three unsuccessful attempts to capture the strongly defended enemy positions located on strategic high ground, Captain Nelson personally led his company in another assault at daybreak. Displaying outstanding courage and dogged determination Captain Nelson, heedless of the intense enemy fire and completely disregarding his personal safety, charged the enemy positions firing his weapon and throwing grenades into enemy entrenchments. Inspired by the daring actions and courageous example of Captain Nelson, the men of Company F dislodged the enemy and drove them off the hill. Immediately after seizure of the objective and while still under intense enemy mortar fire, Captain Nelson ran from man to man designating fields of fire and offering words of encouragement. Through his daring exploits he continued to rouse his men to their maximum effort until he was killed by a burst of enemy mortar fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 359 (May 27, 1951)
Home Town: Roberts, Texas

NESCI, JOSEPH A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph A. Nesci (RA12119041), Sergeant [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Nesci distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 16 September 1950. Sergeant Nesci's unit was attacking well-fortified enemy emplacement on Hill 125 when a concealed enemy machine-gun forced the men to seek cover. Sergeant Nesci, armed with an automatic rifle and grenades, immediately rushed the enemy emplacement, silencing the weapon. Then, moving forward, he began to pick off the enemy with deadly precision as often as they exposed themselves. He motioned for his two comrades to follow him as he reloaded his weapon, but they were wounded before they could proceed more than a few yards. Going forward alone, Sergeant Nesci, single-handedly rendered enemy emplacement after emplacement ineffective with his accurate fire as he came upon them. When overwhelming numbers of the enemy launched a counterattack and the unit was forced to withdraw, he made repeated trips across the fire-swept area to carry his wounded comrades to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 617 (August 5, 1951), as amended by Section V of General Orders No. 640 (1951)
Home Town: Onondaga, New York

*NEVILLE, WARD ORVILLE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ward Orville Neville (0-1112888), First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 3d Engineer Combat Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Neville distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hill 207 in the Republic of Korea on 11 August 1950. Lieutenant Neville volunteered to lead a hazardous patrol across the Naktong River and five thousand yards into enemy-held territory with the mission of observing enemy movement, strength, and location. At 1700 hours on 11 August 1950, the patrol, consisting of Lieutenant Neville and thirteen enlisted men, was attacked by a force of an estimated two hundred enemy riflemen. Lieutenant Neville, realizing the impossible odds with which his patrol was confronted, decided upon a desperate course of action. He personally led his patrol through a hail of enemy fire to the west, one thousand yards farther into enemy territory, to the east bank of the Hoechon River, without casualties. Upon arriving at the Hoechon River, the patrol was fired upon from the North and South by an estimated one hundred enemy riflemen. Lieutenant Neville was shot through the right leg and immobilized and three of his patrol were mortally wounded. Vehemently refusing assistance form any of his patrol members, he directed them across the river and, after most had crossed, he dragged himself through the river to the west bank. During this time he was constantly ordering his patrol to shoot into the areas from which the heaviest enemy fire was coning and urging them on, lest they be captured. Lieutenant Neville, mortally wounded, dragged himself into a rice paddy and was last seen with a grenade in his hand, urging the patrol on to safety. His utter refusal of assistance from his patrol after he was wounded made it possible for five members of the patrol to return to friendly lines and safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 110 (October 11, 1950)
Home Town: Zap, North Dakota

NICHOL, BROMFIELD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bromfield B. Nichol, Second Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a Tank Company of the 40th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Nichol distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sintra-Ni, Korea, on the night of 5 June 1953. On that night, Lieutenant Nichol was in charge of two tanks in firing position on the United Nations main line of resistance, one of which was hit by enemy rounds and set afire. Learning that a man was trapped inside the tank, Lieutenant Nichol courageously braved the intense mortar, artillery and small arms fire, mounted the vehicle and attempted to open the hatch. Unable to enter through the top of the tank, he disregarded the intense heat, crawled beneath the vehicle and tried to extricate the trapped man through the escape hatches. Failing to gain entrance, Lieutenant Nichol, though aware of the dangers occasioned by the explosion of small arms ammunition within the vehicle, again climbed atop the tank and finally succeeded in prying open the bow gunner's hatch with his bayonet. Finding that the trapped man was dead and that evacuation was impossible, Lieutenant Nichol then returned to his battle position and continued to fight throughout the night. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Nichol on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1051 (December 1, 1953)

*NICHOLS, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Nichols (RA13165264), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Nichols distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Waegwan, Korea, on 18 September 1950. During a company attack against a hill heavily defended by intense enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire, Corporal Nichols observed his platoon commander approaching, unknowingly, into the fire of a hostile machine-gun approximately fifty yards away. He shouted a warning, but it was lost in the noise of battle. Acting without hesitation and well aware of the personal risk involved, Corporal Nichols hurled himself between his platoon commander and the point- blank machine-gun fire, absorbing with his own body the bullets aimed at the officer. During this noble selfless act, he suffered critical wounds that resulted in his death.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (April 4, 1951)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

NIEVES-LAGUER, FABIAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Fabian Nieves-Laguer (30419666), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Nieves-Laguer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Chwanchan-dong, Korea, on 19 April 1951. On that date, Corporal Nieves-Laguer's unit was given the mission of attacking and securing positions held by a well entrenched and fanatically determined enemy force. Moving forward under intense enemy mortar and small arms fire, Corporal Nieves-Laguer, an automatic rifleman, repeatedly charged enemy dug-outs, clearing them of opposition and enabling the remainder of his squad to advance without casualties. However the hostile fire finally became so intense that the advancing friendly elements were forced to withdraw to more tenable positions. As the enemy launched a powerful counterattack, Corporal Nieves-Laguer observed three wounded men lying directly in the path of the onrushing hostile forces. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he made three separate trips across the fire swept terrain to carry the stricken soldiers to safety. After successfully evacuating the injured men, Corporal Nieves-Laguer returned to his position and manned his weapon. From his emplacement he was able to furnish effective fire support to cover the withdrawal and subsequent reorganization of his unit. The outstanding devotion to duty and extraordinary heroism displayed by Corporal Nieves-Laguer in this action reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 635 (August 12, 1951)

NIX, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Nix (0-1913384), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander of the 3d Platoon of Company E, 2d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. First Lieutenant Nix distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Nix was ordered to attack well-entrenched enemy positions on Hill 255, a terrain feature lost to a Chinese Community force of battalion strength on the previous night. A frontal attack culminating in an assault of the rugged and well-defended position was the plan for securing the objective. At 1400 hours he launched his attack in coordination with the 1st platoon, the 2d platoon being used as a base of fire. On the initial attack the 1st platoon reached a point about twenty yards from the crest of the hill, but was forced to withdraw when most of the ammunition was expended and the intensity of the enemy fire increased. Lieutenant Nix, detecting the action of the adjacent platoon, withdrew his platoon a short distance in order to reorganize them. Having accomplished this, he resumed the attack and immediately came under flanking fire from the left. Without hesitation, he diverted one squad to neutralize this threat, and continued the attack. Upon reaching the crest of the hill, he observed a ravine on the reverse slope filled with Chinese Communists. Exposing himself to their fire, he emptied his carbine at the group, killing ten of them. After expending his carbine ammunition he drew his pistol and rallied his men in the final phase of the assault among the enemy foxholes. When his pistol ammunition was expended, he picked up an automatic weapon and turned it on the fleeing enemy. His courageous and aggressive leadership inspired his men to overcome the numerically superior enemy force as hand-to-hand combat ensued.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 174 (March 26, 1951)
Home Town: Cowlitz, Washington

NOBLE, JOSEPH E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph E. Noble, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while Commanding a Battalion from an Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Noble distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on the afternoon of 8 July 1953. On that date, Colonel Noble was the commander of a battalion counterattacking a numerically superior enemy force which was assaulting a strategic United Nations outpost. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Colonel Noble left the comparative safety of his command post and proceeded through the intense barrage to the sector of the heaviest fighting to personally direct the activities of his unit. Although he had previously given his steel helmet and armored vest to one of his men, Colonel Noble continually moved about the fire-wept terrain to encourage his comrades, call in accurate variable time fire, and to assist in the manning of crew-served weapons. Although injured by a mortar shell, Colonel Noble remained in the area for the next two days, on one occasion personally extinguishing a fire in an ammunition dump which threatened the lives of many men. Colonel Noble refused to be evacuated until he had personally supervised an orderly withdrawal of all units from the outpost.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 63 (February 19, 1954)

*NONEMAN, ROBERT P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert P. Noneman (RA15260931), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Noneman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chungnyong-san, Korea, on 22 March 1951. On that date, a friendly force was engaged in setting up a tight perimeter defense on a hill position recently captured from the fanatical enemy. Sergeant Noneman moved among his men, inspecting their positions to determine any points of weakness which might jeopardize their safety in the event of an enemy counterattack. Proceeding toward some outlying emplacements he suddenly observed a strong enemy force moving into positions from which they could direct a devastating volume of fire on the friendly forces. Realizing that immediate action was necessary and that there was not sufficient time to return to his men for help, he charged across the open terrain to a knoll and commenced firing on the hostile troops. He was immediately subjected to the concentrated enemy firepower, but he remained in his exposed position, firing rapidly and inflicting many casualties among them. Hearing the conflict, elements of the friendly force moved to the knoll to help him. When they arrived, they found him suffering from serious wounds but, despite this fact, he was still firing at the enemy with unshakable determination. As the friendly troops drove the enemy from the positions, Sergeant Noneman succumbed to his wounds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1034 (December 30, 1951)
Home Town: Paulding, Ohio

NONNWEILER, EDWARD PHILIP
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward Philip Nonnweiler (RA16307361), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Nonnweiler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Ma-dong, Korea on 13 August 1950. In the course of a sneak attack on his unit's position, Sergeant Nonnweiler spotted the enemy and shouted a warning to his comrades. He immediately moved forward and placed into action a 75-mm. recoilless rifle on the exposed slopes of the hill in complete view of the enemy, firing the weapon as fast as it could be loaded. With complete disregard for his own safety he deliberately diverted the heavy enemy fire on himself, thus enabling his comrades to place themselves in a more advantageous firing position. The mortar crews were able to divert their fire from another target and place the full force of the mortar fire to their unit's front. Sergeant Nonnweiler was hit by a burst of machine-gun fire, but despite serious wounds and with his right arm useless, he managed to load and fire the weapon into the charging enemy's midst, until twice again he was wounded leaving him in such pain that he had to crawl from his position to seek safety where his wounds could be treated. His selfless courage and conspicuous devotion to duty saved his unit from possible annihilation by the overwhelming enemy force. The extraordinary heroism of Sergeant Nonnweiler reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the high traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 74 (February 15, 1951)
Home Town: Sheboygan, Wisconsin

NORIEGA, BELISARIO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Belisario Noriega, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Noriega distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Chorwon, Korea, on 27 October 1952. On that date, Sergeant Noriega was with a company defending an outpost position which was subjected to a heavy barrage of artillery and mortar fire. When a fire started in the ammunition supply point, Sergeant Noriega, fully cognizant of the dangers involved, rushed to the scene and assisted in extinguishing the blaze. Upon his return to the defensive positions, Sergeant Noriega found that one of the platoon leaders was a casualty and his men had become confused and disorganized under the strain of the intense shelling. Sergeant Noriega immediately reorganized the men, deployed them in the most advantageous positions, assigned fields of fire and through the assault which followed Sergeant Noriega maintained command of the platoon and employed it effectively. When the company was ordered to withdraw after the position had been encircled, Sergeant Noriega led the men through the hostile ranks to the safety of the main line of resistance. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Sergeant Noriega on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 698 (July 27, 1953)

*NORTHCUTT, EMERY B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Emery B. Northcutt (RA17265927), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Private Northcutt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea, on 27 July 1950. On that date, Company B was in a defensive position when numerically superior enemy forces launched an attack supported by heavy mortar and artillery fire. The position soon became untenable and the order to withdraw was given. Without regard for his own personal safety, Private Northcutt voluntarily remained at his position on the flank, firing his light machine-gun and enabling the rest of the company to withdraw. When last seen, he was firing into the advancing enemy as they overran his position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: Jersey, Illinois

NORTHCUTT, ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert Northcutt (RA15445912), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Northcutt distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 8 and 9 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Northcutt and his companions were counterattacking a strategic position on the west slope of a heavily contested hill. When his platoon leader and platoon sergeant were wounded, Sergeant Northcutt took command of the platoon and led it forward. After advancing a short distance, they suddenly came under heavy mortar and machine-gunfire from two enemy bunkers to the front. Sergeant Northcutt ordered a base of fire to be placed on each bunker and crawled forward from the right under the enemy cross-fire. Although painfully wounded by fragments of a hostile mortar round, he continued to assault the right bunker and succeeded in destroying the enemy gun crew with grenades. After shifting his supporting fire toward the second bunker, he crawled to its side entrance and destroyed its occupants with his last two grenades and pistol fire. Later, his platoon came under an intensive barrage of artillery and mortar fire and was forced to withdraw, whereupon Sergeant Northcutt organized the remaining members of his unit and set up a perimeter of defense. Finding the supply of ammunition low, he again exposed himself to the enemy and began collecting ammunition which had been discarded by wounded comrades. The next morning two companies came through the platoon to assault the enemy-held positions on the crest of the hill. As these units moved through to maneuver, a sniper fired on them, halting their advance. Sergeant Northcutt deliberately exposed himself in order to locate the source of fire, after which he charged the sniper and killed him with pistol fire, thus allowing the two companies to continue their assault. Sergeant Northcutt was wounded a second time in the immediate conflict that followed and was evacuated to the rear area against his wishes.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 558 (August 26, 1954)
Home Town: Clark, Ohio

*NORTON, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert L. Norton (0-2034570), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Norton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Nungnae-dong, Korea, on 4 April 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Norton's platoon was given the mission of attacking and securing a steep, barren hill approximately 800 yards in front of the positions of Company A. After crossing open rice paddies to a position at the base of the hill from which the attack could be launched, Lieutenant Norton was leading his men up the slope of the hill when they came under a heavy volume of enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire. Halting his platoon and exposing himself to the intense fire to check the feasibility of continuing the attack from that point, he noted that such action would result in heavy casualties. Remaining in the exposed position, Lieutenant Norton directed his platoon to withdraw and attack the enemy's right flank from a more sheltered approach while he stayed behind to draw enemy fire and over the movement. He continued to place effective fire on the enemy, covering the maneuver of his platoon, until he was hit by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire and instantly killed. The inspirational leadership and selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Norton enabled his platoon to secure the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 363 (May 28, 1951)
Home Town: Cumberland, Maine

O


*O'DONNELL, JOSEPH T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joseph T. O'Donnell (0-1059578), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant O'Donnell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Mundung-ni, Korea, 0n 13 October 1951. On that date, Company A launched an assault on a strategic hill strongly defended by a determined enemy. Lieutenant O'Donnell led his platoon until they were halted by a heavy barrage of enemy small-arms and mortar fire. Unhesitatingly and with complete indifference to the intense fire, he placed himself at the head of his platoon and led them in a renewed assault, during which he charged and destroyed an enemy position and killed its occupants with his rifle and grenades. Although wounded by an enemy grenade, he continued to lead his men in the attack. Knocked down by a second grenade, he immediately arose and again continued to direct his men in the assault. In the platoon's final charge, he was fatally wounded by mortar fragments. His bravery and spirited leadership were an inspiration to all who witnessed his actions and contributed immeasurably in the successful completion of the mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Kings, New York

*OGLESBY, JAMES N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James N. Oglesby (0-2205488), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader Company A, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Oglesby distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea, on 5 May 1952. On that date, the company of which Lieutenant Oglesby was a member was engaged in an attack against a large hostile force occupying heavily fortified positions on a strategic hill. As the assaulting elements neared their objective, they were subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms, automatic-weapons, mortar, and artillery fire. Realizing that the friendly troops before him were pinned down and threatened with annihilation, Lieutenant Oglesby organized his own platoon and led his men through the halted attackers to renew the attack on the hostile positions. However, the intense enemy fire soon also stopped the fresh assault force. With the knowledge that the attack would fail unless the key hostile emplacements were destroyed, Lieutenant Oglesby, without regard for his personal safety, left his position of cover and, armed with a supply of grenades, moved forward in a single-handed attack. Although the hostile troops converged their entire firepower on him, he advanced to the nearest enemy position and destroyed it with grenades. After replenishing his supply of ammunition, he moved forward a second time and destroyed another enemy bunker. In this attack Lieutenant Oglesby was mortally wounded by the intense enemy fire but his fearless actions had seriously weakened the hostile defense and his men, inspired by his fighting spirit, rushed through the gap he had created and secured the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 238 (May 5, 1952)
Home Town: Trousdale, Tennessee

*OKAMURA, ARTHUR I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur I. Okamura (US50001563), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Okamura distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Muto, Korea, on 14 October 1951. On that date, Company A was engaged in an assault against well-fortified enemy hill positions. As the friendly force advanced, it was temporarily halted by a heavy volume of enemy machine-gun fire. During this period, Private Okamura discovered an enemy minefield directly in the path of the assaulting friendly troops. With a total disregard for his personal safety, he immediately exposed himself to the intense fire of the enemy and began to clear the area of mines and booby traps. Working with unrelenting determination, under the direct observation of the enemy, Private Okamura skillfully removed mine after mine. After four hours of courageous effort, the minefield was almost entirely cleared when one of the hostile booby traps detonated and mortally wounded him. Greatly inspired by the fearlessness of Private Okamura, his comrades renewed their assault and swept the hostile force from the hill, inflicting numerous casualties among them. The heroic actions of Private Okamura were directly responsible for saving the lives friendly troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 986 (December 12, 1951)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

*ORIG, BRUNO R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bruno R. Orig (RA10104620), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Orig distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 15 February 1951. On that date, Private Orig, while returning from a wire laying mission, observed a number of his comrades who had been wounded in a fierce enemy attack that was still in progress. With complete disregard for his own safety, he went to the aid of these men and remained in an exposed position in order to administer first aid to them. With the assistance of several comrades from the company command post he began removing the wounded to a place of safety. While returning from one of these trips, he noticed that all except one man of a machine-gun crew had been wounded. Without hesitation, he volunteered to man the weapon. Remaining in this position, Private Orig placed such effective fire on the enemy that a withdrawing friendly platoon was able to move back without a single casualty. He continued to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy until the company positions were overrun. Later that day, when the lost ground was recaptured, Private Orig was found dead beside his weapon and the area in front of his gun was littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 570 (July 21, 1951)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

*OTOMO, BILL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bill M. Otomo (0-1340575), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Otomo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Ipack, Korea, on 27 November 1950. Leading his platoon into an area which was then under heavy enemy fire, Lieutenant Otomo personally placed each man in a defensive position, assigning fields of fire and insuring the best possible cover for each individual. Almost immediately after occupying the position, the platoon was subjected to several fanatical attacks by an overwhelming enemy force. Although Lieutenant Otomo was hit in the back by grenade fragments, he refused medical attention for his wounds. Moving from position to position in the platoon area, he continued to inspire and encourage his men to hold. Led by Lieutenant Otomo, the platoon engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand fighting, throwing the enemy back and eliminating the threat to the company flank. Lieutenant Otomo's courage, outstanding leadership, and cool judgment were an example to all concerned and prevented an enemy breakthrough at a critical point.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 59 (February 8, 1951, as amended by HQ Eighth US Army Korea General Orders No. 94 (1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*OTTERSTROM, RAWLAND N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Rawland N. Otterstrom (US56059056), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Otterstrom distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangyang, Korea, on 13 October 1951. On that date, the company of which Corporal Otterstrom was a member was engaged in an assault against a series of heavily fortified and well-concealed enemy positions. As the friendly troops advanced, they were subjected to heavy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire which increased in intensity until they were forced to seek cover. At this point in the assault, the company commander was severely wounded by an exploding mortar shell and fell helpless on the fire-swept terrain. Observing that his leader was completely exposed to the fire of a hidden enemy machine-gun, Corporal Otterstrom left his position of cover and attempted to reach the stricken man. With utter fearlessness, he worked his way through the heavy enemy fire being concentrated on him until he was hit and instantly killed by a burst from the machine-gun. His heroic action, however, had forced the hidden automatic-weapons crew to reveal their location and the friendly forces immediately converged their entire firepower on the emplacement. With the enemy positions destroyed, the friendly troops were able to renew their assault and evacuate their leader.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 192 (April 12, 1952)
Home Town: Carbon, Utah

*OTTO, GEORGE WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George William Otto (US56089345), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine-gunner with an Infantry Company of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Otto distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chg'u-dong, Korea, on 27 August 1951. On that date, Corporal Otto was occupying a forward emplacement in a defense perimeter which had just been captured from the enemy. The fanatical force subjected the perimeter to an almost continuous barrage of artillery, mortar and automatic weapons fire but the friendly troops held their positions and hurled back the numerous probing attacks launched by the enemy. When the enemy launched a full-scale assault against the friendly force, Corporal Otto quickly realized that the numerical superiority of the hostile troops seriously endangered his forward position and immediately ordered all of the friendly troops to withdraw to more tenable positions. Remaining at his own position and directing a devastating volume of fire into the on-rushing ranks of the enemy, Corporal Otto provided effective covering fire as his comrades withdrew. With the entire firepower of the attacking enemy being concentrated on his position, and with overwhelming numbers of the hostile troops rushing closer and closer to his position, he doggedly remained behind his weapon, cutting down the enemy soldiers who were trying desperately to neutralize his position. When his machine-gun jammed; he courageously continued to fire at the enemy by using his pistol until he was hit and killed by enemy fire. When the friendly troops launched a counterattack and regained Corporal Otto's position, they found him lying beside his machine-gun with numerous enemy dead strewn about the emplacement.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (January 28, 1952)
Home Town: Kootenai, Idaho

*OWEN, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James B. Owen (0-543663), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Owen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeusan, Korea, on 26 July 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Owen moved forward with the lead element of the company as it launched an assault against a large hostile force, firmly entrenched on a commanding slope. As the company attacked, it was subjected to heavy and accurate fire which began to inflict many casualties among the advancing troops. Shouting directions to his men, Lieutenant Owen deployed them to more advantageous positions and then charged the first enemy emplacement. As he neared the position, his weapon was blown from his hands and he was seriously wounded by the intense fire being concentrated on him by the desperate defenders. Undaunted, he continued with his assault and destroyed the emplacement with grenades. Eliminating position after position in this manner with utter fearlessness and despite his wound, Lieutenant Owen so inspired his men that they moved forward in a body and, displaying fierce determination, drove the enemy from their positions. When the hill was secured and a defensive perimeter had been up, Lieutenant Owen still refused medical treatment until he was assured that all of the casualties had been evacuated. He died from his wound a short time thereafter while supervising the evacuation of the wounded friendly troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 117 (February 28, 1952)
Home Town: Luzerne, Pennsylvania

P

PACHECO, ROBERTO, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roberto Pacheco, Jr. (RA19330456), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Pacheco distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Saradong, Korea, on 9 August 1950. In the course of an attack on an enemy-held hill, Private First Class Pacheco's platoon was pinned down by murderous a murderous hail of enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire. Upon receiving word from one of his comrades that his platoon leader had been wounded, Corporal Pacheco took the initiative and charged up the forward slopes in the face of intense enemy fire. Upon reaching high ground, he paused momentarily to survey an enemy position to his front. Upon spotting a number of the enemy, he lobbed grenades and fired his automatic weapon into their midst. The enemy became so surprised and bewildered by this one-man onslaught that they left their positions and fled in panic. Taking full advantage of their rout, Corporal Pacheco charged on the retreating enemy, firing his weapon on the run. Single-handedly the hill was wrested and secured for the platoon to occupy. In this outstanding display of aggressiveness and courage, Private First Class Pacheco personally accounted for at least thirty of the enemy dead and was solely responsible in causing the withdraw of the remainder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 42 (January 26, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*PAINE, GEORGE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George H. Paine (RA11163980), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Paine distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Koto-ri, in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 30 November 1950. Sergeant Paine was with the leading element of the 2d Battalion moving north to link up with friendly units when the column was attacked by enemy who were entrenched and concentrated on high ground along the route of advance. Sergeant Paine located several enemy positions on a hillside form which automatic-weapons and small-arms were firing. Bravely and without regard for his own personal safety, he advanced alone against these positions, exposing himself to draw their fire from other elements of the column who were regrouping to make an attack. In his advance, he neutralized two enemy automatic weapons, permitting friendly troops to advance without casualties. Joining the attacking troops of the battalion, he assisted in driving the enemy from their positions around the hilltop. During this action Sergeant Paine was mortally wounded while fiercely resisting enemy forces counterattacking in an attempt to retain the hilltop. This counterattack was repulsed with heavy loss of enemy personnel. The courageous actions of Sergeant Paine were an inspiration to his comrades and enabled the battalion to complete its mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 113 (March 4, 1951)
Home Town: Worcester, Massachusetts

PALMER, RICHARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard A. Palmer, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Palmer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Hwachon Reservoir, Korea, on 10 April 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Palmer's battalion had engaged for two days in an almost continuous assault against a series of heavily fortified and fanatically defended hostile positions on a strategic hill. On the morning of 10 April 1951, Lieutenant Palmer received orders to lead his platoon in an attack to take the vital hill mass. As the friendly troops neared their objective, they were subjected to a devastating volume of automatic-weapons, small-arms, and mortar fire. Seeing that his men were pinned down by the heavy fire and that they faced possible annihilation in their present untenable positions, Lieutenant Palmer, without regard for his personal safety, left his position and charged directly into the intense fire toward the neared hostile emplacement. Alternately firing his rifle and throwing grenades, he destroyed an enemy machine gun and killed its three-man crew. He then closed with the enemy troops in hand-to-hand combat and fought fiercely, killing one of the enemy with his bayonet and numerous others with rifle fire. Lieutenant Palmer's fearlessness so inspired his men that they swept forward and routed the enemy from the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 62 (January 31, 1952)

PAPPERT, EDGAR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edgar Pappert, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Pappert distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. During a savage encounter with a numerically superior enemy, four men of an adjacent unit were found wounded on the battlefield. These men were lying in the direct line of enemy fire and their rescue seemed a hopeless impossibility. Replenishing his supply of ammunition, Sergeant Pappert, exposed himself to the enemy and moved directly into the line of fire, clearing his route of approach with grenades and rifle fire. He killed several of the enemy, wounded many more, and succeeded in reaching the wounded soldiers. He rendered first aid on the spot and succeeded in getting the men back to a point from which they could be evacuated. His courageous actions saved the lives of the four wounded soldiers and contributed materially to the ultimate victory which his company achieved.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 127 (March 7, 1951)

*PARRIS, HAROLD G. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold G. Parris (0-1183940), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery C, 8th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Parris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sibyon-ni, Korea, on 6 November 1950. While attached as a forward observer to an infantry regiment and on patrol along the road to Inchon, Lieutenant Parris and fifteen others were ambushed and captured by an overwhelming force of the enemy. Realizing that the enemy were known to sometimes torture and murder their prisoners after having extracted any information of military value from them, Lieutenant Parris warned his men to keep quiet and to tell only their name, rank and serial number when questioned. The sixteen prisoners were marched to the enemy command post and placed in a small room where they were questioned. Lieutenant Parris again exhorted the men not to answer the questions, but to remain quiet. Due to the calm courage of Lieutenant Parris, the men refused to answer except with expletives. The interrogators, realizing that Lieutenant Parris was the leader of the group, took him to another room to question him. While he was gone, the prisoners were again questioned but because of the inspiring leadership and exhortation of Lieutenant Parris, no information was given. When Parris was returned to the room, his face showed the effects of severe treatment - all to no avail. After marching them about three hundred yards, their captors machine-gunned and killed Lieutenant Parris and all but one of his comrades. The outstanding and fearless leadership of Lieutenant Parris in the face of almost certain death was a magnificent example and denied the enemy valuable intelligence information.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 78, (February 17, 1951) as amended by General Orders No. 484 (July 1, 1951)
Home Town: Randolph, North Carolina

PARSLEY, JIMMIE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jimmie R. Parsley (RA18245559), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Forward Observer with a Mortar Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Parsley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ugu-Dong, Korea, on 24 June 1953. On that date, Private Parsley was on duty at his company command post when it was attacked by two enemy battalions. Following an intense artillery and mortar barrage which disrupted all wire communication, the enemy stormed the trenches, penetrated the main line of resistance, and concentrated an attack on the command post. To insure uninterrupted communications, Private Parsley left his sheltered position with his radio and moved into the open to adjust mortar fire on the aggressors. When the enemy had progressed to within a few yards of the command post, Private Parsley, alone and unprotected, met them head-on, firing his weapon at point-blank range and temporarily halted the assault. He then, calmly and with incredible courage, called in mortar fire on his own position to destroy the enemy, force which was beginning another assault. Private Parsley was wounded in the barrage but he refused medical attention and remained at his post, directing supporting fire on the remainder of the enemy until all action had ceased. He then moved among the casualties of his company, giving what aid he could, until he was assured that the position was secure.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 336 (September 11, 1953)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*PATCH, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald L. Patch (RA19049652), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Patch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Wonsan, Korea, on 22 September 1950. Master Sergeant Patch's organization, committed to capture a hill strongly supported by a mortar position about 300 yards away, was pinned down by intense flanking automatic and small-arms fire. Sergeant Patch volunteered to lead a group of three attached South Korean soldiers on a flanking movement against the position. The hostile forces spotted this valiant group approaching, concentrated a vicious stream of fire on them, and wounded Sergeant Patch in the chest. Ignoring his serious wound, he nevertheless forged on with unwavering determination. The group wiped out the position, killing nine of the defenders and routing the remainder. During the final charge on the strong point, this heroic leader received mortal wounds, but his intrepid action enable his company to take its objective.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Home Town: Fresno, California

PATTEN, RALPH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph E. Patten, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Patten distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Norebau, Korea, on 9 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Patten, as an acting platoon leader, was given the mission of spearheading the initial assault on the company's objective, a vital hill near Norebau. Halfway up the hill, the lead elements of the platoon were pinned down under the withering fire of an enemy machine-gun. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Sergeant Patten immediately charged forward, single-handedly attacking the machine-gun nest with rifle fire and grenades. After capturing the weapon and forcing its crew to surrender, he reorganized his platoon and led them forward in a bayonet and grenade charge toward the crest of the hill. The outstanding personal courage and aggressive leadership displayed by Sergeant Patten inspired his men onward to take the objective and inflict heavy losses on the enemy despite the intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire that continued to pour down on them. His quick-thinking and total disregard for his own safety were instrumental in securing the company's objective with the greatest possible speed and with a minimum number of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 576 (July 23, 1951)

*PAYNE, D. F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to D. F. Payne (US54039301), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Payne distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mandae-ri, Korea, on 2 September 1951. On that date, the company of which Corporal Payne was a member was engaged in a determined attack against a series of heavily fortified enemy positions located on a hill of vital strategic importance. Because of the commanding terrain held by the hostile troops, the friendly casualties mounted and Corporal Payne, in an effort to evacuate his helpless comrades from the scene of battle, organized his recoilless rifle section into litter squads. Making repeated trips across the fire-swept terrain, Corporal Payne carried several of the wounded to safety. Although it necessitated his moving along a trail through a combination minefield and barbed-wire barrier directly under the enemy guns, Corporal Payne voluntarily continued with his self-assigned mission, often cradling his stricken comrades in his arms to shield them from enemy fire and running through the impact area to a position of safety. Although exhausted and near collapse from his tremendous exertion, he unhesitatingly traversed the hazardous route each time he heard the call of a wounded comrade. As he searched for additional casualties in an area where the battle was raging fiercely, he observed a hitherto undiscovered hostile machine-gun emplacement a few yards before him. Without regard for his personal safety, he immediately called for mortar fire and, from an exposed position, adjusted the fire until the enemy emplacement had been destroyed. It was in this position that Corporal Payne was later mortally wounded by the intense enemy fire. His selfless actions save the lives of many of his comrades wand greatly inspired all those witnessing them.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 249 (May 14, 1952)
Home Town: Lubbock, Texas

PELFREY, FLOYD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Floyd C. Pelfrey, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Pelfrey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pagdangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. On that date, Company B was engaged in an attack against well-fortified enemy positions. As the battle raged, intense enemy fire accounted for several casualties among the friendly troops including the platoon leader of the 2d platoon. Immediately taking charge of the platoon, Sergeant Pelfrey led the men forward until a heavy volume of automatic-weapons fire from a hostile emplacement halted the advance. At this point, with utter disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Pelfrey single-handedly charged the enemy position and destroyed it with hand grenades. Shouting words of encouragement, he led his men forward. Twice more, the platoon was stopped short of their objective by deadly accurate fire from enemy emplacements and both times Sergeant Pelfrey assaulted them in such an aggressive manner that they were successfully neutralized. Sergeant Pelfrey charged forward and his men, inspired by his fearless action, overran the enemy position and inflicted numerous casualties among the hostile troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 954 (December 1, 1951)

*PENA, MIKE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Mike C. Pena (RA18009659), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Pena distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 4 September 1950. On that date, at approximately 2300 hours, an enemy battalion moved up to within a few yards of Master Sergeant Pena's platoon under cover of darkness and an obscuring mist. Observing the enemy, Sergeant Pena and his men immediately opened fire but the sudden, point-blank fire of the hostile forces made it necessary for the friendly troops to withdraw. Rapidly reorganizing his men, Sergeant Pena led them in a counterattack, regained the lost positions, and attempted to hold back the enemy. Despite the devastating fire laid down by the friendly troops, the enemy continued to hurl themselves at the defenses in overwhelming numbers. Realizing that a scarcity of ammunition would soon make the positions untenable, Sergeant Pena ordered his men to fall back, manning a machine-gun to cover their withdrawal. Single-handedly, he held back the enemy until the early hours of the following morning when his position was overrun and he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 622 (August 6, 1951) as amended by General Orders No. 638 (August 13, 1951)
Home Town: El Paso, Texas

PEPLOE, GEORGE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George B. Peploe, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Peploe distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces on the Chobigok and Naktong River at Dedung, Korea, during the period from 17 to 27 September 1950. When two battalions of his regiment formed the spearhead of the Second Infantry Division's advance toward the Naktong River, Colonel Peploe placed himself with the point of the advance guard and personally directed the assaults against ridges, defiles, and passes where the enemy had massed his artillery and heavy weapons for an offensive of his own and was putting up a most stubborn resistance. Unmindful of the intense artillery, mortar and heavy weapons fire, he personally directed the operations of his two battalions and closely coordinated their advance in order to assure a maximum of offensive power. In one instance, he led the advance guard and enveloped the enemy flanks. This maneuver enabled the command to continue the offensive with a minimum of losses and drove the enemy across the Naktong River. Two days later, Colonel Peploe was again well in front of his troops directing the crossing of the Naktong at a point near Sadung. He proceeded to the river's edge and, with utter disregard for the hostile artillery fire, which was falling in the area, personally directed the crossing of patrols to the far side of the river. Keeping the defeated enemy off balance, Colonel Peploe pursued them to Hyopchon and then to Kochang, a vital enemy communications center in South Central Korea. Regrouping his regiment, he renewed the attack on 27 September 1950 and broke out onto the western coastal plain to capture the key city of Chonju with thousands of prisoners and tons of supplies and equipment. In this pursuit, his regiment fought forward seventy-seven miles in ten hours.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 196 (December 14, 1950)

PEREZ, GINES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gines Perez, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Perez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kwakson, Korea, on 31 October 1950. On that date, the 2d Battalion was conducting a drive toward Sinuiju when it was held up by heavy artillery, mortar and automatic-weapons fire from seven enemy tanks and an estimated battalion of enemy troops. Colonel Perez, riding in the lead tank, leaped to the ground and, despite the intense enemy fire, deployed his battalion with the utmost calmness. After making a rapid, accurate estimate of the situation, he contacted Company E and led them to a position from which they launched an attack designed to envelop the flank of the enemy. Moving back, he directed the emplacement of artillery pieces; then, with complete indifference to the heavy enemy fire, he moved to the foremost position of his troops and personally adjusted the artillery fire. He remained in this exposed position until the enveloping company had overrun the enemy positions, forcing them to retreat in disorder. The successful enveloping attack, engineered and directed by Colonel Perez, resulted in the capture of sixty-four prisoners, inflicted an estimated two hundred casualties on the enemy, and destroyed five enemy tanks one self-propelled gun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 244 (April 26, 1951)

PEREZ, JESSIE F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jessie F. Perez (RA18307559), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Perez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeu-san, Korea, on 30 July 1951. On that date, Company L and Company K were engaged in an assault against a well-entrenched hostile force when they were suddenly pinned down by a heavy volume of enemy fire. Realizing that immediate and aggressive action was necessary, Sergeant Perez unhesitatingly left his position of cover and, followed closely by a comrade firing a machine-gum, charged up the hill. Disregarding the intense hostile fire being concentrated on him, he assaulted two enemy machine-gun emplacements, killing the troops occupying them with pistol fire. Then, calling for men from his squad to move forward to man the captured weapons, he directed their fire against the hostile emplacements and resumed his assault. His courageous actions so inspired the friendly troops that they renewed their attack and rushed forward to secure their objectives, inflicting numerous casualties on the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 904 (November 16, 1951)
Home Town: Harris, Texas

*PERRY, HAROLD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harold Perry (RA13343537), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Perry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 23 September 1950. On that date, Company G had launched an attack against heavily fortified positions near Haman and, while advancing on the objective, received withering small-arms and machine-gun fire which pinned the company down and stalled the advance. Private Perry, with complete disregard for his personal safety, continued to advance alone in the face of the intense enemy fire. Reaching the enemy positions, he crawled from foxhole to foxhole, killing the enemy in each with grenades and rifle fire. After killing seven enemy soldiers, he was hit by enemy fire and mortally wounded. His heroic action resulted in the saving of numerous lives and so inspired is comrades that they moved forward aggressively, and swiftly accomplished the unit's mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 159 (March 21, 1951)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

PERRY, MILLER O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Miller O. Perry (0-18427), Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 52d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Perry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Osan, Korea, on 5 July 1950. On this date Lieutenant Colonel Perry voluntarily accompanied one of his batteries, part of a task force numbering less than four hundred men, deep into enemy territory. The task force organized a defensive position in the path of the advancing enemy and Colonel Perry remained to assist the infantry battalion commander and direct the artillery battery. The enemy attacked in overwhelming numbers, supported by heavy tanks and, without regard for his own personal safety, Colonel Perry manned a rocket launcher from an exposed position firing at tanks from distances of ten to fifteen yards. The rockets were ineffective against the heavy armor, so Colonel Perry ordered his 105-mm. howitzers to place direct fire on the tanks, destroying six. During a lull in the firing the enemy displayed a flag of truce and Colonel Perry, in advancing to recognize the flag, was fired on and wounded. He refused to be evacuated and later on directed the fire that enabled his battery to break out of encirclement, then personally led them twenty miles through enemy held territory to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Sarasota, Florida

PETERS, MILTON L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Milton L. Peters, Jr. (ER31507272), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Peters distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 16 October 1952. Spearheading an assault on the left finger of a strategic hill complex, Sergeant Peters and his platoon moved in as a skirmisher down a narrow, tortuous communications trench toward "Pike's Peak." Advancing at the head of the men, he threw napalm and grenades into enemy bunkers with deadly accuracy. When an officer who was to accompany the platoon on an intelligence mission passed a seemingly unoccupied cave, an enemy soldier jumped from the position and wounded him with machine-gun fire. The officer returned the fire with his pistol, but it was ineffectual. Rushing to the aid of the stricken man, Sergeant Peters killed the assailant, then evacuated the officer to the rear. Returning with a napalm satchel charge, he hurled it into the aperture, but it exploded prematurely and he was engulfed in searing flames and severely burned. Despite the pain, he refused evacuation and continued to lead the advance until ordered to retire for medical treatment. His courageous actions exacted a toll of 26 enemy, cleared the foe from the area, and enabled friendly forces to secure the objective.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 84 (November 3, 1954)
Home Town: Worcester, Massachusetts

*PETERSON, CLARENCE AMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence Ames Peterson (RA11067711), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Master Sergeant Peterson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea, on 26 March 1951. On that date, Master Sergeant Peterson's company was given the mission of securing Hill 228, a commanding terrain feature near Parun-ni, occupied by well-entrenched enemy troops estimated at battalion strength. The 2d platoon was selected as the lead element of the assault, and as it advanced across the fire-swept area toward the hill, the platoon leader and four key noncommissioned officers were wounded. Sergeant Peterson, a member of the platoon, immediately moved to the front of the platoon and assumed command, continuing the assault. At one point during the assault an enemy machine-gun manned by five soldiers opened fire on the platoon and pinned it down. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Peterson crawled to a position within twenty yards of the machine-gun and from that point, armed only with carbine and trench knife, assaulted the gun emplacement, killing the five enemy troops. The elimination of this weapon enabled his platoon and the platoon on the right flank to continue their assault with minimum casualties. Shortly after knocking out the enemy machine-gun, Sergeant Peterson was killed by a burst of enemy fire; however, his aggressive leadership and courageous devotion to duty so inspired the remaining members of his platoon that they engaged the hostile force in hand-to-hand combat, killing eighty enemy troops, capturing ten, and forcing the remainder to flee in wild disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 459 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Knox, Maine

PHOENIX, EARL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earl C. Phoenix (RA17246652), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Phoenix distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Takhyan-dong, Korea, on 27 November 1950. On that date, Corporal Phoenix was assigned as machine gunner on the lead vehicle of a combat patrol committed to recover a vehicle lost in an ambush earlier in the day when the patrol came under heavy hostile fire from mortars, automatic weapons, and small arms that halted its advance. Corporal Phoenix immediately opened fire on the enemy which retarded their attack, limited their fire power, and allowed his comrades to dismount and set up defensive positions. When hit by enemy fire and knocked from the vehicle, he struggled back to his position and continued firing. Struck a second time by enemy fire, he ignored his wounds and continued to deliver deadly fire against the assailants until his ammunition became exhausted. He then rendered his weapon unserviceable to the enemy before consenting to be evacuated. His determined action enabled his patrol to contain the enemy attack until aid could be summoned and the wounded evacuated. The heroic actions and sustained devotion to duty exemplified by Corporal Phoenix reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)

PICOU, WILFRED J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wilfred J. Picou, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine-gunner with Company K, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Picou distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pungchon-ni, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, Company K was subjected to a series of fanatical assaults by a numerically superior enemy force. During one of those assaults, Corporal Picou was driven from his position when an enemy grenade landed in his machine-gun emplacement. Immediately after the grenade exploded, three enemy soldiers took a position behind the machine-gun and began firing on the friendly troops. Unhesitatingly Corporal Picou charged through the hail of enemy machine-gun fire and single- handedly assaulted the enemy position with grenades, killing the three soldiers at the gun and two others who were nearby. His dauntless actions prevented the death of many of his comrades and removed a serious threat to the defense of his entire unit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 479 (June 30, 1951)

*PIERCE, CARL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Carl F. Pierce (RA35366490), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Pierce distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Satae- ri, Korea, on 24 February 1953. Leading a contact patrol committed to close with and capture or destroy hostile troops, Master Sergeant Pierce and his valiant soldiers forged up the steep, barren approach to within approximately one hundred yards of a well-fortified enemy outpost and came under withering automatic-weapons and rifle fire which halted the advance. Realizing the success of the mission was imperiled, he quickly moved to the point position and spearheaded an assault carrying to within fifty yards of the objective when enemy grenades rained down, which wounded him and several other members of the group. Disregarding the wound, he shouted words of encouragement to the men and urged them forward in a daring charge. Minutes later, when an enemy grenade fell to the ground near him, Sergeant Pierce hurled himself on it, absorbing the blast and saving his comrades form possible serious injury. Although wounded again in this action, he remained steadfast until the patrol broke contact with the enemy. He then directed an orderly withdrawal to the safety of the valley below.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: Clay, Indiana

PINNEY, DAVID R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David R. Pinney (RA11146191), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Pinney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mayon-ni, Korea, on 23 March 1953. Sergeant Pinney, responsible for protecting the command post, upon hearing a disturbance moved forward to investigate. As Sergeant Pinney approached the command post bunker, an enemy solider at a distance of about ten yards opened fire and wounded the bunker guard. Sergeant Pinney fired at the enemy soldier and killed him, but a grenade which the enemy soldier exploded and seriously wounded him. This action set off an enemy attack and, although he was in great pain, he formed his men into a close perimeter defense, checked their positions, and directed their fire, adding his own accurate rifle fire to the attempt to ward off the hostile forces. In the course of the battle, Sergeant Pinney observed an enemy soldier moving toward one of his men who had been wounded. Disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Pinney moved through the withering fire toward the wounded man. When he had almost reached him he was again hit by an enemy grenade. Unable to rise as a result of his wounds, Sergeant Pinney crawled to his comrade and, using the stricken man's weapon, killed the advancing soldier and others who followed. Sergeant Pinney continued to direct accurate rifle fire into the enemy ranks until he was wounded a third time. He was then carried to a position where he could direct the men, and he remained there, refusing medical aid, until the attack had been successfully repelled.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 442 (May 1, 1953)
Home Town: Cheshire, New Hampshire

*POHLMAN, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William R. Pohlman (RA17318035), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private First Class Pohlman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea, on 7 February 1953. On that date, Private Pohlman was an element leader of the left element of a combat patrol which had maneuvered into assault positions and opened fire on enemy emplacements. When an enemy machine-gunner directed accurate fire into his section of the group, delaying its advance, Private Pohlman climbed to the top of a small mound and single-handedly destroyed the crew with his machine-gun. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Private Pohlman held his position in the face of intense counter-fire and succeeded in diverting hostile fire from the rest of the patrol, enabling them to effectively organize and move in to engage the enemy. Private Pohlman continued his courageous stand until he was fatally wounded. His heroism so inspired his comrades that they were able to completely secure the left flank of the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 592 (June 23, 1953)
Home Town: Adams, Illinois

*PONCIANO, BENJAMIN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Benjamin A. Ponciano (RA30111683), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Ponciano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 16 September 1950. Sergeant Ponciano, with a companion, was assisting his platoon in attacking the center of a ridge from which came a preponderance of enemy fire, a strongpoint that was successfully holding up the advance of the entire battalion. Being on the left flank of his platoon, he observed prepared enemy positions that posed a serious threat to the left rear of his advancing platoon. Unable to attract the attention of the endangered personnel, and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he attempted to eliminate the nearest enemy machine-gun position. Together with his companion, he was able to destroy the enemy machine-gun, but in so doing was mortally wounded and sacrificed his own life in order to protect his comrades.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 19, (January 12, 1951)
Home Town: Kahuku, Hawaii

POOVEY, JUNIUS G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Junius G. Poovey (RA34964159), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Poovey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uiryong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. On this date Company G was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. The forward elements of the 3d platoon were overrun and hand-to-hand combat ensued. Sergeant First Class Poovey, without regard for his own safety, exposed himself to heavy enemy fire and engaged in the hand-to-hand conflict. Within a few moments the Company Commander, Platoon Leader, and the Platoon Sergeant were killed. Sergeant Poovey immediately took command and directed the fire of his Platoon. Throughout the day Sergeant Poovey exposed himself to enemy hand grenades and devastating artillery, mortar, automatic weapons, and self-propelled gun fire to direct accurate mortar and artillery fire on the attacking enemy, repulsing numerous assaults. He assisted in aid to the wounded, and after ordered to do so by the Battalion Commander, organized and supervised the orderly withdrawal under cover of darkness. Sergeant Poovey was the last man to leave the position, and through his extraordinary heroism the lives of twenty wounded men were saved and all of the unit's equipment was retained.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 175 (November 17, 1950)
Home Town: Catawba, North Carolina

*PORTER, RAYMOND S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Raymond S. Porter (US55057011), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine gunner with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Porter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Imokchong, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date, Corporal Porter's company was attempting to dislodge a large hostile force from a strategic hill. The enemy troops were occupying elaborately prepared defensive positions and their well- protected automatic weapons poured a steady stream of fire down on the friendly troops, forcing them to seek cover at the base of the slope. In addition to enemy small-arms and automatic weapons fire, the entire area occupied by the friendly force was undergoing an almost continuous mortar and artillery bombardment. Realizing that his comrades face annihilation if they remained in their present positions, Corporal Porter, rushed across the fire-swept terrain and placed his machine-gun in an exposed position, forcing the enemy to concentrate their fire on him. When a ruptured cartridge rendered his weapon inoperative, he moved back down the slope, obtained an automatic rifle, and returned to his position. Pouring deadly accurate fire into numerous enemy emplacements an killing many of the hostile troops, Corporal Porter refused to abandon his open position despite the fact that a tremendous amount of hostile fire was brought to bear on him. For over an hour, he methodically neutralized enemy positions to provide a path for his comrades up the hill until he was hit and mortally wounded by the intense hostile mortar fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (April 19, 1952)
Home Town: Morton, North Dakota

*PORUBSKY, SYLVESTER V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Sylvester V. Porubsky (0-1313302), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Porubsky distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chirwon-ni, Korea, on 1 September 1950. On this date, Company A was assigned the mission of retaking a ridge in the vicinity of Chirwon-ni, Korea. Shortly after darkness Lieutenant Porubsky deployed his platoon in a skirmish line and moved slowly and silently up the hill through the hostile fire. When the silently-moving group unnerved the enemy and flashes from their weapons disclosed the hostile positions, Lieutenant Porubsky and his platoon neutralized the opposition with grenades. As the platoon continued its movement up the hill, the enemy, terrified by the silent attack, hastily abandoned their positions and fled. When the enemy moved over the crest of the hill, Lieutenant Porubsky led his platoon in a charge which destroyed the hostile ranks with grenades and rifle fire, accounted for thirty enemy dead, and secured a vital position in the battalion defense line.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950)
Home Town: Shawnee, Kansas

*POSTLETHWAIT, CLARENCE EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence Eugene Postlethwait (RA06898582), Sergeant First Class [then Sergeant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a medical aidman with Company C, 8th Engineer Combat Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Postlethwait distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Unsan, Korea, on 2 November 1950. On that date, the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry) was completely surrounded and contained in a small defense perimeter in an open field and pinned down by heavy concentrations of enemy automatic small-arms fire. There were approximately 125 American wounded within the defense perimeter who had received no medical attention due to the fact that all medical supplies were aboard a truck which had to be abandoned during the preceding night's furious engagement and which was located at an exposed point approximately 75 yards outside the defense perimeter, in full view of the enemy. Sergeant First Class Postlethwait fearlessly volunteered to attempt to reach the truck and bring back medications and bandages to enable the battalion surgeon to render emergency treatment to the wounded. With utter disregard for his own safety, he left the comparative cover of the defense perimeter, made his way to the truck amidst bursts of fire from enemy snipers, and collected the necessary medical supplies. He had all but arrived back at the defense perimeter when he was mortally wounded by fragments from enemy grenades.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 51 (November 29, 1956)
Home Town: Erie, Pennsylvania

POWELL, HERBERT BUTLER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herbert Butler Powell (0-16684), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Colonel Powell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pung-san, Korea, during the period from 1 through 21 November 1950. Colonel Powell's unit was viciously assaulted near Pung-san by a numerically superior force which threatened penetration of the leading elements. In the face of devastating hostile fire, Colonel Powell went forward and directed the employment of elements of his command and repulsed the attack. Later, while approaching Pincho-ri, a reconnaissance patrol detected an ambush in a narrow defile which the armored spearhead had entered. Although suffering from a severe leg injury sustained while organizing his men for counterattack and which was aggravated by the bitter cold weather, Colonel Powell scorning the withering barrage of fire, moved painfully through the impact area and, miraculously escaping death, reached the most forward elements of his command and directed intense supporting fire which rapidly dislodged the stubborn foe. Colonel Powell continued close personal liaison with forward echelons, fearlessly traveling hundreds of miles over rugged terrain, frequently through enemy sniper fire, to direct patrolling and reorganization in preparation for a major attack across the Ungi River.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 172 (July 2, 1951)
Born: July 13, 1903 at Monmouth, Oregon
Home Town: Monmouth, Oregon

POWERS, JOHN J., JR.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Powers, Jr. (0-27478), Captain, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Powers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea.
Army Register (1955)
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

*PRESSLER, ROBERT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert H. Pressler (RA33114359), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 8066th Mechanized Reconnaissance Platoon attached to the 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Pressler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chinju, Korea, on 11 August 1950. Sergeant Pressler was assigned duty as the driver of a gasoline truck refueling tanks for the 89th Medium Tank Battalion in the front lines. On arriving at the front lines, Sergeant Pressler learned of a tank which had ran out of gas behind enemy lines and, accompanied by a small squad of infantry in a truck, went forward into enemy territory. During the advance the small convoy was ambushed by two hundred enemy. During the firefight which followed, Sergeant Pressler ordered the rest of the men to leave and remained in his position, placing accurate fire on the enemy, which delayed their advance, enabling the rest of the men to withdraw. During this action Sergeant Pressler was killed in action.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: Prince Georges, Maryland

PSIHAS, GEORGE PETER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Peter Psihas (0-64184), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Psihas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Naebongchon, Korea on the night of 28 May 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Psihas was commanding a small patrol in an outpost beyond friendly lines when he suddenly detected the sound of movement in the darkness before him. Standing up, he saw that a hostile force was creeping toward the friendly entrenchments. He immediately opened fire with his carbine, and a pitched battle ensued, with the numerically superior enemy swarming into the defensive positions to engage in vicious, direct conflict with the friendly troops. Although his carbine jammed, Lieutenant Psihas continued to direct the fire of his men and to engage the foe in hand-to-hand combat. Inspired by his example of personal fearlessness, the friendly forces managed to repulse the fanatical enemy assault. Despite the fact that he had been wounded in battle, Lieutenant Psihas, refusing medical attention, hurriedly prepared his men for a second attack. When the attack came, he supervised the defense as the enemy forces were again thrown back, suffering heavy casualties. Still refusing medical aid, Lieutenant Psihas saw that his men had almost exhausted their supply of ammunition. Unhesitatingly he left the relative safety of the trenches and, moving quickly over the battlefield, gathered ammunition from the fallen enemy dead. No sooner had the ammunition been distributed, than the hostile force launched a third attack, swarming up the hill in a frenzied attempt to dislodge the friendly patrol. Displaying superb leadership and matchless fighting spirit, Lieutenant Psihas once more directed the fire of his men with such effectiveness that the onslaught was repulsed. Only when a relief force arrived did Lieutenant Psihas allow himself to be evacuated. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty he displayed on this occasion reflect great credit upon himself and are in keeping with the most esteemed traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 537 (September 12, 1952)
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

PUCKETT, RALPH, JR.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph Puckett, Jr. (0-59165), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 8th Ranger Company, 8213th Army Unit, 8th U.S. Army. First Lieutenant Puckett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Unsan, Korea, on 25 and 26 November 1950. With complete disregard for his personal safety, First Lieutenant Puckett led his company across eight hundred yards of open terrain under heavy enemy small-arms fire and captured the company's objective. During this operation he deliberately exposed himself to enemy machine-gun fire to enable his men to spot locations of the machine guns. After capturing the objective, he directed preparation of defensive positions against an expected enemy counterattack. At 2200 hours on 25 November 1950, while directing the defense of his position against a heavy counterattack, he was wounded in the fight shoulder. Refusing evacuation, he continued to direct his company through four more counterattacks by a numerically superior force who advanced to within grenade range before being driven back During these attacks, he left the safety of his foxhole in order to observe movements of the enemy and to direct artillery fire. In so doing, he repeatedly exposed himself to heavy small-arms and mortar fire. In the sixth counterattack, at 0300 hours on 26 November 1950, he was wounded again, so seriously that he was unable to move. Detecting that his company was about to be overrun and forced to withdraw, he ordered his men to leave him behind so as not to endanger their withdrawal. Despite his protests, he was dragged from the hill to a position of safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 119 (March 5, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

PUGH, CURTIS D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Curtis D. Pugh (RA06396324), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Pugh distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 15 September 1950. On that date, Master Sergeant Pugh, as a volunteer member of a rear guard, held his position on a narrow mountain ridge and fought off a series of fanatical enemy assaults at ranges as close as ten yards. He personally stopped one attack by rising from behind his rock barricade with utter disregard for his own safety and firing his automatic rifle in an arc before him. When his battalion commander was engaged in a hand-to-hand combat with enemy soldiers, Sergeant Pugh came to his rescue and saved the life of the battalion commander by shooting the enemy soldiers who had succeeded in wounding him. Sergeant Pugh then maintained a base of fire until the wounded officer was able to escape.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 20 (January 13, 1951)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

R

RADICE, MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael Radice (RA12276936), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Radice distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 10 May 1951. On that date, Company E was assigned the mission of securing commanding terrain approximately 5000 yards north of Uijongbu. As Private Radice and his platoon moved up a steep, rocky slope to attack bitterly defended enemy positions, they were pinned down by heavy machine-gunfire halting their advance. Private Radice, realizing that drastic action was required, began to crawl and dodge from rock to rock, edging toward the enemy foxholes near the summit. Accurately throwing grenades and aggressively assaulting one position after another, he destroyed three separate strongpoints, each containing three hostile riflemen. Despite a withering hail of bullets, Private Radice inched father up the fire-swept incline and was wounded in the right arm while silencing two machine-gun positions. Although bleeding profusely from his wound, he grabbed several abandoned enemy grenades and continued his lone attack on two dugouts, killing four riflemen. Fearlessly proceeding toward a mortar position, which was delivering crippling fire on the company command post, he neutralized a mortar position and its crew. Although seriously weakened by excessive loss of blood, Private Radice reached an exposed area where he rescued a wounded comrade, moving him to a place of comparative safety and refusing medical aid until the man had been treated.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 195 (July 28, 1951)
Home Town: Mercer, New Jersey

*RAMPENDAHL, DIETER WULF
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dieter Wulf Rampendahl (0-2262063), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Rampendahl distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces during the fight for Hill 333 in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 1 February 1951. On that date, an enemy force estimated at regimental strength launched an attack against the 3d Battalion with the brunt of the assault directed at the left flank platoon of Company I. Early in the attack, the platoon leader was wounded and Lieutenant Rampendahl assumed command of the platoon. Under heavy enemy pressure, the platoon was forced to withdraw from its positions on Hill 335. Realizing the tactical importance of recapturing the high ground, Lieutenant Rampendahl reorganized his men, issued a resupply of ammunition, and led a bayonet charge up the hill, forcing the enemy to withdraw. When the enemy regrouped and launched a counterattack, the platoon was again forced to temporarily withdraw from the hill. In the fierce fighting which followed, the hill changed hands five times. As Lieutenant Rampendahl led his decimated platoon in the last charge against the hill, the hostile troops, completely demoralized by their inability to hold the high ground, abandoned their positions and fled in disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 561 (July 19, 1951)
Home Town: San Francisco, California

RANDOLPH, EMMIT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Emmit L. Randolph (US55071460), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Section Leader in an Infantry Company of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Randolph distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 14 October 1952. On that date, Sergeant Randolph was with a company participating in an assault on a well fortified enemy-held hill. When the friendly force was pinned down by enemy fire, Sergeant Randolph left his covered position and advanced toward the enemy position, firing his carbine at a rapid rate. An enemy mortar shell exploded nearby, wounding him and knocking him down the hill. But, refusing to be stopped, Sergeant Randolph again charged the enemy position. Sergeant Randolph was thrown to the ground on two more occasions by enemy shells, one time losing consciousness for a short period. Regaining consciousness, he valiantly pushed forward urging his comrades to follow in the assault. Inspired by his courageous action, the men in his unit followed him and succeeded in destroying the enemy position and securing the objective. Although he was wounded three times in the assault and subsequent counterattack, Sergeant Randolph continued to lead the men and refused to accept medical treatment until the objective was taken.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 421 (April 24, 1953)
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

RANSOM, WAYMOND R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Waymond R. Ransom (RA16148573), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Ransom distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yonchon, Korea, on 11 November 1950. On that date, the Regimental Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, while moving by motor convoy in the vicinity of Yonchon, encountered deadly automatic-weapons fire from a large, well-concealed enemy force occupying commanding positions. Ordering his men to dismount and seek cover, Sergeant Ranson moved to an exposed position and advanced while delivering a steady stream of effective counterfire into the enemy strongpoint. Although wounded several times, he continued to move toward the hostile positions. When his supply of ammunition was exhausted, he engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat until they overcame him and left him for dead. The outstanding courage, grim determination, and selfless devotion to duty of Sergeant Ranson enabled his comrades to withdraw with minimum casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 295 (May 10, 1951)
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

RASNICK, WOODROW W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Woodrow W. Rasnick, Sergeant [then Corporal], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Rasnick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Ch'angnyong, Korea, on 17 August 1950. On that date, Sergeant Rasnick led his squad forward, acting as a security force independent of company support, during an attack in which his company had the mission of capturing the high ground on and adjacent to O'Hang Hill. Unexpected machine-gun fire was encountered and the squad took cover when further advance appeared impossible. Sergeant Rasnick dashed forward, heedless of enemy fire, located two enemy machine-guns and silenced them by accurate, well-aimed fire from his rifle. He then again led his squad forward until heavy machine-gun fire was encountered from other enemy emplacements. While the squad took cover, Sergeant Rasnick again courageously rushed forward under heavy enemy fire, assaulted the enemy machine-gun nest, bayoneted one member of the gun crew and captured another.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 141 (October 27, 1950)

RAY, LAWRENCE A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lawrence A. Ray (RA07040359), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 63d Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Ray distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kongju, Korea, on 14 July 1950. On that date Battery A was attacked from the flank by numerically superior enemy forces. Corporal Ray's gun position was directly in the path of the assault, and when he could no longer fire his gun, he obtained a Browning Automatic Rifle, ammunition, and grenades. The, without regard for his own personal safety, advanced alone on the enemy, finally taking a position in a foxhole. The enemy charged his position and Corporal Ray stopped the attack by his accurate fire. During this second action he was wounded twice and driven from his position by mortar fire. As soon as the mortar fire slackened, Corporal Ray, despite his wounds, charged back to his former position and continued to hold off the enemy until all equipment could be destroyed and personnel withdrawn from the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (September 7, 1950)
Home Town: Hardin, Kentucky

READ, BEVERLY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Beverly M. Read, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Regiment of the 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Read distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 7 July 1953. Early that morning Colonel Read moved to a strategic outpost during a battle to better control, organize, and direct counter-attacking United Nations troops. During the period which he remained on the position, Colonel Read's actions were a constant inspiration to his men. He assisted in manning crew-served weapons, fired the rifle and carbine at enemy troops, and supervised operations in enemy infested trenches. He personally directed artillery fire on the hostile forces and on many occasions disregarded his own safety to aid in the evacuation of the wounded. When he was ordered to withdraw, Colonel Read personally directed the evacuation of the wounded and remained on the outpost until all of his men had successfully moved back.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 90 (March 1, 1954)

RECTOR, EDWARD G. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward G. Rector (RA16263945), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Rector distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 2 August 1950. When his 4.2 mortar platoon was threatened by a machine-gun supported enemy force numbering about twenty-five, Sergeant Rector attacked the force alone. To reach the enemy, he charged fifty yards uphill in the face of intense fire from the enemy machine-gun. Arriving at the enemy position, he destroyed the machine-gun crew and inflicted heavy casualties upon the other enemy soldiers in the area, forcing the survivors to withdraw. He continued his harassing attack until his ammunition was exhausted.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Van Buren, Michigan

*REDDICK, BILLY F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Billy F. Reddick (RA18358022), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Reddick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nago-ri, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date the platoon of which Corporal Reddick was a member was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a strategic hill from a large hostile force. As the friendly troops advanced up the precipitous slope, they were subjected to a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire which forced them to halt their attack and seek cover. Locating the position from which the major portion of the hostile fire originated, Corporal Reddick, without regard for his personal safety, moved forward over the fire-swept terrain. Upon reaching a position a few yards from the enemy emplacement, he threw several grenades inside. Then, fixing his bayonet, he leaped within the bunker and engaged the hostile troops occupying it in hand-to- hand combat. Fighting fiercely, Corporal Reddick single-handedly killed seven of the enemy and neutralizing the bunker. Inspired by his fearlessness, the friendly troops renewed their advance and, as they advanced, Corporal Reddick took charge of an automatic-rifle team. Leading his men directly toward the objective, he directed their fire with great skill until he was hit and killed by hostile fire. His courage and devotion to duty were instrumental in the success achieved by his platoon in seizing its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 163 (March 26, 1952)
Home Town: Richland, Louisiana

REDMAN, WILBUR A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wilbur A. Redman (RA36691603), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Acting Platoon Leader with Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Redman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chau-ni, Korea, on 17 and 18 May 1951. On that date, Sergeant First Class Redman's platoon had the mission of defending a five hundred yard ridge line. On the morning of 17 May 1951, the positions on the left of his platoon were penetrated and Sergeant Redman was directed to provide cover for the withdrawal of these elements. Organizing a series of firing lines, he covered the entire withdrawal; then, remaining in position, he covered the withdrawal of his own platoon with an automatic weapon, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. On the following day, Sergeant Redman's platoon was designated to conduct a rear guard action for the withdrawal of his company. From an exposed position, Sergeant Redman skillfully directed delaying actions which enabled the company to withdraw with minimum casualties, then took a position behind a machine-gun and covered the withdrawal of his platoon, delivering devastating fire on the enemy until the last man of the platoon had safely withdrawn.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 480 (June 30, 1951)
Home Town: Posey, Indiana

*REEDER, JACK NEWTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Newton Reeder (NG28115658), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a recoilless rifle gunner with an Infantry Company of the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Reeder distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yanggu, Korea, on 30 August 1951. On that date, Private Reeder provided supporting fire for his comrades as they launched an attack against well-fortified hostile positions. Firing with deadly accuracy, he destroyed several of the key enemy emplacements. Upon discovering that his ammunition was exhausted, Private Reeder picked up an M-1 rifle and joined a rifle platoon. From his new position he continued to direct a devastating volume of fire against the enemy until his rifle ammunition was also expended. Finding himself unable to fire at the foe, Private Reeder then moved among the wounded men lying on the hill, calming them and dressing their wounds. As he crawled about on the fire-swept terrain, he noticed one of his comrades lying seriously wounded in an area exposed to the direct fire of the enemy. Unhesitatingly, he rushed across the open ground to the stricken man's side. Undaunted by the heavy volume of enemy fire being concentrated on him, Private Reeder attempted to carry the man to safety. He soon realized, however, that the nature of his comrade's wound made this impossible and so, with utter disregard for his personal safety, Private Reeder shielded the man with his body. Because of the intense enemy fire this action cost him his life.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1019 (December 25, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

REEVES, JOSEPH P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph P. Reeves, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Reeves distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongju, Korea, on 30 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Reeves led his rifle squad across open terrain under a deadly hail of enemy fire to the base of a precipitous slope of Hill 764 which was being heavily defended by the enemy. Leading his men up the hill in the face of withering automatic weapons and small-arms fire, Sergeant Reeves reached a point on the hill which offered footing for his riflemen. Establishing a base of fire, he pulled himself forward to within a few yards of an enemy machine-gun nest, killing its crew with a grenade and killing four other enemy soldiers with his carbine. Returning to his squad, he deployed them into effective firing positions and shortly thereafter, the enemy launched a fanatical counterattack. Through the inspiring leadership of Sergeant Reeves the attack was repulsed; however, he was left with only two men who were not wounded. While waiting for reinforcements, the enemy launched anther counterattack against the position. Displaying outstanding courage and coolness, Sergeant Reeves remained in position firing his carbine and throwing grenades at the on-rushing enemy horde. The two men with Sergeant Reeves were also wounded, leaving him the lone defender of the position. After expending all the ammunition from his weapon and the weapons of his wounded comrades, he was attacked by an enemy soldier armed with an automatic weapon and they engaged in hand-to-hand combat. Wrenching the weapon from the enemy, Sergeant Reeves killed him, then turned the automatic weapon on the remaining hostile force, repulsing their attack and putting them to route.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 347 (May 26, 1951)

REIDY, RICHARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard F. Reidy, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Reidy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea during the period from 29 November 1950 through 4 December 1950. Colonel Reidy's actions contributed materially to the successful break-through of the 2d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment in the Chosin Reservoir area and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, X Corps: General Orders No. 66 (December 15, 1950)

RHODES, ROGER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roger J. Rhodes (US55200797), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Rhodes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sachon-ni, Korea, on 8 November 1952. On that date, the company outpost manned by Corporal Rhodes and a small force came under an intense concentration of mortar and artillery fire and, when the bombardment lifted, enemy troops surged forward in a frontal and left- flank assault maneuver in an attempt to overrun the position. Constantly exposed to withering fire, he moved among his men, shouting words of encouragement and directing the holding action. Minutes later, the enemy moved in on the outpost and showered the area with grenades. Retrieving the lethal missiles as they fell, he lobbed them back with deadly accuracy, inflicting numerous casualties. He continued his incredible display of valor for approximately thirty minutes when a grenade detonated in his hand, severely wounding him. Refusing evacuation, he called in artillery and mortar fire on the hostile forces until the attack was contained with heavy enemy losses.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: Cass, Indiana

RHODES, WALTER R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Walter R. Rhodes, Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery B, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division, as an Artillery Forward Observer attached to an Infantry Company. Second Lieutenant Rhodes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pia-ri, Korea, on 23 September 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Rhodes was attached to an infantry company engaged in an assault against a well-entrenched hostile force located near the crest of an almost vertical slope. The friendly force attacked repeatedly only to be hurled back by the numerically superior enemy who was supported by mortar and artillery fire. As the friendly troops fought their way up the slope, Lieutenant Rhodes moved forward with the assaulting elements and made his way to a position which was completely exposed to the observation of the enemy in order to direct the friendly artillery fire more effectively. Upon realizing that the hand-to-hand nature of the conflict rendered artillery support impossible, he began carrying ammunition up to the hard-pressed infantrymen. After making numerous trips up the slope, he picked up a rifle and, moving to the point which was bearing the burnt of the hostile fire, he began firing with deadly accuracy at the enemy emplacements. His actions were entirely voluntary and so inspired the men about him that they effectively repulsed a fanatical enemy counterattack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1 (January 1, 1952)

RHOTENBERRY, R. M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to R. M. Rhotenberry, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Machine Gun Section of Company H, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Rhotenberry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongdon-ni, Korea, on the night of 6 - 7 November 1950. On that date, a machine-gun section of Company H was attached to Company C of the regiment to furnish supporting fire in holding positions on high ground where the company was deployed. When a concealed enemy machine-gun opened fire on the left flank of the company with such accuracy that several machine-gunners and nearby riflemen were wounded, Second Lieutenant Rhotenberry's men became demoralized, abandoned their weapons, and ran for cover. Displaying outstanding courage, Lieutenant Rhotenberry moved through the hail of enemy fire, rounded up his men and returned them to their positions. Observing an abandoned light machine-gun lying close by, he moved the gun and ammunition to a point from which he could direct intense fire on the enemy positions. The heavy volume of fire delivered by him, together with the fire of his section, silenced the hostile fire and forced the enemy to withdraw. Shifting his fire to the opposite flank which was heavily engaged, he assisted in repulsing the attack on the right flank of the company. After the initial attack was repulsed and while the lead platoon was being reorganized, a heavy concentration of mortar fire struck the position, killing the infantry platoon leader and causing several other casualties. Lieutenant Rhotenberry unhesitatingly assumed command of the platoon and, organizing both the platoon and his machine-gun section, personally directed them in renewed action, forcing the enemy to retreat with heavy losses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 288 (May 8, 1951)

*RIBAC, BARTOLOME S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Bartolome S. Ribac (RA30103257), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine-gunner with Company C, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Ribac distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Uiryong, Korea, on 18 September 1950. Sergeant Ribac's platoon launched an attack across a small valley with the mission securing a well-fortified ridge running parallel to the front. Immediately after the unit made the "jump-off" the enemy began delivering a withering hail of automatic weapons and rifle fire from along the entire ridge pinning the platoon down. At the same time the enemy began to fire mortars into the group, causing numerous casualties. Sergeant Ribac immediately leaped to his feet, carrying his machine-gun, and charged the enemy-held hill. In spite of the murderous hail of bullets and bursting shells, he ran to the top of the ridge and into the ranks of the enemy. Once on the ridge he deliberately set up his gun in an extremely exposed position and began delivering effective fire on the enemy. Due to his open position and accurate fire, the enemy was forced to direct their fire at him. Ignoring the enemy grenade bursts and small-arms fire which churned the dirt around him, Sergeant Ribac continued his determined and deadly firing on the enemy positions until he fell mortally wounded. However, his courageous action diverted the enemy long enough for his comrades to extract themselves from an almost hopeless situation and continue the attack and accomplish their mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 55 (February 6, 1951)
Home Town: Virgin Islands

RICHARDS, J. C., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to J. C. Richards, Jr. (RA38461246), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Richards distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yangjimal, Korea, on the night of 5 May 1953. On that night, a reinforced enemy platoon, employing automatic weapons and hand grenades, ambushed a small reserve patrol led by Sergeant Richards. Sergeant Richards, one of several members of the element hit in the first exchanges of fire, suffered head wounds and paralysis from the waist down. Although in great pain, Sergeant Richards forced himself into a sitting position and, while personally directing continuous carbine and grenade fire at the foe and shouting encouragement to his men, called in supporting mortar fire within twenty yards of his own position. Exhibiting the greatest personal courage and gallantry, Sergeant Richards killed three of the enemy while they were attempting to capture members of his patrol. He fired his weapon for a two-hour period in spite of his serious physical condition. Finally, when a rescue force arrived, Sergeant Richards refused to be evacuated until the evacuation of his unit had been completed and all other casualties had been treated. As a result of Sergeant Richard's heroic action, a possible enemy thrust at the unite nations line was thwarted, his patrol was saved, and the dead and wounded were expeditiously evacuated. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Sergeant Richards on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 866 (September 13, 1953)
Home Town: Bell, Texas

*RIDDLE, JAMES WELDON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Weldon Riddle (RA15258471), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Riddle distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pangwa-dong, Korea, on 22 April 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and securing Hill 834, Company B, advancing against the enemy, was suddenly subjected to intense and accurate small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Although his men were pinned down by the heavy volume of fire, Sergeant Riddle exposed himself repeatedly in single-handedly rushing the hostile emplacements. One by one, he neutralized them with grenades and rifle fire, encouraging his men to follow him up the slope. At a point approximately 150 yards from the objective, he unhesitatingly charged the emplacement. Although seriously wounded, Sergeant Riddle managed to destroy both the weapon and its crew. Refusing medical aid, he gathered more grenades and assaulted another position, rendering it ineffective. With his ammunition expended, and weak from his wounds, he nevertheless organized his men and led them in the final assault against the objective which they successfully secured. During this action Sergeant Riddle was killed by a burst of enemy fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 650 (August 18, 1951)
Home Town: Adair, Kentucky

RIGGSBY, RAYMOND M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond M. Riggsby, Captain (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 79th Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Riggsby distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pealtang-ni, Korea, from 7 through 9 March 1951. On 7 March 1951, he was commanding a composite tank company supporting the 24th Infantry Regiment in an amphibious crossing of the Han River. Realizing that the supported rifle companies were engaged with a numerically superior enemy force, he maneuvered his tanks to within fifteen feet of the hostile positions, rendering extremely close support to the hard-pressed infantrymen. While engaged in clearing a ridge which was the regiment's objective, he observed a large number of enemy troops running to the next ridge. Without waiting to advise the infantry units of his contemplated action, he led his tanks in pursuit of the retreating enemy, killing approximately 150 before being ordered to return to the friendly positions. The aggressive leadership of Captain Riggsby resulted in the regiment successfully completing its mission and in inflicting tremendous casualties on the hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 602 (August 1, 1951)

RILEY, RAY O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ray O. Riley, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Sergeant of a 75-mm. Recoilless Rifle Platoon with Company M, 3d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Riley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobuk-san, Korea, on 18 September 1950. Company L, 27th Infantry Regiment, was in position on Sobuk-san Mountain when the enemy launched a strong attack on the company area, overrunning the right flank. Observing the plight of the company, Sergeant Riley left his platoon and reorganized the surviving men of Company L for a counterattack on the enemy. Then, personally leading a group of twenty-five men armed only with rifles and grenades, he closed with a fanatical enemy of approximately company strength. Inspired by the brilliant leadership and courageous example of Sergeant Riley, the small group of men valiantly assaulted the hostile force, killing numerous enemy troops and regaining the positions which the enemy had overrun. As additional enemy troops began attacking the position from the opposite side of the hill, Sergeant Riley moved to an abandoned enemy machine-gun emplacement and turned the weapon the advancing horde. When the attacking force was finally repulsed, twenty-five enemy dead were counted in front of his machine-gun. Sergeant Riley then established a defense perimeter capable of holding the left flank of the company, utilizing the remaining members of his original group and a few reinforcement that had moved up. Throughout the night he moved among his men, keeping them on the alert and prepared for an imminent enemy counterattack. Shortly before daybreak the expected attack occurred, but was successfully repulsed with tremendous losses to the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 427 (June 13, 1951)

RIVERA, DEMENSIO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Demensio Rivera (RA12346464), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Rivera distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Changyong- ni, Korea, on 22 and 23 May 1951. When the outpost area occupied by his platoon was assaulted during the night, Private Rivera, an automatic rifleman, held his forward position tenaciously, although exposed to very heavy fire. With his automatic rifle, he delivered a continuous and devastating fire at the approaching enemy until this weapon became inoperative, whereupon he employed his pistol and grenades and stopped the enemy within a few feet of his position. During a renewed attack, he fought the enemy hand-to-hand and forced them back. Finally, as an overwhelming number of the enemy closed in on him, he killed four of them with his only remaining grenade, although they were in such close proximity he was severely wounded by the same explosion, When is position was retaken, he was recovered, seriously wounded, and lying with the bodies of the four enemy dead or dying. Private Rivera's fearless performance was a major factor in successfully repulsing the enemy's attacks.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 75 (August 6, 1952)
Home Town: New York, New York

ROBERTS, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James E. Roberts (RA14027367), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces while leading a night patrol in the vicinity of Majang-ni, Korea, on 1 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Roberts led a fourteen-man patrol to a point approximately 2,800 yards from the main line of resistance to establish an ambush. While Sergeant Roberts was engaged in deploying his men in the most advantageous fighting positions, the patrol was fired upon by a concealed enemy force of platoon strength. After signaling for aid, Sergeant Roberts moved forward to meet the enemy. When he was attacked by several hostile soldiers his rifle was wrested from him, but he continued to fight with his bare hands. Although wounded several times in the head and legs, Sergeant Roberts took a weapon from the enemy and killed three of his attackers. Exhausted from the bitter fight and weakened by loss of blood, Sergeant Roberts was placed on a stretcher for evacuation. As he was being carried from the area, he continued to should directions and words of encouragement to his men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 738 (August 11, 1953)
Home Town: Suwannee, Florida

ROBERTS, ROBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert D. Roberts (RA15259546), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonchon, Korea, on 8 June 1951. As Company G, the right company of a battalion attack against Hill 541, was attacking in a column of platoons along the top of a ridgeline which led into the final objective, its leading platoon was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of automatic weapons fire from the enemy dug in on one of the main knobs astride the company's route of advance. Completely disorganized, the leading platoon started to fall back. Sergeant Roberts' platoon, which was next in the column, attempted to deploy and return the enemy's fire. Sergeant Roberts gave up his rifle to an assistant, seized an abandoned light machine-gun and a full belt of ammunition. Throwing the loose end of the ammunition belt over his shoulder, he sprang to his feet, and in complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward and up the knoll. Firing the machine-gun from his hip, he ignored the enemy fire directed at him and a flesh wound which he sustained. Yelling at the top of his voice, and keeping a steady volume of fire directed at the enemy, he pressed forward. As he neared the top of the knoll, the enemy under this onslaught abandoned their position and retired The men of company G who witnessed this one-man assault, were so inspired that they moved forward and joined Sergeant Roberts in the final assault as he reached the top of the knoll.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 7 (February 24, 1956)
Home Town: Summit, Ohio

*ROBERTS, ROBERT EARL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Earl Roberts (US55013828), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sobangsan, Korea, on 24 June 1951. On that date, Company B, holding positions on Hill 717, was attacked by a numerically superior hostile force which was fanatically determined to drive the friendly troops from the ridge. During the fierce firefight which ensued, Private Roberts observed that the supply of ammunition for a vital machine-gun position was running dangerously low. He left his position of comparative safety and, moving across the fire-swept terrain, made his way to a supply point. While returning with the desperately needed ammunition, Private Roberts was wounded but, undaunted, he continued up the hill to the machine-gun emplacement. Despite the fresh supply of ammunition and the determination of the friendly forces to hold their positions, the numerical superiority of the enemy soon made withdrawal necessary. As the company fell back, Private Roberts, refusing medical aid, voluntarily remained behind, operating the machine-gun to cover the withdrawal of his comrades. When last seen he was firing with devastating precision at the numerous hostile troops, who were on the point of overwhelming his position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 743 (October 5, 1951)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

*ROBERTS, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert S. Roberts (0-60192), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving commanding a rifle platoon of Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Roberts distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokchong-Myon, Korea, from 1 to 5 September 1950. During this period First Lieutenant Roberts' platoon had the mission of holding an important position between two battalions. This position was subjected to continual attacks by the numerically superior enemy who attempted to use it as a main route of infiltration. During the day, enemy mortar and artillery fire were concentrated on the small area, and after darkness, Lieutenant Roberts and his men were repeatedly subjected to fanatical attacks by hostile troops. Despite the tremendous odds, Lieutenant Roberts valiantly directed the defensive actions of his platoon and repelled the attacks, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. When ammunition ran low and the supply from the rear was cut off, Lieutenant Roberts crawled forward and stripped the enemy dead of rifles, ammunition and grenades for use against future banzai thrusts. On the night of 5 September 1950, the battered platoon was attacked by an overwhelming enemy force and in the ensuing action Lieutenant Roberts was mortally wounded while directing the fire of his men. However, as a result of his gallant and intrepid leadership, enormous casualties were inflicted on the enemy and when the platoon withdrew, more than one hundred and forty enemy dead littered three sides of the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 510 (July 4, 1951)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

ROBINSON, LEROY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leroy Robinson (RA34284673), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Robinson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Igok-tong, Korea, on 11 September 1950. On that date, Company G was assigned the mission of defending a strategic hill near Igok-tong. When the enemy launched a fierce attack against the left flank of the company, several positions were overrun and others on the verge of collapsing, thus endangering the entire line. Sergeant Robinson, observing this disastrous turn of events, left his unit's position and moved through the withering hail of fire to the left flank area. Quickly and aggressively moving among the fire-swept positions, Sergeant Robinson assumed command of the scattered, disorganized men and reformed them in a defense line. For several hours of bitter close combat, he displayed superb leadership and bravery in directing the fire of his men, advantageously re-deploying them and exhorting them to greater effort. After finally beating back the enemy assaults, Sergeant Robinson boldly decided to counterattack. When he defiantly led his men in a charge against the numerically superior hostile force, the enemy troops, dismayed at their inability to penetrate the stubborn defense line, became confused and bewildered, and fled in wild disorder. Although he was painfully wounded during this action, Sergeant Robinson valiantly fought the enemy until the last hostile soldier had retreated. As a result of his quick thinking and aggressive action, the crumbling defense of his company was organized into a bulwark of resistance that successfully thwarted the enemy's desperate attempt to secure the strategically vital hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 400 (June 5, 1951)
Home Town: Appling, Georgia

*ROBISON, PAUL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul L. Robison (RA16310479), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Robison distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chirwan-ni, Korea, on 15 September 1950. While occupying a defensive position along the Nam River, Company F was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force. Under cover of intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, the enemy approached to within grenade range of the company positions and succeeded in knocking out two friendly machine-gun emplacements. When it became obvious that the company would not be able to hold its positions against the overwhelming enemy attack, the order was given for the company to withdraw. Private Robison and a comrade volunteered to remain in position and cover the withdrawal of the company. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he remained exposed to the deadly hail of enemy fire and courageously held the enemy at bay until he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 186 (April 4, 1951)
Home Town: Floyd, Indiana

*ROCHA, FRANK CARPA
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank Carpa Rocha (US50000205), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a heavy machine-gunner with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Rocha distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sang-to-Dong, Korea, on 10 August 1951. On that date, a friendly patrol set out to occupy a commanding terrain feature with orders to engage any hostile troops between the patrol base and the objective. Corporal Rocha volunteered to accompany the patrol in order to render supporting fire with a recoilless rifle. Upon locating enemy emplacements, the assaulting elements of the patrol moved forward to make contact and Corporal Rocha was ordered to station his weapon on a ridge to their rear. Reaching the ridge, Corporal Rocha realized that the range was too long for the recoilless rifle to be used with maximum effect and so, with a total disregard for his personal safety, he moved forward to the position held by the friendly riflemen. Kneeling calmly in an exposed position, he fired with deadly accuracy at the hostile emplacements. Each time he fired, the enemy sought him out and concentrated a heavy volume of automatic-weapons and small-arms fire on him. His devastating fire accounted for many key enemy positions and inflicted numerous casualties among the hostile troops. In desperation, the numerically superior enemy launched a series of fanatical attacks which made it necessary for the friendly force to fall back a short distance with each assault. Upon receiving the order to withdraw, Corporal Rocha observed that his comrades were pinned down by heavy automatic-weapons fire. Moving to an area completely exposed to enemy observation, he fearlessly knelt and provided supporting fire which enabled the friendly force to withdraw. He was attempting to reload his weapon when he was hit by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire and mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1021 (December 26, 1951)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

*RODGERS, FRANKLIN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Franklin E. Rodgers (US55063950), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Rodgers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeu-san, Korea, on 27 July 1951. On that date, Company B was engaged in an assault against well-fortified hostile emplacements on a strategic ridgeline when it was subjected to a heavy volume of fire from an enemy machine-gun emplacement. After several unsuccessful attempts had been made to destroy the weapon with rifle grenades, Private Rodgers, realizing that his comrades faced annihilation in their present untenable positions, moved forward alone to silence the machine- gun. Disregarding the intense enemy fire being concentrated on him, he single-handedly rushed the emplacement, hurling grenades. In his fearless assault, Private Rodgers successfully destroyed the gun crew, thus enabling his comrades to renew their attack. As the friendly force moved forward, Private Rogers, even though exposed to hostile fire, moved into the captured enemy position and turned the weapon on other hostile emplacements. He then directed an effective volume of fire on the enemy to cover the advance of his comrades and succeeded in inflicting numerous casualties among the hostile forces before being hit and mortally wounded by return fire. The extraordinary heroism and self-sacrifice of Private Rodgers made it possible for his company to secure its objective with a minimum number of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 946 (November 27, 1951)
Home Town: McLean, Illinois

*RODRIGUEZ, CLIFFORD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clifford R. Rodriguez (RA06562803), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Master Sergeant Rodriguez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yangnung-ni, Korea, on 27 September 1950. On that date, Master Sergeant Rodriguez was in a motor convoy en route to take combat positions when the convoy was ambushed. The vehicle in which Sergeant Rodriguez was riding was the first vehicle to be hit. Taking immediate action, Sergeant Rodriguez got all but the critically wounded off the truck and deployed them to engage the enemy. His action destroyed several enemy automatic weapons. He then moved the personnel with him to the high ground on the left to secure the left flank of his company. In doing this, he was severely wounded in the shoulder, leg, and foot. These wounds rendered him immobile except for crawling. Notwithstanding, he continued deployment his troops, directing fire and participated in the fire-fight. When the detachment was ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Rodriguez covered the withdrawal with his own fire and then crawled to a covered position where he might be assisted without exposing anyone else to enemy fire. Medical attention was declined until all wounded members of his platoon had been treated. His inspiring leadership encouraged other members of the platoon to beat off the enemy attack and thereby prevented the left flank from being overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 207 (December 22, 1950)
Home Town: Santa Clara, California

*RODSTROM, DONALD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald E. Rodstrom (RA18099417), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with as a Medical Aidman attached to an Infantry Company of the 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Rodstrom distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. Corporal Rodstrom was an aidman to an infantry company attacking a heavily defended and fortified enemy position when it came under a barrage of extremely heavy enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire and was forced to seek cover. Seeing a comrade lying wounded in an open area in full view of the enemy and completely exposed to their devastating fire, Corporal Rodstrom, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, left his position of cover and moved forward to render emergency medial treatment. Disregarding the hail of enemy fire that was directed at him, and though in a position that offered no cover whatsoever, Corporal Rodstrom continued to aid his comrade until he himself was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 37 (January 22, 1951)
Home Town: Dallas, Texas

*ROGERS, DONALD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald C. Rogers (ER21262205), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Platoon Sergeant in an Infantry Company of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Rogers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 31 October 1952. On that date, Sergeant Rogers voluntarily joined the lead element of an allied counter-attack force which was committed to assaulting and securing a strategic position overrun earlier by the enemy. Sergeant Rogers urged the squad, comprised mostly of replacements inexperienced in battle, forward until the squad leader was seriously wounded. Immediately assuming command of the squad, Sergeant Rogers reorganized the men and continued the advance until they were pinned down and dispersed by accurate and heavy small-arms fire from a hostile bunker in close proximity their position. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Sergeant Rogers moved from his covered position while the enemy rolled grenades down on him and, although seriously wounded, attacked the bunker and killed its occupants. After regrouping the men, Sergeant Rogers led them forward but the squad was halted a second time by enemy fire from another bunker further up the slope. Displaying the same courageous leadership, Sergeant Rogers rose to charge the enemy position but was mortally wounded while advancing. Although dying, Sergeant Rogers continued to fire his carbine and offer words of encouragement, inspiring his men to press forward.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 617 (June 30, 1953)
Home Town: Suffolk, Massachusetts

ROLLINS, JOHN L. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John L. Rollins (RA44120741), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of a Field Artillery Battery of the 987th Field Artillery Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Rollins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumsong, Korea, on 12 June 1953. On that, Sergeant Rollins was on a forward artillery observation post under heavy attack by a hostile force. When the forward observer was wounded in the ensuing artillery and mortar barrage, Sergeant Rollins assumed responsibility for directing fire on the advancing enemy. Through sheer weight of numbers, the enemy was successful in surrounding the outpost. Realizing the consequences of his action, Sergeant Rollins called in artillery fire on his own position. His heroic action in delaying the advance of the enemy force enabled the United Nations infantry to reorganize and establish new defensive positions. When the observation post was last seen by Allied troops, hostile soldiers were swarming over the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 718 (August 3, 1953)
Home Town: Lucas, Ohio

*RORRER, FRANK D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank D. Rorrer (RA06899436), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Rorrer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. On that date, during the withdrawal from Taejon, the route of Company H was cut by an enemy roadblock. Enemy fire was intense, causing many casualties. Seeing this, Sergeant First Class Rorrer went forward with advance elements of the company to force the roadblock. Without regard for his personal safety, he charged an enemy machine-gun crew, engaging them with rifle fire and then closing in on them with his bayonet to eliminate them. Although wounded in this action, Sergeant First Class Rorrer voluntarily remained in his position and covered the withdrawal of his unit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: Webster, West Virginia

*ROSE, SYDNEY C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Sydney C. Rose (RA19319698), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Rose distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungan-ni, Korea, on 30 August 1950 and on 11 September 1950. On 30 August 1050, a numerically superior enemy force attacked Company B. The regiment was defending a high ridge line named Sibi-ang-san. In the course of the attack several enemy machine- guns delivered such devastating fire that Company B was threatened with annihilation. Due to restricted visibility and the use of smokeless powder by the enemy, the mortar observers and friendly machine-gunners were unable to pick out the enemy positions. Sergeant Rose, without regard for his own safety, immediately stood up in a hail of enemy fire and began firing his carbine to draw fire and enable the positions to be located. By his extraordinary display of heroism the observers were able to locate and neutralize the enemy's emplacements. On 11 September 1950, Corporal Rose was a member of a patrol entering a village near the ridge line of Sibi-dang-san. The patrol was pinned down in the edge of the village by enemy small arms and machine-gun fire. Corporal Rose, without regard for his own safety, exposed himself to the enemy fire and charged the enemy machine-gun. Although Corporal Rose was killed in his gallant attempt to destroy the machine-gun, his extraordinary heroism in the face of overwhelming odds so inspired his comrades that they rallied, assaulted the machine-gun and destroyed the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 178 (November 23, 1950)
Home Town: Yakima, Washington

*ROSLOF, EDWARD E. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward E. Roslof (RA32368709), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Roslof distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea, on 27 July 1950. On that date, Company B was surrounded and the enemy established roadblocks to the rear of the company's position. With complete disregard for his life and in the face of heavy enemy fire, Sergeant Roslof attacked a roadblock in an effort to keep open the only route to friendly forces. When overwhelming odds forced the unit to withdraw, he volunteered to remain behind and destroy all equipment which could not be carried to prevent its seizure by the enemy. In delaying his departure to perform this heroic deed, he was not able to escape and was missing in action.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (September 3, 1950)
Home Town: Salem, New Jersey

ROTON, FRANKLIN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Franklin D. Roton (RA17329786), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to an Infantry Company of the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Roton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sat'ae-ri, Korea, on 6 October 1951. On that date, the company to which Private Roton was attached was engaged in an assault against a series of heavily fortified enemy positions located on a strategic slope. As the friendly troops neared their objective, they were subjected to a devastating volume of small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire from the fanatically resisting enemy. Many of the soldiers were wounded and Private Roton, disregarding the intense hostile fire, moved across the fire-swept terrain to administer aid. He moved from man to man, calming them and dressing their wounds. Observing a man fall wounded near a hostile bunker, Private Roton made his way to the stricken man's side. As he began to treat the wounds of the injured man, he saw an enemy grenade land nearby. Without hesitation and with total disregard for his personal safety, Private Roton threw himself over the body of his comrade in order to protect him and absorbed the full impact of the grenade with his own body. Seriously wounded in the back and neck by the grenade and unable to move, Private Roton heroically saved the live of his wounded comrade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 61 (January 30, 1952)
Home Town: Sheridan, Wyoming

ROUSH, JOHN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Roush, Jr., First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 71st Tank Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Roush distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. Lieutenant Roush's platoon of four tanks was attached to the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Division, to assist with the withdrawal of the unit from the Kum River to Taejon, fourteen miles to the rear. The 19th Infantry Regiment was outflanked on both sides and seven miles of the road to Taejon was under enemy fire from automatic and antitank weapons. Lieutenant Roush kept his tank on the Kum River line under constant artillery and mortar fire for approximately six hours, shelling the enemy and preventing entrance into the town of Taegu-youn-ni. His tank was the last vehicle to leave the Kum River defense line. Withdrawing his tank, he destroyed an enemy machine-gun nest, which had pinned down a company of the 19th Infantry Regiment and set fire to the town with white phosphorus shelling. Lieutenant Roush, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to intense small arms fire to remove wounded men from a rice paddy while fire from his tank permitted the balance to crawl to safety. Lieutenant Roush loaded the wounded, who were unable to walk, on the top of his tank and proceeded to the Regimental Headquarters. He found the regimental commander seriously wounded. It was agreed that a staff officer would lead those able to walk and carry the wounded through the mountains. Lieutenant Roush decided to run the seven-mile gauntlet with the wounded regimental commander in his tank. The remainder of the unit followed his tank in fifteen trucks. Lieutenant Roush, with superb skill and personal daring, bypassed or destroyed several enemy roadblocks and cleared several burning wrecks from the path of the column. One mile from friendly lines his tank was disabled by enemy fire and, despite this fire, Lieutenant Roush dismounted and halted the last truck, placed the wounded regimental commander on board, destroyed his tank, and succeeded with his crew in reaching the friendly lines. The inspiring leadership and gallant actions of this officer contributed greatly to the 19th Infantry Regiment's withdrawal, the saving of many of the Regiment's wounded, including its commander, fifteen of its vehicles, and causing heavy losses to the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 120 (October 18, 1950)

*RUDDELL, JAMES CORNELIUS, JR. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James Cornelius Ruddell, Jr. (0-57177), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Ruddell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On this date the enemy, far outnumbering the forces against them, penetrated the Kum River Line, and overran the forward positions. The action disorganized communications, broke up coordinated defense and threatened the regimental command post. Lieutenant Ruddell personally rallied small fighting groups and organized them into a defensive team to delay the enemy advance. He constantly exposed himself to heavy fire in organizing and fighting the delaying action on the spot. His courage was exemplary. He took time to give aid to wounded men in exposed positions, where several others had been killed in the attempt. Heedless of numbers, the threat of envelopment, and accurate enemy fire, including that of snipers, Lieutenant Ruddell took up a forward position from which he directed mortar fire against the enemy and automatic-weapons fire against infiltrators. His delaying action prevented encirclement and permitted military withdrawal. For several hours he continued to encourage and to lead his troops. His coolness under fire, expert direction of the depleted forces under his command, and his keen analysis of enemy dispositions, won the complete confidence of men who did not know him personally but who were inspired by his determination in the face of tremendous odds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)
Home Town: Geary, Kansas

RUFFNER, CLARK LOUIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clark Louis Ruffner, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 2d Infantry Division. Major General Ruffner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hangyi and Umyang-ni, Korea, during the period from 16 through 24 May 1951. On 16 May 1951, after an ominous build-up of strength, the Chinese Communist forces launched a massive offensive against the Second Infantry Division and two Republic of Korea divisions of the United States X Corps with a force of an estimated 96,000 troops. Although the attack was expected and enormous casualties were inflicted on the enemy, the situation became critical on 18 May 1951, when the Republic of Korea forces, overrun by a numerically preponderant enemy force, collapsed and exposed the right flank of the Second Infantry Division. At this juncture, General Ruffner personally visited the most forward positions to rally his troops and reorganize the defense on a new line. Through his coolness, efficiency and indifference to danger, he assisted in extricating several units which had been cut off, narrowly escaping death on one occasion when the helicopter in which he was riding crashed on a mountain peak within sight of the enemy. On 20 and 21 May 1951, General Ruffner moved his division in a difficult lateral maneuver across the battlefront, then personally led a counterattack against the enemy. As a result of this brilliantly executed counterattack, the hostile forces were routed after suffering losses thirty times as great as those sustained by the Second Division. On 24 May 1951, General Ruffner organized and led a special task force to seize and secure a bridgehead across the Soyang River and sever enemy escape routes to the north. When the troops were stopped by enemy mortar fire, General Ruffner drove his jeep near the head of the tank-infantry column over a road that had not been swept for mines and through the areas of the hostile mortar fire. This fearless action so inspired the officers and men of the task force that they mounted their vehicles and immediately resumed the advance. By his brave and daring leadership the objective was secured in minimum time, thus putting a force twelve miles deep into the territory held by the enemy force and severing two of its main avenues of escape to the north.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 416 (June 9, 1951)
Born: January 12, 1903 at Buffalo, New York

RUSS, JOSEPH R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph R. Russ, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Colonel Russ distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 21 October 1952. On that date, Colonel Russ was observing the defensive action of his regiment in protecting a vital hill. Because of intense artillery, mortar, and small arms fire from hostile forces, the position of his troops was practically untenable. Colonel Russ, realizing the critical state of the battle, unhesitatingly left his observation post and moved through the intense enemy fire to most forward elements of his command. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Colonel Russ moved from rifleman to rifleman, across the entire sector, directing the organization and improvement of his defensive positions. His courageous leadership was an inspiration to his men and instilled in them the will to hold the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 396 (April 8, 1953)

*RUTH, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John R. Ruth (ER17227905), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Ruth distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Inje, Korea, on 27 May 1951. As the leader of one of two squads assigned the mission of securing Hill 592, Sergeant Ruth and his squad were approaching the objective when they came under heavy mortar fire which killed two members of his squad. Despite this fire, he led his men forward. As he and two other members of his squad gained the crest of the hill, they were met by automatic-weapons and grenade fire of an enemy force well entrenched on the reverse slope of the hill. Although painfully wounded, he rushed toward the enemy, firing an automatic rifle as he advanced. When he had fired all his ammunition he continued to advance, throwing grenades and rocks until he fell mortally wounded. Sergeant Ruth's heroic action was chiefly responsible for the subsequent capture of the hill by the remainder of the two squads. After the action 23 enemy dead were found in the immediate vicinity of Sergeant Ruth's advance.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 89 (October 3, 1952)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

RUTHERFORD, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Rutherford (RA06936401), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Rutherford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Songong-ni, Korea, on 2 July 1950. On that date, Sergeant First Class Rutherford left his observation post under heavy fire to destroy two SCR 300 radios which were left on a high hill overrun by the enemy. He reached the hill and destroyed the radios. He was immediately attacked by five of the enemy. He killed or wounded all of them. In so doing, he was wounded in the shoulder by a sub-machinegun, but he continued over the hill and threw grenades into enemy positions, killing and wounding several more. On his return to his post, he was hit again, this time in the ankle. He continued and destroyed his radio while under heavy fire and prevented the equipment, vital to the enemy, from falling into enemy hands.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)
Home Town: Berrien, Michigan

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