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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Korea 

  I - M  

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

ICKES, CHARLES V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles V. Ickes, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Heavy Mortar Company, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Ickes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 15 August 1950. When the enemy, with overwhelming numbers and firepower, attacked his platoon in an attempt to annihilate it and capture its mortars, Lieutenant Ickes exposed himself to intense enemy automatic weapons fire in order to establish a defense line. Moving from man to man, he assigned them to positions, distributed ammunition, and encouraged them in their assigned tasks. When one flank of the newly established defense line became pinned down and the operator of the machine-gun supporting it was killed, Lieutenant Ickes immediately manned the .50 caliber weapon and eliminated the enemy machine-gun crew. Although his platoon inflicted extremely high casualties on the enemy and halted their envelopment, withdrawal became necessary due to the sheer weight of the enemy's numbers. During a lull in the battle, Lieutenant Ickes supervised the evacuation of dead and wounded and prepared his men and equipment for an orderly withdrawal. When the unit began to withdraw, he voluntarily elected to remain behind with an automatic rifle to cover their withdrawal. While engaged in this courageous action he was attacked by a banzai charge of approximately thirty enemy and single-handedly repelled the attack, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. By his inspiring leadership, tactical skill, and conspicuous devotion to duty, he enabled his platoon and its support weapons to be saved form a dangerous situation without undue loses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 204 (December 20, 1950)

*IMRIE, ROBERT KINGWEL (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Kingwel Imrie (RA31502963), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Imrie distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yong Bong Dong, Korea, on 27 November 1950. The platoon of which Corporal Imrie was a member of a platoon that was ordered to retake a hill which the enemy had seized during the operations of the previous night. On approaching the crest of the hill the platoon was subjected to intense machine-gun crossfire and the advance was halted. Corporal Imrie, aware of the possible annihilation of the entire platoon by the deadly machine-gun fire, single-handedly charged the machine-gun position on the right flank, completely disregarding his personal safety, and continually fired his automatic weapon until he had neutralized the position. After neutralizing the right flank machine-gun, he was hit by a burst of fire from the machine-gun on the left flank and mortally wounded. His gallant and intrepid actions had diverted the enemy machine-gun fire from his platoon, thereby saving his comrades from annihilation and enabling them to eliminate the one remaining machine-gun position and secure the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 329 (May 23, 1951)
Born: April 22, 1927 at Randolph, Massachusetts
Home Town: Randolph, Massachusetts

INUZUKA, MINEO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mineo Inuzuka, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Inuzuka distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chango-ri, Korea, on 27 May 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Inuzuka's unit was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a commanding terrain feature from a well-entrenched and determined enemy force. Advancing with his men to within six hundred yards of the objective, his platoon was suddenly subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons fire. Realizing that the present position was untenable, he moved forward alone in an attempt to locate the enemy machine-gun emplacements. Moving from one vantage point to anther under a heavy volume of fire, he discovered the camouflaged positions and adjusted mortar fire on them. The men moved forward to attack once more but were again slowed by heavy and accurate enemy fire. Disregarding his own safety, Lieutenant Inuzuka moved among them, encouraging them and pointing out individual routes of attack to them. His display of courage so inspired the men that they moved onward in a spontaneous attack that secured the objective. Selecting their positions and personally directing the fire of his men, he was directly responsible for the successful beating off of the numerous fierce counterattacks hurled at the platoon by the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 615 (August 5, 1951)
Born: April 21, 1925 at Portland, Oregon
Home Town: Portland, Oregon

*ISBELL, WILLIAM HARRIS, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Harris Isbell, Jr. (0-18474), Lieutenant Colonel (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Battery, 7th Division Artillery, 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Isbell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 14 October 1952. Observing that friendly elements were pinned down by withering fire during a bitterly contested engagement on key terrain, Colonel Isbell proceeded alone up the barren, rugged slope. When he reached the forward observer, he requested that artillery fire on the commanding ground be lifted. Fearlessly advancing approximately thirty yards to the first hostile position, he fired his pistol and lobbed grenades into the bunker. He then moved back to the crest of the hill and beckoned for the troops to join him. Inspired by his heroic challenge, the men rallied and moved forward, but as they approached the position, Colonel Isbell was mortally wounded by a mortar burst. His unflinching courage and intrepid actions set a lasting example of valor to all who observed him.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)
Home Town: Anne Arundel, Maryland

*ISHIBASHI, EDWARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward M. Ishibashi (RA10104611), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Ishibashi distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Satae-ri, Korea, on 12 October 1951. Spearheading an attack to secure a finger approach to Heartbreak Ridge, Sergeant Ishibashi's platoon was pinned down by heavy automatic-weapons, grenade, and small-arms fire from fortified positions emplaced in the rugged terrain. Several of his comrades were wounded in the initial phase of the action and lay in an exposed area. Fearlessly, Sergeant Ishibashi charged hostile emplacements. Firing his weapon and hurling grenades with deadly accuracy, he reduced enemy fire and enabled evacuation of the wounded. Despite wounds sustained in this action, he continued the assault and threw a grenade into a machine-gun position, killing the crew. He then turned the captured weapon on the enemy, inflicting numerous casualties and forcing the hostile force to retreat. Inspired by his display of courage, the unit quickly moved up and joined in securing the position.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 18 (February 18, 1953)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

*IVISON, ROBERT DONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Donald Ivison (RA12284786), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Ivison distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chonjo-ri, Korea, on 20 May 1951. On that date, Private Ivison's company was given the mission of attacking and securing the position of a well-entrenched and fanatically determined enemy force holding Hill 198. Moving in a frontal assault up the hill, the unit was pinned down by intense and accurate enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. As the enemy began to roll grenades down among the group, Private Ivison, observing that both the platoon leader and platoon sergeant had been wounded, realized that his comrades must move from their precarious position on the slope or face annihilation. Jumping up from his position, he rushed through the accurate, point-blank enemy fire toward a hostile machine-gun emplacement, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades and urging them forward. With his automatic rifle, he killed the two enemy machine gunners and, although mortally wounded in his charge up the hill, he continued to fire at the now retreating enemy. His actions so inspired his comrades that they charged up the slope, routing the enemy from their position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 615 (August 5, 1951)
Home Town: Onondaga, New York

 

J

*JACKSON, EARL K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl K. Jackson (RA16264890), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kube-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1950. Private Jackson's platoon, in defensive positions on a strategic hill, was viciously attacked in the early morning hours by a numerically superior hostile force supported by intense automatic weapons and grenade fire. The fanatical assailants swarmed up the hill, overran several individual positions, and ferocious hand-to-hand combat ensued. During the encounter, an enemy grenade was thrown within two feet of the emplacement occupied by Private Jackson and two comrades. Without hesitation, he jumped out of the foxhole, grabbed the grenade, and hurled it back, wounding one of the enemy. Then, while in another foxhole with three soldiers, a grenade was thrown into the position. Fully realizing the odds against him, Private Jackson threw himself on it, absorbing the full force of the explosion with his body. Private Jackson was mortally wounded in this fearless display of valor, but his willing self-sacrifice saved several of his comrades from death or serious injury and imbued the members of his company with indomitable resolution to repel the ruthless foe.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 206 (August 14, 1951)
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

*JACKSON, LEVI, JR. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Levi Jackson, Jr. (RA13267105), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to Company G, 2d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 13 August 1950. On this date, Corporal Jackson was serving as medical aid man with Company G when two men were seriously wounded. Moving across the exposed terrain through the withering enemy small arms and automatic-weapons fire, he reached the men and was administering first aid when the enemy laid a devastating barrage on the area. Heedless of his personal safety, he shielded the two wounded men with his own body in an effort to protect them from further wounds. While in this exposed position he was mortally wounded. Corporal Jackson performed his duties as medical corpsman in a heroic manner. His primary concern at all times was the welfare and prompt treatment of the many wounded. On numerous occasions he evacuated men under the most adverse conditions over treacherous terrain while subjected to constant hostile fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

JACKSON, WILLIAM E.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William E. Jackson (RA35708200), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea.
History of the 2d Infantry Division in Korea (1951-1952)
Home Town: Posey, Indiana

*JACKSON, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William R. Jackson (ER33722215), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunom-ni, Korea, on 9 February 1951. On that date, Company C had the mission of seizing and securing Hill 584 near Kunom-ni. As the company neared the crest of the hill, an estimated two battalions of enemy troops launched a counterattack against the hill and the friendly forces were forced to withdraw. Private Jackson, a machine-gunner in the company, voluntarily remained in an exposed position in order to place effective fire on the advancing enemy and furnish covering fire for the withdrawal of his company. Although he was killed when his position was overrun by the enemy, his heroic stand enabled his company to accomplish a successful withdrawal with minimum casualties. When the position was later regained by friendly forces, it was found that his withering machine-gun fire had accounted for more than 150 enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 415 (June 9, 1951)
Home Town: Allegany, Maryland

JACKSON, WILLIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willis Jackson (0-1335009), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Jackson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 21 May 1951. On that date, Company F was assigned the mission of securing Hill 329 from a well-entrenched and fanatically determined enemy. Lieutenant Jackson was leading one of the assault platoons up the slope when a sudden burst of intense and accurate automatic-weapons fire from the enemy emplacement halted his men in an exposed area, pinning them down and painfully wounding Lieutenant Jackson. As friendly artillery began to bombard the hostile position, the platoon renewed its attack and fought fiercely for two hours until enemy fire from the crest of the hill became so intense that they were pinned down once more. In an effort to rally his men into making a final sweeping assault against the hilltop, Lieutenant Jackson single-handedly charged an enemy position and, despite his wound, wrested an enemy soldier's own weapon from him and beat him to death with it. This courageous action so inspired Lieutenant Jackson's men that they charged forward, overrunning the enemy emplacements. As the enemy fled in wild disorder down the reverse slope of the hill, Lieutenant Jackson pitched grenades after them and then succeeded in killing three more of the enemy with his rifle. Despite his painful wound, he organized his men in a defense against a counterattack and only fell back to be treated when the company commander ordered him to do so. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Jackson reflect great credit on himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 708 (September 19, 1951)
Born: September 21, 1922 at Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Home Town: Etowah, Alabama

*JAMES, ELWOOD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elwood F. James (0-1313896), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant James distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sinsan-ni, Korea, on 2 September 1950. During a battalion attack along high ground south of the Chinju-Masan road, First Lieutenant James' company was driving the enemy from the ground overlooking the road. He repeatedly displayed conspicuous gallantry in the face of enemy fire from the high ground as his company assaulted up the slopes of the ridge. Casualties were extremely high from plunging and grazing machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire which wounded all three of his company officers and many of the non-commissioned officers, leaving him virtually alone to organize and direct his company's attack. During the last and successful assault on the objective, he was wounded; however, he continued to physically lead his troops until the advance had reached a point almost to the crest of the ridge. At this point he was again wounded, this time mortally. His last words on his radio to the battalion command post, although morally wounded, were cheerful and calm as he reported the capture of the objective. Only through this outstanding individual example of bravery and devotion to duty could such an objective have been taken with the force available.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 18 (January 12, 1951), as amended by Section V of General Orders No. 56 (1951), US Eighth Army Korea
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

JAMES, TYLEE N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Tylee N. James, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company A, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant James distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Turengi, Korea, on 26 January 1951. On that date, when Company A was given the mission of attacking and securing Hill 256, Lieutenant James observed that the enemy had concentrated intense small-arms and automatic-weapons fire on the only approach to the hill. Although the hostile force was well dug in and awaiting the attack with fixed bayonets, Lieutenant James, without regard for his personal safety, volunteered to lead his platoon in an assault on the objective. The distance between the platoon's position and the enemy position was approximately thirty-five yards and the intervening area was covered by intense mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire. As Lieutenant James led his platoon through the deadly hail of fire, the unit suffered a large number of casualties; however, his aggressive leadership and personal bravery so inspired the remaining members of the platoon that they stormed the hill, killing and wounding numerous hostile troops. Through the gallant and inspiring leadership of Lieutenant James, the enemy force was completely routed and Hill 256 secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 394 (June 3, 1951)

*JASTRAM, ALAN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alan R. Jastram (RA17249836), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Jastram distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, the Battalion Command Post was subjected to a fanatical attack by a numerically superior enemy force. Successful defense of the area depended on control of high ground one hundred yards to the rear of the command post, which was occupied by the enemy. Twice the Headquarters Company troops assaulted the ridge and were beaten off by the enemy. On the third attempt, when the attack seemed doomed to failure and his comrades were wavering under the intense enemy fire, Sergeant Jastram single-handedly attacked the hill, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades as he moved forward. Inspired by the boldness of his action, his comrades followed him in the attack, overran the enemy, and secured the commanding terrain. During this action Sergeant Jastram was killed by a burst of enemy fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 501 (July 3, 1951)
Home Town: St. Louis, Missouri

*JEAL, JOHN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John W. Jeal (RA19294705), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Jeal distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 16 September 1950. While he was leading his platoon forward in an attack, Sergeant Jeal and his men encountered enemy machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire in such volume that they were pinned down in a position almost devoid of cover. Quickly sensing the critical nature of the situation, Sergeant Jeal arose to his feet and fearlessly charged the enemy, thereby drawing their fire entirely upon his own person, while simultaneously ordering his men forward into a defiladed position of relative safety from which they later were able to repulse three successive counterattacks. By his selfless and diversionary action, through which his platoon was able to escape heavy casualties, Sergeant Jeal himself was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 37 (January 22, 1951)
Home Town: Siskiyou, California

*JEFFERSON, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James H. Jefferson (RA15274687), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Jefferson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 21 July 1950. On that date positions of the 2d platoon, Company F, became untenable due to penetration by numerically superior enemy forces. Private First Class Jefferson, without regard to his personal safety, voluntarily remained in his position to cover the withdrawal of his platoon. He delivered a volume of accurate automatic rifle fire on the enemy, slowing the enemy and enabling the rest of his platoon to successfully withdrawal to new positions. In this heroic action Private First Class Jefferson was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 15 (August 1, 1950)
Home Town: Putnam, West Virginia

JENKINS, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James B. Jenkins (RA14313612), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Jenkins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Shindo, Korea, on 14 September 1950. When his company's attack on a heavily fortified enemy hill position was suddenly halted by an extremely heavy and accurate mortar barrage, a platoon of tanks was sent forward to give support. Realizing that the tanks would be unable to observe the enemy and their concealed emplacements, Corporal Jenkins abandoned all cover and moved through the intense enemy fire to an open field where the tanks had taken up position. Then, with the use of the external tank phone, he proceeded to direct the fire of the tank. As the tanks moved forward, he - alone and exposed - remained but a few feet behind the lead tank, and totally disregarding the hail of enemy mortar fire that was falling around him, continued to give directions and point out enemy emplacements until the near miss of a mortar shell knocked him unconscious. Upon regaining consciousness, he still refused to abandon his vulnerable position, fearlessly resumed carrying out his self-appointed mission. Through his outstanding courage and aggressive action against overwhelming odds, Corporal Jenkins was directly responsible for the complete annihilation of an enemy strongpoint and the successful occupation of his unit's objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 79 (February 17, 1951)
Home Town: Halifax, North Carolina

JENKINS, REUBEN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Reuben E. Jenkins, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, IX Corps. Lieutenant General Jenkins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 9 October 1952. On that date, the Ninth Korean Army Division was attacked by a superior and fanatical enemy force intent upon destroying the division and capturing Hill 395 (White Horse Mountain), a vital terrain feature dominating the Chorwon Valley. General Jenkins, taking with him his subordinate commanders, moved to the critical area in order to personally assess the situation and direct the forces under his command. Despite the extreme dangers from intense and continuous enemy artillery and mortar fire, General Jenkins remained in the danger area and served as a constant inspiration to his subordinate commanders and soldiers throughout the first phase of the battle, during which the friendly troops fought the superior and fanatical enemy to a standstill. After the enemy attack was successfully stopped, General Jenkins remained in the battle area, prepared and launched a counterattack. Through his continued presence in the battle area throughout the day, on foot, or in a helicopter at low altitude, in calm defiance of the enemy, he was an inspiration to his entire command and by these actions was able to supervise and closely direct the counterattack which resulted in annihilation of the determined, powerful and fanatical enemy. The skillful leadership and prolonged outstanding demonstration of personal courage shown by General Jenkins under extremely hazardous conditions constituted vital elements in the successful conclusion of the battle.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 801 (December 27, 1952)

JENNETT, CLAIR W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clair W. Jennett (0-2209125), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Jennett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pyaru, Korea, on 13 and 14 October 1951. On that date, the friendly force, of which Lieutenant Jennett was a member, launched an attack against a series of heavily fortified enemy positions on a strategic slope. After a fierce battle, the hostile force was routed from the hill and the friendly troops immediately set up a defense perimeter facing the direction from which the inevitable enemy counterattack would come. The enemy assault began with an intense mortar barrage, followed by wave after wave of hostile troops. For two hours, the friendly force beat back the charging enemy, but, with their ammunition all but exhausted, they received the order to withdraw. As they fell back, the enemy came charging over the crest of the hill and brought a deadly volume of fire to bear on the friendly troops, who sought what cover they could on the barren slope. Realizing that the enemy was determined to annihilate the friendly force and that he was the only platoon leader left, Lieutenant Jennett quickly organized the men about him and led them in a savage bayonet charge which met the enemy head-on. So unexpected was this furious action, that it completely disorganized the hostile assault. Repeatedly, he led his men against the weakest point in the enemy line and engaged the foe in hand-to-hand combat. When Lieutenant Jennett observed two enemy machine-guns firing into his men, he maneuvered around behind them and, disregarding his personal safety, he charged across the exposed terrain and destroyed both emplacements with well-aimed grenades. His fearless action demoralized the hostile force to such an extent that they abandoned their weapons.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 90 (February 12, 1952)
Home Town: Sac City, Iowa

*JENSEN, CARL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Carl C. Jensen (0-38904), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Jensen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 12 July 1950. On that date, when a numerically superior enemy force, supported by artillery and armor, attacked the 3d Battalion's position, Colonel Jensen displayed outstanding leadership ability and personal courage. He voluntarily exposed himself to the intense artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire and reorganized small groups of withdrawing troops and replaced them in the defense line. By his calmness under extremely heavy enemy fire, he inspired his men to the highest possible degree of determination and confidence. When the order to withdraw was issued, Colonel Jensen remained behind and personally directed the withdrawal of all units of his Battalion. When the withdrawal was complete, he himself began to withdraw from the forward position, collecting stragglers as he withdrew. As he led his small group of straggler from the forward positions, they were pinned down by heavy enemy automatic weapons fire. Colonel Jensen once more exposed himself to the enemy fire, placing his men in positions from where the most effective fire could be delivered. He himself then took up a position and attempted to destroy as many enemy as possible. His utter disregard for personal safety, his exceptional leadership ability, courage, and devotion to duty, were directly responsible for saving the lives of many of the men in his command.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 189 (December 5, 1950)
Home Town: Wells, North Dakota

JENSEN, RAYMOND A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond A. Jensen (0-971104), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Jensen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nago-ri, Korea, on 10 October 1951. On that date, a friendly force was in the fourth day of an attack against a well-entrenched hostile force. The repeated assaults against the enemy emplacement had seriously decimated Lieutenant Jensen's platoon. Left with only ten men, he decided to lead them in a final attack. Charging up the hill, the friendly troops were immediately met by a devastating volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Constantly exposing himself in order to encourage his men, he urged them forward. Although painfully wounded in the leg, he located an enemy bunker and, standing in full view of the enemy, neutralized it with grenades. Upon receiving the order to withdraw, he again exposed himself in order to draw the hostile fire. This action enabled his men to reach cover. Wounded again by shrapnel, he steadfastly remained in his position, destroying another hostile emplacement with grenades. Weak from loss of blood, he collapsed on the slope but he summoned enough strength to shout to his men to withdraw without him. However, his courageous actions so inspired his men that they moved to his position and carried him down the hill to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1034 (December 30, 1951)
Home Town: San Diego, California

JENSON, LLOYD K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lloyd K. Jenson, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Jenson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changyong, Korea, on 31 August 1950. Shortly after midnight on that date, Colonel Jenson commanded a task force with the mission of establishing a roadblock to halt an anticipated enemy attack on the regimental flank. Deploying his force with great skill, Colonel Jenson personally inspected the positions held by his men and then spent the remainder of the night reconnoitering every possible avenue of approach available to the enemy. When the advance guard of a large hostile force appeared on the scene the following morning, it was almost completely destroyed by the concentrated firepower of the firmly entrenched tank force. The remainder of the enemy force then launched a fanatical attack, but the friendly troops were prepared and, under the skilled leadership of Colonel Jenson, the assault was repulsed at great cost to the foe. Disregarding their heavy losses, the hostile troops threw themselves against the friendly defensive positions twice more, each time supported by heavy mortar and artillery fire. Exhibiting a matchless fighting spirit, Colonel Jenson, without regard for his personal safety, moved among his men, encouraging them and directing their fire with such skill that the numerically superior enemy force was pushed back repeatedly. When he observed a body of hostile troops moving to envelope the roadblock, he organized a small group of infantrymen and, with one tank, proceeded to an advantageous position from which he directed a deadly fusillade of fire, which ended the threat of encirclement. Through his courageous efforts the positions of the friendly troops remained secure against seemingly overwhelming odds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 462 (August 16, 1952)

*JERRELL, LAWRENCE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lawrence E. Jerrell (RA16254406), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Jerrell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tang Won-ni, Korea, on 7 September 1951. On that date, Corporal Jerrell and his squad were part of a friendly force holding a strategic hill position. Although the hill was subjected to a devastating mortar and artillery barrage by the enemy, he constantly exposed himself in order to move among his men, shouting words of encouragement and supervising the evacuation of the wounded. When the artillery barrage lifted, the hostile force launched a fanatical assault against the friendly troops. Because of his personal contact with his men, they met this attack with great self-assurance. In the initial phase of this assault, Corporal Jerrell shared a position with four of his men. The enemy immediately began hurling grenades in an effort to neutralize the deadly accurate fire pouring from the emplacement. With a total disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Jerrell gabbed three of the grenades which had fallen into the position and threw them back at the enemy, thus saving he lives of his comrades. At this point in the battle, a machine-gun, brought forward to replace a weapon which had been disabled by enemy fire, failed to function. Realizing that this weapon was vitally necessary to repulse the repeated hostile attacks, Corporal Jerrell rushed across the fire-swept terrain to the machine-gun and put it back into operation. When the order to withdraw was given, he had been serious wounded by a bursting shell. Although he attempted to remain at the machine-gun to cover the withdrawal of his comrades, the friendly troops placed him on a litter and proceeded to evacuate him, but he died of his wounds before his men could reach the friendly positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1002 (December 20, 1951)
Home Town: Washtenaw, Michigan

*JOHNSON, CHARLES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles F. Johnson (0-1925417), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Samichon, Korea, on the night of 21 March 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Johnson was in charge of a support group to an Allied patrol which had been surrounded by the enemy. As he moved his men forward to aid the surrounded patrol, it was subjected to a three-pronged attack by the enemy. Shouting words of encouragement and directing fire, Lieutenant Johnson employed his men in such a manner as to inflict heavy casualties on the enemy. When their ammunition was expended, Lieutenant Johnson withdrew his command back toward the main body of United Nations troops, personally killing nine enemy soldiers by effective use of hand grenades and bayonet. After reorganizing his group with the main force, Lieutenant Johnson led them in a spirited attack against the hostile troops and engaged in bitter hand-to-hand combat until the enemy was repulsed. On the following morning he then volunteered to aid in the evacuation of the dead and wounded. While he was engaged in this activity, Lieutenant Johnson was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 720 (August 3, 1953)
Home Town: Tulsa, Oklahoma

*JOHNSON, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles L. Johnson (US53064153), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sanae-dong, Korea, on 29 May 1953. On that date, the 3d platoon, spearheading an assault against "Carson Outpost," was pinned down by heavy concentrations of mortar fire and suffered numerous casualties. Constantly vulnerable to withering fire and bursting shells, Corporal Johnson moved fearlessly about the impact area comforting and ministering to the wounded, and assisted aidmen in adjacent platoons in treating and evacuating casualties. As enemy action increased in tempo and fury, fragments from a mortar burst struck him and completely blinded him. Although dazed, shaken, and unable to see, he pursued his heroic task and crawled among his comrades, attending their needs and offering words of encouragement until he was morally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 84 (November 3, 1953)
Home Town: Dade, Florida

JOHNSON, HAROLD K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold K. Johnson, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Tabu-dong, Korea, on 4 September 1950. When his battalion had been forced to withdraw from their hill position by a series of fierce attacks by an overwhelming number of the enemy, Colonel Johnson immediately directed a counterattack in an attempt to regain the vitally important dominating terrain. Placing himself with the most forward elements in order to more effectively direct and coordinate the attack, Colonel Johnson rallied his men and led them forward. Moving about exposed to the heavy enemy artillery, mortar and small-arms fire, he directed fire, assigned positions and, by personal example, proved the necessary incentive to stimulate and keep the attack moving. When his battalion began to falter due to the devastating enemy fire, Colonel Johnson moved forward to close proximity of the enemy to establish and personally operate a forward observation post. Remaining in this exposed position, he directed effective mortar counter fire against the enemy. When his mortars became inoperable and his casualties very heavy due to the tremendous firepower and numerically superior enemy forces, he realized the necessity for withdrawal. Remaining in the position until the last unit had withdrawn, he directed the salvaging of both weapons and equipment. Reestablishing a new defensive position, he reorganized his battalion and supervised medical attention and evacuation of the wounded. His conspicuous devotion to duty and selfless conduct under enemy fire provided an inspiring example to his men and prevented a serious penetration of friendly lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 52 (February 2, 1951)
Born: February 22, 1912 at Bowesmont, North Dakota
Home Town: Grafton, North Dakota

*JOHNSON, JAMES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James B. Johnson (0-1335426), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup'a-ri, Korea, on 6 September 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Johnson led his platoon across the Imjin River under an extremely heavy enemy mortar and artillery barrage in an effort to relieve Company K, which had been subjected to fierce enemy attacks for several hours. Making his way to the company's defensive area, Lieutenant Johnson quickly deployed his men to protect a flank of the perimeter. Almost immediately, the platoon was attacked by the enemy but, despite the intense hostile artillery, mortar and automatic-weapons fire, the men successfully defended their sector, repulsing the enemy with heavy casualties. After this attack, Lieutenant Johnson led his men in an assault against an enemy-held ridge line, but a heavy volume of hostile fire forced a withdrawal. Although painfully wounded, Lieutenant Johnson reorganized his men and led them in a second assault against the hostile positions. During this assault, he was again wounded when he courageously shielded one of his men from an exploding grenade. Undaunted, Lieutenant Johnson continued to lead the advance until mortally wounded by mortar fragments. His heroic actions so inspired his men that the ridge line was subsequently captured from a vastly superior number of hostile troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 768 (October 14, 1951)
Home Town: Okfuskee, Oklahoma

*JOHNSON, MERTON R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Merton R. Johnson (RA23409267), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Johnson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chiro- dong, Korea, on the early morning of 15 August 1952. Early on that date the company of which Private Johnson was a member launched an attack on a rugged hill held by a fanatically determined hostile force. Private Johnson, a member of the assault platoon, remained with the foremost of the attacking elements, ignoring the heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire pouring from the enemy's position. As the assaulting unit neared the crest of the hill, the foe began to direct extremely intense fire on the supporting platoon, some distance to the rear, threatening to separate the two forces. Without hesitation, Private Johnson charged forward alone in a one-man attack on the hostile installations, firing his weapon rapidly and accurately and inflicting heavy casualties on the foe. Despite the fact that the hostile force was concentrating an ever-increasing volume of fire on him, he continued to move forward until he was knocked to the ground and seriously wounded by the blast of an enemy grenade. Dragging himself to his feet, he gathered his ebbing strength and resumed his advance in a final attempt to complete his self-assigned mission. Within a few yards of the hostile positions, he fell once more and succumbed to his wounds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 782 (December 19, 1952)
Home Town: Wayne, Ohio

JONES, ROBERT E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert E. Jones, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Colonel Jones distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 1 December 1950. On that date, the 1st Battalion was attacking to the south to join the 1st Marine Division near Hagaru-ri, and advance elements of the motor convoy carrying the wounded to an assembly area were halted by a demolished bridge requiring construction of a by-pass to allow forward movement. At this juncture, several hundred hostile troops opened fire with machine guns and small arms from well-entrenched positions approximately four hundred yards up the mountain side to the right of the road and inflicted heavy casualties. Major Jones immediately organized and led a group of his men up the rugged, snow-covered terrain, despite a blinding snowstorm and heavy fire. Forcing the enemy to withdraw, they succeeded in working their way to the crest of the mountain, where they observed a well-fortified road block further along the withdrawal route. Using hand grenades and rifles, Major Jones led his men in an attack from the flank and rear, eliminating the road block and allowing the motor column to advance. Nearing a bend in the road, the convoy came under fire from a machine gun nest on the left flank. With sustained courage and inspirational leadership, Major Jones formed and led an assault destroying the position. Major Jones' conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity enabled the wounded-laden convoy to reach the safety of friendly lines. His selfless devotion to duty reflects untold glory on himself and upholds the heroic traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: (1951)

JONES, WAYNE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wayne D. Jones, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Jones distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mago- ri, Korea On that date, Company L was engaged in an attack against a hostile force, firmly entrenched in hill positions. As the company moved forward, it was subjected to a heavy volume of fire from the enemy elements and the attack began to falter. Observing this, Lieutenant Jones, without regard for his personal safety, moved to the advance elements and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, charged directly into the devastating enemy fire. Firing a captured enemy sub-machine gun, Lieutenant Jones single-handedly assaulted two bunkers from which most of the enemy fire originated. Completely demoralized by Lieutenant Jones' fearless attack, the enemy force withdrew in disorder, leaving fourteen dead in the two bunkers. Inspired by the bravery and personal courage displayed by Lieutenant Jones, the friendly troops renewed their assault, and closing with the enemy in fierce hand-to-hand combat, routing them from the objective with extremely heavy casualties. After he had personally placed his men in the most advantageous defensive positions to guard against an enemy counterattack, Lieutenant Jones then personally supervised the evacuation of the wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 990 (December 14, 1951)
Born: March 11, 1924 at Newton, Illinois
Home Town: Newton, Illinois

JORDAN, EARLE H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earle H. Jordan, Jr., Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company M, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Captain Jordan, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea during the period 28 November 1950 through 2 December 1950. On 28 November 1950, the 3d Battalion, in defensive positions for the night, was surrounded and ferociously attacked at approximately 0500 hours by a numerically superior hostile force, seriously penetrating the outer line of resistance, inflicting heavy casualties and causing a disorderly withdrawal of troops from the east side of the perimeter. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Major Jordan, despite intense mortar, automatic weapons, small arms and grenade fire, rallied and reorganized the withdrawing troops and personally supervised the establishment of a new perimeter. During the ensuing two days he fearlessly led his command against repeated attacks and constantly braved withering machine gun and mortar fire to move among his men, encouraging and deploying them to insure maximum defense of each position. Upon orders to withdraw, Major Jordan supervised the evacuation of the wounded and, while directing the retrograde action of his unit, two road blocks were encountered by the mortar convoy. Major Jordan immediately rallied, organized and led determined attacks against well-entrenched positions on high ground, routing the ruthless foe from their strong-points and enabling the convoy to resume its march. Although seriously wounded, Major Jordan held his forces together and, dominating and controlling the critical situation through sheer force of his forces together and, dominating and controlling the successful completion of the mission. Major Jordan's inspirational leadership, unflinching courage and intrepid actions reflect utmost credit on himself and the honored traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 186 (1951)

JOSEY, CLAUDE K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Claude K. Josey (0-27433), Captain (Infantry), [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Captain Josey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongju, Korea, on 22 October 1950. At 0115 hours an enemy patrol infiltrated the defensive perimeter and followed a telephone line to the company command post where one of the enemy soldiers leaped over a low fence and began spraying the area with automatic-weapons fire. The first burst struck the company commander and Captain Josey. The soldier then swung his weapon around to fire on other members of the command post group, but Captain Josey, though seriously wounded in the side, jumped up and placed his body directly in the line of fire, shielding the group. He was again wounded, this time in the groin, but he sprang at the enemy, wrestled the weapon from him, and was attempting to fire it when, due to the seriousness of his wounds, he collapsed. The extraordinary display of heroism by Captain Josey in using his own body as a shield to protect his comrades and the, despite two severe wounds, disarming the enemy, reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 135 (March 12, 1951)
Home Town: Halifax, North Carolina

JOSLEN, DONALD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald R. Joslen, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Joslen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chalp'-ot'-o, Korea, on 24 May 1951. On that date, the 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, was attacking a well-entrenched enemy force occupying Hill 895 near Chalp'-ot'-o. When the battalion had advanced about halfway up the hill, the lead company was pinned down by intense enemy automatic-weapons and mortar fire, temporarily halting the entire advance. Sergeant Joslen, an 81-mm. mortar forward observer with the lead company, continued to move up the hill under direct observation and fire of the enemy to a point where he could adjust and direct mortar fire on the hostile positions. As he began calling in fire orders, the enemy placed a mortar barrage on the friendly positions. Despite the intense small-arms fire and mortar shell fragments covering the area around his position, he continued to adjust mortar fire with such accuracy that the enemy mortars were silenced and several cleverly concealed machine-gun emplacements were knocked out of action. As a result of the courageous actions of Sergeant Joslen, the enemy suffered tremendous casualties and the 2d Battalion was able to seize and secure its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 477 (June 29, 1951)

JOVENALL, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James J. Jovenall, Sergeant [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Jovenall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongnanghi, Korea, on 4 March 1951. On that date, Company G was given the mission of assaulting a commanding terrain feature held by a well-entrenched and determined hostile force. Thee attempts were made to secure the objective, but each time the heavy volume of enemy fire forced the friendly forces to withdraw. In the fourth assault, Sergeant Jovenall led his machine-gun squad across the fire-swept terrain and placed his weapons in an exposed position in order to bring effective fire to bear on the enemy forces. Despite the intense and accurate fire concentrated on him by the enemy, Sergeant Jovenall fearlessly directed fire on the hostile emplacements. During this action, an enemy grenade landed near one of the machine-gun emplacements. Without hesitation, Sergeant Jovenall hurled himself across the gunner and assistant gunner to protect them from shrapnel. Although painfully wounded, he refused medical treatment until the hill was secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 722 (September 25, 1951)

JUNG, GORDON C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon C. Jung (0-1333221), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Jung distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sang- Yong-ni, Korea, on 24 July 1950. On this date, Lieutenant Jung was assigned the mission of holding the high ground in the forward battalion defense area. At dawn a large enemy force supported by tanks, artillery, and mortars began a fierce assault on the position. During the assault Lieutenant Jung moved among his men encouraging them and directing their fire and the fire of supporting artillery. The enemy pressed the attack, disrupting communications, causing heavy casualties, and reducing defensive fire. Lieutenant Jung continued to rally his men and reorganize the defenses. Thee enemy tanks broke into the position and Lieutenant Jung, exposed to heavy fire, directed the attack against the tanks. His courage in the face of heavy enemy action and superior odds inspired the men of Company B to supreme efforts that ultimately succeeded in defeating the fanatical assault of the enemy and securing the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)
Home Town: Volusia, Florida

K

*KAHOOHANOHANO, ANTHONY T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Anthony T. Kahoohanohano (RA29040479), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Kahoohanohano distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chup'a-ri, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Private Kahoohanohano was in charge of a machine-gun squad supporting the defensive positions of Company F when a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack. Because of the overwhelming numbers of the enemy, it was necessary for the friendly troops to execute a limited withdrawal. As the men fell back, he ordered his squad to take up more tenable positions and provide covering fire for the friendly force. Then, although painfully wounded in the shoulder during the initial enemy assault, he gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone. As the hostile troops concentrated their strength against his emplacement in an effort to overrun it, Private Kahoohanohano fought fiercely and courageously, delivering deadly accurate fire into the ranks of the onrushing enemy. When his ammunition was depleted, he engaged the enemy in hand- to-hand combat until he was killed. His heroic stand so inspired his comrades that they launched a counterattack that completely repulse the enemy. Coming upon Private Kahoohanohano's position, the friendly troops found eleven enemy soldiers lying dead before it and two in the emplacement itself, beaten to death with an entrenching shovel.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 903 (November 16, 1951)
Home Town: Hawaii

*KAPAUN, EMIL JOSEPH (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Emil Joseph Kapaun (0-558217), Captain (Chaplain), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Chaplain with Headquarters Company, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain (Chaplain) Kapaun distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Unsan, Korea, on 1 and 2 November 1950. On the afternoon of 1 November 1950, and continuing through the following 36 hours, the regiment was subjected to a relentless, fanatical attack by hostile troops attempting to break through the perimeter defense. In the early morning hours, the enemy succeeded in breaking through the defenses, and hand-to-hand combat ensued in the immediate vicinity of the command post where the aid station had been set up. Chaplain Kapaun, with complete disregard for his personal safety, calmly moved among the wounded men, giving them medical aid and easing their fears. His courageous manner inspired all those present and many men who might otherwise have fled in panic were encouraged by his presence and remained to fight the enemy. As the battle progressed, the number of wounded increased greatly and it became apparent that many of the men would not be able to escape the enemy encirclement. Finally, at dusk on 2 November 1950, the remaining able-bodied men were ordered to attempt to break through the surrounding enemy. At this time, although fully aware of the great danger, Chaplain Kapaun voluntarily remained behind, and when last seen was administering medical treatment and rendering religious rites wherever needed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 625 (August 18, 1951)
Born: April 20, 1916 at Pilsen, Kansas
Home Town: Marion, Kansas

*KAUHINI, LEROY ST. JOHN (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to LeRoy St. John Kauhini (RA10104661), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Kauhini distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sobangsan, Korea, on 23 and 24 June 1951. After attacking and capturing the southern peak of twin crests on 23 June 1951, Private Kauhini's company readied defensive positions for imminent counterattack. A reinforced enemy company launched a ruthless counterattack, inflicting numerous casualties. Observing a grenade fall into a foxhole and seriously wound and blow a soldier from the position, he dashed through a hail of hostile bullets to within ten feet of the enemy, brought the man to safety, and then, rushing back up the fire-swept slope, fired his pistol point-blank into the enemy until his ammunition was expended. Detecting several hostile troops moving toward an unmanned friendly machine-gun, he raced through withering fire, seized the weapon, and inflicted sweeping destruction into the ranks of the fanatical foe, thereby retarding the advance and enabling his company to regroup, counterattack, and regain the hill. Private Kauhini sustained a painful arm wound in this action, but refusing medical treatment, he remained steadfast in his position. At approximately 0200 hours on 24 June 1951, the enemy made a ferocious banzai charge, employing an estimate two battalions supported by automatic weapons, small- arms, and grenade fire. Again, Private Kauhini advanced alone in the face of vicious hostile fire and, firing his rifle and throwing grenades, halted the attack momentarily and enabled the company to effect an orderly withdrawal. He was last seen standing alone on the crest of the hill, delivering crippling fire into the onrushing assailants.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 5 (January 15, 1952)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

KAWAMURA, JAMES J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James J. Kawamura (RA29040786), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Kawamura distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chindong-ni, Korea, on 7 August 1950. On that date, a force of some forty well-armed enemy penetrated the area of the platoon of which he was a member and the order was given to withdraw to a more defensible position. However, Private Kawamura, armed with an automatic rifle, remained in place firing into the onrushing enemy. As they dispersed in the face of the withering fire, he shouted to them in Japanese and fired when they revealed their positions by answering. By his gallant stand, he inflicted at least twenty-five casualties on the fanatic forces, causing them to withdraw in such haste that they abandoned a machine-gun, and permitted his platoon to reoccupy the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 89 (October 1, 1950)
Home Town: Hawaii

*KEACHER, FLOYD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Floyd A. Keacher (US55036343), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Keacher distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tangunon-ni, Korea, on 9 September 1951. On that date, Corporal Keacher's company was engaged in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. In the initial phase of the attack the assaulting elements were pinned down by a devastating volume of enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire Realizing that his comrades faced possible annihilation in their present untenable positions, Corporal Keacher voluntarily left his position of comparative safety and crawled forward with his machine-gun. Although he was constantly under direct observation of the enemy and subjected to their concentrated fire, Corporal Keacher continued his advance until he reached a vantage point from which he could direct fire on four key enemy emplacements. With a total disregard for his personal safety, he put his weapon into operation on the exposed terrain and began to rake the strongpoints, which were holding up the advance of his comrades, with a devastating fire. In desperation, the hostile troops concentrated their entire firepower on Corporal Keacher's position. He finally fell, mortally wounded by the enemy fire, but not before his deadly accuracy had destroyed three of the four enemy emplacements. His self- sacrifice and fearlessness enabled his comrades to renew their assault and to secure their objective with a minimum of casualties. When the hostile positions were captured, the friendly troops counted twelve enemy dead near the silenced automatic weapons.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 24 (January 11, 1952)
Home Town: Chisago, Minnesota

KEEBLE, WOODROW WILSON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Woodrow Wilson Keeble, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Acting Platoon Leader with Company G, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Keeble distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Daegean-ni, Korea, on 20 October 1951. On that date, Sergeant Keeble's company was moving forward in an attack against a fanatically determined enemy force occupying positions on a steep, rocky terrain feature of great tactical importance. Leading the support platoon, Sergeant Keeble suddenly saw that the attacking elements had become pinned down on the precipitous slope by a murderous volume of fire of machine-gun positions from three well fortified and carefully placed enemy positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he dashed forward and joined the pinned-down platoon. Then, hugging the ground, he crawled forward alone until he was in close proximity to one of the hostile machine-gun emplacements. Ignoring the vicious stream of fire which the enemy crew trained on him, he activated a grenade and, throwing it with great accuracy, successfully destroyed the position. Continuing his one-man assault, he moved to the second enemy position and destroyed it with another grenade. Despite the fact that the hostile troops were now directing their entire firepower against him and unleashing a shower of grenades in a fanatic attempt to stop his advance, he moved forward against the third hostile emplacement. Stunned by an enemy concussion grenade, he hesitated only long enough to regain his senses, then renewed his assault and skillful neutralized the remaining enemy position with exceptionally accurate rifle fire. As his comrades moved forward to join him, he continued to direct deadly accurate fire against nearby enemy trenches, inflicting extremely heavy casualties on the foe. Inspired by his courageous example, the friendly troops swept the enemy from the hill and secured the important objective. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant Keeble on this occasion enabled his company to accomplish its mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 624 (October 16, 1952)
Home Town: Wahpeton, North Dakota

KEHL, ALVIN W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alvin W. Kehl, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader in an Infantry Company. First Lieutenant Kehl distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, on 13 June 1953. Early the morning on that date, Lieutenant Kehl was a member of a United Nations element which was ordered to reinforce a vital outpost under assault by a hostile force. Lieutenant Kehl, leader of the assault platoon, organized his men and led them up the fire- swept slope to the summit of the hill. There he regrouped the unit and led an advance on well-fortified hostile forward positions. As the group neared the outpost, it was pinned down by a heavy enemy grenade barrage which threatened to inflict heavy casualties and stall the advance. Unhesitatingly, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Kehl moved forward, located the enemy force, and single-handedly destroyed them. Reaching the forward slope, Lieutenant Kehl directed his men in clearing the enemy from the Allied trenches and bunkers which had been overrun. He then secured an automatic rifle and charged down the forward slope to disrupt and demoralize an enemy element which was preparing to counterattack. Returning to his men, Lieutenant Kehl deployed them in the most effective defensive positions and then turned his efforts toward the evacuation of the wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 737 (August 11, 1953)

KELLEHER, GERALD C.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Gerald C. Kelleher, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Colonel Kelleher distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yuru, Korea, on 24 and 25 April 1951. On the night of 24 - 25 April 1951, a numerically superior enemy launched an attack against the regiment and, due to the withdrawal of friendly flanking units, succeeded in infiltrating behind the front lines and encircling the regimental command post and other rear elements of the regiment. Although constantly exposed to enemy automatic-weapons, small-arms and bazooka fire, Colonel Kelleher personally assumed command of the reserve battalion and led the unit in a successful effort to extricate the encircled elements. Despite intense enemy fire and the illuminative glare from burning vehicles, he moved among the tanks and men of his force, effectively directing their fire and exhorting them to greater efforts. His aggressive leadership, expert advice, and personal bravery in the face the face of overwhelming odds so inspired the member of the battalion that they assaulted the enemy positions, inflicting numerous casualties on the hostile troops and forcing them to withdraw in wild disorder. His courageous actions during this engagement resulted in the successful withdrawal of the beleaguered elements with minimum losses of personnel and equipment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 419 (June 10, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

KESTLINGER, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert S. Kestlinger, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to the Liaison Detachment, Far East Command. Captain Kestlinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 2 June 1952. Captain Kestlinger, in command of a two-man patrol, landed on the eastern bank of a river in enemy-held territory to reconnoiter the area and investigate a reported radar station. During the early hours of the following day, the patrol sighted a Chinese soldier and, while effecting capture, an outcry from the prisoner alerted the foe who immediately opened fire. Securing the captive, Captain Kestlinger exposed himself to hostile fire to cover his patrol member who had rushed forward to silence the nearest position with grenades. Ordering his patrol to withdraw with the prisoner, Captain Kestlinger assaulted the other machine-gun position, killing two of the manning crew with grenades and another with his trench knife. Despite vulnerability to rifle fire from high ground to the rear, he courageously seized a hostile submachine-gun and intercepted and charged a squad of six enemy, killing all of them. Through his unflinching courage and intrepid actions, the lives of a fellow officer and an indigenous boatman were saved.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 21 (January 22, 1953)

*KETCHUM, RUFUS LLOYD (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Rufus Lloyd Ketchum (RA18103207), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Ketchum distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea during the period 28 through 30 November 1950. After the numerically superior enemy attacked and surrounded elements of the battalion and isolated the medical officer, Sergeant Ketchum assumed charge of the aidmen and, after establishing a collection point and an aid station in a native house, he moved fearlessly about the impact area in full view and under direct enemy fire to minister to and evacuate the wounded. Constantly vulnerable to vicious hostile fire, he supervised the search for blankets, sleeping bags, and parachutes to protect his patients from the bitter cold and foraged for coffee and other material comforts to meliorate their condition. Upon being ordered to withdraw, Sergeant Ketchum directed and assisted in placing the disabled in vehicles to form a motor convoy. Enemy fire was continuous and intense, and the progress of the column further impeded by a blinding snow storm, icy roads, and rugged mountainous terrain. After several vehicles were immobilized by hostile fire, Sergeant Ketchum directed transferal of the wounded to serviceable vehicles, and when the advance was halted by an enemy road block and withering fire rained down on the convoy from the surrounding hills wounding him in the chest and left arm, he continued to treat the injured. Sergeant Ketchum was last seen with his arm in a sling and, despite his painful wounds, administering a syrette of morphine to a wounded comrade.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 274 (December 2, 1951)
Home Town: Burnett, Wisconsin

*KETELE, ANDRE J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Andre J. Ketele (RA51093076), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a gunner on a 57-mm. recoilless rifle with Company I, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Corporal Ketele distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Op-a-ri, Korea, on 21 October 1950. On that date, Corporal Ketele was on a reconnaissance-in-force with his company through the hilly terrain near Op-a-ri. As the company moved through a very narrow valley they were met by a withering hail of fire from an enemy force of battalion size, well concealed and dug in on the surrounding high ground. Due to the complete surprise of the attack and the enemy's commanding position, heavy casualties were inflicted on the company at the outset. The company commander, realizing the futility of attempting to set up defensive positions in the valley, ordered a withdrawal from the valley. Disregarding the order to withdraw, and heedless of his own personal safety, Corporal Ketele acted as both gunner and assistant gunner and continued to fire his weapon with extreme accuracy, inflicting heavy casualties on the advancing enemy troops. Mortally wounded and with only one round left, he held his fire until the advancing enemy were only fifty yards from his position before firing. Corporal Ketele's accurate fire and personal bravery materially slowed down the enemy's advance and permitted the orderly withdrawal of his unit from the valley. His selfless devotion to duty was an inspiration to all who witnessed his deed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 27 (January 18, 1951)
Home Town: Virgin Islands

*KIRK, DWIGHT ALLAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dwight Allan Kirk (0-65912), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Kirk distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sane-Dong, Korea, on 29 May 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Kirk was participating in an attack on hostile positions through a draw behind a vital hill. Observing a platoon of the company caught it a heavy barrage of artillery and mortar fire, Lieutenant Kirk moved across the open terrain under the heavy concentration of fire and succeeded in leading the men from the hazardous position. After making a reconnaissance of the hill, Lieutenant Kirk led a platoon against the numerically- superior enemy force, but found it necessary to withdraw due to a spirited mass counterattack. Shortly afterwards, Lieutenant Kirk again led a force against the hostile positions but again was forced to withdraw. Placing the men in a holding position, Lieutenant Kirk immediately organized a fresh platoon and led another assault which, through his skill and inspirational leadership, inflicted approximately five hundred casualties on the enemy. In the course of this third assault, Lieutenant Kirk moved across a minefield to aid a Korean soldier who had been seriously wounded and in so doing detonated a mine which took his life.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 661 (July 17, 1953)
Home Town: Macon, Illinois

*KLINEFELTER, JOE THOMAS (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joe Thomas Klinefelter (0-1890262), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 955th Field Artillery Battalion, 8th U.S. Army. Second Lieutenant Klinefelter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumwha, Korea, on the night of 13 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Klinefelter was a forward artillery observer with a Republic of Korea Army division under intense enemy attack. Although the enemy quickly overran the area to the right and left of his position, Lieutenant Klinefelter fearlessly carried out his mission and directed effective and accurate fire on the enemy. When the enemy penetrated the United Nations main line of resistance and occupied positions to the rear of his bunker, Lieutenant Klinefelter immediately directed a barrage on the sector which dispersed the assault. Simultaneously informing organizations to the rear of the progress of the battle in his area, Lieutenant Klinefelter then directed artillery fire on his own bunker when the enemy threatened to overrun the position. The following morning, after all United Nations infantry and armored units had withdrawn, Lieutenant Klinefelter attempted to lead his men to safety, but was soon pinned down by enemy fire. With conspicuous devotion to duty, he continued to direct an effective barrage on the enemy forces surrounding his group until his radio failed and all communications were lost. Lieutenant Klinefelter and his two comrades failed to return to United Nations lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 18 (January 15, 1954)
Home Town: Lancaster, Pennsylvania

*KNAPP, WILLIAM C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William C. Knapp (0-925698), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Knapp distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumhwa, Korea, on 15 and 16 October 1952. While participating in the defense of a key terrain feature under counterattack by a numerically superior foe, Lieutenant Knapp observed the enemy approaching through an area off the left flank of the company, which was unprotected by artillery fire. Realizing this maneuver and the vulnerability of the position posed an imminent threat to the defense of the entire perimeter, and unable to contact the forward observer by telephone, he left the comparative safety of his bunker and raced over the fire-swept terrain to investigate. Although wounded and knocked to the ground by a mortar burst, he rose to his feet with grim determination and courage and proceeded to the observation post. Finding that the observer had become a casualty, he quickly positioned himself at the telephone and called in round after round of artillery fire on the advancing enemy in an attempt to stem the onslaught. He maintained his heroic stand until hostile troops approached within one hundred yards of his position. He then made a final call for a heavy concentration on the area in which he was located. Through his incredible courage and inspirational actions, the enemy was routed form the commanding ground with staggering losses.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: Angelina, Texas

*KNAUS, ROBERT P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert P. Knaus (RA12356606), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Knaus distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sat'ae-ri, Korea, on the night of 9 - 10 October 1951. While engaged in an assault on a strongly fortified enemy-held hill, the attacking elements of his company were met with devastating automatic-weapons and grenade fire which pinned them down. Carrying his machine-gun, Corporal Knaus maneuvered to a flank of the enemy bunker and although he was subjected to concentrated fire, he brought such effective fire upon the position that it was silenced and his companions were able to advance and secure the first objective. During the succeeding thirty hours the enemy's several counterattacks were repulsed largely because of his efficient employment of his weapon. When his company resumed the attack, he was again in the vanguard, employing his machine-gun as an assault weapon. As the final objective was secured and the enemy fled, he was killed by a sniper's bullet.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 75 (August 6, 1952)
Home Town: Onondaga, New York

*KOBASHIGAWA, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert S. Kobashigawa (RA10104680), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Kobashigawa distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on the night of 3 October 1951. On that night, the hill positions held by the company of which Sergeant Kobashigawa was a member were attacked by the enemy force determined to dislodge the friendly troops. Occupying a position on the right flank of the company perimeter, Sergeant Kobashigawa poured a deadly accurate stream of fire into the on-rushing ranks of the enemy. Because of their numerical superiority, the enemy troops were able to fight their way to within a few yards of the position occupied by Sergeant Kobashigawa and a machine-gunner. As he directed the fire of the automatic weapon, he held the charging enemy at bay by throwing a heavy volume of grenades into their midst. The hostile troops, realizing that the position held by Sergeant Kobashigawa and his comrade would have to be overrun if the friendly forces were to be penetrated, concentrated their entire firepower on the two men. The heavy fire killed the machine-gunner and wounded Sergeant Kobashigawa but, undaunted, he manned the automatic weapon and resumed firing at the enemy. He continued to render supporting fire until the enemy was forced to withdraw because of the extremely heavy casualties they had suffered. As the hostile troops retreated down the slope, Sergeant Kobashigawa continued to fire his weapon until he collapsed and died from his wound.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 164 (March 28, 1952)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

KOCH, KENNETH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Kenneth W. Koch, First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 72d Medium Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Koch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Cheryong-ni, Korea, on 23 and 24 April 1951. During the night of 23 - 24 April 1951, Lieutenant Koch's company was subjected to a savage attack by the enemy, who were using mortars, automatic-weapons and rocket launchers. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Koch repeatedly went on foot from one tank to another, encouraging and directing his men. Throughout the night he displayed excellent tactical ability, superb leadership, and conspicuous gallantry in directing the employment of his company against the numerically superior hostile force. Due to his dauntless efforts, his men held their positions and by dawn, the enemy were repulsed with an estimated five hundred dead. Throughout the day of 24 April 1951, Lieutenant Koch personally led repeated attacks against enemy troops who had surrounded two friendly battalions and under his inspiring leadership Company A dislodged the enemy, thereby permitting the battalions to make an orderly withdrawal to new positions. During this engagement more than three hundred enemy soldiers were killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 378 (June 1, 1951)

KOEHNEN, MARK B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mark B. Koehnen (RA17313487), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a member of a combat patrol from and Infantry Company of the 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Koehnen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on 13 February 1953. Early on the morning of 13 February 1953, Corporal Koehnen was moving up a steep slope when a sudden and intense burst of hostile fire was directed against him and his comrades. The advance faltered and the patrol leader, knowing that his men were at the mercy of the enemy guns should they stop where they were, ordered an assault. Without hesitation, Corporal Koehnen ran forward and spearheaded the attack. Leaping into an enemy trench, he engaged the foe in hand-to-hand combat. Corporal Koehnen, together with the other members of the patrol, then drove the hostile troops back until they withdrew to a cave located behind their outpost position. Repeated attempts by the friendly force failed to dislodge the foe from their protected position. Instead, each time Corporal Koehnen and his comrades attacked, they were met by a barrage of grenades and a heavy volume of automatic-weapons fire which forced them to seek cover. Reorganizing, the friendly troops launched another assault with Corporal Koehnen leading the way. It was at this point that an armed enemy grenade fell in the midst of the charging men. Corporal Koehnen, without thought of his personal safety, immediately changed his direction and kicked at the rolling grenade in an effort to protect the rest of the patrol. The grenade exploded and seriously wounded Corporal Koehnen.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 641 (July 9, 1953)
Home Town: McLeod, Minnesota

KOLDENHOVEN, RICHARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard A. Koldenhoven, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Koldenhoven distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Saoring-chi, Korea, on 17 May 1951. On the night of 17 May 1951, the enemy launched a desperate offensive against friendly positions. Lieutenant Koldenhoven's company was well out in front of the main line of resistance where it bore the brunt of many fanatical attacks. Later, when the numerically superior enemy cut off segments of his company, which he was leading to a predetermined position, Lieutenant Koldenhoven, realizing that only the most drastic action could check the hostile advance and save his greatly outnumbered company from annihilation, unhesitatingly called for artillery fire to be brought on his own position. He then ordered the two platoons that were with him to withdraw to an assembly area while he proceeded through the artillery barrage to reach the remainder of his beleaguered company. Heedless of the murderous fire sweeping the entire area, he calmly rallied his scattered men and withdrew them from the trap. After reorganizing his company, in a display of dauntless courage and inspirational leadership, he again led his men against the enemy, personally deploying his platoons and squads and encouraging his men to hold their positions. His gallant and determined efforts in the face of tremendous odds prevented the enemy hordes from encircling and annihilating the entire battalion and enabled the friendly troops to recover from the fierce hostile onslaughts and repulse the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 478 (June 29, 1951)

*KOLLOCK, LORENZO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lorenzo Kollock (US52022500), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Kollock distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pong-Dang-ni, Korea, on 14 October 1951. On that date, the company of which Private Kollock was a member, was advancing on its objective when it was stopped by heavy fire coming from a series of well-entrenched hostile hill positions. Realizing that an attack against these positions would cause many casualties to be inflicted on the friendly troops because of the deep fortification occupied by the enemy, the company commander called for a volunteer to go forward alone and eliminate the positions with a flame thrower. Private Kollock immediately stepped forward and, grasping the weapon, he moved up the slope toward the first enemy bunker. Despite the intense fire being concentrated on him, he eliminated the position, killing two of its occupants and causing others to surrender. Observing a large group of the enemy grouping to launch a counter-attack, he unhesitatingly moved forward once more and subjected them to a long burst from his flame thrower. This courageous action inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile force and broke up the attack. Those of the enemy who were not killed or injured became thoroughly demoralized and fled to the safety of their bunkers. Private Kollock then pursued them and destroyed many of them in their positions. In attempting to sweep the area clean of the enemy, he exhausted the fuel for his weapon and was cut down by enemy automatic-weapons fire. His comrades were so inspired by his fearless actions that they charged forward and overran the enemy positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 115 (February 26, 1952)
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

KOPSICK, ALBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert R. Kopsick (0-1882339), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Kopsick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kachil-li, Korea, on the night 8 June 1953. On that night, Lieutenant Kopsick was the leader of an ambush patrol which encountered a numerically superior enemy force while operating forward of the United Nations main line of resistance. Although wounded in the initial action, Lieutenant Kopsick quickly established a defensive perimeter, then moved about the fire-swept terrain to distribute ammunition and to encourage his men. Throughout the action Lieutenant Kopsick continued to brave the intense barrage and traverse the area until he was wounded a second time and lost the use of his legs. When he saw a wounded comrade lying in an exposed area, Lieutenant Kopsick ignored his own injuries and the heavy bombardment, crawled to the casualty, and administered first aid. After dragging the wounded soldier to a covered position, he continued to fire his weapon with great effectiveness and to inspire his men until reinforcements arrive the following morning and routed the enemy force. Even though he was in a state of semi-consciousness, Lieutenant Kopsick courageously refused to be evacuated until other wounded men had been treated. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Kopsick on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 996 (November 8, 1953)
Born: June 21, 1929 at Brooklyn, New York
Home Town: Nassau, New York

*KORAKIAN, JACK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Jack Korakian (US55046685), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Korakian distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hyoryongdae, Korea, on 23 January 1952. On that date, Corporal Korakian was accompanying a squad as it moved along the saddle of a hill when it was subjected to intense enemy fire and an almost continuous rain of grenades. Snipers on the heights to the rear and on the flanks of the squad further harassed the friendly troops and, in the ensuing struggle, the squad leader was seriously wounded. Corporal Korakian immediately assumed command and proceeded to organize an orderly withdrawal. Under his capable direction, the men began the perilous descent from the hill but one particular enemy bunker with a clear field of fire made their retrograde movement almost impossible. Determined to silence the nearby enemy emplacement in an effort to save his men from annihilation, Corporal Korakian appointed a rifleman to render covering fire and then, in a single-handed assault, he charged directly into the heavy enemy fire toward the bunker. Before he could reach it, he was stopped by a wound in his chest. Undaunted, he remained in an exposed position and poured a deadly accurate stream of rifle fire into the position and, at the same time, directed his men to resume their withdrawal. Although seriously weakened by his painful wound, Corporal Korakian remained in his position, firing at the enemy, until he was sure that his comrades had reached safety. Only then did he laboriously make his way to them under the heavy enemy fire. Upon reaching friendly positions, he succumbed to his wound.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 225 (April 30, 1952)
Home Town: Racine, Wisconsin

KOTITE, RICHARD S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard S. Kotite, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with as a Platoon Leader of Company B, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Kotite distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 15 February 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Kotite, a platoon leader of a rifle unit, was given the mission of attacking and seizing a hill from which the enemy was delivering effective fire on the flanks of the friendly troops. When he had led his platoon to a point near the top of the hill, a sudden and intense mortar barrage killed several of his men and scattered the remainder. Lieutenant Kotite immediately reorganized his men and, under intense enemy fire, again led them forward. At this point, an enemy machine-gun opened fire, killing the platoon sergeant and the one remaining squad leader. Undaunted by the intense and accurate fire, Lieutenant Kotite shouted encouragement to his troops and personally rushed the machine-gun emplacement, disposing of it with a grenade. He then led his men, in the face of point-blank enemy fire, over the crest of the hill. As a result of the heroic and inspiring leadership of Lieutenant Kotite, his company was able to secure commanding terrain vital to the security of United Nations troops in the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 572 (July 22, 1951)

KOZARES, VICTOR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Victor Kozares, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Kozares distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Soan-ni, Korea, on 6 February 1951. As the 1st platoon was halted by the intense and accurate small-arms and automatic-weapons fire of the enemy, the company commander ordered the 3d platoon, of' which Corporal Kozares was a member, to launch a bayonet attack against the hostile emplacements. Corporal Kozares immediately led a small group forward to engage the enemy. After expending his grenades on the outer defenses of the hostile force, he called for his comrades to pass their grenades to him and continued hurling them until their defenses were breached. With this accomplished, he charged the nearest enemy emplacement, shouting for the rest of the men to follow. After killing one of the enemy with rifle fire and bayoneting another, Corporal Kozares ran down a third and killed him with his bayonet after his rifle jammed. Stopping only long enough to clear his rifle, he then moved forward through the hostile positions, killing many of the enemy with his bayonet and rifle. His courageous and aggressive actions were a primary factor in the successful accomplishment of the company's mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 749 (October 7, 1951)
Home Town: South Union Township, Pennsylvania

*KRAUSS, HARRY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Harry A. Krauss (ER13281876), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Krauss distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 3 October 1951. On that date, Sergeant Krauss' company was engaged in an attack against well-fortified enemy hill positions. In the initial assault, the friendly force was pinned down by an extremely heavy enemy mortar and artillery fire. Realizing that in their present untenable position, his comrades faced annihilation, Sergeant, Krauss immediately gathered all of the hand grenades he could carry and, hurling them and firing his rifle, single-handedly charged the enemy emplacements. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved across the open terrain, fully exposed to the concentrated fire of the enemy. The bold attack of' Sergeant Krauss successfully diverted the fire of the hostile troops and allowed his company to renew its assault. After expending all of' his grenades he, steadfastly remained in his exposed position, firing his rifle with deadly accuracy until he was hit and mortally wounded by hostile fire. inspired by the great personal courage displayed by Sergeant Krauss, his comrades charged forward and drove the enemy force from their emplacements.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 996 (December 16, 1951)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*KRAVITZ, LEONARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leonard M. Kravitz (RA12322776), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Kravitz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea near Yangpyong, Korea, on 6 and 7 March 1951. On that date, Private Kravitz, an assistant machine gunner attached to Company L, was in a defensive position on strategic key terrain. After the friendly elements had repulsed two earlier probing attacks, the enemy launched a fanatical banzai charge with heavy supporting fire and, despite staggering losses, pressed the assault with ruthless determination. When the machine gunner was wounded in the initial phase of action, Private Kravitz immediately seized the weapon and poured devastating fire into the ranks of the onrushing assailants. The enemy effected and exploited a breach on the left flank, rendering the friendly positions untenable. Upon order to withdraw, Private Kravitz voluntarily remained to provide protective fire for the retiring elements. Traversing the gun to the left to cover the infiltrating enemy and ignoring the pleadings of his comrades to fall back, he fearlessly maintained his position. Detecting a column of Communist troops moving toward friendly positions, he swept the hostile soldiers with deadly, accurate fire, killing the entire group. His destructive retaliation caused the enemy to concentrate vicious fire on his position and enabled the friendly elements to effect a withdrawal. After the strong point was re-secured, Private Kravitz' body was found lying beside the gun he had so heroically manned and numerous enemy dead lay in and around his emplacement. Private Kravitz' incredible display of valor set an inspiring example for his comrades. His unflinching courage and consummate devotion to duty reflect the highest credit on himself and uphold the finest traditions of the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 5 (January 15, 1952)
Home Town: Kings, New York

KRILLING, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William E. Krilling (RA17216353), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Krilling distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on 13 February 1953. On that date, Sergeant Krilling assumed command of a combat patrol when the patrol leader was wounded in the initial stages of a fire-fight with hostile forces. Sergeant Krilling led the members of the patrol in an attack through a minefield during an intense barrage. When the patrol reached the enemy trenches, Sergeant Krilling, ignoring painful arm and hip wounds inflicted by a grenade, drove the enemy troops from their installation and into a deep cave. After his three companions were wounded by a fragmentation grenade, Sergeant Krilling ran through the grenades and small-arms fire to sweep the enemy's position with a burst from his carbine. Though weakened from loss of blood, Sergeant Krilling lifted two of his comrades out of the trench and carried them to safety. When the third man, whom Sergeant Krilling had assumed could move by himself, cried out for help, Sergeant Krilling moved back to the cave, again swept the entrance with a burst of fire, and carried the man to a waiting litter. The patrol was ambushed, but Sergeant Krilling calmly directed supporting fire on the enemy squad and guided his men to a successful escape without further mishap. He then refused medical aid until all of his disabled comrades had been treated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 564 (June 12, 1953)
Home Town: Arlington, Virginia

KUHN, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles E. Kuhn (0-1293610), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Kuhn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Changnyhong, Korea, on 1 September 1950. On that date, when a group of approximately twenty enemy soldiers approached a roadblock established by Company F, Captain Kuhn waited until they were at close range, then ordered his men to fire. Throughout the ensuing action, he moved from one foxhole, to another, heedless of enemy fire, to give orders. As a result of his gallant actions, eighteen of the enemy were killed and two captured. Later that day, Captain Kuhn voluntarily accompanied a combat patrol, which included two tanks, into a nearby enemy occupied village and the patrol, under his inspiring leadership, destroyed five enemy anti-tank guns and two mortars, killed sixteen troops, and cleared the village of the remainder. On the night of 3 September 1950, Captain Kuhn led a rocket launcher team against an enemy force which was supported by tanks and self-propelled guns. Personally firing a 3.5 inch launcher, he knocked out two self-propelled guns and damaged one tank. The remainder of the enemy force was dispersed with heavy casualties. On 5 September 1950, he infiltrated through enemy-held territory to reach a platoon that had been cut off, and although wounded during this action, organized and coordinated an attack which repulsed the enemy end restored friendly lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 299 (May 10, 1951)
Home Town: Allegheny, Pennsylvania

L

LACK, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles E. Lack, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine gunner of an Infantry Company. Corporal Lack distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, on the night of 10 June 1953. On that night Corporal Lack was a machine-gunner in a United Nations force defending an outpost against an intense enemy attack. Although wounded early in the engagement, Corporal Lack insisted on returning to his gun and continued to direct accurate fire on the advancing enemy. Noticing a medical aidman attempting to move a wounded man into a bunker, Corporal Lack unhesitatingly rushed to his assistance. He was attacked en route and paralyzed from the waist down by a blow on the back. Fighting with his bayonet, he warded off the enemy until help arrived. When he regained partial control of his legs, Corporeal Lack again returned to the machine-gun. Although completely isolated from friendly forces, he continued to place deadly fire on the enemy, employing his pistol when close proximity rendered his machine-gun ineffective. Corporal Lack courageously remained at his position and inflicted great casualties on the enemy infantrymen until the following morning when the United Nations forces drove the element from the key outpost.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 977 (October 30, 1953)

*LAMBERT, ROBERT R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert R. Lambert (US53005081), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Lambert distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chungso-ri, Korea, on the morning of 4 October 1951. On that date, the unit of which Corporal Lambert was a member launched an attack against a large hostile force firmly entrenched on a strategic hill. Leading one of the assaulting squads, Corporal Lambert moved up the slope toward a series of enemy bunkers which were the key to the hostile defense. As the friendly troops neared the objective, they were met by a tremendous concentration of enemy fire. The foe poured burst after burst of machine- gunfire into the ranks of the attackers, one of which hit and wounded Corporal Lambert. Although seriously weakened and bleeding profusely, he refused to be evacuated. Instead, Corporal Lambert, displaying a matchless fighting spirit, urged his men forward, and summoning the last of his strength, he attacked and destroyed the machine-gun position from which the major portion of the hostile fire originated. Thoroughly inspired by his valiant actions, the friendly troops swept up the hill and routed the hostile force. Although his life was ebbing fast, Corporal Lambert managed to emplace his men in advantageous positions in anticipation of an enemy counterattack before he collapsed and died.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 323 (June 21, 1952)
Home Town: Escambia, Florida

LANDES, DAVID G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David G. Landes (0-2206931), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Landes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 7 September 1951. In the early morning hours on that date, Lieutenant Landes' platoon was occupying a sector of a company defense perimeter which was located on the crest of a hill, well in advance of the friendly lines. In the darkness, several enemy patrols probed the friendly positions but they were repulsed in short, bitter engagements. These patrols, however, proved to be the vanguard of a large hostile force which suddenly launched a full-scale attack against the perimeter. While a heavy volume of enemy fire raked the friendly emplacements, the attackers advanced under cover of a smoke screen and breached the barbed-wire entanglements with explosive charges. Then with a rush, the hostile troops charged up the slope and concentrated their entire strength against one small sector of the perimeter. Under this unrelenting pressure, the defending squad began to fall back. Observing this, Lieutenant Landes, without regard for his personal safety, left his position and fought his way to the confused men. Battling hand-to-hand with the enemy in an effort to contact each man, he reorganized the friendly troops and directed them in an orderly withdrawal to a more defensible position. Seeing the command post fall into the hands of the enemy, he attempted to contact the company commander on a field telephone only to find that the instrument was no longer functioning. Realizing that his message was of vital importance, he fearlessly traveled across a wide expanse of exposed ground and personally delivered his information to his superior. After reporting the tactical situation, Lieutenant Landes crossed the fire-swept terrain once again and reorganized his platoon in an effort to drive the enemy from the friendly positions. Ordering his men to fix bayonets, he led them in a fierce counter-attack which routed the enemy from the perimeter with heavy losses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 100 (February 20, 1952)
Home Town: Noble, Oklahoma

LAUER, RICHARD F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard F. Lauer, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Lauer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Han River in Korea on 7 March 1951. Following an assault landing across the river by his company, the assault platoon became subjected to intense hostile fire from a small hill some five hundred yards to the east. Ordered up the river to draw enemy fire and relieve pressure on the assault platoon, he deployed his platoon and opened fire, only to be pinned by a vicious cross-fire from two machine guns, approximately seventy-five yards distant. Running forty yards through the fire-swept area, Lieutenant Lauer secured a rifle and grenade adapter, crawled closer and fired two grenades into the position on the right which knocked it out. When the gun on the left again pinned down his platoon, he advanced alone and fired three grenades into this hostile emplacement which due to its construction, proved ineffective. Circling the emplacement, he bayoneted an enemy soldier who was firing on his platoon and, dropping a grenade into the escape vent, silenced the gun and annihilated its crew. Leaping to his feet and shouting orders to fix bayonets and charge, his men, so inspired by his heroic action, made a frontal assault against the hill, killed twenty-one hostile troops and completely routed their remaining force. Lieutenant Lauer, in his daring exploits, had personally knocked out two machine guns and killed five of the determined enemy. His courageous conduct, indomitable determination and outstanding combat leadership reflect the highest credit upon himself, and are in keeping with the finest traditions of the infantry and United States Army.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 91 (October 24, 1951)

LEACHMAN, GAIL B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gail B. Leachman (US56068875), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant with Company F, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Leachman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagamnyong, Korea, on 12 September 1951. On that date, the company of which Sergeant Leachman was a member, was engaged in an attack against a well-entrenched hostile force occupying a strategic slope. Rather than launch a costly frontal assault, the friendly troops maneuvered around the enemy positions and attempted to attack from the rear. As Sergeant Leachman's platoon moved forward in the assault, it was subjected to a heavy volume of fire from a well- concealed hostile emplacement. In the initial burst of fire, both the platoon leader and Sergeant Leachman were wounded. Realizing that the platoon leader was unable to lead the attack, Sergeant Leachman, although painfully wounded, moved to the front of the platoon. In an attempt to minimize the danger felt by his men, he fearlessly exposed himself to the heavy fire and, shouting words of encouragement to them, he began to advance on the enemy position. Inspired by his heroic example, the friendly troops resumed the assault and followed Sergeant Leachman as he attacked the emplacement. Wounded again by grenade fragments, he nevertheless neutralized the left flank of the enemy position and continued to advance. By that time, the entire platoon was fighting with such fierce aggressiveness that the hostile force became demoralized and fled from the hill. Only after he had deployed his men in a defensive perimeter on the newly won ground did Sergeant Leachman allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 105 (February 22, 1952)
Home Town: Bonneville, Idaho

LEDERER, EDWARD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward R. Lederer (RA15282298), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Lederer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeu-san, Korea, on 30 July 1951. During an assault on enemy emplacements, Company L, was pinned down by heavy small arms, automatic-weapons, grenade, and mortar fire. Sergeant Lederer, with his machine gun in his arms, leaped from the safety of his position and went forward with his company through the fire-swept are, firing his weapon with deadly accuracy. With fearless determination, he continued this fire, causing many enemy casualties and completely destroying three enemy machine-gun emplacements. This display of valor, in the face of a numerically superior enemy force, inspired Sergeant Lederer's comrades to press the attack, which culminated in the complete destruction of the enemy and attainment of the company's objective. The conspicuous courage and consummate devotion to duty demonstrated by Sergeant Lederer reflect the highest credit on himself and the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 75 (August 6, 1952)
Home Town: Maricopa, Arizona

LEE, CHEW-MON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chew-Mon Lee (0-1341886), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Lee distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunu-ri, Korea, on 30 November 1950. On that date, Company H was defensively deployed near Kunu-ri when a numerically superior enemy force succeeded in completely surrounding the company and subjecting it to intense small-arms, machine-gun and automatic-weapons fire. During the initial phase of this action the company suffered heavy casualties and the company commander was killed. Lieutenant Lee immediately assumed command of the company and, with complete disregard for the intense enemy fire, deployed the company in a tight defensive perimeter. Realizing that the loss of the company commander had tended to panic the men, Lieutenant Lee moved from one position to another, encouraging his men and steadying those who were confused and bewildered by the heavy casualties suffered and the intensity of the enemy attack. When accurate sniper fire from a hill about 150 yards distant began harassing his men, Lieutenant Lee and a small group of volunteers attacked the hill and cleared it of enemy opposition. After establishing a small outpost on the hill, he dispatched a messenger through the enemy lines in an attempt to obtain reinforcements. Under his capable leadership the men repulsed several fanatical enemy attacks until a friendly tank force broke through to their position. As it became apparent that the tank crews could not identify the friendly forces, Lieutenant Lee attracted the attention of the lead tank crew, then mounted on top of the tank and, heedless of the enemy fire, directed return fire on the hostile positions with such accuracy that all enemy resistance was eliminated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 463 (June 26, 1951)
Home Town: Sacramento, California

LEMINGS, RAYMOND C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Raymond C. Lemings (RA18129754), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Lemings distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 21 September 1950. On that date, Private First Class Lemings's platoon attacked against what was believed to be a small group of the enemy on an adjacent ridge. Upon reaching the enemy positions a sudden barrage of grenades revealed that the platoon had been drawn into a trap manned by over eighty enemy troops. Ordering his squad to a safer place, Private Lemings charged the enemy emplacements in the face of exploding grenades and launched an attack with his own grenades. Three times he returned for a new supply and charged back at the entrenched enemy. His outstanding courage and exemplary conduct so inspired the rest of the platoon that they swept up the hill routing the dazed and disorganized North Koreans.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 49 (January 31, 1951)
Home Town: Seminole, Oklahoma

LENON, CHESTER J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chester J. Lenon (0-2206421), Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 77th Engineer Combat Company, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Lenon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 6 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Lenon, Platoon Leader, of the 3d platoon, was covering the withdrawal of Company I, 24th Infantry Regiment, south of Haman, Korea. During this action the platoon was pimped down by intense enemy small-arms and mortar fire. Despite the intense fire, Lieutenant Lenon and six volunteers, flanked the enemy and inflicted heavy casualties which enabled the remainder of the platoon to withdraw. Although wounded, Lieutenant Lenon refused to be evacuated, but remained in an exposed position delivering effective fire on the enemy until his men had reached safety. He then withdrew and despite his wounds devoted himself to the care and treatment of his wounded men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Montgomery, Kansas

*LEWELLYN, ELMER E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elmer E. Lewellyn (ER06142686), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Lewellyn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Oneamsong, Korea, on 13 January 1951. On that date, Company E was defending a key terrain feature in the Wonju area when a numerically superior enemy force launched several fanatical attacks against the company positions. In the initial attack, Private Lewellyn, a newly assigned replacement that had joined the company the preceding day, was thrown from his foxhole by the force of an enemy concussion grenade that exploded near his position. Quickly recovering from the shock of the blast, he crawled back to his position and aided in repulsing the attack by placing withering fire on the enemy. When the enemy troops rallied and launched a second attack, Private Lewellyn, heedless of the intense enemy fire, moved from one position to another in order to gain a better field of fire and thus inflict greater casualties on the enemy. Although seriously wounded during the second enemy assault, Private Lewellyn refused to retire for medical attention. When the enemy closed in for the third and final assault, Private Lewellyn leaped from his foxhole and stood fully exposed to the hostile fire, yelling taunts at the enemy and shouting words of encouragement to his comrades. During the final assault, enemy troops approached to within a few yards of Private Lewellyn's position but he steadfastly refused to fall back and killed several enemy soldiers at his position before he fell mortally wounded. Inspired by the intrepid courage and self sacrifice of Private Lewellyn, his comrades tenaciously held their positions, inflicted tremendous casualties on the enemy and successfully repelled the hostile assaults.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 581 (July 24, 1951)
Home Town: Sevier, Tennessee

LEWIS, WALTER S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Walter S. Lewis, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Lewis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Samt'ae-dong, Korea, on 23 September 1951. On that date, the company of which Lieutenant Lewis was a member was assigned to attack a strategic hill which had barred the advance of a large friendly assaulting force. After several costly attacks, Lieutenant Lewis was the only platoon leader who had not been rendered a casualty. Without hesitation he organized all of the remaining friendly troops into a single group and fearlessly led them in a renewed attack. Charging directly into the heavy enemy fire, he reached a point on an intermediate objective where he directed his men to establish a defense line. Constantly moving among the friendly troops with words of encouragement, Lieutenant Lewis then led his men in three attacks against the enemy positions, each of which was unsuccessful because of the tremendous volume of hostile fire. In the fourth attempt, he cautiously led his men up the steep slope and then charged forward alone toward a key enemy bunker. Disregarding the heavy fire being concentrated on him by the enemy, he fearlessly attacked the position and destroyed it with grenades. After shouting to his men to move forward, he maneuvered around the crest of the enemy-held hill and neutralized the hostile emplacements, one by one. In this manner, the strategic area was secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 218 (April 26, 1952)

*LEWIS, WARREN G. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Warren G. Lewis (0-1686698), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Lewis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonji, Korea, on 9 and 10 July 1950. During the afternoon of 9 July, Lieutenant Lewis volunteered to go to an exposed position where he could adjust mortar fire on enemy machinegun positions. His conduct of the fire, in the face of heavy enemy fire, was successful and enabled the Battalion to repulse an enemy attack and remain in their positions longer than would otherwise have been possible. On 10 July 1950, a full-scale attack was launched on the Battalion position. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Lewis took position with the flank machinegun section. He personally moved from gun to gun directing fire. When two men were wounded, he carried them to defilade positions where Medical Department personal were able to treat them. When one of the guns was destroyed, Lieutenant Lewis redistributed the remaining gun so that it protected the Battalion Observation Post as well as the flank of the position. Upon the position being overrun, he directed the withdrawal of his men and did not leave until all survivors had gotten to safety. He covered the withdrawal by personally firing his machine gun. By his gallant actions and outstanding leadership, Lieutenant Lewis brought credit to himself and to the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 12 (July 28, 1950)
Home Town: Bartow, Georgia

LIMBOCK, ROEY E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Roey E. Limbock (RA38079505), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Limbock distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea, on 27 July 1950. On this date, Company B was attacked and surrounded by an overwhelming enemy force. The aggressiveness of the assault, superior numbers and superior numbers and fire superiority disorganized the company into isolated small groups, each vainly trying to fight a withdrawing action to escape the trap. Sergeant Limbock led a group of nineteen men through enemy lines to the hills south of Anui. He did so while wounded and with complete disregard for personal safety in the interest of saving his detachment. Sergeant Limbock was wounded so severely that he was unable to walk and had to be carried by his men. He continued to lead and direct his men in this fashion for three days. He directed their route of march, instructed them in providing security along the route, and maintained battle discipline. On one occasion he further risked his life to prevent a grenade from injuring men of his group. Sergeant Limbock, although very weak, encouraged his detachment to keep going in spite of hunger and fatigue. By so doing the men reached a point where a patrol was sent for assistance which arrived and took the group to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 162 (November 8, 1950)
Home Town: Red River, Texas

LIPPMAN, GORDON J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gordon J. Lippman, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company A, 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Lippman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Do Chung, Korea, on 11 April 1951. Captain Lippman was leading his men across the Hantan River in the pre-dawn darkness in an attempt to secure the high ground on the opposite shore from a well-entrenched hostile force. When the friendly troops were in the middle of the river, an enemy outpost discovered the operation and directed machine-gun fire on the wading troops. Quickly deploying his men, Captain Lippman led a charge against the hostile emplacement, destroying it and enabling the company to finish the crossing with a minimum of casualties. He then reorganized the company and led his men across a flat, exposed area toward the objective. The enemy, placed in a strong perimeter defense on the crest of the hill, directed such a devastating volume of fire on the friendly troops that only a platoon of the company reached the base of the objective with Captain Lippman, the remainder being pinned down by the intense fire. He realized that he platoon would be forced to launch a frontal assault against the enemy positions, risking annihilation, unless some method was employed to divert the hostile fire from the attacking troops. He immediately moved up the slope and, armed with a pistol and grenades, attacked the enemy emplacements. For forty-five minutes he maneuvered to within a few yards of these positions, harassing the hostile troops and drawing their concentrated fire. This courageous action enabled the platoon to work its way to a position from which an assault was launched that routed the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 784 (October 19, 1951)

LITTLE, JAMES C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James C. Little, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Little distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonan, Korea, on 8 July 1950. On that date, the entire battalion had been surrounded by superior enemy forces which had launched a tank and infantry attack. First Lieutenant Little voluntarily took command of a 2.36 inch rocket launching team and a rifle grenade launcher. With these inadequate weapons, he destroyed two of the enemy tanks. Noticing that a platoon, which was operating without an officer, was preparing to prematurely withdraw from its position, Lieutenant Little organized the men and placed them in firing positions where they were able to inflict severe casualties on the enemy. When the order was given to withdraw, he picked up an M-1 rifle and personally destroyed a machine-gun position which was holding up the movement. He moved from place to place, ensuring that all men withdrew in an orderly and effective manner. Throughout the entire action, he displayed a complete disregard for his own safety and repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire. By his gallant action, casualties were held to a minimum and the Battalion was able to retain its effectiveness as a fighting unit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 12 (July 28, 1950)

*LITTLE, JOHN F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John F. Little (RA06662835), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Little distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yechon, Korea, on 19 July 1950. While leading a motorized patrol of the Intelligence and Reconnaissance Platoon, Sergeant First Class Little discovered the presence of approximately fifty enemy troops. He immediately signaled the danger, dismounted, and at close range engaged the enemy in a fire-fight from an exposed position in a small ditch approximately fifteen yards away. Meanwhile, his comrades took cover in a small building nearby. Although under intense fire from enemy small-arms and automatic weapons, Sergeant Little, from his exposed position, coolly directed his men into position to wipe out the enemy strongpoint. By diverting to himself the fire and attention of the enemy, and with the deadly accurate fire of his own weapon, he successfully covered the deployment of his patrol. He then adjusted mortar fire on the enemy position. Under his skillful direction the patrol was able to rout the enemy, inflict heavy losses, and capture much valuable enemy equipment. In this heroic action Sergeant Little was mortally wounded by a burst of fire from an enemy machine-gun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 24 (August 12, 1950)
Home Town: Breathitt, Kentucky

LITZINGER, DUANE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Duane E. Litzinger, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with an Infantry Company of the 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Litzinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mago-ri, Korea, on 11 and 12 October 1951. On that date, Private Litzinger's company was engaged in an assault against well-fortified enemy emplacements. In the opening phases of the attack, Private Litzinger was assigned to provide overhead machine-gun fire to support the attacking infantry. The heavy enemy counter-fire soon disabled his weapon and wounded two of his comrades. Exposing himself to the direct observation of the enemy, he fearlessly moved to the two men and evacuated them to safety. Upon returning to the battle Private Litzinger, armed only with his carbine, single-handedly advanced against a hostile automatic-weapon emplacement and killed the crew manning the machine gun. Later, when another attack was launched by the friendly troops, Private Litzinger, observing that his comrades were pinned down by intense enemy automatic-weapons fire, organized five men and led them against the hostile bunkers. Working their way to within a few yards of the enemy positions, the men assaulted the emplacements with grenades under the direction of Private Litzinger and destroyed three of them. With the enemy automatic-weapons silenced, the friendly troops were able to renew their assault and secure their objective. The platoon was immediately arranged in a defense perimeter, with Private Litzinger and two comrades in a forward position. When the fanatical enemy counterattack came, Private Litzinger's emplacement bore the brunt of the assault. Fighting fiercely and with great determination, he held his ground, repulsing the enemy with extremely heavy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1003 (December 20, 1951)

LONSFORD, CHARLES ARTHUR
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles Arthur Lonsford, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, Company B, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Lonsford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sabanggari, Korea, on 10 June 1951. While advancing against the enemy, Company B was halted by a heavy volume of enemy fire. Quickly, and with utter disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Lonsford moved among his men, reorganizing them and directing fire. He then personally led one squad against a key enemy emplacement and succeeded in neutralizing it. With this obstacle overcome, the entire company moved forward in the assault and Lieutenant Lonsford moved on toward the next enemy position. At this time, he noticed a wounded man lying in an exposed position with the enemy fire concentrating on him. Immediately he ran across the fire-swept terrain and, picking up the man, carried him to safety. After arranging for the wounded man's evacuation, he returned to the head of the assaulting elements and led them forward, securing the objective and routing the enemy from their positions. The outstanding personal courage and inspirational leadership displayed by Lieutenant Lonsford in this action reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 633 (August 12, 1951)

LOPEZ, ERASMO G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Erasmo G. Lopez, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Lopez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chik-tong, Korea, on 16 May 1951. When his company was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, Corporal Lopez, a machine gunner, remained in position and delivered withering fire on the assaulting enemy masses, inflicting many casualties. Undaunted by the continual enemy attacks, he steadfastly remained in position, continually sweeping the area clear of the enemy with his devastating machine gun fire. When his ammunition was expended, Corporal Lopez held the hostile troops off with grenades and small-arms fire until additional ammunition was brought forward to his position. Supplied with more ammunition, Corporal Lopez again opened a deadly stream of fire on the enemy, heedless of the small-arms fire and mortar bursts which were striking near his position, until the hostile troops, after suffering tremendous casualties, were repulsed. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Corporal Lopez throughout this engagement was instrumental in the defeat of the enemy and was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military services.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 478 (June 29, 1951)

LOVISKA, FRANCIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Francis Loviska, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery B, 99th Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Loviska distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yong-dong, Korea, on 24 July 1950. While serving as a forward artillery observer attached to Company E, 8th Cavalry Regiment, Private Loviska and his comrades were cut off behind enemy lines by a machine-gun, pinning the unit to the ground. Private Loviska volunteered to carry ammunition for a bazooka team which was seeking to destroy the machine-gun position, constituting a part of the road block. Moving forward of an infantry platoon position, the team fired upon the road block and knocked out three machine-guns. Before it could deliver more fire, the bazooka team, except for Private Loviska, was killed. He immediately picked up the bazooka and single-handedly destroyed two more machine-gun positions, enabling his unit to withdraw without further opposition.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 114 (March 4, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 212 (1951)

LOWE, FRANK E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank E. Lowe, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as the Personal Representative of the President of the United States, attached to the Far East Command, with the mission of observing and reporting on military operations in Korea, from 10 August 1950 to 9 April 1951. Accepting personal hazards far beyond the requirements of his mission, Major General Lowe devoted long periods of time with the forward elements of our major units in combat in order that he might better observe and evaluate the battle efficiency of the United Nations Command.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 75 (April 10, 1951)

LOWRY, LEONARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Leonard Lowry (0-1302026), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Major Lowry distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hoengsong, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, Company C had the mission of covering the withdrawal of a road-bound artillery battalion along a road paralleled by enemy-infested hills and ridges. After ten consecutive hours of heavy fighting, during which Major Lowry heroically led his men in knocking out several enemy roadblocks designed to trap the battalion, the column reached the regimental assembly area and joined the 3d Battalion. As the two battalions began assembling and reorganizing, a strong enemy force occupying positions on a ridge adjacent to the assembly area placed a heavy barrage of mortar and automatic-weapons fire on the friendly troops, inflicting numerous casualties. Quickly organizing a group of men from his company, Major Lowry personally led them in an assault on the nearest enemy held hill and succeeded in killing the enemy occupying it. Although serious wounded during this engagement, he continued to lead his men in assaults on the others hills in the area until the entire ridge had been cleared of hostile forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 419 (June 10, 1951)
Born: May 16, 1920 at Milford, California
Home Town: Blackhawk, Iowa

*LOYD, FRANK RILEY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Frank Riley Loyd, Jr. (0-62775), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Loyd distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sinan-Myan, Korea, on 26 September 1950. When Task Force DOLVIN was proceeding along a road, the column was stopped by severe enemy sniper and automatic-weapons fire from the high ground to their right. Lieutenant Loyd, as platoon leader of the 1st platoon, was riding tanks at the rear of the column. When the enemy commenced firing, Lieutenant Loyd, without regard for his own safety, immediately formed fifteen men into an effective fighting force and attacked the hill. In the course of the attack the group was pinned down by devastating enemy fire and grenades. Lieutenant Loyd, although armed only with a pistol, exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire and through his outstanding display of courage, aggressiveness and leadership so inspired his men that they assaulted the position and forced the enemy to withdraw. In this final assault Lieutenant Loyd was killed. Due to his heroic action, an enemy force of what was later determined to be 150 men were forced from well fortified positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 78, (February 17, 1951)
Home Town: Laramie, Texas

LUKAS, FRANK W.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank W. Lukas, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to the 26th Republic of Korea Regiment. Captain Lukas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 3 and 4 September 1950. At approximately 2000 hours, on 3 September 1950, an estimated two companies of enemy infiltrated behind friendly lines and established a strong roadblock overlooking an area in which the command post of reconnaissance in a convoy with approximately 200 Republic of Korea soldiers, was trapped in the roadblock. The sudden attack created confusion among the Korean soldiers and many abandoned their vehicles and fled, enabling the enemy to inflict 20 casualties on the group. Observing the confusion and realizing that the regimental headquarters was faced with possible annihilation, Major Lukas turned his vehicle around and drove down the road to intercept the fleeing troops. Halting them, he dismounted two .50 caliber machine guns from an artillery truck and organized two machine gun squads to return the enemy fire. While engaged in this operation, a part of the enemy force suddenly appeared from the darkness behind his machine gun positions, inflicting additional casualties on the group. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Major Lukas moved through the intense small arms fire to one of the machine guns and turned it on the enemy, killing seven, wounding 15, and causing the remainder to withdraw. He repeatedly exposed himself to sporadic enemy fire throughout the night by moving among the soldiers and encouraging them to maintain their positions. At daylight, despite the incessant mortar and small arms fire, he organized the group of Korean soldiers and personally led the in an attack on the numerically superior enemy. His display of courage, aggressive leadership and devotion to duty so inspired the Republic of Korea soldiers that they zealously assaulted the enemy positions, killing 45, wounding 30, and forcing the remainder to flee in disorder, thereby eliminating the roadblock.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 252 (May 1, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

LUKAS, FRANK W.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank W. Lukas, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to the 2d Battalion, 26th Republic of Korea Regiment. Captain Lukas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kangnung, Korea, on 6 February 1951. On that date, the 2d Battalion, 26th Republic of Korea Regiment, was given the mission of attacking an estimated three battalions of Korean communist soldiers who had held up the 2d Battalion advance for three days in the vicinity of Mosan Hill, a dominating terrain feature commanding the approaches to Kangnung. Captain Lukas, equipped with a backpack Air Force control radio, advanced with the lead company to attack the enemy. The Company was immediately placed under a heavy barrage of enemy mortar, automatic weapons and small arms fire, during which time the company commander was killed and 15 friendly soldiers wounded. Captain Lukas crawled through the enemy fire to another position within 100 years of the enemy positions, and for two hours while under heavy constant enemy small arms fire, directed devastating air strikes by friendly fighter aircraft. These planes knocked out four machine guns, two mortars, caused 50 enemy casualties and partially disorganized the enemy in the entrenchments. At the completion of the air strikes Captain Lukas again exposed himself to enemy fire, and firing a submachine gun, led the company in assaulting the enemy positions. Inspired by the daring and courage of Captain Lukas, the company assaulted the enemy position so aggressively and effectively with rifles, grenades, and submachine guns that 93 of the enemy were killed, an unknown number wounded, and 16 captured, and the remainder forced to withdraw. The capture of Mosan Hill enabled the remainder of the battalion to advance successfully on the city of Kangnung. The intrepid actions and courageous leadership of Captain Lukas reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 159 (March 21, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

*LUNDQUIST, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles L. Lundquist (RA17228261), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Lundquist distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chorwon, Korea, on 24 March 1953. On that date, Corporal Lundquist was a member of a platoon committed to reinforce and assist an outpost of the battalion which was heavily engaged with the enemy. As the valiant group neared the objective, hostile troops were endeavoring to break off the engagement. The platoon quickly integrated into the friendly forces. While pursuing the foe and screening the area for casualties, Corporal Lundquist spotted an enemy soldier lying in a shallow hole near the trail. After calling for assistance, he and an aidman moved to the position. As they attempted to lift the wounded man to administer medical treatment, the soldier pulled a grenade form his clothing, released the pin, and extended the deadly missile before him, which endangered the lives of members of the platoon. Fully realizing the danger involved, Corporal Lundquist unhesitatingly wrested the grenade from the enemy, attempting to prevent injury to himself and his comrades. As a result of the ensuing explosion, he was mortally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 72 (September 23, 1953)
Home Town: Travis, Texas

*LYDON, EDWARD T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward T. Lydon (RA43009153), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Lydon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on the morning of 19 November 1951. On that morning Sergeant Lydon led his platoon in an attack on a well-entrenched hostile force occupying a strategic hill. As the friendly troops advanced, they were pinned down by intense enemy mortar and automatic-weapons fire. Realizing that his men were at the mercy of the enemy guns in their present positions, Sergeant Lydon, without regard for his personal safety, raced across the fire-swept slope toward the nearest hostile emplacement. From an exposed position, he threw several grenades which destroyed the enemy weapon and killed its crew. With this threat eliminated his platoon resumed its advance but it had proceeded no more than fifty yards when was again halted by deadly accurate enemy fire. Once more, Sergeant Lydon moved forward in a single-handed assault. Despite the heavy enemy fire being concentrated on him, he reached a point within ten yards of the key hostile bunker. From this position, he destroyed the emplacement with grenades. As he exposed himself in order to shout words of encouragement to his men and rally them to the attack, he was hit and mortally wounded by enemy small arms fire. Inspired by his fighting spirit, the friendly force charged forward and routed the hostile troops from the hill with heavy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 281 (April 26, 1952)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

LYLE, NED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ned Lyle, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Lyle distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea, on 26 August 1951. On that date, Company F was subjected to a devastating barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire and was forced to begin a limited withdrawal. In this action two platoon leaders became casualties and Sergeant Lyle promptly took charge of both platoons. He rapidly reorganized the men in order to meet the oncoming enemy who now began to subject them to a heavy volume of fire. When the close proximity of the numerically superior hostile troops threatened the small friendly force with annihilation, Sergeant Lyle, with utter disregard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the enemy fire in order to draw it away from the wounded. After personally carrying several casualties to cover, he then stationed himself in such a manner as to slow the enemy advance while his men sought more tenable positions. Pouring a deadly accurate fire into the ranks of the attacking troops, Sergeant Lyle successfully delayed them. Upon observing that the fire from an enemy machine-gun emplacement further endangered his comrades, Sergeant Lyle, with fixed bayonet, single-handedly charged the position. This bold action so unnerved the enemy that they abandoned the emplacement. Seizing the captured weapon, Sergeant Lyle turned it on the enemy troops and inflicted such heavy casualties among them that their assault became disorganized. Upon returning to his men, he regrouped them and led them in a fierce counterattack. In the assault which followed, the friendly troops were so inspired by Sergeant Lyle's personal example of fearlessness that they repulsed the enemy with heavy casualties and regained their lost positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 951 (November 29, 1951)

LYNCH, JAMES H.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Lynch, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Lynch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 21 and 22 September 1950. As commander of Task Force LYNCH, Colonel Lynch was assigned the mission of organizing, coordinating, and directing the tactical operations of a task force to drive through enemy territory to a junction with Allied Forces near Seoul. Though faced by a confident enemy flush from recent victories, Colonel Lynch so skillfully maneuvered and employed his force that he confused and completely demoralized an enemy who had tremendous numerical superiority. Inspired by his courage and aggressive leadership, the men of Task Force LYNCH, in their drive northward, annihilated over nine hundred enemy troops and destroyed great quantities of enemy weapons, vehicles, and ordnance stores.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 189 (December 5, 1950)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

LYNCH, JAMES H.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Lynch, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Lynch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hambung-ni, Korea, on 27 September 1950. As Colonel Lynch's task force moved forward deeper into enemy territory, the motorized column suddenly was intercepted and brought under fire by an enemy force of ten tanks. Having no friendly tanks at his immediate disposal, and realizing that the enemy tanks, if unopposed, would bring about the annihilation of his command, Colonel Lynch, with total disregard for his personal safety, moved forward to effect the reorganization of his then scattered and confused force. Despite the devastating lane of enemy tank and machine-gun fire that was placed on the highway, he directed the placing of a two and a half ton truck across the road as a temporary road block, thus sufficiently retarding the advance of the enemy to allow friendly tanks to move forward from the rear guard position. During the vicious tank battle that ensued, he refused to take cover and moving about openly, organized rocket launcher teams and placed them in position. Through his courageous, aggressive action and superior leadership Lieutenant Colonel Lynch was directly responsible for the total annihilation of an overwhelming enemy force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 132 (March 11, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

M

MacDONALD, ALBERT B. V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert B. V. MacDonald, Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery C, 37th Field Artillery Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant MacDonald distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 1 February 1951. On that date, an enemy force estimated at one regiment launched an attack against the 3d Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, and succeeded in forcing a breach in the line defended by Company I. When the artillery forward observer with Company I was killed early in the attack, Lieutenant MacDonald volunteered to join the company as forward artillery observer. Realizing the importance of close-in artillery fire, he moved to an exposed position with the left flank of the platoon on Hill 333 from which he could accurately adjust artillery fire on the advancing enemy. As the intensity of the fighting increased, Lieutenant MacDonald refused to leave his observation post but continued directing artillery fire on the enemy troops until they approached within twenty-five yards of his position. When the platoon fell back to the base of the hill and reorganized for a bayonet charge on the enemy, Lieutenant MacDonald joined the riflemen in the assault. Reaching his former position, he found that his telephone and radio had been destroyed by enemy fire; however, he effectively continued to direct orders orally, calling for artillery fire to within twenty-five yards of his position. When the enemy launched a counterattack and again drove the platoon from the hill, Lieutenant MacDonald rejoined the riflemen in a second bayonet charge that carried them to the crest of the hill. Five times the hill changed hands five times, and each time Lieutenant MacDonald would remain in position directing artillery fire orders until the close proximity of the enemy rendered artillery fire useless, then fall back and rejoin the platoon to help retake the hill in hand-to-hand combat. His courageous actions and tenacity during the bitter engagement were instrumental in the final success of the platoon in driving the numerically superior enemy from the hill and securing the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 426 (June 13, 1951)

*MacGILL, HENRY TOMLINSON (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Tomlinson MacGill (0-50808), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant MacGill distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. Lieutenant MacGill had placed his company in a defensive position on the Kum River line. At dawn on 16 July 1950, the enemy commenced an attack with overwhelming forces that enveloped the right flank of Company C. Lieutenant MacGill, with no regard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself in organizing the defense of his company, in directing the action, and in encouraging his men. He stationed himself in the most exposed and dangerous part of the line and continued to rally his troops through the incessant and severe fighting. By 1300 the situation was extremely grave, and it was apparent that a withdrawal must be made. When ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant MacGill, from his exposed position, gave the order to fire and fall back, but remained in position himself to cover the withdrawal of his unit. By so doing, he was able to save the remainder of his company but sacrificed his chance to escape.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 120 (October 16, 1950)
Home Town: Cumberland, North Carolina

*MACHCINSKI, DANIEL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Daniel J. Machcinski (US52007862), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Machcinski distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pandangdong-ni, Korea, on 13 October 1951. On that date, Private Machcinski's company was engaged in an attack against a fanatical enemy force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. As the friendly troops advanced, they were subjected to a devastating volume of automatic weapons fire that forced them to seek cover on the bare slope. It was immediately determined that the heaviest fire originated from a single bunker and several men moved forward in an effort to destroy it. All of these attacks failed, and Private Machcinski, realizing that his comrades faced annihilation, unhesitatingly volunteered to attempt to eliminate the position. With the knowledge that he faced almost certain death, he moved directly into the enemy fire and advanced on the bunker. With grim determination he moved to a position within a few yards of the bunker and eliminated its occupants with rifle fire and grenades. This enabled the friendly troops to renew their assault, and as they moved forward, Private Machcinski made his way over the crest of the hill, where he spotted another enemy bunker. With total disregard for his personal safety, he single-handedly assaulted this new threat, moving steadily forward until he was mortally wounded by the intense hostile fire. The extraordinary heroism and self sacrifice of Private Machcinski enabled his comrades to secure their objective with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 36 (January 18, 1952)
Home Town: Lucas, Ohio

*MacLEAN, ALLAN DUARD (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Allan Duard MacLean (0-18229), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Commanding Officer of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Colonel MacLean distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Chosin Reservoir in North Korea during the period 27 through 29 November 1950. On the afternoon of 27 November 1950 the regiment was proceeding north to the Yalu River, and Colonel MacLean, heading a small party, went forward to reconnoiter a route of advance. After considering the terrain, road conditions and overall tactical situation, he established positions for the night on the southern tip of the reservoir and located his command post between two defensive perimeters. The unit successfully repelled a vicious assault in the early hours of 28 November 1950, and at daybreak, Colonel MacLean ordered readjustment of the perimeter to employ a natural defensive feature while denying the enemy a route to the south and friendly supply installations at Hagaru-ri. Despite continued sniper fire, he moved between the two groups throughout the day to insure proper coordination of forces and maintained his command post with the most forward elements to direct operations. The enemy again attacked in great strength throughout the night, but was repulsed by the skillful defense tactics employed by Colonel McLean. The heavy night fighting seriously depleted the ammunition and with enemy activity increasing, he ordered consolidation of the two groups at approximately 0430 hours the following morning. The wounded were placed on vehicles near the front of the column and after proceeding about one hundred and fifty yards Colonel MacLean, spotting a physical roadblock at a bridge, immediately deployed troops to a hill east of the vehicles to provide covering fire and fearlessly advanced alone to neutralize this new threat and was last seen in close grips with a hostile group. For three days, through snowstorms and under constant heavy shelling, he held his combined force together, dominating and controlling the critical situation through the force of his heroic example.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 177 (July 7, 1951)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

MacLEOD, NORMAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Norman E. MacLeod (US56072717), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. Corporal MacLeod distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Nae-Dong, Korea, on 26 October 1951. On that date, Corporal MacLeod was assigned the mission of leading the battalion surgeon and a group of litter bearers to his company, which was actively engaged with the enemy, in order to assist in the evacuation of the wounded. After leading the group to their destination, he continued on to the positions occupied by his comrades and, when he saw one of his comrades lying wounded on the exposed terrain, he moved under heavy enemy fire to his side and carried him to safety. Returning to the scene of the battle, he saw another friendly company moving up the slope to engage the enemy. Intercepting the friendly troops, Corporal MacLeod pointed out the position of the enemy and of his own company. Then, reorganizing a squad, he led the men in an assault against the hostile positions. As he advanced on an enemy automatic weapons position, a painful wound in his hand rendered him unable to fire his weapon. Undaunted, he charged the emplacement and destroyed it with grenades. After the friendly company had secured its objective, Corporal MacLeod, disregarding his own wound, organized litter teams and supervised the evacuation of the wounded form the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 111 (February 25, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

MAGELINSKI, MICHAEL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Michael Magelinski, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Magelinski distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at the "Punch Bowl" in Korea, on 8 and 9 December 1952. On that date, Sergeant Magelinski was assistant leader of a five-man detail assigned the mission of reconnoitering and contacting the enemy on key terrain. Forging up the rugged, snow-covered slope to within fifteen yards of hostile trenches, the valiant group came under intense grenade and automatic-weapons fire, which wounded the patrol leader and struck and tore the radio from the operator's back. Ignoring his leader's order to withdraw and his own painful wound, Sergeant Magelinski moved through withering fire to the side of the wounded officer and attempted to evacuate him down the hill. Later, when an enemy patrol began searching the area, the officer declared that he would be a burden and urged Sergeant Magelinski to abandon him, but refusing to leave the helpless man, he organized a rear-guard action and carried his leader down into a valley through waist-deep snow and to the base of the next hill, where they were met by a rescue patrol.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 59 (August 4, 1953)

*MALLOY, ROBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert J. Malloy (RA06145676), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Corporal Malloy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. Patrolling near the Seoul City Race Track in an area between two high roadbeds through a low river valley, Corporal Malloy's platoon was ambushed from the right by a heavily armed force located on high ground across the river. Deadly, direct fire from the enemy inflicted heavy casualties and completely pinned down the right flank. Upon hearing the cries of the wounded, Corporal Malloy, with utter disregard for his life, left his position of comparative safety and crossed into the fire- swept area to aid his men. Heedless of warnings to stay down in the face of the devastating fire, he treated the wounded and assisted in their evacuation to safety until he was mortally wounded by a burst of hostile fire.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 17 (January 29, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

MAMULA, GEORGE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George Mamula, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant with an Infantry Company of the 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Mamula distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 9 September 1951. On that date, Sergeant Mamula's company was engaged in an attack against a fanatical hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. In the opening phases of the assault, intense enemy mortar and artillery fire accounted for numerous casualties among the friendly troops, including the company commander and all of the platoon leaders. Without leadership, the attacking elements became confused and the assault was temporarily halted. Sergeant Mamula, holding his platoon in reserve, realized that immediate and aggressive action was necessary to sustain the attack. He quickly moved his men forward through the pinned-down friendly troops and urged all of the men forward. Completely exposed to the devastating enemy fire, he remained with the lead elements, shouting encouragement and directing actions of the friendly troops. Inspired by his fearlessness, the entire friendly force moved forward in a coordinated attack. Skillfully maneuvering the three platoons, Sergeant Mamula led them to the objective, routing the disorganized hostile force from the hill. Quickly emplacing his automatic weapons in forward positrons, he directed their fire against the fleeing enemy with deadly accuracy. He then reorganized his men in a defensive perimeter to guard against a counterattack. Throughout this assault, his complete disregard for the intense enemy fire and his inspiring qualities of leadership enabled his company to complete its mission with a minimum of casualties but at great cost to the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 45 (January 22, 1952)

MANNING, MURRAY T., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Murray T. Manning, Jr., Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Manning distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sogong-ni, Korea, on 25 May 1951. On that date, two squads of Company I had the mission of assaulting Hill 800 while the remainder of the company furnished covering fire for the operation. Private Manning, a member of one of the squads, was in the leading element of the assault when intense enemy fire temporarily halted the advance. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved up the fire-swept slope until he could bring effective fire on the hostile elements holding up the advance. When he had killed six enemy riflemen with accurate fire from his M-1 rifle, the assault was able to continue. Observing the automatic rifleman of his squad fall from exhaustion, he rushed to the fallen man, pushed him to a safe position behind a rock, then picked up the automatic rifle and continued advancing up the hill. As the squads reached the hilltop, the enemy launched a vicious counterattack on the friendly forces, forcing them to withdraw. Heedless of the intense enemy fire, Private Manning remained in position, throwing grenades at the hostile troops and delivering withering automatic-rifle fire on them until the friendly troops reached cover. When the squads had regrouped and rejoined the company, the entire company assaulted the hill. Again Private Manning led the attack, moving relentlessly forward in the face of withering enemy fire. His aggressive actions so inspired the men around him that they followed him to the crest of the hill, engaged the numerically superior enemy troops in hand-to-hand combat, and forced them to flee in disorder, leaving numerous dead and wounded on the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 477 (June 29, 1951)

*MANUEL, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John R. Manuel (RA18280500), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with Company E, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Manuel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Twi-got, Korea, on 9 March 1951. Sergeant Manuel led his rifle squad against a numerically superior enemy force entrenched on Hill 1232. As the platoon moved forward toward their objective, they came under intense enemy automatic- weapons and small-arms fire which pinned the entire assault wave down. Immediately, Sergeant Manuel began moving his squad forward but several of his men were hit by enemy fire. Realizing that the platoon faced probable annihilation, Sergeant Manuel, displaying outstanding courage, moved rapidly toward the enemy until a burst of fire from an automatic weapons position killed him. By this selfless, gallant act, he succeeded in diverting the hostile fire from his men, thereby allowing them to regroup, continue the assault, and force the enemy from the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 390 (June 2, 1951)
Home Town: Evangeline, Louisiana

MAPP, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Mapp, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while attached to the Liaison Detachment, Far East Command. Second Lieutenant Mapp distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 1 and 2 June 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Mapp was a member of a two-man reconnaissance patrol committed effect a daring amphibious maneuver, investigate a reported radar station, and seize enemy personnel for interrogation. While effecting the capture of a Chinese sentry, an outcry from the prisoner alerted the hostile force who immediately opened fire with small arms and automatic weapons from well dug-in positions to the northeast and southeast of the patrol, blocking the route of withdrawal. Realizing the success of the mission was imperiled, Lieutenant Mapp charged the position nearest him and, lobbing grenades with deadly accuracy, destroyed the weapon and its crew. He courageously moved toward the second position, but was ordered to withdraw with the captive soldier to the safety of the beach.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 15 (January 17, 1953)

*MARSHALL, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James E. Marshall (0-2202494), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Company Commander of Company L, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant (Infantry) Marshall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Changu-Gol, Korea, on 19 September 1952. Upon assuming command of Company L due to the evacuation of the company commander because of wounds, Lieutenant Marshall maneuvered the company into a position preparatory to an attack on enemy positions on top of a hill. While awaiting the lifting of friendly artillery fire from the area, lieutenant Marshall noticed a tank attempting to fire into the embrasures of enemy bunkers. The fire from the tank was ineffective as the tank commander's view was inadequate from his position. Despite the continued hail of both friendly and enemy artillery and mortar fire, he rushed to the tank in order to direct its guns. Firing his carbine en route, Lieutenant Marshall reached the tank and was able to direct accurate and deadly fire upon the entrenched enemy until he fell mortally wounded.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 51 (November 29, 1956)
Home Town: Kanawha, West Virginia

MARTIN, EMMETTE B. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Emmette B. Martin (RA15250403), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Martin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Ipsok, Korea, on 27 November 1950. On that date, Sergeant Martin was wounded by an enemy mortar shell burst near his position. Although there was increasing enemy pressure from all sides and heavy small-arms and mortar fire, he, despite his painful wounds, continued to administer first aid and to evacuate casualties to a position of safety. The enemy continued to exert heavy pressure, and he was told that he was to withdraw with his company. Heedless of the immediate danger of the savage enemy attack, he refused to withdraw with his company, stating that there were too many wounded to leave behind. He remained with the wounded, who were unable to withdraw, treating and comforting them. Shortly thereafter the position was overrun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 119 (March 5, 1951)
Home Town: Barbour, West Virginia

*MARTIN, ROBERT REINHOLD (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Reinhold Martin (0-15953), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Martin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonan, Korea, on 8 July 1950. Observing enemy tanks and infantry in force penetrated his regiment's forward position, Colonel Martin, with total disregard for his own personal safety, rushed forward to organize and personally led rocket launcher and grenade attacks against the tanks and infantry at ranges of ten to twenty yards. Despite heavy small-arms and tank gun fire, Colonel Martin, by his heroic example, so inspired his men that they destroyed several tanks and forced others to withdraw, thereby preventing the enemy from immediately overrunning the position. During this action Colonel Martin lost his life while single-handedly attacking an enemy tank with a rocket launcher at a range of about fifteen yards.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 12 (July 11, 1950)
Home Town: Toledo, Ohio

*MASTIN, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert L. Mastin (RA17265186), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 1st Ranger Company (Airborne), 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Mastin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kunmul-Gol, Korea, on 17 and 18 May 1951. Private First Class Mastin's company, committed to securing commanding ground on the left flank of the battalion perimeter, moved into position under withering automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. Private Mastin, constantly braved intense hostile fire as he ministered to the wounded and assisted in their evacuation. Although wounded himself in the initial action, he continued to perform his duties with determination. The enemy launched repeated assaults, showering friendly positions with grenades and inflicting further casualties. Disregarding his safety, Private Mastin moved freely among the wounded and continued to render aid and to assist them to places of safety. Despite additional wounds received during the action, he unhesitatingly made his way to the assistance of a wounded comrade through heavy enemy fire. While continuing his heroic performance of duty and directing others in caring for the wounded, he lost his life.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)
Home Town: Eau Claire, Wisconsin

MATHEWSON, STANLEY A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Stanley A. Mathewson, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Mathewson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pungchon-ni, Korea, on 17 and 18 May 1951. While occupying a forward position as an assistant machine-gunner during a savage battle with a fanatical enemy force, Private Mathewson was wounded in the head by an enemy grenade. Shortly thereafter, the machine-gunner was also wounded, and Private Mathewson, ignoring the pain from his own wound, took a position at the gun and raked the enemy troops with devastating fire. Heedless of the intense mortar, grenade and automatic-weapons fire concentrated on his position, he continued to place withering fire on the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties. The hostile assaults on his position increased in fury and for two days and nights, without food or water, Private Mathewson held his ground, killing the enemy at point-blank range and continually repulsing their savage attacks. His gallant stand prevented the enemy from overrunning his position and contributed greatly to the successful defensive actions of his unit.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 479 (June 30, 1951)

*MATTA, ELMY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Elmy L. Matta (0-38339), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, 2d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Matta distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kumchon, Korea, on 3 August 1950. On that date, Lieutenant Matta was assigned mission of destroying an enemy road block which had cut the Division supply route and personally led the assault of his company against the enemy in the face of intense small arms and automatic weapons fire. Even after expending all his ammunition, Lieutenant Matta pressed the attack with his bayonet, causing the enemy to bolt and run. During this action Lieutenant Matta was killed. His fearlessness and aggressive leadership inspired his company to eliminate the enemy and successfully complete the mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 46 (August 31, 1950)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

MATTEO, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Matteo (ER11208629), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Matteo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mandae-ri, Korea, on the morning of 31 August 1951. On that morning the entire company was engaged in an attack against a heavily fortified enemy-held hill. As the friendly troops advanced, they were subjected to an intense hail of hostile fire pouring down from numerous automatic weapons emplacements. The attackers, hampered by extremely poor visibility caused by a thick fog, continued to move forward with dogged determination but, with half the assaulting force rendered casualties in the first few minutes, the friendly troops were eventually forced to seek what cover they could find on the bare slope. Without hesitation, Sergeant Matteo moved across the fire-swept terrain and supervised the evacuation of casualties. After assuring himself that his wounded comrades were safe, he advanced toward the enemy positions in order to make a reconnaissance of their strength and disposition. Although constantly under heavy enemy fire, he returned with the necessary information and volunteered to lead a fresh assault. Following Sergeant Matteo toward the objective, the friendly troops were pinned down once again by automatic weapons fire from a key hostile emplacement. Without regard for his personal safety, Sergeant Matteo single-handedly charged the position and destroyed the enemy weapon and its crew with grenades.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 208 (April 21, 1952)
Home Town: New Haven, Connecticut

MAUDIE, BERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bert W. Maudie (RA13315209), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Maudie distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sohui-ryong, Korea, on 28 January 1953. On that date, Corporal Maudie was in the company command post making a report after having returned form an ambush patrol when a company-sized group of hostile forces launched a fanatical attack supported by artillery and mortar fire. Unhesitatingly, Corporal Maudie grabbed his rifle and ran into the midst of the enemy. Firing his weapon at point-blank range, Corporal Maudie charged the enemy through a rain of automatic weapons and grenade fire, killing four of them. When he expended his ammunition, Corporal Maudie fixed his bayonet and engaged them in hand-to-hand combat. Fighting furiously, he succeeded in keeping the enemy from entering the command post. Reluctant to press their attack further in the face of such and aggressive resistance, the enemy force withdrew. The courageous defense which Corporal Maudie made was responsible for turning back the hostile troops and assuring the safety of the command post area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 522 (May 29, 1953)
Home Town: Indiana, Pennsylvania

*MAY, HOMER IRWIN (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Homer Irwin May (RA37590089), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant May distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chup'a-ri, Korea, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Sergeant May led the assault squad in an attack on Hill 851, which was stubbornly held by a determined enemy. The squad was suddenly subjected to intense hostile fire, forcing him to deploy his men to positions of cover. With complete disregard for his safety, he exposed himself to the withering enemy fire to better observe three heavily fortified bunkers. Armed with many grenades, he worked his way forward and completely destroyed one of the bunkers. After returning to his squad and obtaining anew supply of grenades, he again maneuvered forward and silenced another bunker. Sergeant May repeated this courageous performance until he had completely overcome the enemy's resistance, thereby enabling the squad to safely advance and secure their objective. The next morning, after the friendly positions had been consolidated, a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce counterattack, which forced the elements of Company L to withdraw. When the company was reorganized, Sergeant May was missing.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 3 (January 20, 1954)
Home Town: Hennepin, Minnesota

*MAYO, GREEN BERRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Green Berry Mayo (0-962708), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Mayo distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Omaegok, Korea, on 29 January 1951. While Lieutenant Mayo's platoon was participating in an attack against a well fortified and determined enemy force on Hill 312, it was suddenly subjected to intense and accurate fire from two enemy machine-gun emplacements, forcing the men to take advantage of the little cover available to them on the side of the hill. Lieutenant Mayo immediately realized that it would be impossible to withdraw without suffering heavy casualties and yet, to remain in their present position would subject the men to threat of annihilation from grenades rolled down the slope by the enemy. Instructing his men to stay under cover, he scrambled from his position and moved forward to assault the enemy emplacements. Single-handedly. Charging directly into the heavy fire, he began to throw grenades rapidly at all of the enemy strongpoints visible to him. As he drew closer to the enemy positions, the hostile troops rolled numerous grenades into his path, one of which exploded and fatally wounded him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 620 (August 6, 1951), as amended by General Orders No. 633 (August 12, 1951) to correct his service number.
Home Town: Worth, Georgia

*McCANN, RUSSELL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Russell J. McCann (0-1861919), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company K, 3d Battalion, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant McCann distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Songnae-dong, Korea, on 25 December 1952. On the morning of 25 December 1952, enemy forces launched a vicious attack against Lieutenant McCann's company. The company outpost was destroyed and the friendly forces withdrew to secondary lines. Lieutenant McCann, realizing the enemy had to be stopped, reorganized his platoon and with speed and skill established a line of defense that momentarily halted the attackers. When the enemy assaulted again, a fierce hand-to-and engagement ensued. In the midst of the battle, Lieutenant McCann regrouped the platoon and led it in a well executed counterattack. The platoon was blanketed by a constant barrage of artillery, mortar, and small arms fire as it charged up the rugged hillside. Inspired by the personal bravery of Lieutenant McCann, the men continued toward the objective, again engaged the enemy, and force the foe to retreat. Lieutenant McCann, shouting encouragement to his men throughout the battle, was fatally wounded as he reached the crest of the hill. Through his leadership, devotion to duty, and self-sacrifice, Lieutenant McCann led his men to a victory against the enemy forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 232 (February 21, 1953)
Home Town: Oneida, New York

McCORLEY, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James McCorley (RA14122323), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class McCorley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Senchon, Korea, on 23 May 1951. On that date, the 1st Battalion was attacking a well-entrenched enemy force near Senchon when withering machine-gun fire was received form a fortified enemy emplacement on the summit of Hill 665. Realizing that the battalion would suffer numerous casualties if the deadly fire from the hill continued to sweep the friendly position, corporal McCorley ran across an open, fire-swept field and began climbing the steep slope of the hill. Approximately half way up the slope, he was pinned down by enemy rifle fire. Scanning the hillside until he located four enemy riflemen firing on him, he killed them with accurate rifle fire and continued his ascent. Upon reaching the log-fortified emplacement on the summit of the hill, he threw several grenades into it, killing eight of the enemy troops inside and forcing the remainder to flee.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 482 (June 30, 1951)
Home Town: Wayne, Michigan

McCRANEY, WILLIAM P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William P. McCraney (RA18282304), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal McCraney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces north of Seoul, Korea on 21 May 1951. On that date, Corporal McCraney's squad was participating in an assault against a fanatically determined hostile force firmly entrenched on Hill 329. As the squad advanced, it was suddenly subjected to heavy automatic-weapons fire which forced the men to seek cover. Realizing the necessity for immediate action, Corporal McCraney crawled across the fireswept terrain toward the hostile machine-gun emplacement and succeeded in neutralizing it with grenades. This action enabled his men to resume their attack; but, as they reached the main enemy defenses, they were again pinned down by small-arms fire and bursting grenades. Securing an automatic rifle, Corporal McCraney rallied his men and charged forward toward the crest of the hill, raking the hostile entrenchments with accurate fire as he advanced. Although painfully wounded in this assault, he nevertheless managed to destroy an enemy strongpoint containing five men. This action breached the hostile defenses and gained a foothold on the crest of the hill for his men who subsequently routed the enemy from their positions. With the objective secured, Corporal McCraney then assisted one of his wounded comrades through the heavy sniper fire to an aid station at the base of the hill. The extraordinary heroism and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by Corporal McCraney throughout this action reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 719 (September 23, 1951)
Born: June 2, 1932 at Gulfport, Mississippi
Home Town: Saint Tammany, Louisiana

*McCULLOUGH, RICHARD ROUGHIER
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Roughier McCullough (0-64121), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant (Infantry) McCullough distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chorwon, Korea, on 18 July 1952. During a bitterly contested engagement in which one of the soldiers lost his helmet and carbine, Lieutenant McCullough replaced them with his own and fearlessly continued to lead the attack on the military crest of a strategic key terrain feature. As the troops approached the summit of the objective, they faltered under a shower of enemy grenades, many of which Lieutenant McCullough tossed back into the emplacement. Although wounded during this action, he successfully effected a limited withdrawal and set up defensive positions. Constantly vulnerable to heavy mortar and artillery fire, he moved about the perimeter encouraging the men, distributing ammunition, and coordinating the holding action. Although sustaining additional wounds, he organized and spearheaded a counterattack to the crest of the hill and gallantly continued to direct the assault until he lost his life.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)
Born: September 26, 1927 at Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Home Town: Arlington, Virginia

*McDANIEL, WILLIAM THOMAS (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Thomas McDaniel (0-12650), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), [then Major], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Operations Officer of the 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces during the period 27 August to 19 October 1950, after he was captured by North Korean Army forces at Taejon, Korea on 20 July 1950. Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel was the senior officer in a column of some 370 American prisoners of ware being marched from Seoul to Pyongyang, North Korea. The prisoners were suffering from wounds, hunger, disease, malnutrition, and the constant brutality of enemy guards. At great personal danger, Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel continually interceded with the captors for food, medication, and better treatment of his men. By personal example, and with disregard for retribution which followed his efforts, he organized his fellow prisoners toward assisting the wounded and weak, not allowing them to be left behind. Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel inspired the men and restored the will to live and resist among the soldiers in the column. Additionally, he sanctioned and materially aided the prisoners who planned to escape the enemy-held column. Resisting his own instincts for safety and survival, he declined to participate in several successful escape attempts of others because of his unfailing loyalty to, and compassion for, his fellow prisoners. Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel's refusal to break under mistreatment by his captors and inspirational leadership at a time when the North Koreans were intent upon breaking the morale and spirit of their captives, finally led to his execution at the hands of the North Koreans at the Sunchon Railway Tunnel. Lieutenant Colonel McDaniel's courage and unwavering devotion to duty and his men were in keeping with the most cherished traditions and ideals of military service and reflect great credit on him and the United States Army.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 24 (October 7, 1985)
Home Town: Dougherty, Georgia

*McDONALD, JOHN D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John D. McDonald (RA18350873), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private McDonald distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 9 and 10 August 1950. Serving as an ammunition bearer with a mortar section, on this date Private McDonald was moving forward with Company H when it was suddenly attacked by a fiercely determined and numerically superior enemy force. Realizing that the mortar section could not operate with effect due to the close proximity of the enemy, he voluntarily took up a position as a rifleman to aid in stemming the assault. Although wounded early in this action, Private McDonald refused medical aid and continued to fire on the enemy with deadly effect from an exposed position. His extreme accuracy with his weapon accounted for fifteen of the enemy during the night and only when he had been assured that the attack had been repulsed did he allow his wound to be treated. On the morning of 10 August 1950, the enemy again assaulted the friendly positions and Private McDonald, shouting words of encouragement to his comrades, once more placed devastating fire on the hostile forces. Ten more of the enemy were killed by him before he was killed by a burst of hostile fire. The outstanding courage exhibited by Private McDonald so inspired his comrades that they successfully repelled the repeated attars, inflicting extremely heavy casualties on the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 649 (August 18, 1951)
Home Town: White, Arkansas

*McDONALD, WILLIAM E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William E. McDonald (0-1879065), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant McDonald distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taegwanni, Korea, on 9 July 1953. On that morning, Lieutenant McDonald was in the fire direction center of a battery under intense enemy fire, when a gun position was hit by an enemy artillery shell. Despite the fierce fire raging about the destroyed bunker, Lieutenant McDonald immediately rushed to the position and began to dig out wounded personnel who were trapped under the debris. Fully realizing that the fire would undoubtedly set off an explosion in the ammunition pit, Lieutenant McDonald continued in his mission and succeeded in extricating three of the trapped men. When fuzes in close proximity to the ammunition began to burn and detonation was imminent, Lieutenant McDonald was warned to leave the position. With courageous disregard for his personal safety, he continued his efforts to rescue the remaining personnel until he was killed in the ensuing explosion. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant McDonald on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 996 (November 8, 1953)
Home Town: Baltimore, Maryland

McGARITY, WILEY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wiley McGarity, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant McGarity distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Paengma-gol, Korea, on 1 September 1951. On that date, Company F, in defensive positions on a strategic hill, was viciously attacked at approximately 0200 hours by an estimated three hundred ruthless hostile forces supported by automatic-weapons and grenade fire. After the enemy penetrated a company position on the west end of the hill, inflicting heavy casualties and gaining control of key terrain, Captain McGarity, armed only with a pistol and several grenades, braved withering small-arms and automatic-weapons fire and, launching a one-man assault against the fanatical assailants, killed approximately six hostile soldier before his ammunition was expended. Although wounded by grenade fragments, he grabbed abandoned enemy grenades and a discarded carbine and continued to pour deadly accurate fire into enemy positions until the ammunition was exhausted. Then, seizing a trenching tool, he closed in hand-to-hand combat, killing two more hostile soldiers. Maintaining his magnificent stand, he inflicted such sweeping destruction that the enemy broke off the engagement and when friendly troops reached the area, he was hurling grenades at the retreating force. His inspirational, intrepid actions exacted a toll of approximately thirty enemy dead and as a result of his incredible display of valor the vital strongpoint was re-secured.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)
Born: August 19, 1926 at Atlanta, Georgia
Home Town: Atlanta, Georgia

McGOWEN, DEWEY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dewey McGowen, Jr., Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Heavy Mortar Company, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class McGowen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chorwan, Korea, on 19 April 1951. On that date, the regiment had made a night assault on heavily defended, well-entrenched enemy positions and succeeded in establishing a bridgehead across the Han Tan river. The enemy launched a strong, determined counterattack, forcing friendly units to hastily withdraw under heavy mortar, automatic-weapons, and small-arms fire. As Lieutenant McGowen began to withdraw, he observed a seriously wounded comrade nearby. Leaving his radio behind, he successfully carried his comrade across the swift mountain stream, at the crossing site which was continuously subjected to concentrated hostile fire, to a place of relative safety where medical aid was available. When he re-crossed the river to recover his equipment, he found a second seriously wounded soldier. Repeating his hazardous task, Lieutenant McGowen carried his comrade to safety on the friendly side of the river where he had left the first wounded man. Then, with disregard for his personal safety, he again crossed over to the hostile bank of the river. As he neared the location where he had left his radio, he observed than an enemy soldier had captured the equipment. He courageously attacked and killed his foe, regained possession of his radio, and retuned safely to friendly lines.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 35 (May 13, 1954)

*McILQUHAM, ALFRED K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred K. McIlquham (0-1540949), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant McIlquham distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sangju, Korea, on 27 July 1950. On that date, Company B was attacked by an enemy force of overwhelming numerical superiority. Faced with the certainty of being overrun, the company was ordered to withdraw while the 1st platoon, commanded by Lieutenant McIlquham remained in position and furnished covering fire for the withdrawal. Heedless of the deadly enemy fire, Lieutenant McIlquham repeatedly moved about the exposed terrain to deploy his men and effectively direct their fire. When two men were wounded by enemy machine-gun fire, Lieutenant McIlquham single-handedly charged the machine-gun, silenced it, and then carried the two wounded men to a less exposed position. By his aggressive leadership and courageous example throughout the protracted engagement, he inspired his men to hold their positions despite the overwhelming odds against them, thereby enabling the remainder of the company to reach safety. Later, while reconnoitering an escape route for his encircled platoon, the position was overrun by the numerically superior hostile force and Lieutenant McIlquham was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 415 (June 9, 1951)
Home Town: Cook County, Illinois

McKIM, JOHN S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John S. McKim, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant McKim distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kyongan-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, the defensive positions occupied by Lieutenant McKims' platoon were attacked by approximately seventy-five enemy troops. As the hostile force overran the 57-mm. recoilless rifle section, he realized that this assault posed a serious threat to the key terrain feature occupied by his unit which, in addition, was an important sector in the battalion's defense. He immediately rushed forward under intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire, set up a 60- mm. mortar in an exposed position directly on the skyline, and fired at the hostile troops in an effort to stem their attack. When his ammunition was exhausted, he stood erect, completely exposed to the enemy, and began hurling grenades at them. Throughout this action he shouted directions and words of encouragement to his men who, inspired by his great example of personal courage, fought fiercely to repulse the enemy. Through his determined efforts, the hostile force was repelled with heavy casualties and the vital positions were held. The gallantry and steadfast devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant McKim on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and uphold the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 784 (October 19, 1951)

*McKIM, ROBERT BOYCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Boyce McKim (RA15243413), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class McKim distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 9 August 1950. As his platoon was attacking a heavily defended enemy position it suddenly came under the cross fire of two enemy machine-guns and was forced to take cover. Realizing that the attack could not continue until the enemy machine-guns were eliminated, Private McKim, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, seized his automatic rifle and charged toward the enemy positions. Disregarding the hail of enemy fire directed at him, Private McKim, moving to within a few feet of one of the enemy guns, opened fire and destroyed it. Turing his attention to the remaining machine-gun, Private McKim the, moving directly towards its dug-in position, and through devastating fire, continued his one- man assault. At this point he was wounded in the leg, but refusing to give in, dropping to his knees, he continued delivering effective fire upon the enemy until he was killed by another burst from the enemy machine-gun. Through his inspiring example of courageous action at the sacrifice of his own life, Private McKim contributed materially to the successful completion of his unit's mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 39 (January 23, 1951)
Home Town: Howard, Indiana

McKINLEY, RICHARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard McKinley, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class McKinley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tongun-Gol, Korea, on 18 April 1953. On that date, three friendly platoons launched a determined counterattack against a dominant key terrain feature occupied by two enemy companies. Corporal McKinley, a member of the 1st platoon, and his comrades crawled up the barren slopes and worked their way through gaps in a double-apron wire barrier. As they inched forward on "Angle Finger" to the edge of a thick well-anchored mesh of concertina wire within fifty yards of hostile trenches, grenades and automatic-weapons fire rained down on the valiant group, halting their advance. Realizing the consequences of a stalemate in the exposed position, Corporal McKinley dashed through the fire-swept impact area. After freeing one of the men impaled on the wire, he flung himself across the jagged barricade and shouted for the men to use his body as a bridge. Approximately eighteen men moved forward, one at a time, crossing over to the far side. While in the process of crossing, a machine-gunner stumbled, striking the prone man's head with the heavy weapon. He stepped back to inquire if Corporal McKinley was badly hurt, but he urged the soldier to try again. In the meantime, two wounded comrades on the forward side returned to the wire block and, being unable to cross over, corporal McKinley assisted them across and successfully evacuated them down the hill to safety.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 59 (August 4, 1953)

*McLAUGHLIN, PAUL J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul J. McLaughlin (RA16296071), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Tank-Infantry Task Force, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class McLaughlin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kiokso-ri, Korea, on 15 February 1951. Private First Class McLaughlin's Tank-Infantry Task Force had the mission of breaking through the enemy lines in an effort to relieve a beleaguered friendly unit. With the infantrymen riding the tanks, the task force advanced through a narrow draw and was suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from enemy emplacements located on both sides of the road. The men were soon forced to abandon the tanks because of the intense fire and take up positions along the road. Private McLaughlin observed one of his comrades fall to the ground, seriously wounded. With a complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved across the fire-swept terrain in an effort to aid him. After carrying the wounded man to the safety of a ditch, he made his way back to the tank and secured ammunition for a friendly machine-gun position. As he made his way across an exposed paddy with the heavy boxes of ammunition, he was wounded in both legs by enemy fire. Undaunted, he crawled to the machine-gun emplacement, dragging the ammunition behind him. Private McLaughlin then took up a position to protect the machine-gunner with rifle fire but, weak from loss of blood, he collapsed. Upon regaining consciousness, he realized that the situation had become desperate and so, ordering the friendly troops about him to withdraw with the wounded, he crawled to the machine-gun and began firing at the on- rushing enemy with deadly accuracy. He was still firing the weapon when his position was overrun by the enemy and he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1002 (December 20, 1951)
Home Town: Sanilac, Michigan

McMANUS, LUTHER M., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Luther M. McManus, Jr. (0-975625), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 21st Infantry Division. First Lieutenant McManus distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Wolbong-ni, Korea, on 18 October 1951. On that date the company of which Lieutenant McManus was a member launched an attack on a strongly defended enemy-held hill. Lieutenant McManus observed that an adjacent assaulting platoon had been halted by a tremendous concentration of hostile fire. Upon investigating, he found that the leader of the platoon had become a casualty and that the friendly troops were becoming confused. Without hesitation, he crossed the fire-swept terrain and reorganized the friendly force, shouting words of encouragement and urging the men forward. When they had resumed their advance, he joined another platoon which was engaged in a fierce action and, upon discovering that it leader had also been wounded, he quickly assumed command. Inspiring the troops with his personal fearlessness, Lieutenant McManus called to them to fix their bayonets and then led them in a determined charge against the hostile positions. Halfway up the slope, the attacking force was subjected to a veritable rain of grenades and heavy automatic weapons fire. As the men faltered, Lieutenant McManus charged forward alone and, in the face of heavy enemy fire, attacked a key enemy bunker. Using his pistol and grenades, he fought toward the crest of the objective, and so inspired the friendly troops with his fighting spirit that they rushed forward and secured the hill. As the hostile troops retreated in disorder down the reverse slope, Lieutenant McManus seized an automatic rifle and inflicted heavy casualties among the fleeing enemy. Upon reorganizing the friendly force, he found that all the officers had become casualties, and so he immediately took command of the company and deployed the men in defensive positions in anticipation of an enemy counterattack. Throughout the night the enemy launched repeated assaults in an effort to regain their lost ground, but each was repulsed by the friendly troops under the aggressive leadership of Lieutenant McManus, who constantly moved about the perimeter, directing the fire of his men. On several occasions, he rushed to threatened spots in the defense line and personally repelled attacking masses of enemy troops with grenades and machine-gun fire. Through his superlative ability as a leader and his uncompromising devotion to duty, a hill of vital strategic importance was seized and held against tremendous odds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 251 (May 17, 1952)
Born: at Washington, D.C.
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

*McPHATE, PRENTISS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Prentiss E. McPhate (RA24882672), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant McPhate distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tohwa-Dong, Korea, on 2 June 1953. On that date, Sergeant McPhate led a combat patrol into enemy-held territory to set up an ambush on a hill position. Upon arrival at the scene, Sergeant McPhate deployed the men to the best possible advantage and moved among them issuing instructions. When two enemy soldiers were seen approaching the position, the patrol opened fire. A short time, a numerically superior hostile force of hostile troops moved in and completely overran the position. Throughout the action, Sergeant McPhate maintained complete control over his men, directing their fire and shouting words of encouragement. Realizing that the enemy held the advantage through sheer weight of numbers, Sergeant McPhate ordered his comrades to withdraw while he remained completely exposed to an intense barrage of grenades, automatic weapons, and mortar fire to cover them. When last seen, he was firing his carbine into the enemy ranks.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 638 (July 7, 1953)
Home Town: Jefferson, Mississippi

*MECKLEY, WILLIAM L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William L. Meckley (RA13314641), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Meckley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Majon-ni, Korea, on 21 November 1950. While on a combat patrol to establish contact with a South Korean Marine battalion that had been cut off by the enemy, Corporal Meckley's company was ambushed by a large force of North Korean guerrillas estimated at approximately nine hundred troops. In the initial burst of enemy fire, several men were wounded before his squad was able to take cover on the side of the road. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Corporal Meckley left his position of cover, exposing himself to intense fire, and went to the aid of one of the wounded men. Although he succeeded in moving the wounded man to cover, he was also wounded in the process. Without receiving first aid, Corporal Meckley left his covered position twice more to give aid to the wounded members of his squad, thereby receiving his second and third wounds. When orders were received for the unit to withdraw, Corporal Meckley, realizing that he was unable to walk, Voluntarily covered the withdrawal of the squad, during which time he received his fourth and fatal wound. His intrepid and resolute actions enabled the unit to successfully withdraw from the ambushed position and made possible the safe evacuation of many wounded men.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 128 (April 25, 1951)
Home Town: York, Pennsylvania

MEISNER, HAROLD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold H. Meisner, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to the 36th Republic of Korea Regiment. Major Meisner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kapyong, Korea, on 1 January 1951. When his unit was withdrawing to new positions they were ambushed by the enemy north of Kapyong. The suddenness of the enemy attack disorganized the friendly troops, but Major Meisner located the regimental commander, gave him instructions on the deployment of his forces and, completely exposing himself to enemy fire, moved form position to position to insure that his instructions were being carried out. As a result of his forceful actions the enemy was repulsed. Shortly thereafter, however, the enemy again attacked in such strong numbers that despite his valiant efforts, the friendly forces became disorganized and intermingled with enemy troops. Major Meisner organized a small group and, displaying valiant leadership, fought through the enemy to escape into the hills. For the next three days and nights, although his hands and feet were frozen from the bitter cold, he led his small group toward the south until they arrived at the friendly city of Yoju.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 155 (March 20, 1951)

MELOY, GUY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Guy S. Meloy (0-16892), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Meloy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taejon, Korea, on 16 July 1950. Upon learning that a large enemy force had penetrated the unit's position and was menacing the 1st Battalion command post, Colonel Meloy personally led a counter attack with two lightly armored vehicles through heavy machine-gun and sniper fire, personally taking charge of a machine-gun position in order to aid in the counterattack. He continued to lead and inspire his men until loss of blood from a serious wound forced his evacuation. His fearlessness and aggressive leadership so inspired the officers and enlisted men of his unit that the attacking force was eliminated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (September 3, 1950)
Born: May 16, 1930 at Washington, D.C.
Home Town: Washington, D.C.

*MERKLE, HOWARD P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Howard P. Merkle (US52003637), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Merkle distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yusil-li, Korea, on 14 March 1951. On that date, Corporal Merkle's company was advancing up a steep slope in an attack against a well-concealed and firmly entrenched enemy force. Suddenly, intense and accurate fire from an enemy machine-gun began to pour down on the company, halting the assault. Realizing that his comrades were faced with possible annihilation, Corporal Merkle leapt from his covered position and single-handedly rushed the hostile emplacement. With grenades and rifle fire, he successfully silenced the weapon and killed its crew before falling, mortally wounded. Greatly inspired by Corporal Merkle's courage in the face of point-blank enemy fire, his comrades renewed their assault and successfully routed the hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 595 (July 28, 1951)
Home Town: Hamilton, Ohio

MESSINGER, EDWIN J.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edwin J. Messinger, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Messinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hangye, Hasolschi, and Sabanggarri, Korea, during the period 17 through 24 May 1951. When an enemy force, consisting of 12 divisions, attacked the 2d Infantry Division's defensive positions in a massive offensive, Colonel Messinger fearlessly and aggressively led his regiment to secure a defensive position assigned to it. Under his daring and skillful leadership, the regiment successfully repelled the attack of two enemy divisions and nearly annihilated the enemy force. Colonel Messinger aggressively moved over difficult terrain, under intense enemy automatic-weapons and mortar fire, to direct personally both the defensive and offensive action of his unit. The indomitable courage, outstanding tactical ability and inspiring leadership of Colonel Messinger were responsible for the tremendous casualties suffered by the enemy and the complete failure of the hostile attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 516 (July 5, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

MESSINGER, EDWIN J.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Edwin J. Messinger, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Messinger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the area of Sillim-ni and Takpakkol, Korea, during the period 22 February 1951 through 11 March 1951. During this period, Colonel Messinger's regiment had the mission of seizing and securing the Sillim-ni - Takpakkol area which was held by well-entrenched elements of three hostile divisions. Throughout the entire period, Colonel Messinger remained with the foremost units of his regiment, directing the advance and exhorting his men to greater efforts against the stubbornly resisting enemy. His calm, fearless conduct while under heavy enemy fire was an invaluable source of inspiration to all members of his command, and his aggressive leadership at critical points during the operation was a major factor in the successful accomplishment of the regiment's mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 547 (July 15, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

MICHAELIS, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John H. Michaelis, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Colonel Michaelis distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea near Sinsen-ni, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Colonel Michaelis' regiment launched an assault against heavily fortified enemy positions. While the attack was in progress Colonel Michaelis, although all avenues of approach were under heavy mortar and sniper fire, walked forward form the Regimental Command Post to personally determine the tactical situation. During this period the enemy launched a determined counterattack, penetrating the forward elements and forcing the Command Post group to take shelter in a culvert. Colonel Michaelis, despite heavy fire, remained in the open until he had made a complete estimate of the situation; then retiring to the culvert, he attempted to contact the Regimental command Post for support communications were out. Without regard for his own personal safety, Colonel Michaelis, disregarding the heavy mortar and sniper fire, made his way to the Regimental Command Post where he called for an air strike on the enemy position. The air strike was successful, causing the enemy to withdraw in disorder and permitting the 3d Battalion to take its objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 96 (October 4, 1950)

MIDDLEMAS, JOHN N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John N. Middlemas (0-2262644), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Middlemas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tosong-ni, Korea, on 25 April 1951. On that date, the defensive positions of Company A were attacked by a fiercely determined and numerically superior hostile force. The positions were successfully defended, but Lieutenant Middlemas realized that the overwhelming numbers of the enemy would soon make the position untenable. Cognizant of the fact that the hostile troops were preparing for another assault, he unhesitatingly rushed across one hundred and fifty yards of exposed terrain in an effort to secure reinforcements for his hard-pressed men. As he returned with the friendly troops, he was hit and knocked down by the enemy fire. Undaunted, he arose and led the reinforcements to the friendly positions where he stationed them. When the enemy attack came, heavy casualties were inflicted among the hostile troops. Upon receiving the order to withdraw, Lieutenant Middlemas assumed command of the company because the company commander was wounded. Supervising the evacuation of the casualties, he voluntarily led a small group in a rear-guard action in order to cover the withdrawal of the remainder of the company. When the withdrawal had been accomplished, Lieutenant Middlemas began to fall back to the friendly lines but observed a wounded soldier too weak to walk. Despite his own wounds, he helped the stricken man back to the friendly positions.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 989 (December 13, 1951)
Home Town: Hartford, Connecticut

*MILBURN, GILBERT D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Gilbert D. Milburn (RA16279614), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Milburn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 5 September 1950. While attached to Company A, Private Milburn voluntarily remained in position with his section when the company withdrew. Fighting off an enemy assault at about 0430 hours in the morning, Private Milburn used every weapon at his disposal and resisted the overwhelming attack until all ammunition was exhausted and he was forced to withdraw. Upon reaching the next ridgeline to the rear, Private Milburn came upon friendly troops of another unit that were completely demoralized and disorganized. Assuming leadership of this group of men, he reorganized them into a cohesive fighting force. He moved out in front of them and led them in an assault on his former position. Advancing about ten yards in front of the troops, he personally destroyed three machine-gun positions. Private Milburn was killed as he reached his objective, the top of the ridge.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 405 (June 6, 1951)
Home Town: Pottawattamie, Iowa

*MILLER, EARL K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl K. Miller (RA23948945), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private Miller distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chindong-ni, Korea, on 4 September 1950. On this date, when his position was overrun by the enemy and he was unable to withdraw without abandoning his .50 caliber machine-gun, Private Miller carefully placed a hand grenade in the receiver of his weapon, knowing that it was an extremely dangerous operation, and pulled the pin. In the ensuing blast he received fatal wounds, not being able to get far enough away from the grenade before it exploded. Private Miller's heroic act was responsible for denying the enemy the use of a vital piece of equipment and was ultimately responsible for saving the lives of many of his comrades during the counterattack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 151 (November 1, 1950)
Home Town: Montgomery, Pennsylvania

*MILLER, JOHNNY J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Johnny J. Miller (RA16314225), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with a machine gun section of Company H, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Miller distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Waegwan, Korea, on 3 September 1950. On that date, Company F, Seventh Cavalry Regiment, with an attached machine-gun section from Company H, was defensively deployed on Hill 300 near Waegwan when elements of a hostile division launched a mass attack against the hill, preceded by a heavy artillery and mortar barrage. When it became apparent the hill could not be held against the numerically superior enemy force, the company was ordered to withdraw. Sergeant Miller, section sergeant of the machine-gun section attached to the company, and two comrades volunteered to remain behind and cover the withdrawal. He remained in position delivering accurate, withering fire into the ranks of the advancing enemy until his gun emplacement was overrun, then began throwing grenades and engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When the company launched a counterattack later in the day and regained the hill, Sergeant Miller was found dead beside his machine-gun and the surrounding area was littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 458 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Marshall, Indiana

MILLER, WILFRED D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Wilfred D. Miller, First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 72d Medium Tank Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Miller distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Cheryong-ni, Korea, on 23 and 24 April 1951. On the night of 23 April 1951, a fiercely determined and numerically superior enemy force launched a sudden attack against Company A's positions. The leading tank platoon of the company bore the brunt of the assault and the platoon leader was killed and three of the tank commanders were wounded. After receiving heavy casualties, the platoon began to fall back. Lieutenant Miller, advancing with his own platoon, observed that the withdrawal was threatening to become disorderly. He quickly jumped from the protection of his own tank and ran forward, halting the tanks and directing them to alternate defensive positions. The rapidly advancing enemy however, suddenly rendered these positions untenable and Lieutenant Miller, realizing that the tanks would now be exposed to devastating antitank fire, ordered them to fall back. Then, although exposed to the concentrated, close range fire of the enemy Lieutenant Miller managed to fight his way back to his own platoon. On the following day he led his platoon, time and time again, through enemy territory to reach beleaguered friendly infantry units with critically needed ammunition and supplies. On each of these trips he had the tanks loaded with wounded and repeatedly broke through the enemy encirclement to carry them to safety. Finally, he placed such devastating fire on the enemy that the withdrawal of the friendly units was successfully covered.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 642 (August 14, 1951)

MILLS, JAMES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James R. Mills (RA06919653), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Mills distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chonju, Korea, on 27 September 1950. On that date, Master Sergeant Mills led his men in an attack on a heavily fortified enemy position. Advancing through extremely heavy hostile fire, he was wounded while kicking an enemy grenade away from his men. However, he continued in spite of a paralyzed right arm and a serious chest wound to engage and destroy an enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Sergeant Mills, by personal example and calm encouragement, so inspired his men that they continued to advance and destroyed an enemy machine-gun, killed several enemy and secured the hill. Sergeant Mills refused medical aid and remained with his men for over an hour until the road below had been cleared of mines for the attack to continue.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 97 (February 25, 1951)
Home Town: Jefferson, Kentucky

MINNICK, EDWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward W. Minnick (RA35005105), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Minnick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Waegwan, Korea, on 10 and 12 September 1950. After successfully attacking an enemy held hill, Sergeant Minnick, realizing that the enemy would soon counterattack, established his platoon defenses. When the contemplated attack finally came, his platoon, although vastly outnumbered, refused to give ground and for over two hours fought with the enemy, who at times approached to within twenty yards of friendly positions. Attack after attack was repulsed until the ammunition supply was exhausted, but even then Sergeant Minnick, setting an inspiring example for his men to follow, closed with the enemy with his bare fists. Although wounded six times during the ensuing action, bleeding profusely and weak from loss of blood, he refused to allow himself or his platoon to withdraw until he was ordered to do so by a senior officer. Even then, he elected to remain behind until he was certain that all the other wounded had been evacuated. Through his outstanding courage and inspiring leadership, he was able to keep his platoon completely organized and to withdraw with minimum of loss while at the same time inflicting extremely heavy casualties upon the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 41 (January 25, 1951)
Home Town: New York, New York

*MITCHELL, FRANCIS L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Francis L. Mitchell (RA18316966), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Heavy Mortar Company, 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Mitchell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chung-nan, Korea, on 18 August 1950. On that date, one company of enemy moved through the left flank of the 1st Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, in a heavy fog. Due to the extremely restricted visibility, they were not discovered until they were well within the defense perimeter of the 1st platoon of the Heavy Mortar Company. Immediately upon discovery, a fierce fire-fight broke out. The platoon leader attempted to close his men with the enemy but was unable to do so due to the devastating enemy fire. He then moved his platoon to the ridge n the rear overlooking the enemy. Private Mitchell, without regard for his own safety, left his squad, went to his truck in the enemy area, obtained a Browning Automatic Rifle, and returned to the ridge. At this time the enemy commenced delivering devastating fire with a .50 caliber machine-gun which was captured during the action. This gun was located high on the ridge and permitted the enemy to deliver cross-fire on the platoon. The enemy meanwhile moved approximately one platoon into position and began delivering accurate fire from a third position. The platoon leader again moved the platoon to a position five hundred yards in the rear. Private Mitchell, with an extraordinary display of heroism, remained on the hill holding the enemy at bay with his Browning Automatic Rifle. Although caught in a withering cross fire and faced with a frontal assault, he held the position, killing numerous enemy. Several enemy reached grenade distance but with calm courage Private Mitchell delivered accurate fire until his ammunition was expended. He again went into the enemy ranks, fought his way to his truck, secured a light machine-gun, and was attempting to open fire at the enemy when he was killed. The military action of Private Mitchell enabled the platoon to reorganize into an effective force and retake the position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 183 (November 27, 1950)
Home Town: Custer, Oklahoma

*MITCHELL, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John H. Mitchell (RA20212607), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Mitchell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 12 September 1950. While engaged in an attack on the strategic enemy position on Hill 314, Master Sergeant Mitchell's platoon began to falter under the deadly hail of enemy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire directed at them. With a display of extreme courage and selflessness, Sergeant Mitchell moved about in the intense enemy fire to assign positions and encourage and urge his men forward in the attack. His dauntless leadership under enemy fire provided an inspiring example to his men and stimulated them in the assault. Near the top of the hill, Sergeant Mitchell was seriously wounded in the chest by small-arms fire, but despite great pain and loss of blood, he continued to lead his platoon forward until the enemy, with heavy losses, was driven from the top of the hill. Not until the objective was completely secured could he be persuaded to seek medical aid. As Sergeant Mitchell started to leave the hilltop, he lost his life in an enemy mortar barrage, which suddenly struck the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 37 (January 22, 1951)
Home Town: Kenosha, Wisconsin

MIURA, ATSUO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Atsuo Miura, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Miura distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Karhyon-ni, Korea, on 12 June 1952. Attacking a stubbornly defended hill, the 2d platoon of Company F was halted near a trench at the top of the slope by small-arms and grenade fire. The' platoon was forced to withdraw approximately fifty yards. Corporal Miura voluntarily left his sheltered position and, armed only with a pistol and bayonet, started back up the hill in the face of intense fire, picking up enemy grenades en route. Reaching the enemy trench, he threw grenades into it, driving the enemy into their bunkers. Jumping into the trench, he tossed grenades into the bunkers. When a comrade came to his aid with a flame-thrower, they cleared the emplacement, thus enabling the platoon to move up. As they were rejoining the platoon at the crest of the hill, a concussion grenade fell between Corporal Miura and his platoon sergeant. Corporal Miura threw his helmet on the grenade and flung himself on the helmet. The force of the explosion shattered the helmet and momentarily stunned him. On recovering, he pursued and captured the enemy soldier who had thrown the grenade.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 30 (March 26, 1953)

*MIYASAKI, ICHIRO R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ichiro R. Miyasaki (US56061999), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private Miyasaki distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Tumyong-dong, Korea, on 12 June 1952. While accompanying his platoon on a mission to clear the area between Hills 183 and 191, an automatic rifleman was wounded early in the action and Private Miyasaki immediately secured the automatic weapon and continued forward with the unit through heavy mortar, artillery, and automatic-weapons fore. He was wounded during this action, but refused evacuation or emergency treatment and pushed rapidly ahead, killing an estimated five of the enemy. The hostile troops fell back under the fury of the attack until they reached a small knoll defended from a bunker by six enemy soldiers armed with automatic weapons and grenades. The platoon's advance was halted here until Private Miyasaki rushed the strongpoint, killing at least four of the defending foe. The platoon then occupied the positions the enemy retreated. Hostile units regrouped and launched a determined counterattack. Despite wounds he had received, Private Miyasaki gallantly withstood repeated assaults on his position, repulsing the foe with heavy losses. During this action, he lost his life.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 49 (June 9, 1953)
Born: April 23, 1931 at Hibbard, Idaho
Home Town: Madison, Idaho

MONAGHAN, JOHN T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John T. Monaghan, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Monaghan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taejon-ni, Korea, on 24 April 1951. On that date, Captain Monaghan's company, occupying defensive positions, was suddenly attacked and encircled by an overwhelming enemy force. Despite the heavy volume of fire pouring into the area, Captain Monaghan constantly moved about the perimeter, encouraging his men and supplementing their fire with his own weapons. When an enemy machine-gun began to fire at the position from a distance no greater than forty yards, he single-handedly rushed the emplacement in the face of the intense fire and destroyed it with grenade and rifle fire. Given permission to move his men at his own discretion, Captain Monaghan then ordered all platoons to prepare to withdraw and, keeping complete control of the unit, led them to safety through the surrounding enemy's lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 603 (August 1, 1951)

*MONFORE, PETER HOWLAND
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Peter Howland Monfore (0-62499), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while commanding Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Monfore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Satae-ri, Korea, on the night of 18 - 19 September 1951. On that night, Lieutenant Monfore received orders to lead his company in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified positions on a key terrain feature. On the morning of 19 September 1951, the friendly forces had fought its way, yard by yard, to its objective under the inspiring leadership of Lieutenant Monfore, who had consistently remained with the leading assault elements, exhorting his men onward. After reaching the objective, Lieutenant Monfore deployed his men in defensive positions in anticipation of the enemy counterattack which was inevitable. It began with a tremendous artillery and mortar barrage which inflicted many casualties among the already battered friendly force. Disregarding his own personal safety, Lieutenant Monfore constantly moved about the exposed terrain, calming his men and inspiring confidence. Immediately after the barrage abated, two battalions of the enemy launched a fanatic attack to regain the hill. For five and a half hours the battle raged with the friendly troops repeatedly hurling the enemy back. Realizing that the ammunition of his small force was practically exhausted, Lieutenant Monfore moved about the fire-swept terrain, gathering ammunition and weapons from both friendly and enemy casualties. At one point, he found a friendly gun crew dead in its emplacement. Without hesitation, he manned the machine-gun and poured a devastating volume of fire into the onrushing ranks of the enemy. When the ammunition of the friendly troops was almost depleted, he ordered them to withdraw. As he moved about the terrain in order to direct his men as they withdrew, Lieutenant Monfore was killed by enemy sniper fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 62 (January 31, 1952)
Home Town: Bon Homme, South Dakota

*MONFORTON, EUGENE P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene P. Monforton (US56092192), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Corporal Monforton distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on the night of 3 October 1951. On that night the company of which Corporal Monforton was a member was occupying defensive positions on a recently captured hill when a large enemy force launched a determined counterattack. Occupying a forward position in the defense perimeter, Corporal Monforton opened fire with his machine-gun as soon as the enemy came into view. With deadly accuracy, he raked the forward elements of the attacking force, causing the hostile troops to disperse and seek cover. Realizing that Corporal Monforton's position was the site from which the major portion of the firepower being directed against them originated, the enemy soldiers concentrated a heavy volume of coutnerfire on it and began to hurl numerous grenades. One of these grenades exploded, but despite his wounds, Corporal Monforton steadfastly remained at his post, alternately throwing grenades at the enemy and attempting to clear his weapon, which had malfunctioned as a result of the explosion. Putting the machine-gun back into operation, he resumed firing at the milling enemy before him until he collapsed and died of his wounds. The numerous casualties inflicted by Corporal Monforton's deadly fire effectively halted the hostile attack and enabled his comrades to repulse the foe with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 132 (March 6, 1952)
Home Town: Gallatin, Montana

MONTEZ, BENITO JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Benito Jr. Montez (RA18380162), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private Montez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Unjang-Ni, Korea, on 16 April 1953. On that date, Private Montez was an automatic rifleman in the support element of a reconnaissance patrol which was attacked by hostile forces. In the initial phase of the fire fight which ensued, Private Montez observed an enemy soldier penetrate the support positions and disposed of him before he could cause any harm. Private Montez then arose from his covered position and, disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, ran forward to where the reconnaissance force had been ambushed. At the scene, he found an officer and several men suffering from wounds. Though he was ordered to return to the line, Private Montez took up an exposed position to protect the casualties and remained with them until dawn when they were evacuated. At one time during the night, Private Montez single-handedly threw back a hostile assault force by firing his automatic rifle and accurately hurling hand grenades into the ranks of the charging foe. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Private Montez on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 565 (June 13, 1953)
Home Town: Travis, Texas

MOORE, HOWARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard M. Moore, Captain (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while commanding Battery C, 61st Field Artillery Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pakchon, Korea, on 5 November 1950. On that date, Captain Moore's battery had moved into a new position to provide supporting fire for the withdrawal of a friendly brigade when a numerically superior enemy force attacked the new position in an attempt to cut off the route of withdrawal. Although subjected to intense fire from the enemy, who occupied commanding terrain, Captain Moore, realizing the importance of repulsing the attack, moved among his men, organizing them and supervising their defensive actions. During the ensuring engagement he repeatedly exposed himself to the deadly enemy fire to direct return fire. His courageous leadership was an incentive to his men who fought willingly and valiantly against tremendous odds. When enemy troops were storming his position, Captain Moore ordered 105-mm. howitzers to be brought into action and used as direct fire weapons. His selfless devotion to duty and inspiring leadership were directly responsible for the success of the battery in repulsing the enemy attack and protecting the only route of withdrawal for the friendly brigade.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 508 (July 4, 1951)

*MOORE, LEROY L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Leroy L. Moore (RA17200878), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 8066th Mechanized Reconnaissance Platoon attached to the 1st Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chinju, Korea, on 30 July 1950. On that date, Corporal Moore was a gunner on an M-8 Reconnaissance Car in support of an infantry company which was pinned down by heavy enemy machine-gun fire. Without regard for his own personal safety, Corporal Moore moved to an exposed position on a river bank, and with accurate fire from his machine-gun knocked out three enemy machine-guns, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy This action enabled the infantry company to withdraw to new positions. In a later action, on 2 August 1950, when his car was put out of action, Corporal Moore dismounted a 30 caliber machine-gun and attempted to move to the flank of an enemy machine-gun which was hampering the evacuation of wounded men. During this action Corporal Moore was killed by mortar fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)
Home Town: Thurston, Nebraska

MOORE, NED D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ned D. Moore, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Commanding Officer of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Colonel Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 1 August 1950. During a visit to the command post of his 1st Battalion, Colonel Moore discovered that the positions were in grave danger of being overrun and that the defenses were rapidly nearing a breaking point. Without hesitation, he initiated prompt action to prevent a complete collapse. In spite of intense enemy automatic weapons, small-arms, mortar, and tank fire, which was falling throughout the entire area, he voluntarily undertook the task of making a personal visit to each of the exposed front line units. He immediately went forward to a position less than one hundred yards behind the foremost rifleman of Company C and, from this position, personally began to rally the wavering frontline troops. Later, under his personal supervision, Company A was quickly reorganized and launched in an attack that regained critical terrain which had been lost to the enemy. Colonel Moore remained with the forward elements of the battalion throughout the remainder of the day, directing the employment of heavy weapons and riflemen, until the enemy attack was completely repulsed. The calm demeanor, prompt decision, absolute disregard for his own personal safety, fearless leadership, and the courageous example he exhibited were an inspiration to all members of his command and proved to be the turning point for our troops during this crucial engagement with the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 75 (February 15, 1951)

*MOORE, WILLIE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Willie L. Moore (RA33644463), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Moore distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 22 August 1950. On that date, his unit was defending a position during an attack and Sergeant First Class Moore was directing machine-gunfire. When the machine-gunner was wounded by enemy fire, Sergeant Moore moved him to a safe place, returned to man the gun himself, and delivered devastating fire on the numerically superior enemy force. While firing the weapon, he was hit in the groin by enemy fire, but refused to leave his gun. Only after pain and excessive flow of blood rendered his fire ineffective did he permit himself to be relieved. Overlooking personal safety, he insisted on directing the fire until the enemy was completely routed. This mission accomplished, Sergeant First Class Moore permitted himself to be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950)
Home Town: Prince George, Virginia

*MORE, MELVIN WILLIAM
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Melvin William More (US56149735), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Section Leader with the Mortar Section, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant More distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kundung-ni, Korea, on 7 September 1952. In the pre-dawn darkness Sergeant More's company, occupying defensive positions on a hill of great tactical importance, was subjected to an extremely intense enemy mortar and artillery bombardment followed by a fanatical smashing assault by a numerically superior hostile force. With hundreds of incoming hostile rounds exploding in close proximity to his section's position, Sergeant More rallied his men and directed their efforts as they supported the beleaguered riflemen at the top of the hill. Suddenly communication with the section's forward observer was disrupted as essential lines were cut by the intense enemy fire. In order to adjust the fire of his men, Sergeant More, painfully wounded, nevertheless made repeated trips through the intense hostile bombardment to the crest of the hill and back to his section's position. Inspired by his efforts, the section fired with deadly accuracy until its ammunition was exhausted. Suddenly Sergeant More learned that the enemy had secured a foothold on the crest of the hill. Displaying aggressive leadership, he immediately organized his men into an assault force and led them in a charge up the precipitous slope through the murderous fusillade of enemy fire. Well in advance of his comrades, he moved from bunker to bunker, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy troops inside with accurately thrown grenades. As the force led by Sergeant More pushed the foe from the hill, flying shrapnel from an exploding enemy round ended his courageous mission. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Sergeant More on this occasion resulted in the recapture of an important terrain feature.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 638 (October 20, 1952)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*MORGAN, THOMAS DAVIS (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas Davis Morgan (0-2017887), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Morgan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 19 November 1951. On that date Lieutenant Morgan led his platoon in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. As the friendly force advanced toward their objective, they were subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire. With a total disregard for his personal safety, Lieutenant Morgan moved through the devastating fire, fearlessly directing his the fire of his men and constantly urging them forward. When the advance was halted by a stubborn group of enemy soldiers firing a machine-gun from an almost inaccessible bunker, Lieutenant Morgan unhesitatingly moved across the fire-swept terrain and single-handedly neutralized the bunker and took three prisoners. During this courageous assault he was painfully wounded, but he refused to leave his men. Instead, he directed the men holding their positions against the hostile force which was preparing to attack in an effort to drive the platoon from the hill. In a heavy mortar barrage which preceded the hostile attack, Lieutenant Morgan was again wounded. At this time several of his men offered to brave the enemy fire in order to evacuate him. Not wishing to endanger the lives of his men, Lieutenant Morgan ordered them to fall back to more tenable positions without him. He was last seen occupying a forward emplacement, still shouting directions to his men as they withdrew. In the hostile attack which followed, this position was overrun by the numerically superior enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 15 (January 7, 1952)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

*MORISHIGE, EIJI
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Eiji Morishige (RA10732257), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving an acting Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Morishige distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ochon-ni, Korea, on 4 February 1951. On that date, Company C had the mission of seizing and securing Hill W-6, a key terrain feature near Ochon-ni. Corporal Morishige was acting platoon leader of an attached platoon of Republic of Korea troops which had been selected to assault the hill. Midway up the slope, the assaulting force was subjected to intense small-arms and automatic weapons fire. Realizing the strategic importance of the hill, and seeing that his men were faltering in the face of intense enemy fire, Corporal Morishige rushed forward in front of his platoon, firing his weapon and throwing grenades at the enemy. Inspired by the heroism and aggressive leadership of Corporal Morishige, the platoon followed him and closed with the enemy with such ferocity that they were forced to flee in disorder after suffering heavy casualties. While deploying his men in defensive position on the hill, he was killed by enemy sniper fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 459 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Oahu, Hawaii

*MORIYAMA, FUMIO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Fumio Moriyama (RA30111675), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Moriyama distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumul-gol, Korea, on 18 May 1951. On that date, Company H was attacked by a numerically superior and fanatically determined hostile force. During this assault, the onrushing enemy succeeded in breaking the vital communication line connecting the company's defense perimeter with its supporting mortar platoon. Realizing that without control of the urgently needed defensive fire of the mortar platoon the company was threatened with annihilation, Private Moriyama voluntarily left his position of cover and moved across the fire-swept terrain in an attempt to mend the break in the communication line. Completely exposed and subjected to the concentrated fire of the enemy, he crawled along the tine searching for the break. Upon locating it he quickly repaired the wire, thus enabling his comrades to resume direction of the mortar fire against the vast numbers of the enemy. As he attempted to crawl back to his position, Private Moriyama was hit and mortally wounded by the intense enemy fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 873 (November 10, 1951)
Home Town: Hawaii

*MORRIS, NEAL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Neal M. Morris (RA34769763), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 26th Anti-Aircraft Artillery (Automatic Weapons) Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Morris distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yonch'on, North Korea, on 13 December 1950. While he was on outpost duty protecting battery C, 555th Field Artillery Battalion from aircraft and ground attack, a force of approximately sixty guerrillas infiltrated through the darkness to within a few yards of the vehicle. Observing that the enemy were too close for him to bring effective fire on them, he attempted to withdraw with his driver; however, when the motor of the half track was started, it drew heavy enemy fire and the driver was seriously wounded. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he withdrew approximately seventy-five yards where he reorganized the remaining seven men of his section and started back to the half-track position to engage the enemy. He crossed an open field under heavy enemy fire which became so intense that the group was pinned down ten yards from their objective. Heedless of the intense enemy small-arms fire and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he crawled the remaining ten yards and removed the wounded driver from the half track. After removing the driver, he started the motor which operated the gun turret in an attempt to bring the quad-mounted .50 caliber machine guns to bear on the enemy. The noise of the motor again drew heavy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire and an enemy grenade blew Sergeant Morris from the track, mortally wounding him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 132 (March 11, 1951)
Home Town: Halifax, North Carolina

MORTRUDE, JAMES O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James O. Mortrude (0-971102), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Mortrude distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in Seoul, Korea, on 26 September 1950. After moving through the city of Seoul for more than an hour without encountering the enemy, Lieutenant Mortrude's platoon was ordered to advance alone for the purpose of establishing contact with the enemy. Approximately two hundred and fifty yards further, where terrain coverage was scant, the platoon came under heavy and devastatingly accurate enemy fire that killed six and wounded many. Lieutenant Mortrude repeatedly exposed himself to intense hostile fire to direct and coordinate his platoon's defense. Realizing that the position was extremely untenable and that any chosen route of withdrawal would result in additional casualties, Lieutenant Mortrude, with complete disregard for the continuous enemy activity, raced approximately twenty-five yards across open ground to a spot where friendly tanks were located. And there, using the external interphone system on the rear of the tanks, he directed the movement of three tanks into position, enabling them to provide supporting fire for his platoon. Then, personally reorganizing his platoon for withdrawal, he directed his men to a place affording cover and deployed them as a base of fire. Continuing to expose himself to the deluge of enemy fire, Lieutenant Mortrude made two return trips to his platoon's former position, where he recovered wounded men and carried them to safety.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 16 (January 27, 1951)
Home Town: King, Washington

MOSES, LLOYD ROOSEVELT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lloyd Roosevelt Moses, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Colonel Moses distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 15 October 1952. On that date, Colonel Moses moved forward from an outpost to join a battalion of the regiment which had assaulted and secured the crest of an important hill. He advanced unhesitatingly through a heavy barrage of enemy mortar and artillery fire to reach newly won position. Sniper and automatic weapons fire was direct at him as he moved across open terrain, but he succeeded in arriving at the position to supervise personally the disposition of troops and weapons. Under his superb leadership, the units of his command repulsed several enemy counterattacks. His courage and determination, coupled with his sincere concern for the welfare of his men, were an inspiration to the entire friendly force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 352 (April 1, 1953)
Born: September 4, 1904 at Fairfax, South Dakota
Home Town: Colome, South Dakota

*MOSIER, BILLY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Billy Mosier (RA13319670), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Mosier distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 3 January 1951. When the defensive positions of Company A were attacked by an estimated enemy battalion, supported by heavy mortar fire, Corporal Mosier voluntarily exposed himself to the intense enemy fire to administer aid to wounded soldiers. While treating a wounded man he heard a call for aid coming from a soldier approximately five hundred yards away. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he moved through the enemy fire to the wounded man and administered first aid as small arms fire struck all around him. When the enemy snipers continued to cover the area with fire, making it impossible for him to evacuate the wounded man, he picked up the wounded soldier's rifle and moved forward to crest of a hill from which he placed accurate fire on the enemy's position, killing several of them. He continued to fire on the enemy's positions until he was killed by an enemy sniper.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (March 12, 1951)
Home Town: Smyth, Virginia

MUELLER, HAROLD P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold P. Mueller (0-2033931), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Mueller distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chowang-ni, Korea on 29 January 1951. While leading a forty man reconnaissance patrol deep into enemy territory, Lieutenant Mueller was fired on by an estimated enemy platoon. He withdrew his pistol a short distance to the south and from a more advantageous defensive position engaged the enemy, destroying twenty of the attacking force and causing them to withdraw. At this time a force of approximately seven hundred Chinese Communists launched a series of "banzai" attacks which lasted throughout the day. Lieutenant Mueller established a perimeter where he directed the fire against the superior enemy force, causing heavy casualties and forcing the enemy to make repeated withdrawals. Although he was twice wounded during the six "banzai" attacks upon his platoon's position, he continued to check the position of his men, distribute ammunition and direct the fire of his automatic weapons. In the midst of the heaviest fighting Lieutenant Mueller found time to comfort and aid the wounded, assuring them that he would lead them to safety. Lieutenant Mueller's courage, confidence, and superior leadership enabled the patrol to inflict heavy casualties upon the enemy, killing two hundred and wounding an additional estimated two hundred Chinese Communists. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Lieutenant Mueller reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 114 (March 4, 1951)
Home Town: Wilwaukee, Wisconsin

*MULDOON, ERVIN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Ervin L. Muldoon (RA12104945), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving in command of a Machine-Gun Section attached to Company H, 3d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Master Sergeant Muldoon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Parun-ni, Korea, on 25 March 1951. On that date, Master Sergeant Muldoon was furnishing supporting fire during an attack on enemy positions. Soon after the attack was launched it was determined that enemy opposition to Company F was very light; however, Company G, on the left flank of Company F, had encountered a strong enemy force of approximately battalion strength. Observing the action in Company G's sector, Sergeant Muldoon realized that the company could not withstand the numerically superior enemy without immediate assistance. Making a hasty decision to aid the beleaguered company, he moved his section across open rice fields under heavy enemy fire and placed the guns in position to give supporting fire to the outnumbered friendly unit. As he was designating fields of fire for his guns, the enemy launched a fanatical "banzai" attack in an effort to overrun this sector. The attacking forces swept in from the front and both flanks but were repulsed with heavy casualties inflicted by Sergeant Muldoon's section. Repeated attempts were made by the enemy to overrun the position and each time they were driven back with appalling losses. Sergeant Muldoon personally manned a machine- gun when the gunner was wounded and, while firing this weapon from an exposed position, was hit by a burst of enemy fire and killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 349 (May 26, 1951)
Home Town: Cumberland, North Carolina

MURPHY, JAMES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James F. Murphy, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. First Lieutenant Murphy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Schui-ryong, Korea, on 18 January 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Murphy, a platoon leader, was engaged in repelling a three-prong attack by a large enemy force on his unit's position. He led his men into the hostile ranks, personally employing carbine fire, grenades and automatic rifle fire in breaking up the attack, and pursuing the retreating enemy after the repulse. Later, hearing cries for help from a valley in front of his position, he made his way, with two volunteers, down the icy slope to a point where he discovered a wounded American soldier, stripped of clothing by the enemy, abandoned, and in great danger of death by freezing. Lieutenant Murphy worked under enemy observation for approximately three hours rigging a rope sling to carry the wounded man to safety. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Murphy on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 668 (July 18, 1953)

MURPHY, JOHN M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John M. Murphy, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company G, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Murphy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongsan, Korea, on 5 and 6 September 1950. When Company G was attacked by an estimated enemy battalion, the 1st platoon, which was separated from the company by about 3,000 yards, was ordered to regroup and return to aid in the defense. As Lieutenant Murphy was leading the platoon toward the company positions, they encountered an estimated fifty enemy soldiers. Engaging the leading enemy scouts in a bayonet fight, he killed two; then picking up a machine gun, he delivered accurate fire on the enemy troops, killing six, wounding several and forcing the remainder to disperse. Lieutenant Murphy learned that his company had been driven from their positions on two hills and were occupying new positions on an adjacent hill. After joining his company and battling the enemy for approximately two hours, he was ordered to lead an assault on one of the enemy-held hills. Although there were only three men with him, he moved toward the objective and, using bayonets, grenades, and small- arms fire, killed nine of the enemy as the remainder, stunned by the boldness of the attack, fled in disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 284 (May 7, 1951)

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