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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Army Recipients  - Korea 

  A - C  

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

*ADAMS, ALFRED B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alfred B. Adams (RA15423301), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Corporal Adams distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces when his battalion launched an attack near Chinju, Korea, on 25 September 1950. On that date, Company F, on the left flank of the battalion, was nearing its objective when it was pinned down by heavy enemy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire. Corporal Adams, exposing himself to hostile fire, went to an advantageous position, set up his machine-gun, and delivered effective fire on the enemy until his ammunition was exhausted. Leaving his position, he ran across approximately forty yards of fire- swept terrain to help a wounded man to safety, and then returned to the dangerous area and evacuated another wounded comrade. When he observed that a platoon had launched an assault on the next ridge, Corporal Adams obtained ammunition, retrieved his machine-gun and, placing it in a new position on the forward slope of a hill, delivered such accurate and devastating fire on the enemy that the assaulting platoon was able to overrun and destroy them.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 202 (April 13, 1951)
Home Town: Laurel, Kentucky

AGNEW, RICHARD S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard S. Agnew (0-1925377), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Agnew distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mundung-ni, Korea, on 19 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Agnew was serving as the leader of a combat patrol operating far ahead of the United Nations main line of resistance when he and the assistant patrol leader fell from a cliff. Although his ankle was painfully injured and he was in enemy territory, Lieutenant Agnew ordered the patrol to return to friendly lines and establish plans to rejoin allied forces the following evening. The following night, Lieutenant Agnew and his comrade scaled the cliff and proceeded toward United Nations territory. When challenged by an enemy soldier, Lieutenant Agnew ignored his weakened condition, engaged him in hand to hand combat and killed him with his own weapon. Hearing other enemy forces advancing, Lieutenant Agnew then pulled the pin on his remaining hand grenade and tied it to his hand before falling to the ground in exhaustion. He was later found in a semi-conscious condition by a United Nations patrol. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Agnew on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military services.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 3 (January 1, 1954)
Home Town: Middlesex, Connecticut

ALEXANDER, JOHN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Alexander, Jr. (US53016549), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader of an Infantry Company of the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Alexander distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Hagaenyong, Korea, on 12 September 1951. On that date, Sergeant Alexander's men comprised the lead squad in an assault launched by his company against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill emplacements. As the friendly troops advanced on the objective, they were subjected to a barrage of grenades and a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire from the enemy positions. Locating the hostile emplacement from which most of the fire originated, Sergeant Alexander led his men in repeated assaults against it, but each time they were hurled back because of the heavy fire. Realizing that this men would be annihilated if the position was not neutralized, Sergeant Alexander left his position and, without regard for his personal safety, single-handedly charged the enemy strongpoint. Although the entire firepower of the hostile force was being concentrated on him, he steadfastly moved forward, alternately hurling grenades and firing his rifle. As he neared the position, an enemy grenade bounced form his helmet and exploded at his feet, destroying his weapon and knocking him to the ground. Undaunted, he jumped to his feet and, even though he was without a weapon, resumed his assault. Reaching the hostile position, he leaped inside and, wrenching a machine-gun from one of the enemy soldier, he killed all of the occupants of the entrenchment. Then, signaling his men to move forward, he led them in an assault which drove the hostile force from the hill with heavy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 85 (February 10, 1952)
Home Town: Madison, Tennessee

*ALLEN, CHARLIE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charlie E. Allen (US53061833), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Private First Class Allen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on the morning of 4 October 1951. On that date, the company of which Private Allen was a member was occupying a strategic hill when it was brought under fire by hostile troops emplaced on adjacent ridges. This harassing fire threatened to make the friendly positions untenable and squads were sent to attack and eliminate the enemy emplacements. As Private Allen and his comrades assaulted one of the ridges, they were subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from the enemy positions, effectively pinning them down. In the initial burst of fire, Private Allen observed one of his comrades fall wounded on exposed terrain. Without regard for his personal safety, he hastened to the man's side in an effort to render aid. Upon reaching the stricken soldier, Private Allen attempted to evacuate him but the hostile troops threw a large number of grenades at the position occupied by the two men. As the grenades began to explode all about him, Private Allen, thinking only of the safety of his comrade, dropped to the ground and courageously shielded the man's body with his own. His selfless action saved the life of the wounded soldier, but it cost Private Allen his own for he was mortally wounded by grenade fragments.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 227 (May 1, 1952)
Home Town: Fayette, Tennessee

*ALLEN, JOHN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John P. Allen (RA35016145), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Allen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Ghingdon-ni, Korea, on 15 September 1950. When Company G was ordered to attack an enemy position, Sergeant Allen's platoon became heavily engaged, Sergeant Allen was ordered to move his machine-gun squad to a ridge in order to better support the attack. When he reached the ridge line and began setting up his machine-gun to support the attacking elements, an enemy soldier threw a grenade in the middle of the squad. With complete disregard for his own life, Sergeant Allen threw his body over the grenade in order to protect his men; however, the grenade failed to explode. Sergeant Allen's squad was so inspired by this action that they delivered the seriously needed supporting fire with great ferocity, aiding the attacking elements to take the objective and accomplish their mission. Sergeant Allen's gallant offer to sacrifice his life and his dauntless leadership were an inspiration to all men who witnessed the action.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 64 (February 10, 1951)
Home Town: Hancock, Ohio

ALMOND, EDWARD M.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward M. Almond, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of X Corps. Major General Almond distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea during the period from 15 to 25 September 1950. During the seizure of Inchon, General Almond personally visited front line units, coordinated tactical efforts, and by his own fearless example aided them in seizing assigned objectives. Following the fall of Inchon, General Almond personally led his troops in their rapid drive through enemy-held territory to seize Seoul, and to speed the disintegration of the enemy forces. During the assault of the Han River, he moved to a forward position well beyond the line of friendly forces to observe and control the river crossing. Despite heavy enemy mortar fire directed at him, General Almond remained to supervise the air and artillery support which was protecting the first units of the Seventh Infantry Division crossing the river. Disregarding enemy mine fields and sniper fire, he proceeded to the crossing site to direct fire of amphibious tanks neutralizing enemy opposition which was impeding our crossing. By his inspirational leadership, his complete indifference to danger, and personal control of the battlefield, General Almond quickly concluded tactical operations which destroyed the enemy forces in the X Corps zone of action and saved countless lives in the forces under his command.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 43 (October 23, 1950)
Born: December 12, 1892 at Luray, Virginia
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

ALMOND, EDWARD M.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Edward M. Almond, Lieutenant General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, X Corps. Lieutenant General Almond distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces during the massive offensive by three known Communist Armies against the X Corps, during the period from 16 through 25 May 1951. General Almond personally directed the historic defense which contained this attack and resulted in crushing losses in enemy manpower and materiel. During this period General Almond distinguished himself by countless acts of individual heroism as well as providing the inspiration, leadership and tactical skill which contributed materially the success of this operation. On 19 May 1951, while reconnoitering enemy positions in a light aircraft, he observed 250 enemy at a point forward of a friendly tank patrol. General Almond landed his plane by the tank column and sent the tank platoon leader in his aide's plane to observe the enemy group. While with the tank column the enemy set up a machine gun within 500 yards of his position. Without regard for hostile fire from this gun, he directed tank fire which silenced the weapon. The tank platoon went on to destroy the 250 enemy. On 21 May 1951, General Almond made an aerial reconnaissance before a tank column operating at Soksa-ri, Korea. While flying low over this area, General Almond received intense automatic-weapons fire. Again, without regard for personal safety, he located these weapons and personally directed their destruction. Again on 25 May 1951, he made four flights in an unarmed light plane through the enemy-held mountain pass between Hangye and the Umyang bridgehead on the Seyang River. Despite intense enemy small-arms and friendly artillery fire, he returned time and again to insure proper command and liaison between friendly forces operating at both ends of the pass. These specific acts, as well as countless visits to forward-most command posts, provided the inspiration and forceful leadership essential at this critical time.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 362 (May 28, 1951)
Born: December 12, 1892 at Luray, Virginia
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

ANDERSON, ALFRED J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Alfred J. Anderson (0-59289), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Anderson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Koto-ri, in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea on 29 and 30 November 1950. On 29 November 1950, at approximately 0630 hours, Lieutenant Anderson's company, moving in motor convoy to join other units of the regiment near the Chosin Reservoir, was ambushed by a ruthless, hostile force, overwhelmingly superior in number. In the ensuing action, the column was divided in two, causing disorder among the troops, and Lieutenant Anderson immediately regrouped all available men and readied a defensive perimeter to meet the enemy onslaught. Armed only with a pistol, he constantly braved intense hostile fire as he moved calmly among the men, bolstering morale and securing each position. Lieutenant Anderson's skillful deployment of his forces enabled the unit to repulse repeated attacks throughout the bitter cold night; and, on two occasions, he closed in hand-to-hand combat with fanatical enemy soldiers, who had infiltrated the outer line of resistance, and succeeded in killing them with his pistol while deflecting their weapons with his other hand. Upon orders to withdraw at 0600 on 30 November 1950, Lieutenant Anderson organized and successfully led a retrograde action through heavy enemy concentrations and reached friendly forces.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 177 (July 7, 1951)
Home Town: Jackson, Missouri

ANDERSON, CLARENCE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Clarence L. Anderson (0-61069), Captain (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Officer attached to the 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Captain Anderson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Unsan, Korea, on 1 and 2 November 1950. On the afternoon of 1 November 1950, and continuing through the following thirty-six hours, the regiment was subjected to a relentless, fanatical attack by the enemy. At approximately 0100 hours, the enemy penetrated the lines and the 3d Battalion was ordered to cover the withdrawal of the remaining regimental units. When the enemy mounted a strong attack against the battalion, Captain Anderson, with complete disregard for his personal safety, repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire in order to administer medical attention to the wounded. At approximately 0200 hours, the battalion was ordered to begin its withdrawal. Fully realizing the hazards involved, Captain Anderson voluntarily remained behind as the battalion withdrew in order to give medical assistance to wounded personnel. Captain Anderson's gallant decision to remain with his wounded comrades reflects utmost credit on himself and the medical profession.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 256 (May 1, 1951)
Home Town: Anderson, Tennessee

*ANDERSON, CLYDE T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clyde T. Anderson (RA38070559), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Anderson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Inje, Korea, on 29 May 1951. On that date, Private Anderson was traveling in a convoy when it was ambushed by a numerically superior hostile force. Subjected to a heavy volume of enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, most of the friendly troops scattered and attempted to fight their way through the surrounding enemy. Private Anderson, however, remained by his vehicle, fighting fiercely and courageously. The numerical superiority of the attacking enemy force made it obvious that Private Anderson faced certain death if he remained in his position and yet, even with this knowledge, he closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. Although painfully wounded, he met each attack with courage and determination, and in the final hostile assault he killed four of the enemy with his bayonet before he fell, mortally wounded. His gallant stand against overwhelming odds enabled his inspired comrades to reorganize and counterattack, successfully repulsing the hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 903 (November 16, 1951)
Home Town: San Bernardino, California

ANDERSON, RICHARD V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard V. Anderson (RA26242415), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 70th Medium Tank Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Anderson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chonjamal, Korea, on 29 October 1951. On that date, as United Nations units prepared to launch an assault against a strong hostile force, the tank section, of which Sergeant Anderson was a member, was ordered to proceed to the rear of the enemy entrenchments in order to support a friendly force which was about to engage in a flanking attack. With only one route of approach open to them, the friendly tanks moved boldly toward the objective but they were soon stopped by a wide minefield which was being continually raked by enemy automatic weapons fire. Knowing that the friendly attack would fail without the planned support of the tanks, Sergeant Anderson fearlessly dismounted from his vehicle and, with the help of two comrades, began clearing a path through the field by digging up the mines, one by one. As he moved with caution across the hazardous terrain, he directed the fire of the tanks behind him against the hostile emplacement, but still the enemy fire continued to hit all about him. With the field cleared and thirty-five of the enemy lying dead, through his skillful fire direction, Sergeant Anderson climbed into his tank once more and led the section to a strategic ridge from which effective fire was placed on the hostile force occupying the hill. So devastating was the fire he directed in support of the friendly troops that the enemy soldiers attacked the tanks repeatedly in a frantic effort to silence them. Eventually, the desperate fire of the foe caused Sergeant Anderson's tank to burst in flames. Although seriously wounded by enemy small-arms fire and shell fragments, he left the tank and extinguished the blaze. Then, refusing medical attention, he directed the section to a new position from which they continued their deadly accurate fire. Only when his was assured that the objective had been secured, did he allow himself to be evacuated for treatment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 88 (February 10, 1952)
Home Town: Scott, Kansas

AOYAGI, TOSHIO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Toshio Aoyagi (0-2263324), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with an Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Aoyagi distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chungae-ri, Korea, on 4 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Aoyagi was instructed to lead his men in an attack against a well-entrenched hostile force occupying a strategic slope. After advancing through light resistance to within thirty yards of the enemy main line of defense, the friendly troops were suddenly subjected to a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire which pinned them down. In the initial phase of this attack, Lieutenant Aoyagi's radio was shot from his hands, and having no communication with the remainder of the friendly force, he was forced to act independently. First, he attempted to direct his men in outmaneuvering the hostile positions but they were unable to coordinate their actions because of the intense hostile fire. Realizing that the attack would fail unless the key enemy emplacements were destroyed, Lieutenant Aoyagi gathered extra grenades and magazines for his carbine and moved forward alone after ordering his men to fire as rapidly as possible at the enemy. Although the friendly troops were unable to gain fire superiority over the hostile force, Lieutenant Aoyagi, without regard for his personal safety, charged forward in a bold, single-handed attack. The three enemy positions that were the key to the hostile defenses were grouped closely together and he advanced directly into the heavy fire being concentrated on him by all three of them. Reaching the first, he silenced it with a burst from his carbine. The second, he neutralized with well-aimed grenades. Between these two emplacements, there ran a trench which led to the third and, without hesitation, Lieutenant Aoyagi leaped into it and continued his assault. One of the hostile soldiers, in desperation, reached around a corner in the trench without exposing himself and fired a burst from his automatic weapon. The fire hit Lieutenant Aoyagi's carbine and rendered it useless and also seriously wounded him in the abdomen. Undaunted, he destroyed the position with grenades. His intrepid actions forced a breach in the enemy line and the friendly troops rushed forward and secured their objective. Then, despite intense pain, he deployed his men in defensive positions in anticipation of an enemy counterattack. Only when he was sure that they were adequately prepared did he allow himself to be evacuated for medical treatment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 243 (May 9, 1952)
Home Town: Hawaii

ARTHUR, DONALD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald J. Arthur (0-1331132), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while Commanding an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Arthur distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 3 October 1951. On that date, Captain Arthur led his men in an attack against a large hostile force occupying a strategic hill. Two other friendly companies had previously attacked the enemy positions only to be hurled back with heavy casualties. As his men struggled to advance against the tremendous volume of enemy fire, Captain Arthur realized that the only means of wresting the hill from the enemy was a rapid and concentrated attack by his men, directly up the slope. Moving from man to man, he instructed them to fix bayonets and prepare for a frontal assault. When he gave the order to charge, Captain Arthur observed that his men were reluctant to face the heavy enemy fire and so, with utter disregard for his personal safety, he stood before them, fully exposed to intense small-arms and automatic weapons fire, and called for them to follow him. As he charged up the slope and leaped into an enemy position, his men, inspired by his fearless actions, moved forward in a body and engaged the enemy in close combat. Fighting fiercely, Captain Arthur was attempting to drive the enemy from an emplacement when a grenade exploded, seriously wounding him. Although he tried repeatedly to regain his footing and continue to lead the attack, his wounds made this impossible. But his men, imbued with his own courage, overran the hostile emplacements and secured the objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 127 (March 5, 1952)
Home Town: Putnam, Florida

*ASHWORTH, ALTON M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Alton M. Ashworth (ER38589076), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Ashworth distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Unsan-ni, North Korea, on 2 December 1950. Sergeant Ashworth's company was assigned the mission of securing the high ground along the edge of a route over which the regiment was planning a withdrawal to escape an enemy trap. As the men moved into the assault, they encountered intense machine-gun fire from an enemy emplacement on their left flank. As Sergeant Ashworth deployed his men into position to silence the weapon, they were pinned down by the fire of a second machine- gun. Realizing that his initial mission could not be completed until this new threat was neutralized, he immediately moved forward to within ten feet of the emplacement and silenced the weapon with grenades. Suddenly an enemy soldier charged down upon him with a grenade in his hand. Sergeant Ashworth successfully cut him down with a burst from his carbine, but was mortally wounded by fragments from the exploding grenade. Although he was dying on his feet, he refused evacuation but instead organized his men and led them forward in a charge which secured the main objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 620 (August 6, 1951)
Home Town: Muskogee, Oklahoma

*ATCHLEY, OREN C. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Oren C. Atchley (0-31111), Lieutenant Colonel (Medical Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 7th Medical Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Atchley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pungsan, Korea, on 24 November 1950. While at a forward command post, Colonel Atchley organized a search party to attempt to locate an ambulance with wounded men that was missing in enemy territory. The search party was attacked while he was on reconnaissance, and he was separated from the other men. On his return, without hesitation and fully aware of the odds against him, he fired on the enemy, distracting them, giving his men time to escape. When last seen he was fearlessly maintaining his stand and urging the others to withdraw.
Home Town: Hunt, Texas

*ATWOOD, VIRGIL MILTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Virgil Milton Atwood (0-2262952), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Atwood distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Okkye-ri, Korea, on 3 June 1951. Lieutenant Atwood was the leader of the assault platoon in an attack against an enemy-held hill. As the platoon advanced to the crest of the hill, it was suddenly subjected to intense enemy small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from well-fortified and camouflaged emplacements manned by a hostile force estimated at battalion strength. Realizing that in their present exposed position the platoon faced annihilation, Lieutenant Atwood, with complete disregard for his personal safety, charged up the slope toward the entrenchments. His heroic single-handed assault so surprised the enemy that they momentarily forgot the platoon, granting it time to seek cover, and instead concentrated their fire on Lieutenant Atwood. Rapidly firing his carbine and throwing grenades among the confused enemy, he leaped into their midst and killed approximately twenty of them in addition to rendering six automatic weapons useless. With the enemy in his immediate vicinity eliminated, Lieutenant Atwood began to move foreword once mere but was hit and instantly killed by a bursting enemy shell.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 695 (September 14, 1951)
Home Town: Talladega, Alabama

AVINGTON, ROBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert J. Avington (RA13273276), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Private First Class Avington distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hwachon, Korea, on 30 May 1951. On that date, the machine-gunner in his squad was seriously wounded, when Private Avington, despite a wound in his arm, placed the gun back in operation and successfully turned back an enemy attack in force. Aiding the seriously wounded gunner as best he could, he refused aid for himself and sent for a litter to evacuate his comrade. The enemy again sent a wave of troops to rush his position, and the remaining element of the hostile force attempted to isolate him from assistance by pouring heavy fire on his position. He again poured a relentless stream of fire into the on-rushing horde and, while reloading his weapon, was grazed on the head by rifle fire and thrown back from his gun by concussion grenades. Crawling back to his gun, and pausing only to throw out enemy grenades which were lobbed into his position, he again halted the hostile assault with his accurate fire. Several of his comrades sprang forward to render assistance, but Private Avington, although bleeding profusely from the head and arm, again refused evacuation and demanded more ammunition for his weapons. When the enemy launched third assault against his position, though nearly unconscious from loss of blood, he again directed a devastating stream of fire on the assaulting force until they fled in wild disorder. His determined and heroic action resulted in more than 150 dead Chinese Communist troops, numerous others wounded, and in saving the platoon position from being overrun.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 85 (September 25, 1951)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

B

BAILEY, DON V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Don V. Bailey (RA15274625), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Ambulance Company, 24th Medical Battalion, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Bailey distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yongi, Korea, on 16 July 1950. Private First Class Bailey, an ambulance driver, was wounded while he was part of a group that was encircled and under extremely heavy enemy fire. Disregarding his wound, he continued to try and evacuate the wounded. His ambulance was destroyed by enemy fire and he then transferred the wounded to an armored vehicle. During this action he was wounded again, and the armored vehicle rendered inoperative. He then secured a jeep and loaded it with wounded and during this action he was wounded six times, rendering him helpless. Only then, would he allow himself to be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 27 (August 17, 1950)
Home Town: Pike, Kentucky

BAKER, JAMES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James F. Baker, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with an Infantry Company. First Lieutenant Baker distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Surang-ni, Korea, on 24 April 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Baker was on a position which was under assault by artillery and mortar fire. Twice prevented from leaving the command post by hostile fire, Lieutenant Baker managed to extricate himself and moved among the men, at times engaging in hand-to-hand combat with the enemy troops who had already overrun the position. When the ferocity of the battle forced the allied troops to withdraw to more tenable positions, Lieutenant Baker organized a small force and led them in an attempt to regain the lost position. The counter-attack was halted twice by heavy fire but on the third attempt Lieutenant Baker, through his inspirational leadership, led the men into the trenches and repulsed the hostile forces. He then immediately set up an effective defense and administered medical aid to the wounded. Upon the arrival of reinforcements, Lieutenant Baker turned his efforts toward the evacuation of casualties and refused to leave the outpost until he was assured that it was safe from further attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 596 (June 23, 1953)

*BALBONI, JOSEPH W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joseph W. Balboni (RA11194795), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Balboni distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Anju, Korea, on 5 November 1950. At dawn on that date, an enemy force of approximately six hundred Chinese Communist soldiers launched a sudden fanatical attack on Private First Class Balboni's company's position. By stealth and excellent fire discipline, the enemy worked their way at points to within twenty-five yards of the company's lines before the full fury of their attack was unleashed. Private Balboni, armed with a Browning Automatic Rifle, immediately opened fire on the advancing enemy troops, whose attack was increased in strength and vigor. As the Communist attack mounted against the thin line of Company E, it became apparent that a withdrawal must be ordered. As the unit withdrew, Private Balboni continued his deadly fire even when the enemy came within a few feet of his position, and voluntarily remaining in place, placed burst after burst on the advancing ranks of the enemy. This momentarily delayed, but did not stop, their advance in his sector. Despite his grim determination and his deadly fire, which killed seventeen of the enemy, he was presently surrounded and killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 63 (February 10, 1951)
Home Town: Hampton, Massachusetts

*BALDONADO, JOE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joe R. Baldonado (RA19324868), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine-gunner with Company B, 1st Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Corporal Baldonado distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kang-deng, Korea, on 25 November 1950. On that date, at 0400 hours, the 2d platoon of Company B was occupying positions on Hill 171 near Kang-deng when the enemy launched a strong attack in an effort to seize the hill. By 0600 hours, the platoon had expended most of its ammunition in repelling the enemy attack, and the platoon leader decided to commit his third squad, with its supply of ammunition, in the defensive action. Since there was not time to dig in because of the proximity of the had advanced to within twenty-five yards of the platoon positions, Corporal Baldonado, machine-gunner of the third squad, placed his weapon in an exposed position and delivered a withering stream of fire on the advancing enemy, causing them to fall back in disorder. The enemy then concentrated all their fire on Corporal Baldonado's gun and attempted to knock it out by rushing the position in small groups and hurling grenades. Several times grenades exploded extremely close to Corporal Baldonado, but failed to interrupt his continuous firing. The hostile troops made repeated attempts to storm his position and were driven back each time with appalling casualties. The enemy finally withdrew at 0700 hours after making a final assault on corporal Baldonado's position during which a grenade landed near his gun, killing him instantly.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 355 (May 26, 1951)
Home Town: Santa Clara, California

BALDWIN, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George R. Baldwin, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Acting Platoon Sergeant of an Infantry Company. Sergeant Baldwin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ihyon-ni, Korea, on the night of 1 June 1953. On that night, Sergeant Baldwin was acting platoon sergeant of a company outpost which was overrun by the enemy. When the hostile forces swarmed into the trenches Sergeant Baldwin attacked them, killing the leader of the force and two other enemy soldiers with withering fire from his carbine. As the battle continued Sergeant Baldwin, disregarding his own safety and the grave dangers involved, proceeded to an outpost one hundred and fifty yards in front of the main line of resistance to aid in bolstering the defense there. On his way he encountered and killed another enemy soldier. Sergeant Baldwin then returned to his former position and vas responsible for killing two more of the enemy. Again under intense fire, Sergeant Baldwin proceeded back to the outpost to assist the wounded. His courageous and selfless actions were instrumental in the evacuation of the dead and wounded. Through Sergeant Baldwin's exceptional valor the position was successfully defended and many casualties inflicted on the hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 892 (September 28, 1953)

BALES, J. E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to J. E. Bales, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Bales distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 24 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Bales' platoon was given the mission of attacking and securing a well-defended enemy held hill near Uijongbu. As the attack commenced, the Second Squad, led by Sergeant Bales, moved out as the lead element of the platoon and after advancing approximately seventy-five yards across open, fire-swept terrain, encountered the first enemy position. Deploying his squad to furnish covering fire, Sergeant Bales secured eight grenades and single-handedly charged the position, hurling grenades into the entrenchment as he approached it. Then, assaulting the position with his rifle, he killed five enemy soldiers and captured two. Although constantly exposed to intense hostile fire, he signaled his squad to advance and then led his men in systematic assaults on the remaining enemy positions. On one occasion, Sergeant Bales boldly advanced to within fifteen feet of an enemy position and fired a rocket launcher from point blank range into a fiercely defended dugout, forcing three enemy troops to surrender. The personal bravery and aggressive leadership of Sergeant Bales resulted in sixty-three enemy killed and in the complete dispersal of a numerically superior hostile force.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 400 (June 5, 1951)

*BALTZ, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert L. Baltz (0-2028370), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Baltz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tang-Wan-ni, Korea. On the morning of 16 June 1952, Lieutenant Baltz led an assault squad in an attack on a heavily-fortified hill to capture or kill enemy troops. While the group was advancing toward the position, an intense barrage of enemy small-arms, mortar, and artillery fire was encountered. In spite of the dangers involved, Lieutenant Baltz left the squad and circled an enemy bunker to throw grenades into the tunnel which connected the communications trench and the bunker. Returning to his squad, Lieutenant Baltz saw that the enemy was moving in reinforcements. Unhesitatingly, he assaulted the hill, encouraging his men to follow. Lieutenant Baltz had advanced only a few yards when he was hit by a burst of fire from an enemy burp-gun and mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 297 (March 15, 1953)
Home Town: Humboldt, California

BAMFORD, CHARLES F. II
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles F. II Bamford (0-1927575), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 223d Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Bamford distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Mandae-ri, Korea, on the early morning of 4 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Bamford was the leader of a combat patrol which was subjected to intense small-arms and machine-gun fire. Completely ignoring his personal safety, Lieutenant Bamford charged forty yards through the heavy barrage to the machine-gun emplacement and silenced the weapon with grenades. Continuing to disregard the bombardment, he led five of his men into the heavily-fortified enemy trenches and, through personal example encouraged them in engaging in hand-to-hand combat with the numerically superior enemy. Although wounded by grenade, Lieutenant Bamford employed his carbine and grenades with great effectiveness and directed an assault through 150 yards of enemy trenches. Through his fearless devotion to duty and his refusal to withdraw until ordered to do so, Lieutenant Bamford so inspired his men that they voluntarily Joined him in attacking and destroying a vital enemy stronghold and in inflicting numerous casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1067 (December 10, 1953)
Home Town: Clackamas, Oregon

*BARBER, WORTH H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Worth H. Barber (0-946114), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company I, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Barber distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pangmang-ni, Korea, on 25 December 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Barber was leading his men in an assault against a series of heavily fortified hostile emplacements. As the friendly troops approached their objective, a heavy volume of small-arms, automatic weapons, mortar, and artillery fire poured down from the enemy positions. Continuously exposing himself to enemy fire, Lieutenant Barber did not allow his men to falter. Instead he led them forward, inspiring them by his own courageous actions. Observing one of his men fall wounded on the exposed terrain, Lieutenant Barber raced through the enemy fire and carried the man to cover and then moved to the forefront of his troops to continue directing the attack. At this time, he was hit by fragments of an exploding mortar shell, but upon discovering the position of an enemy machine-gun which was pouring intense fire into the ranks of the friendly troops, he disregarded his painfully wound and charged forward in a single-handed attack. With his rifle and grenades, he succeeded in neutralizing the position, thus enabling his men to resume their assault. Finally, when the deeply entrenched hostile force threatened the friendly troops with annihilation, Lieutenant Barber received instructions to break contact with the enemy. After leading his men to safety, Lieutenant Barber voluntarily returned to the fire-swept area to assure himself that all of his men had fallen back. It was while searching the terrain that he was killed by an exploding artillery shell.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 276 (May 29, 1952)
Home Town: Forsyth, North Carolina

BARKER, WILLIAM C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William C. Barker, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a medical aidman with Company B, 65th Engineer Combat Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Barker distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chungam-ni, Korea, on 19 August 1950. Throughout the day the enemy launched repeated fanatical attacks against the strategic position held by Company B. During the battle, which raged for eight hours, Sergeant Barker made repeated trips over mountainous terrain exposed to concentrated enemy automatic weapons fire to evacuate wounded. In the final stages of the battle, when overwhelming hostile forces penetrated the company position and the order to withdraw was given, Sergeant Barker, heedless of the intense enemy fire, remained in a forward position and administered first aid to one of the wounded. When he had finished dressing the wounds the company had withdrawn; Sergeant Barker, unassisted, evacuated the wounded man down a treacherous slope to safety.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)

BARNES, JAMES C., JR.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James C. Barnes, Jr., First Lieutenant (Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 48th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Barnes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea.
Army Register (1954)

BARNES, RALPH H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph H. Barnes, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Barnes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 24 March 1951. On that date, Company C, given the mission of securing Hill 337 from a well-entrenched and determined hostile force, was temporarily pinned down by intense enemy small-arms, automatic-weapons and mortar fire while moving toward the objective. Lieutenant Barnes, leader of the 1st platoon, realizing the necessity of seizing the objective to alleviate the pressure being exerted on other friendly units, courageously led his men forward in a frontal assault until forced to take cover. Observing that a machine-gun emplacement was blocking the platoon's advance, Lieutenant Barnes ordered his men to cover him then fearlessly charged toward the enemy position, but was knocked to the ground by an exploding grenade. Although stunned, he regained his footing and, disregarding the intense enemy fire being concentrated on him, continued his single-handed assault. Hurling grenades into the hostile emplacement, he killed the four enemy occupants, permitting his unit to renew their attack and preventing the casualties the enemy-manned machine-gun undoubtedly would have inflicted. He then led his men in an assault that terminated with the seizure of the objective and resulted in heavy losses to the enemy in both men and equipment.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 652 (August 18, 1951)

*BARNES, THOMAS J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Thomas J. Barnes (0-1882511), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Executive Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Barnes distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sokkogae, Korea, on 9 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Barnes participated in a counterattack to secure a heavily fortified hill position when the company was suddenly halted and pinned down by intense enemy artillery, mortar, and small-arms fire, which seriously hampered further progress and forced the men to seek cover. Realizing the vulnerability of their position and refusing to take cover, he unhesitatingly left his position and, with utter disregard for his safety, moved to a position approximately fifty yards from an enemy bunker. From this exposed position, he daringly fired several rounds into the enemy bunker, destroying it completely and killing all the occupants. The friendly assault forces were thus inspired and encouraged by Lieutenant Barnes, who, despite enemy fire, moved fearlessly among the men urging them to rout the enemy. Finding the company commander a casualty during the ensuing battle and other members of the company scattered, he assumed command, quickly reorganized the men, and resumed the attack. Dominating the critical situation through sheer force of heroic example, he led the daring assault up the hill where they were again met with enemy mortar, grenade and small-arms fire, making further advance impossible. Concerned for the lives of his men, he calmly ordered them to withdraw to a trench below the crest of the objective, but he remained exposed on high ground until all had gained cover. Then descending and hastily jumping into the trench below, he was hit by an enemy mortar burst that critically wounded him and killed several others. Although partially blinded and seriously wounded in the left leg, he attempted to rise to assist his injured comrades, but collapsed. He refused medical aid and evacuation until all others were treated, and he later succumbed to his wounds
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 3 (January 20, 1954)
Home Town: Gasconade, Missouri

*BARNETT, BILLY E. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Billy E. Barnett (RA15414582), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Barnett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Changyoung, Korea, on 16 September 1950. On this date, Corporal Barnett was with a patrol as forward observer when the patrol made contact with a unit of the enemy, entrenched and supported by mortars and machine-guns. The enemy suddenly delivered a volume of fire heavy enough to prevent the patrol from moving either forward or backward and making the patrol's position untenable. Corporal Barnett realized that the patrol would be annihilated unless the men could withdraw. He left his position of relative safety end crawled to a point from which he could direct effective fire. The fire that he directed relieved the pressure on the patrol and permitted them to withdrew to a better position. Corporal Barnett refused to accompany them and with full knowledge of the peril, continued to screen his withdrawing comrades with fire. After the patrol was well out of danger, the enemy rushed Corporal Barnett's position. He is credited with destroying at least five of them with his carbine and driving off the remainder in hand-to-hand combat. While still in position firing at the enemy he was hit by a mortar shell and instantly killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 183 (November 27, 1950)
Home Town: Lawrence, Ohio

BARR, DAVID GORDON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David Gordon Barr, Major General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General of the 7th Infantry Division, during the drive of his Division from Iwon to Hyesanjin, Korea, from 31 October 1950 to 22 November 1950. Although faced by treacherous, mountainous terrain, sub-zero temperatures and a crafty, tenacious foe, General Barr so skillfully led his Division that enemy resistance was crushed at Kapsar and the Division advanced rapidly to the Korean-Manchurian border. His continued presence at the front under bitter winter conditions with total disregard for his personal safety and under continual small-arms, automatic weapons and mortar fire, was an inspiration to his men during the period of this historical drive. Major General Barr's aggressive leadership, courage under fire and personal heroism are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters: X Corps: General Orders No. 50 (December 6, 1950)
Home Town: Alabama

BARSANTI, OLINTO MARK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Olinto Mark Barsanti (0-34037), Lieutenant Colonel (General Staff Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the General Staff Corps, X Corps. Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea. During the period 19 October 1950 through 20 October 1950, Colonel Barsanti was directed to contact two Republic of Korea Infantry Divisions operating at a distance of eighty miles from the Command Post, X Corps, to arrange for the coordination of their operations with those of other United States Forces. The route to these divisions lay over a dangerous mountainous route intermittently occupied by organized enemy forces and guerrillas. Movement of individual vehicles by daylight was hazardous and movement by night was considered unfeasible. Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti, in order to complete his mission, moved continuously to contact the leading elements of both the Sixth and Eighth Republic of Korea Divisions. In order to reach both divisions, Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti had to move both day and night, a total of 190 miles over mountain roads in the rain for a period of thirty-six hours in an individual jeep. During this movement, he was stopped twice by enemy automatic and individual small arms fire at short ranges and was under small arms fire six times. After contacting the Sixth and Eighth Republic of Korea Divisions in the vicinity of Pyongjiwon, Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti, on his own initiative and with complete disregard for his safety, accompanied the leading elements of the Sixth and Eight Republic of Korea Divisions for an additional twenty-five miles in order to obtain valuable information important to the success of the X Corps' mission of forming a junction with other United Nations units. Again, Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti traveled over muddy, narrow mountainous roads, through enemy-infested areas, until the leading elements were stopped southwest and northwest of Songchon, North Korea, and although subjected again to enemy automatic and small arms fire, he obtained the information required. This action on the part of Lieutenant Colonel Barsanti reflects the highest credit upon himself and the military service.
Headquarters, X Corps: General Orders No. 28 (November 14, 1950)
Born: November 11, 1917 at Tonopah, Nevada
Home Town: Tonopah, Nevada

*BATER, LAWRENCE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lawrence H. Bater (RA12349842), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Bater distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 11 August 1950. Private First Class Bater was a member of a motor patrol that was suddenly ambushed by a strong and determined enemy force. From well-concealed positions, the hostile troops directed intense and accurate fire on the patrol, forcing it to withdraw. Private Bater, completely disregarding his personal safety, voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal of the patrol. Under withering enemy fire from three sides, he steadfastly remained in place, fearlessly engaging the enemy with his rifle. Until killed by the intense enemy fire, he defiantly resisted the fanatically charging enemy, inflicting heavy casualties on them with his deadly accurate fire. His heroic and selfless action resulted in the successful withdrawal of his comrades. Three days later, when his remains were recovered, he was found in the position he had held, the area around him littered with enemy dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 649 (August 18, 1951)
Home Town: Erie, New York

BAUMGARTNER, WILLIAM L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William L. Baumgartner, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters Battery, 90th Field Artillery Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Private Baumgartner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pongam-ni, Korea, on 12 August 1950. On this date the Headquarters Battery was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force supported by artillery, mortars, tanks and automatic weapons. Despite devastating enemy fire, Private Baumgartner continued to man his .50 caliber machine-gun which became a primary target for the enemy. In addition, shells were exploding from an ammunition truck which had been hit and added to the hazards of the situation. After Private Baumgartner was thrown from his position by concussion and his machine-gun upset, he returned to his position and put the gun back into action. Another concussion threw him from his weapon a second time. After regaining consciousness, he again crawled to his post, and by accurate and effective fire destroyed an enemy assault gun and machine-gun nest, disabled another assault gun, and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. By his heroic and persistent effort he enabled his unit to withdraw in an orderly manner.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 77 (September 23, 1950)

*BAXTER, EARL ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Robert Baxter (RA20134815), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Baxter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taegu, Korea, on 15 September 1950. On that date, the 2d platoon of Company L had seized Hill 401 and was preparing to reorganize and establish a defensive perimeter when the enemy suddenly launched a fanatical counterattack. The platoon withstood the assault until an acute shortage of ammunition made a withdrawal inevitable. Sergeant First Class Baxter, who had temporarily assumed command while the platoon sergeant attended a wounded man, ordered the platoon to withdraw while he remained behind to furnish covering fire. Standing fully exposed to the enemy, Sergeant Baxter placed a withering stream of fire on the on-rushing enemy horde until he was killed by an enemy grenade. When Company L later regained the hill, Sergeant Baxter's body was found with ten enemy soldiers lying nearby, attesting to the accuracy of his fire and grim determination to prevent the enemy routing the platoon's withdrawal. Undoubtedly the enemy suffered numerous other casualties as a result of his heroic action which enabled his comrades to withdraw with minimum losses.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 328 (May 20, 1951)
Home Town: Milton, Vermont

BEAHLER, LEE E., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lee E. Beahler, Jr., First Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, 2d Engineer Combat Battalion, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Beahler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 2 September 1950. When an enemy force supported by artillery and armor continued an attack which had already overrun three infantry battalions, the 2d Engineer Battalion was rushed into the line to hold the vital communications center of Yongsan, which was the key to the pass leading back to Miryang on the Pusan-Taegu lifeline. With other elements of the battalion fighting as infantry south of the town, Company D was given a "stand or die" mission overlooking Yongsan itself. Deployed without supporting artillery or mortars, the unit beat off two enemy attacks, but at a cost of twelve dead and eighteen wounded, including all of the company officers except for Lieutenant Beahler. Assuming command of the battered and shaken unit, he rushed from man to man directing the fire of their small-arms, automatic-weapons, and rocket launchers in such a manner as to regain fire superiority. When the enemy returned to the attack for a third time, and actually penetrated into the town with tanks, Lieutenant Beahler, fearlessly exposing himself to the heavy fire being directed at him, maneuvered his men to more advantageous positions from which they soon destroyed one of the enemy tanks with a rocket fired at close range. Ranging up and down his line, this Engineer Officer inspired his men to pour a devastating fire upon the advancing North Koreans until the attack was broken up and the enemy driven back. By his superb leadership and aggressive actions throughout the entire day, the town was saved and the threat to the whole position was eliminated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 59 (February 8, 1951)

*BEAL, EDWARD N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward N. Beal (RA19322870), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Beal distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chudeng-ni, Korea, on the night of 31 December 1950. On that date, a Chinese Communist force estimated at one division attacked the 19th Infantry Regiment. The main enemy effort was directed at high positions occupied by Company A. Moving his machine-gun to an exposed position, Corporal Beal poured withering fire into the ranks of the enemy, forcing them to withdraw. Unable to gain their objective by a frontal assault, the enemy began moving to the flank to make another attempt. Sensing their intention, Corporal Beal moved his gun to a more advantageous position, set it on free traverse, and caught the attacking enemy unawares. So accurate and devastating was his machine-gun fire that the enemy was again forced back, leaving an estimated 150 dead on the hill in front of his gun. At 0700 hours on 1 January 1951, his company was ordered to withdraw, but Corporal Beal voluntarily remained behind, and when last seen by his comrades, was still delivering heavy machine-gunfire on the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 138 (March 13, 1951)
Home Town: Cochise, Arizona

*BEARD, RICHARD R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard R. Beard (RA6894102), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 70th Tank Battalion (Medium), 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Beard distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sinchang-ni, Korea, on 29 November 1950. On that date, while supporting the defense of a friendly roadblock, Sergeant Beard's platoon was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force employing an intense volume of automatic-weapons, small-arms and mortar fire. Mounting the rear deck of his tank and completely exposing himself to the enemy fire, Sergeant Beard calmly directed the fire of his tank weapons, then manned the tank's machine-gun and delivered withering fire on the enemy, inflicting many casualties and forcing them to withdraw. Reforming, the enemy again attacked his position and once more was repulsed by the devastating machine-gun fire of Sergeant Beard. Later, when orders to move to a new position were received, Sergeant Beard, unable to contact one of his tanks by radio because of communications failure, dismounted from his tank and., running through a deadly volume of hostile fire, delivered withdrawal instructions to the tank commander. He then returned to his tank and was directing withdrawal actions when he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 220 (April 19, 1951)
Home Town: Washington, Maryland

BECKETT, JAMES O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James O. Beckett, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Beckett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Agok, Korea, on 25 January 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Beckett was in charge of an alert platoon on the main line of resistance. When a signal flare was observed in the area of a contact patrol which had been dispatched earlier, Lieutenant Beckett recognized it as a distress signal and immediately organized a squad of twelve men to move to the rescue. Through Lieutenant Beckett's inspirational leadership and aggressive direction, the squad was successful in penetrating an enemy encirclement and in reaching the ambushed patrol. While he was guiding the wounded men back through hostile lines, Lieutenant Beckett was informed that there were still four men on the position and that the patrol aidman was being taken prisoner by the enemy. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Lieutenant Beckett returned to the scene with five men, rescued the four wounded soldiers and then, ordering his comrades to cover him, pursued two enemy soldiers who held the aidman captive, killing them with a white phosphorous grenade and rescuing the prisoner.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 608 (June 28, 1953)

*BELTZ, LLOYD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Lloyd E. Beltz (RA24289099), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Beltz distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Yonchon, Korea, on 5 October 1951. On that date, Private Beltz's platoon was ordered to attack and secure commanding terrain tenaciously defended by superior enemy forces. Having advanced to within seventy-five yards of the objective, the platoon was pinned down by intense fire from two enemy machine-gun nests and sustained several casualties. On his own initiative, Private Beltz cradled his light machine-gun in his arms and advanced on the enemy entrenchments. In spite of the intense fire, seemingly directed only at him, Private Beltz, alone and unaided, dispersed and destroyed the enemy position. As the platoon moved forward to join him, Private Beltz charged the last, slightly lower fringe of terrain from which enemy fire emanated and, with very little ammunition remaining in his belt, successfully dispersed the enemy and secured the objective. In the last stages of the attack, he was mortally wounded by machine gun fire from an adjacent hill.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 20 (May 25, 1956)
Home Town: Elizabeth City, Virginia

*BENEFIELD, WILLIAM M., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William M. Benefield, Jr. (0-1685718), Second Lieutenant (Corps of Engineers), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 77th Engineer Combat Company, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Benefield distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sangju, Korea, on 29 July 1950. On that date, during daylight hours, the 77th Engineer Combat Company received orders to advance against the enemy's position. Information was received on the location of an enemy minefield in the path of the company's advance. Realizing the danger to personnel of the company, Lieutenant Benefield, with complete disregard for his personal safety, went forward alone. Although the area was swept by intense small-arms fire, he advanced to within two-hundred yards of the enemy position and attempted to remove the mine field. During this action Lieutenant Benefield was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Crawford, Kansas

*BENNETT, CLYDE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clyde L. Bennett (RA16210456), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Tank Commander with Company B, 89th Medium Tank Battalion, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Bennett distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sandokchong-ni, Korea, on 21 May 1951. Committed to enter a narrow valley to contact and engage the enemy, Sergeant Bennett's platoon was ruthlessly attacked and surrounded by a numerically superior force. During the bitter fighting which ensued, he detected one of the half-tracks moving slowly because of mechanical failure and placed his tank directly in the path of hostile fire to shield the disabled vehicle and its exposed crew. When the enemy on the hills to his left and right attempted to flank his position, rendering fire from his tank ineffective, he left the protective cover of the armored turret and, braving withering hostile fire, fearlessly manned the .50 caliber machine-gun mounted on the rear of the deck. Maintaining his stand, he delivered accurate fire into the ranks of the enemy until he was mortally wounded. His courageous action retarded the hostile advance, exacted a heavy toll in casualties, and insured the save withdrawal of friendly forces.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 102 (November 27, 1951)
Home Town: Cheboygan, Michigan

*BENNINGTON, ROBERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert W. Bennington (RA13174309), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Browning Automatic Rifleman with Company K, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Benington distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hill 189 near Yongsan, Korea, on the night of 15 - 16 September 1950. The defensive positions on Hill 189 were occupied by Private Bennington's unit when, at about 2400 hours the enemy attacked the hill with great force, using machine-guns and other automatic weapons and grenades. Private Bennington, in position on the right flank of his platoon, continued firing into the enemy while the machine-guns of his unit were withdrawn to a secondary position. During this action, he killed an estimated fifty of the enemy and helped to thwart several enemy attempts to overrun this platoon's position. At about 0300 hours on 16 September 1950, when the order to withdraw to higher ground was given, he continued to hold his position and to cover the withdrawal of the remainder of the platoon. He remained in this exposed position, firing upon the enemy, until he was killed by an enemy grenade
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 243 (March 16, 1951)
Home Town: Prince Georges, Maryland

BERNARD, CARL F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Carl F. Bernard, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Bernard distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chochiwon, Korea, on 10 July 1950. On that date, when Company L was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force, supported by armor, Second Lieutenant Bernard, voluntarily and on his own initiative, organized and led a small patrol forward and engaged the enemy tanks, personally destroying two enemy tanks and dispersing two others with accurate 2.36-inch rocket fire. The following morning when his company was ordered to withdraw before an estimated enemy regiment which had encircled their positions, Lieutenant Bernard, single-handedly and with complete disregard for his own safety, attacked with his carbine and hand grenades, an enemy machine gun which was blocking his company's only route of withdrawal. Lieutenant Bernard with extreme calmness advanced through the heavy enemy small-arms fire and killed four enemy soldiers with carbine fire and destroyed the machine gun and crew with hand grenades, opening a route of withdrawal. Lieutenant Bernard then collected stragglers, organizing them into a fighting unit and placed them into new defensive positions to cover the battalion withdrawal. Lieutenant Bernard's aggressive attacks on the enemy tanks and machine-gun emplacement inspired the outnumbered men of his command to fight with him, until out of ammunition, against overwhelming odds. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Lieutenant Bernard reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 45 (January 22, 1951)

BERNOTAS, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Bernotas (0-2019414), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Bernotas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Aea-ri, Korea, on 6 March 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Bernotas' platoon was given the mission of holding key terrain until the remainder of Company L could move into position. That night his platoon, in position on four hilltops, was attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and split up into small defensive sectors. Lieutenant Bernotas and eight men were cut off on a hill overlooking the intended approach route of the remainder of the company. Under his expert and fearless leadership, the small group fought off encirclement and inflicted heavy casualties on the attacking enemy. When the enemy added reinforcements and it appeared that they were certain to take the commanding terrain, Lieutenant Bernotas adjusted friendly artillery fire on his own positions, thereby completely disrupting the hostile attack. Although wounded twice during this action, he continued to remain in an exposed position and gallantly directed the fire of his troops until reinforcements arrived.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 461 (June 25, 1951)
Home Town: Schuylkill, Pennsylvania

BLAIR, MELVIN RUSSELL
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Melvin Russell Blair, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Major Blair distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 14 and 15 September 1950. On 14 September 1950, when one of his companies lost all but one of its officers, Major Blair, realizing the need for inspiring leadership, joined the hard-hit unit. From 1400 until 0800 the following morning he inspired the men of the company to new determinations by his many heroic and courageous acts. He led one platoon in a successful counterattack upon its old position and then covered its withdrawal when the position became untenable. Organizing a perimeter of defense with forty to fifty men, Major Blain inspired them by word and deed to hold this position despite four banzai attacks by over four hundred enemy troops until almost all of their ammunition had been expended. He covered the disengagement of the company with six men during which action he was ambushed and wounded in the leg; yet he supported the covering party to fight their way out of the ambush. By staying with the covering party despite his wounds and the intense enemy fire, Major Blain assured that the main body and the wounded were able to withdraw safely. The sight of the battalion commander facing death with them constantly inspired the reluctant to stay and fight with new found determination.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 31 (January 18, 1951)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*BOISVENUE, JOHN P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John P. Boisvenue (RA31403816), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Sergeant Boisvenue distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chung Chon-ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. On that date, the enemy infiltrated the battalion position and attacked the command post with automatic weapons and small-arms fire. Sergeant Boisvenue immediately led two men with a light machine-gun in an assault on enemy machine-gun nests. Placing the light machine-gun in position, he took grenades and without regard for his own personal safety rushed the enemy position and destroyed it. He again advanced with grenades on a second enemy position but during this assault he was mortally wounded. Sergeant Boisvenue's daring and courageous action inspired his comrades who routed the attacking enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Addison, Vermont

BOLEN, JACK
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack Bolen (RA15415874), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with as a Medical Aidman attached to the 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private Bolen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 9 July 1950. On this date, an enemy division, supported by heavy armor and artillery, attacked his position. During the attack, Private Bolen, with complete disregard for his own life, circulated through the company's position rendering first aid wherever needed. While exposing himself in this selfless manner, he was seriously wounded. Despite the wound, he continued to aid his comrades until he collapsed from loss of blood.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 50 (September 3, 1950)
Home Town: Summit, Ohio

BOSTICK, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George R. Bostick (RA16287894), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Bostick distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 3 January 1951. On that date, Company F was attacked by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength and well-supported by mortar and small-arms fire. As the enemy broke through on three sides of the friendly defenses the company was ordered to fall back to more tenable positions. Corporal Bostick voluntarily remained behind to cover the withdrawal of his comrades with automatic-rifle fire. Placing his weapon in position on the high ground, he poured a heavy volume of fire into the advancing enemy masses until his ammunition was exhausted. He then crawled through intense and accurate enemy small-arms fire and retrieved a machine-gun from a fallen comrade, which he set up in an exposed position and began firing with devastating effect into the enemy ranks. When the machine-gun ammunition was expended, Corporal Bostick then picked up a rifle and began to withdraw slowly to friendly lines, still firing on the enemy. His courageous actions accounted for thirty enemy dead and enabled his company to withdraw with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 692 (September 11, 1951)
Home Town: Cook County, Illinois

BOUKNIGHT, EDDIE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Eddie L. Bouknight, Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Bouknight distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces Taptong-ni, Korea, on 20 September 1952. While spearheading an attack to secure "Old Baldy," Corporal Bouknight's platoon advanced through an open draw and up a sandy slope under intense mortar and artillery fire to a predetermined point below the crest of the key terrain. While readying defensive positions to reorganize for the assault, the platoon was subjected to heavy enemy fire from strongly fortified emplacements. Sergeant Bouknight covered the platoon with automatic rifle fire against hostile positions while his unit regrouped to resume the attack. When his weapon burned out from continuous firing, he obtained a rifle and charged ahead with the platoon. Despite wounds received in this action, he assisted in evacuating casualties after the crest was captured. While the newly won positions were being consolidated, the enemy launched a strong counterattack. Observing an unmanned machine gun, he picked up the weapon and moved forward, firing with deadly accuracy and inflicting many casualties on the enemy, thereby materially contributing to the successful breaking of the counterattack and forcing the enemy to withdraw.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 37 (April 29, 1953)

BOWEN, FRANK S., JR.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Frank S. Bowen, Jr., Brigadier General [then Colonel], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Brigadier General Bowen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 20 October 1950. General Bowen gallantly risking his life, personally conducted the daring maneuvers of more than four thousand paratroopers approximately thirty-five miles behind the enemy front lines. After six hours' delay caused by extremely adverse weather conditions, the perfectly coordinated airdrop was accomplished with an absolute minimum loss of personnel and equipment. General Bowen parachuted with his men to pre-designated drop zones in the Sukchon-Songchon area known to contain enemy ground forces and antiaircraft batteries. Concentrating his forces in a strategic move to block the enemy's main escape communications and transportation lines, including the two road and rail lines leading north out of Pyongyang. As a result of General Bowen's dauntless and inspirational leadership, this operation was highly successful and effected the immediate seizure of initial objectives.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 47 (October 22, 1950)
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*BOWMAN, RICHARD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard E. Bowman (ER35966565), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Bowman distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chorwon, Korea, on 6 and 7 September 1951. During the night of 6 September 1951, Company L's defensive positions were attacked by a numerically superior and fanatically determined hostile force. Advancing under cover of a smoke screen, wave after wave of enemy troops hurled themselves against the friendly defenses. After the battle had raged for two hours with each enemy assault being successfully repulsed, the hostile force suddenly shifted its attack to a different sector of the defense perimeter. Under the terrific pressure of this attack, the perimeter was breached and the enemy began to pour through the gap. Realizing the dangerous threat posed by this break in the friendly lines, Sergeant Bowman immediately moved across the fire-swept terrain, organizing men for a counterattack. He then fearlessly led them forward in the face of the devastating enemy fire and engaged the hostile troops in hand-to-hand combat. Early on the morning of 7 September 1951 with the friendly forces fighting fiercely, Sergeant Bowman observed a fresh enemy force poised to attack his squad from the flank. Without hesitation, he charged the enemy troops single-handedly, effectively delaying them and diverting, their fire from his men until he fell, mortally wounded, by the intense hostile fire concentrated on him. His aggressive action so inspired the friendly troops that they successfully executed their counterattack and drove the enemy, from the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 873 (November 10, 1951)
Home Town: Elkhart, Indiana

BOWSER, DONALD H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald H. Bowser, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Squad Leader in an Infantry Company. Sergeant Bowser distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pau-gol, Korea, on the morning of 15 July 1953. On that date, Sergeant Bowser was the leader of a squad which was completely isolated from the remainder of the United Nations forces when a numerically superior enemy element overran outpost. Although all but six men in his squad had been killed, Sergeant Bowser inspired his comrades to continue fighting against the great odds, moving his group from bunker to bunker in the face of the onrushing enemy. When further withdrawal became impossible, Sergeant Bowser position his men in a bunker and, for the next eleven hours, encouraged them in inflicting heavy casualties and in warding off the enemy. When the United Nations artillery laid down a smoke screen over the area, Sergeant Bowser ordered his men to withdraw. Remaining behind, he courageously picked up one of his companions who had been seriously wounded and carried him over four hundred yards through an intense barrage to the friendly lines.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 978 (October 30, 1953)

BRADLEY, JOSEPH S.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph S. Bradley (0-12428), Brigadier General, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Assistant Division Commander, 2d Infantry Division, from 2 through 5 September 1950, after the enemy had broken through the lines of the 9th and 23rd Infantry Regiments in what proved to be his last attempt to crush the United Nations forces in Korea. General Bradley was ordered by the Commanding General, Second Infantry Division, to take command of the scattered units south of the breakthrough and to defend the town of Yongsan and the pass leading back to Miryang at all costs. Hastily gathering disorganized elements of the First and 2d Battalions, Ninth Infantry, General Bradley reorganized them together with the Second Engineer Combat Battalion and elements of the 72nd Tank Battalion, and beat off repeated enemy attacks. On 2 September 1950, with enemy tanks in the town of Yongsan, he personally took charge of the disorganized Engineer Battalion and placed Company D in position to beat back and destroy the Communists in the town. On the next day, a force of eight hundred enemy infantry with tanks and self-propelled guns threatened to come in from the south and overrun the command post of the Ninth Infantry and the nearby artillery positions from the rear. General Bradley again went forward under heavy fire and directed a task force consisting of tanks and engineers against this threat, and with two batteries of 166-mm. howitzers firing at extreme muzzle elevation, so short was the range, succeeded in driving back the enemy force with heavy casualties. Throughout the period of this desperate, last-ditch defense in which even elements of the Division Band and clerks from the rear echelon were put into the line, General Bradley was always in front, encouraging individual riflemen to stand fast in spite of enemy penetrations to their flanks and rear. On the fourth and fifth of September, with the enemy stopped but still capable of exploiting their success, General Bradley rallied his decimate force to make a coordinated counterattack with the First Provisional Marine Brigade and again leading the forward elements, successfully restored the position. By his extraordinary heroism and outstanding example of valor, General Bradley was an inspiration to the entire command and was directly responsible for stopping the enemy attack.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950).
Home Town: Vancouver, Washington
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

BRAGG, BERNARD B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Bernard B. Bragg (RA35204557), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Bragg distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Hadong, Korea, on 27 July 1950. When the 3d Battalion was subjected to devastating mortar, artillery and automatic-weapons fire from a numerically superior, well-concealed enemy force, Sergeant Bragg directed the fire of his 81-mm. mortar platoon on the enemy positions until the supply of ammunition was nearly exhausted. Exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, he made his way to the ammunition supply point and returned with all available 81-mm. mortar ammunition. As he was preparing to unload the ammunition, an enemy mortar shell burst nearby, knocking him to the ground and setting his vehicle on fire. Regaining his feet, he extinguished the flames with his jacket, then unloaded the ammunition and distributed it among his mortar crews. After this supply was exhausted, he deployed his platoon as riflemen and engaged the enemy until displacement was ordered. Assembling his platoon with the 60-mm. mortar section of another company, he directed the fire of that section on enemy positions until all ammunition was expended. As Sergeant Bragg organized the men for redeployment, they were pinned down by fire from two enemy machine-gun positions. Directing his men to take cover, he moved forward alone, threw two grenades into on of the machine-gun nests, killing the crew; then he made his way toward the other machine-gun and destroyed it with another well-placed grenade. Rejoining his men, he led them to a road where he found an abandoned vehicle and trailer and made two trips in transporting them to safety. As he was returning for the third time, his vehicle was completely disabled by enemy fire. After making his way to the group he had driven to safety and reorganizing them, he was seriously wounded by enemy shell fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 262 (May 3, 1951)
Home Town: Summers, West Virginia

BRANDENBURG, BILLY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Billy D. Brandenburg (US55073569), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader with an Infantry Company of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Corporal Brandenburg distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sokkogae, Korea, on 10 June 1952. On that night, the company in which Corporal Brandenburg served was entrenched on a key hill when its position was subjected to a devastating artillery and mortar barrage. Painfully wounded by flying shrapnel, Corporal Brandenburg refused medical treatment and played a major part in the defense of the outpost against the smashing enemy attacks which immediately followed the bombardment. Moving from position to position in the sector hit the hardest by the fanatical assault and firing rapidly and accurately into the charging mass of hostile troops, he soon expended his carbine ammunition. Hurriedly obtaining an automatic rifle, he continued to inflict heavy casualties upon the foe, almost single- handedly hurling back one of the enemy wave attempting to engulf the friendly positions. Observing a hostile grenade land near one of his companions, he threw himself at the man and knocked him to the ground, saving his life. Then, moving to a friendly machine-gun emplacement, he helped the gunner direct fire against the on-rushing enemy until a grenade landed in the position, destroying the weapon and wounding Corporal Brandenburg for a second time. Early the following morning, the friendly troops, their ammunition exhausted, were forced to move back to a secondary defense line. After obtaining and distributing ammunition, Corporal Brandenburg reorganized the battered friendly force and le it in a spirited counterattack which successfully recaptured the hill. Only after all casualties had received proper medical attention did he allow himself to be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 676 (November 4, 1952)
Home Town: Jackson, Michigan

*BRANNON, CHARLES E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Brannon (0-61207), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Brannon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pangwa-dong, Korea, on 22 April 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Brannon led his platoon in an assault against a heavily fortified objective. However, the intense enemy fire soon pinned the friendly troops down. With keen tactical perception, Lieutenant Brannon analyzed the situation and immediately took positive steps to relive the pressure on his men. Calling for an automatic-weapons team, he directed them to fire at one of the two enemy emplacements from which the major portion of the deadly fusillade originated. He then single-handedly attacked the other and, ignoring its heavy volume of fire, he killed its occupants. This paved the way to the crest of the objective and he personally led his men in a spirited assault. Heavy fire from deeply entrenched for halted this attack also and Lieutenant Brannon immediately charged forward alone and attacked position after position, neutralizing each in turn. When his men moved up to consolidate the top of the hill, hitherto hidden enemy troops began firing in conjunction with defensive fire from the reverse slope of the hill. Realizing the untenable nature of the friendly positions, Lieutenant Brannon and his men were forced to seek out each enemy soldier before establishing their perimeter. The fanatical foe then launched a counterattack which caught the friendly troops with the ammunition almost completely exhausted. To save his men from almost certain death, Lieutenant Brannon ordered them to execute a limited withdrawal while he provided covering fire which enabled them to perform the maneuver with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 453 (August 14, 1952)
Home Town: Panama Canal Zone
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Korea)

*BRANNON, CHARLES E.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Brannon (0-61207), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Brannon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sorak-san, Korea, on 25 April 1951. When the convoy in which he was proceeding was ambushed by a heavily armed, well-entrenched enemy force, Lieutenant Brannon completely exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to place members of the convoy in defensive positions and direct their return fire. He then organized a group of soldiers and led an assault against the well-fortified enemy. Under his inspiring leadership, the small group inflicted heavy casualties on the hostile troops until the overwhelming numerical superiority of the enemy forced a withdrawal. As he was returning to the road, Lieutenant Brannon noticed that many wounded soldiers were lying in positions exposed to the murderous enemy fire. With utter disregard for his personal safety, he proceeded from one vehicle to another, trying to locate one that would start. During this courageous action he was shot in the neck but, although bleeding profusely, continued to check the vehicles until he located a two and one-half ton truck that was in operating condition. After driving to the area of the wounded men, he assisted in loading them on the vehicle. Then, when he had ascertained that all of the wounded were on the truck, he drove through the crossfire of the ambush to an aid station approximately six miles distant. Only after all other wounded were cared for did Lieutenant Brannon accept treatment for his own wound.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 655 (August 19, 1951)
Home Town: Panama Canal Zone
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

BRAZEAL, AMOS L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Amos L. Brazeal (RA27516851), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Brazeal distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Choryum-chi, Korea, on 24 May 1951. On that date, Private Brazeal's company was engaged in an attack against a well-fortified enemy position on Hill 895. As Private Brazeal led his squad forward in the assault, sudden heavy enemy automatic- weapons and small-arms fire halted the attack and forced the men to seek cover. Immediately, Private Brazeal reorganized his squad and, laying down a base of fire to cover their advance, he urged the men forward. With his ammunition expended, he fixed his bayonet and advanced on the enemy. As he neared the hostile emplacements, he was painfully wounded. Moving down the slope for medical aid, he heard enemy voices from a heavily wooded area and, securing a weapon, he took up a position and waited for the hostile troops to appear. As they came into view, he opened fire, killing four and wounding two. This courageous act kept the enemy from completing a flanking movement that undoubtedly would have caused many casualties among the friendly forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 715 (September 22, 1951).
Home Town: Scott, Missouri

*BROUILLETTE, NEILSON V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Neilson V. Brouillette (0-2206728), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as an Artillery Forward Observer with the 555th Field Artillery Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Brouillette distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kongsu-dong, Korea, on 19 and 20 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Brouillette moved forward with an infantry company as it engaged a numerically superior enemy force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. Despite the devastating volume of fire concentrated on the friendly force by the enemy, Lieutenant Brouillette, acting as an artillery observer, consistently moved with most forward elements in order to direct the fire of the friendly artillery with maximum effect. The fierce battle had raged throughout the day and into the night when the friendly force, pressing the advantage of superior artillery support provided by Lieutenant Brouillette, finally drove the hostile troops from the hill and organized a defensive perimeter to await the inevitable counterattack. In the early morning hours of 20 October 1951, the hostile force launched a fanatical attack against the friendly positions in an attempt to regain their lost ground. Realizing that the overwhelming numbers of the enemy would soon make the defense perimeter untenable, Lieutenant Brouillette voluntarily moved to an exposed forward position and called or more artillery fire. Although the enemy troops we in close proximity to his position, he fearlessly brought fire to bear directly in their midst. This devastating barrage brought the enemy assault to a standstill and enabled the friendly troops to withdraw to a stronger defensive position. With his mission complete, Lieutenant Brouillette attempted to fall back to the friendly lines from his forward position but he was killed by an exploding enemy mortar shell.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 66 (February 1, 1952)
Home Town: Avoyelles, Louisiana

BROWN, CHESTER H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chester H. Brown, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Brown distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taepyon-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. On that date, during an attack by an enemy force of superior numbers, the position was being overrun. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant First Class Brown repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire by moving from position to position, rendering encouragement and confidence to his men. At the last moment he withdrew his remaining force, even through they were intermingled with the enemy and led them over twenty miles of mountainous terrain to rejoin friendly forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 7 (July 23, 1950)

*BROWN, CLARENCE G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence G. Brown (RA18293605), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Brown distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Twin Tunnels area south of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 1 February 1951. On that date, Company L was occupying defensive positions in the Twin Tunnels area when a numerically superior enemy force launched an attack against the positions, forcing two platoons to withdraw in order to establish a tighter perimeter. As the two platoons were effecting this maneuver, a second enemy group launched an attack that threatened to cut off one of the platoons from the remainder of the company. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Sergeant Brown immediately deployed his squad and began placing effective fire on the second enemy group. Throughout this action, he moved among his men, encouraging them to hold their positions despite the intense hostile fire received from three sides. When the two platoons had completed their withdrawal and established a new defense perimeter, Sergeant Brown ordered his squad to withdraw to the reestablished friendly line, then remained behind alone to furnish covering fire for the movement. He was killed at this position while hurling hand grenades at the advancing enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 582 (July 24, 1951)
Home Town: Randolph, Arkansas

BROWN, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James L. Brown (RA15048486), Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Brown distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sinjang, Korea, on 26 November 1950. On the morning of 26 November 1950, remnants of the 1st and 2d Battalions of the 9th Infantry Regiment were surrounded by the enemy and had been repelling fierce enemy attacks for several hours. Due to heavy fighting many casualties were received; however, the wounded men could not be evacuated because of an enemy roadblock along the main supply route one mile south of Company E's positions. Corporal Brown was personally selected by his company commander to take charge of the casualties of the two besieged battalions, break through the enemy roadblock, and get the wounded men to safety. The roadblock was established in a culvert that crossed under train tracks on the left of the road and continued along a river on the right. Scattered around the culvert were approximately fifteen or twenty of the enemy. Corporal Brown immediately estimated the situation and directed the walking wounded to lay down a base of fire on the culvert. He then took two men with him and advanced down the railroad tracks pushing a small railroad handcar in front of him. Corporal Brown began engaging each enemy position as he ran down the tracks, exposing himself many times to enemy grenades and rifle fire, but destroying each position as he went along. When he was close enough, he engaged the main body of the enemy in the culvert, using grenades and rifle fire, and even using his rifle butt and boots when he ran out of ammunition. By destroying this roadblock he made it possible to evacuate the wounded and secured a route for the withdrawal of his company and other units.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 138 (March 15, 1951)
Home Town: Scott, Indiana

*BROWN, KENNETH E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Kenneth E. Brown (0-1304844), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company L, 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Captain Brown distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Idong-Myon, Korea, on 1 and 2 June 1951. On that date, when leading elements of his attacking company were stopped by hostile fire, Captain Brown continued the advance. Using his pistol and throwing grenades, he personally eliminated an enemy machine-gun and two automatic rifles and killed three and captured one of the enemy. Under his aggressive leadership, his company resumed the advance and secured its objective. Within two hours the enemy launched determined counterattacks. Throughout the night, although twice wounded, he moved among his men, encouraging them to hold on. When ammunition became low, he gathered and distributed enemy weapons and ammunition. Personally participating in the fighting with any weapon available, and finally with clubbed rifle and his fists, Captain Brown continued to set an inspiring example to his men until he was killed by a burst of machine-gun fire. As a result of his unflinching courage and inspiring leadership, the position was maintained and a heavy toll of dead and wounded inflicted upon the enemy.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 102 (November 27, 1951)
Home Town: Gregg, Texas

BROWNELL, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George R. Brownell, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company K, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Brownell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of P'ungch'on-ni, Korea, on 18 and 19 May 1951. On 18 May 1951, Company K was attacked by an enemy force of great numerical superiority intent upon totally destroying the company. During the two-day period in which the hostile forces mounted numerous assaults against the company, Captain Brownell calmly remained exposed to intense enemy fire to direct the defense of his unit, successfully stemming the desperate onslaughts of the enemy. When the company was forced to fall back under tremendous enemy pressure, Captain Brownell personally led his troops in fierce counterattacks to restore the friendly lines. His aggressive leadership and personal bravery were directly responsible for the successful defense of the company positions during this crucial operation and resulted in the infliction of staggering losses upon the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 483 (June 30, 1951)

*BRUINOOGE, MARINUS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Marinus Bruinooge (0-1334095), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company G, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Bruinooge distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Konjiam-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Committed to attack and secure commanding terrain tenaciously defended by a well-fortified hostile force, Lieutenant Bruinooge's platoon was pinned down within 150 yards of its objective by intense automatic-weapons, small-arms, and mortar fire and suffered numerous casualties. After artillery and mortar fire had been placed on the enemy position, he again led his men forward, but was halted by a vicious barrage of fire from two machine-guns and an emplacement employing grenades. Making a one-man assault at approximately 1800 hours, he advanced within twenty yards and was wounded, but gallantly forged on and, after lobbing a grenade into the position, closed with the enemy and killed its four occupants. Observing the nearest machine-gun was but twenty-five yards distant, he harassed the gunners with grenades and then, fearlessly rushing forward, fired his carbine full automatic into the foxhole until he was mortally wounded. His intrepid actions retarded the onslaught, enabled evacuation of the wounded, and contributed significantly to the subsequent accomplishment of the mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 107 (December 14, 1951)
Home Town: Bergen, New Jersey

BRUMET, CHESTER C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Chester C. Brumet, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company E, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Brumet distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yangimal, Korea, on 8 March 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Brumet led his platoon in an attack against the left flank of well-fortified enemy positions on Hill 281. As the men advanced, they were subjected to a heavy volume of automatic- weapons fire from the enemy. Completely disregarding the intense fire, Lieutenant Brumet maneuvered a machine-gun into an advantageous position from which, under his skillful direction, the enemy weapons were silenced. As the platoon renewed its assault and neared the objective, it was again subjected to intense enemy fire and was pinned down. Undaunted, Lieutenant Brumet exposed himself to the heavy fire and deployed his men to covered positions from which they could return fire. He then moved across the fire-swept terrain to a friendly tank and effectively directed its fire against the enemy emplacements, enabling his men to secure their objective. The enemy immediately launched a fierce counterattack. During this attack Lieutenant BRUMET observed an automatic rifleman lying wounded in an exposed position. Unhesitatingly, he moved to the wounded man's side and carried him to safety. Returning to the exposed position, he began firing the automatic rifle at the onrushing enemy. His deadly accurate fire successfully broke up the counterattack and inflicted numerous casualties among the hostile troops. Lieutenant Brumet then reorganized his men despite a devastating mortar barrage concentrated on the friendly positions, and led them in an attack that completely demoralized the hostile troops and caused them to flee in disorder.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 904 (November 16, 1951)

*BUNDY, WALT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Walt W. Bundy (0-2053977), Captain (Signal Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Detachment E, 205th Signal Repair Company, attached to the 6th Republic of Korea Division, II Corps. Captain Bundy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 2 October 1950. Captain Bundy bivouacked his detachment of two officers and seventeen enlisted men in a compound on the outskirts off Wonju near the division command post. At 0100 hours, the area was attacked by a banzai charge of approximately 2400 enemy troops which had apparently been by-passed in the surrounding hills. The position of Captain Bundy's detachment was discovered by the enemy and the compound was subjected to extremely heavy, direct fire. The enemy troops then launched a frontal assault. Realizing the gravity of the situation, Captain Bundy ordered his detachment to withdraw via the rear wall and seek cover in the hilly terrain outside the compound. Utterly disregarding his own safety Captain Bundy remained in an exposed position near the front entrance to cover the withdrawal. Although he was thus able to save the enlisted men of his unit, he gallantly sacrificed his own life as the enemy stormed into the area in great strength overwhelming him completely.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 35 (January 21, 1951)
Home Town: Fulton, Georgia

BURKE, LLOYD LESLIE "SCOOTER"
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lloyd Leslie "Scooter" Burke, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Second Lieutenant Burke distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Samso-ri, Korea, on 26 November 1950. On that date, while Company F was moving toward Sunchon, Korea, contact was made with a strong enemy force that had infiltrated friendly lines and established a roadblock. Ordered to secure possession of a commanding ridge on which the enemy was well entrenched, Lieutenant Burke organized his men and personally led an attack against the enemy position. Blazing fire met the assaulting group and it was forced to fall back. Four times Lieutenant burke heroically rallied his men and with dogged determination led them against the death-spitting ridge, and each time they were forced to fall back because of the withering fire. Spotting the location of an enemy machine-gun position that was the major stumbling block in the attack, Lieutenant Burke crawled forward, heedless of the enemy fire which chewed and churned the dirt around him, until he was within grenade range. Despite the murderous fire now being directed at him, he accurately lobbed several grenades into the machine-gun nest, completely obliterating it. Having eliminated this obstacle, he dauntlessly arose and valiantly led his inspired men in a fifth furious assault on the ridge and successfully secured it.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 253 (May 1, 1951)
Born: September 29, 1924 at Tichnor, Arkansas
Home Town: Stuttgart, Arkansas
Other Award: Medal of Honor (Korea)

BURKHOLDER, ELMER E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Elmer E. Burkholder (RA15104213), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Burkholder distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. When Headquarters and Headquarters Company, with attached units, attempted to run a roadblock set up by the North Koreans, the driver for the Company Commander was killed and the First Sergeant was wounded. Sergeant Burkholder volunteered to drive his commanding officer, First Sergeant and a regimental chaplain through the blockade. Almost immediately after starting the run Sergeant Burkholder was wounded in the face and chest by shrapnel from a grenade. He continued to drive until his vehicle was knocked out by enemy fire and he was forced to take cover. A prime mover stopped nearby to remove some vehicles that were blocking his way and upon seeing this, Sergeant Burkholder carried his First Sergeant, who had a broken leg, approximately forty yards through intense small arms and automatic weapons fire to the prime mover, which moved them to a safe position.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 23 (August 11, 1950)
Home Town: Hancock, Ohio

*BURNETTE, JAMES I.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James I. Burnette (RA14312953), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Burnette distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Changnyong, Korea, on 17 September 1950. Corporal Burnette's company was attacking a well-entrenched enemy force when it was pinned down by intense enemy small-arms and machine-gun fire. With complete disregard for his personal safety, he picked up his light machine-gun and advanced alone toward the enemy position, firing from the hip. He continued to advance on the enemy, inflicting heavy casualties with his machine-gun fire, until he was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 155 (March 20, 1951)
Home Town: Fulton, Georgia

*BURNS, CHARLES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles E. Burns (RA42116226), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Burns distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chonji, Korea, on 10 July 1950. On this date, Master Sergeant Burns led a squad into enemy-held territory with the mission of laying a minefield across an important road to deny its use by the enemy. On completion of this mission Sergeant Burns advanced alone through intense enemy small arms fire and destroyed an enemy tank with grenades. In this engagement, Sergeant Burns was wounded. In spite of the wounds, he refused to be evacuated and remained alone at his post throughout the night.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 54 (September 6, 1950)
Home Town: Essex, New Jersey

BUSH, LAVERN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lavern L. Bush (RA17240792), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Leader of a heavy machine-gun section of Company H, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant Bush distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Soktunji, Korea, on 18 August 1951. Sergeant Bush participated in a combat patrol which had the mission of making contact with enemy units known to be in the area. The friendly troops had moved half-way across an open field when it was discovered that the area was mined. Simultaneously, a heavy volume of enemy fire began to pour down from the surrounding slopes. From a rear position, Sergeant Bush observed that the patrol was experiencing extreme difficulty in evacuating its wounded. Quickly, he organized a volunteer rescue party and led it directly under the enemy guns in an attempt to save his wounded comrades. With two men successfully evacuated, Sergeant Bush began to make his way across the minefield but one of his men inadvertently stepped on a mine and detonated it. In the explosion that followed, Sergeant Bush was seriously wounded but, displaying great courage, he directed the evacuation of the man who had stepped on the mine and then he pushed forward once more. He advanced to the side of the last wounded man, who was lying less than fifty yards from the enemy emplacements and, disregarding the intense hostile fire being concentrated on him, he picked him up and began to make his way back to the friendly positions. Despite his own wounds, Sergeant Bush transported his wounded comrade across the wide expanse of fire-swept terrain, through the minefield, and back to the friendly positions. Although he was weak from loss of blood, he still refused medical treatment. Instead, Sergeant Bush led his men in an attack against the hostile emplacements and inflicted many casualties upon the enemy force before being ordered to withdraw.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 118 (February 29, 1952)
Home Town: Douglas, Nebraska

*BUTLER, ARTHUR BELL
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur Bell Butler (0-29783), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Major Butler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Soi-ri, Korea, on 25 August 1950. When a Republic of Korea unit was to relieve elements of his battalion which had secured a line of departure, Major Butler while observing the relief, found that heavy enemy action was delaying the movement of the Korean unit and impeding the planned attack. He went forward despite the hostile fire to coordinate the friendly action and help press the attack. Heedless of the enemy small-arms, machine-gun and artillery fire, he moved calmly among the troops, organizing the units and inspiring the men by his courage and confidence. While continuing his mission he was mortally wounded by an enemy shell.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)
Home Town: Nueces, Texas

BUTLER, CHARLES LEWIS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles Lewis Butler (0-62588), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Butler distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Singyang-ni, Korea, on 15 December 1950. Lieutenant Butler was in command of Task Force FOX, which had been organized in an attempt to relieve a platoon of Company G when it was enveloped by a numerically superior enemy force. While en route to the objective area, his task force was ambushed. With no thought for his personal safety, he was continuously in the forefront of the battle, rallying his men on to their objective. In the ensuing fierce encounter, he was wounded in the left arm. Despite his painful wound, he continued to press his men forward, reassuring them with words of encouragement as they advanced. It was then that he received a second wound, in the abdomen. Even though seriously wounded, he refused medical attention and continued the attack with the assistance of his platoon sergeant. When the order was received to withdraw, he was unable to walk but requested that he be lifted onto the tank so that he could fire the machine gun mounted on the turret to support his platoon in the withdrawal from its encircled position. Through this action, his extreme coolness under fire, though suffering much pain, served to inspire his men, thereby facilitating the successful withdrawal of his force with a minimum of casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 132 (March 11, 1951)
Home Town: Allegheny, Pennsylvania

C

*CAGLE, MILTON L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Milton L. Cagle (US54026223), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Cagle distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Togol, Korea, on 8 April 1951. On that date, Private Cagle's unit was assigned the mission of attacking a well-entrenched and determined enemy force. As the men advanced, they were suddenly pinned down by intense and accurate automatic-weapons fire from a camouflaged enemy emplacement. Realizing that his comrades were in danger of annihilation, Private Cagle, despite the heavy volume of fire being directed at him, moved forward. Mortally wounded by the point-blank fire, he nevertheless crawled close enough to the enemy position to silence the weapon with grenades. The heroic action of Private Cagle so inspired his comrades that they overran the enemy positions and secured their objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 611 (August 3, 1951)
Home Town: Nolan, Texas

*CALDWELL, JAMES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James L. Caldwell (0-2005656), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company L, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Caldwell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Homangi, Korea, on 5 October 1951. Assigned the mission of attacking and occupying commanding ground tenaciously defended by a strongly fortified hostile force, Lieutenant Caldwell's platoon moved up the rugged slope of the hill under devastating small-arms, automatic weapons, and mortar fire. He led his platoon in a charge and was the first to enter the enemy position. Forced to withdraw for lack of ammunition, he reorganized and led a second but unsuccessful charge. Although wounded twice by small-arms fire while rallying and regrouping to renew the assault, he refused medical treatment and continued to lead the platoon through withering fire until he was struck by a mortar burst and fell mortally wounded on the crest of the hill. Inspired by the incredible courage of their valiant leader, Lieutenant Caldwell's resolute troopers stormed forward with such ferocity that the enemy was overwhelmed and the key terrain feature secured.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 54 (May 29, 1952)
Home Town: Wake, North Carolina

CALLAHAN, RONALD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ronald E. Callahan, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Callahan distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Uijongbu, Korea, on 24 March 1951. On that date, Sergeant Callahan's platoon was assigned the mission of attacking and securing a group of heavily fortified hill positions from a numerically superior hostile force. As the friendly force advanced, it was subjected to a heavy volume of enemy automatic weapons fire. Upon reaching a point some seventy-five yards from the hostile emplacements, the enemy fire became so intense that further forward movement was impossible and the friendly troops were forced to seek what cover they could on the bare slope. Realizing that his men faced possible annihilation in their present untenable positions, Sergeant Callahan, without regard for his personal safety, left his position of cover and single-handedly charged toward the key enemy emplacement from which most of the devastating fire originated. Despite the fire being concentrated on him, he steadfastly moved forward, alternately firing his rifle and throwing grenades. Sergeant Callahan's deadly accurate fire was responsible for the destruction of the enemy weapon and his bold assault enabled him to kill two of the hostile soldiers with his bayonet and to capture three. He then signaled his men to move forward and, distributing captured enemy grenades among the men, he led them in an assault against the remaining enemy positions. Throughout this action Sergeant Callahan remained where the fighting was heaviest, constantly urging them forward and inspiring them by his personal example of fearlessness until the objective was secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 27 (January 15, 1952)

*CAMP, HENRY CLAY, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Henry Clay Camp, Jr. (0-63031), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Camp distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sagimak, Korea, on the night of 31 January - 1 February 1951. On that date, Company C was occupying positions on Hill 381 near Sagimak, with the 1st platoon, commanded by Lieutenant Camp, occupying positions on a commanding knoll approximately 250 yards in front of the company perimeter. At 0030 hours on 1 February 1951, the 1st platoon was attacked by approximately sixty enemy troops. Sweeping forward in a screaming banzai attack, the enemy completely overran the second squad of the platoon in their effort to reach the summit of the hill. Displaying outstanding courage and coolness, Lieutenant Camp, with complete disregard for his personal safety and seemingly heedless of the intense enemy fire, remained in position firing his carbine and throwing grenades at the onrushing enemy. During this assault, Lieutenant Camp personally killed five of the enemy and later tabulation revealed twenty enemy dead in the immediate area of the 1st platoon. The fierce defensive fighting and superlative leadership of Lieutenant Camp prevented enemy infiltration of his entire position and resulted in complete dispersal of the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 329 (May 23, 1951)
Home Town: Barrow, Georgia

CAMPBELL, EARL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earl R. Campbell (RA34936577), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Campbell distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Anju, Korea, 5 November 1950. At approximately 0600 hours on that date, Chinese Communist forces launched an attack in strength against positions which were occupied by the 2d Battalion. Because of the overwhelming strength and fierceness of the enemy attack, the battalion commander issued orders for the battalion to withdraw to more favorable positions approximately 1,500 yards to the rear in order to regroup units and launch a coordinated counterattack against the enemy. The platoon of Corporal Campbell was designated to serve as the covering force for Company G's withdrawal. Although subjected to a vicious enemy attack and in positions that threatened to be overrun at any moment, the platoon stood its ground and successfully covered the withdrawal of the remainder of the company. By the time that the covering force received orders to withdraw, Corporal Campbell was the sole surviving member of his squad. Voluntarily ignoring the order to withdraw, he remained alone in his position placing devastating fire upon the enemy with his automatic rifle while the remainder of his platoon withdrew. When his weapon suddenly failed to function, he secured a rifle and several grenades from a fallen comrade and continued his fire upon the enemy. Not until he was completely surrounded, and faced with the probability of being either captured or killed, did he finally crawl a distance of four hundred yards down a small ravine under a hail of enemy fire and rejoin his platoon. Based upon an examination of the position after it was retaken by counterattack, Corporal Campbell is believed to have killed seventeen enemy during the course of his heroic stand.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 97 (February 25, 1951)
Home Town: Henderson, Tennessee

CANANT, ERMER O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ermer O. Canant (0-2262856), First Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Battery A, 10th Field Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Canant distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Hurullae, Korea, on 27 September 1951. Observing a member of a combat patrol, which had become pinned down by intense enemy fire, lying wounded and helpless on open terrain, Lieutenant Canant left his place of safety and rushed to the aid of the stricken man. While returning the casualty to friendly lines, he was severely wounded in the lower jaw and was unable to talk. He succeeded, however, in assisting the wounded soldier to a place of safety some three hundred yards to the rear and returned to his former position. Refusing evacuation, with motions and gestures, he ably assisted in the reorganization of the patrol and the direction of its successful defense until ordered to retire for medical treatment.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 28 (March 13, 1952)
Home Town: Queens, New York

CARDENAS, RICARDO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ricardo Cardenas, Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of Company F, 2d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Captain Cardenas distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chat- Kol, Korea, on the morning of 13 June 1953. On that date, Captain Cardenas' company was defending positions along the United Nations main line of resistance. When the enemy threatened to rout a Republic of Korea Army unit in an adjacent area, Captain Cardenas voluntarily proceeded to the sector, reorganized a portion of the troops, and personally led a counter-attack which regained over four hundred yards of territory. The following evening, the enemy subjected Captain Cardenas' company to an intense artillery barrage and destroyed all communications. Noticing that the enemy forces were approaching the right flank of the company, Captain Cardenas fearlessly left the comparative safety of the command post to alert his men. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he moved through the heavy fire to an open trench and, after three futile attempts, succeeded in firing a warning flare. Continuing to brave the bombardment, Captain Cardenas then directed the defense of the position and personally killed two of the enemy. Although wounded, he refused to he evacuated until the area was secured.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1000 (November 10, 1953)
Born: December 19, 1923 at Oro Grande, California
Home Town: El Paso, Texas

CARDOZA, HOWARD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Howard W. Cardoza (0-1177318), First Lieutenant (Armor), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, 70th Tank Battalion (Heavy), attached to the 1st Cavalry Division. First Lieutenant Cardoza distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Waegwan, Korea, on 16 August 1950. Lieutenant Cardoza's tank platoon was operating in direct support of the infantry whose mission was to take a hill just outside of Waegwan. The enemy, well entrenched on the hill, was delivering intense small-arms, mortar, and artillery fire. Lieutenant Cardoza moved his tank forward to the infantry positions in order to place fire on the enemy. Then, with total disregard for his personal safety, he crawled out of the tank onto the rear deck to direct the fire of his platoon. Firing the .50-caliber machine-gun, which was mounted on the turret, Lieutenant Cardoza in this manner pointed out the enemy targets to his gunners. During this action an enemy shell exploded next to Lieutenant Cardoza's tank seriously wounding him in the head, legs and arm. Although his left arm was useless, he continued to fire the .50-caliber machine-gun with one arm until he collapsed from loss of blood. It was only because of the devastating tank fire directed by Lieutenant Cardoza on the enemy that the infantry was able to continue on and accomplish its mission.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 99 (October 5, 1950).
Home Town: Mercer, Pennsylvania

CARLSON, DALE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Dale W. Carlson (0-1308923), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader of Company H, 3d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Carlson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pai-ri, Korea, on 27 August 1951. Early on the morning of 27 August 1951, the machine-gun platoon commanded by Lieutenant Carlson was ordered to withdraw from positions well in advance of the friendly main line of resistance. As the platoon began to fall back, Lieutenant Carlson observed a large hostile force advancing in an effort to intercept the friendly Troops. Without regard for his personal safety, he rushed to an exposed position and opened fire on the enemy, who retaliated with a heavy volume of small-arms fire. Painfully wounded, Lieutenant Carlson realized that he would be a hindrance to his men and so he ordered them to continue their withdrawal while re remained to provide covering fire. His deadly accurate fire delayed the foe long enough for the friendly troops to reach the safety of their own lines but, in so doing, his own position was overrun and he was captured. He was shot three times and left for dead by the enemy, who were forced to retreat form the area because of heavy friendly mortar and artillery fire. Although greatly weakened by his serious wounds, Lieutenant Carlson, displaying courageous tenacity, crawled over a wide expanse of open terrain to the friendly lines where he received medical treatment fore being evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 200 (April 17, 1952)
Home Town: McHenry, Illinois

CARNABUCI, PRIMO C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Primo C. Carnabuci (RA11167074), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Carnabuci distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pohang-dong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. When Company K launched an attack against enemy positions Private First Class Carnabuci, personally led his squad into the face of heavy automatic-weapons and small-arms fire, until he was wounded in the face and neck by fragments of a bursting enemy grenade. He personally killed three enemy soldiers and wounded several more with accurate rifle fire during the attack. While receiving medial aid, he observed his squad pinned down by heavy, accurate fire from an enemy machine-gun. Private Carnabuci, although weak from loss of blood, thrust away the aid man, picked up his rifle, and with utter disregard for his own safety, advanced into the fire of the enemy machine-gun with blood steaming down his face. The ferocity of his attack and the accurate fire from his rifle destroyed the enemy machine-gun crew and so unnerved the enemy troops near the machine-gun that they fled from the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 64 (February 10, 1951)
Home Town: Middlesex, Connecticut

CARPENTER, SIDNEY C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Sidney C. Carpenter, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to the 2d Republic of Korea Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Carpenter distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against the enemy in the vicinity of Kumhwa, North Korea on 24 October 1952. On that morning, a friendly demolition team, attempting to assault and destroy a series of large enemy bunkers on a key terrain feature, was pinned down short of its goal by intense and prolonged hostile artillery and mortar fire. Ignoring the hazards involved, Colonel Carpenter left the safety of his observation post and crossed the fire-swept terrain to the point where the team was halted by enemy fire. Inspired by his presence, the friendly troops left their positions, rallied and followed Colonel Carpenter up the precipitous fire-swept slopes to the bunkers they were to destroy. Colonel Carpenter's presence on the battlefield, his calm defiance of the enemy, cool initiative, and courageous leadership, at a critical time in the battle, inspired his men to maximum effort with the result that three key enemy bunkers were heavily damaged causing an irreparable breach in the enemy defenses. The extraordinary heroism exhibited by Lieutenant Colonel Carpenter on this occasion reflects great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.
Headquarters: Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 807 (December 29, 1952)
Home Town: Kentucky

CARPY, CHARLES A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles A. Carpy (0-1341147), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company of the 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Carpy distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Suim-Myon, Korea, on 7 January 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Carpy was leading a combat reconnaissance patrol through hostile territory when it was suddenly subjected to intense enemy fire as it advanced up a steep slope. Realizing that his men faced annihilation on the bare hillside, Lieutenant Carpy, without hesitation, charged directly into the heavy enemy fire. As he moved to attack the first of the enemy positions, he inadvertently stepped on a hostile mine. The resultant explosion hurled him thirty feet but, wounded and shaken, he dauntlessly rose to his feet and pressed forward once again. This time, an enemy grenade exploded directly over his head, tearing his helmet off and wounding him a second time. Exhibiting a matchless fighting spirit, Lieutenant Carpy regained his footing and, shouting words of encouragement to his men, he led them forward in an assault which overran the enemy stronghold. Upon receiving orders to withdraw, Lieutenant Carpy directed his men to fall back. As they did so, they were subjected to a deadly fusillade of fire from yet another enemy emplacement. In the initial burst of fire, Lieutenant Carpy was wounded in the leg. Although weakened and suffering excruciating pain, he ordered his men to continue their maneuver while he remained to provide covering fire. He then directed friendly artillery and mortar fire on the hostile force, which enable litter teams to evacuate the wounded. Only when he was assured that his men were safe did he allow himself to be treated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 455 (August 15, 1952)
Home Town: Napa, California

*CARROL, CHARLES F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles F. Carrol (RA38612724), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 72d Engineer Combat Company, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant First Class Carrol distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumchon, Korea, on 26 September 1950. During a combined infantry-tank attack against fierce enemy opposition, the tanks were held up by a roadblock consisting of antitank mines and enemy machine-gun emplacements. Voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, Sergeant First Class Carroll made his way out in front of the lead tank and began to remove the mines, heedless of the heavy volume of enemy fire. Tenaciously, he continued to remove the mines until he was mortally wounded by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. His courage and devotion to duty in the face of grave danger were an inspiration to the men and enabled them to continue their attack and destroy the enemy without undue casualties to themselves.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 189 (December 5, 1950)
Home Town: Jefferson, Oklahoma

CARROLL, ROBERT C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert C. Carroll, Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company H, 2d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Carroll distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yongsan, Korea, on 15 August 1950. At approximately 0300 hours on 15 August 1950, four enemy tanks penetrated the defense perimeter of the 2d Battalion and succeeded in disrupting communications and destroying several company supply points. Obtaining a 3.5-inch rocket launcher, Corporal Carroll crawled to within fifty yards of the lead tank, fired at the tank and succeeded in immobilizing it. The three remaining tanks immediately withdrew. Armed with a hand grenade, Corporal Carroll charged the disabled tank, which was still firing its guns. Unable to locate an opening through which to drop his grenade, he removed an axe and sledge strapped outside the vehicle and used them to force open the turret hatch cover. As the hatch cover flew open, an enemy tanker stood up in the hatch, firing a sub-machine gun. In the face of this sudden and unexpected attack, Corporal Carroll was forced off the tank and the enemy tanker again fastened the hatch cover. Procuring a five gallon can of gasoline from a nearby abandoned vehicle, Corporal Carroll mounted the tank a second time and poured the gasoline around the turret and on the deck of the tank. Then, after climbing down to the ground, he made a rag torch which he threw on the tank, igniting the gasoline. The enemy tankers remained in the tank, firing all guns, until they were burned to death
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 532 (July 10, 1951)

CARTAGENA, MODESTO
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Modesto Cartagena (RA10404100), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Cartagena distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yonch'on, Korea, on 19 April 1951. On that date, Company C was assigned the mission of capturing Hill 206, a terrain feature dominating a critical road junction. When the company assaulted the summit, it encountered stubborn resistance from a well-entrenched and fanatically determined hostile force. Sergeant Cartagena, directed to move his squad forward in order to approach the enemy positions from another ridgeline, led his men toward the objective, but, almost immediately, the group was forced to seek cower from an intense and accurate volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire. Locating the hostile emplacements that posed the greatest obstacle to the advance of the friendly forces, Sergeant Cartagena left his position and, charging directly into the devastating enemy fire he hurled a grenade at the first emplacement, totally destroying it. Ordering his squad to remain under cover, he successfully and single-handedly assaulted the second enemy position. Although knocked to the ground by exploding enemy grenades, Sergeant Cartagena repeated this daring action three more times. Finally, an increased volume of fire from the remaining hostile emplacements was concentrated on him and he was wounded. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion, to duty displayed by Sergeant Cartagena throughout this action enabled the company to secure its objective successfully with a minimum of casualties, reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 698 (September 16, 1951)
Home Town: Puerto Rico

CATANESE, ALBERT
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Albert Catanese (RA33256410), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Catanese distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on at Taejon, Korea, on 20 July 1950. On this date Sergeant Catanese, a squad leader, was in a defensive position with his squad while undergoing a heavy attack by numerically superior enemy forces, supported by artillery and mortar fire. During this action Sergeant Catanese was seriously wounded in the left arm but refused to be evacuated. The enemy surrounded his unit on three sides and Sergeant Catanese ordered the withdrawal of his men and, without regard for his own personal safety, he remained in position to cover them. Despite his painful wound, he continued to direct accurate fire on the enemy, firing his rifle with one hand and reloading by holding the rifle between his knees. By his personal bravery he insured the safe withdrawal of his squad.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 76 (September 20, 1950)
Home Town: Indiana, Pennsylvania
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

CATHCART, WILLIAM D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William D. Cathcart, Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with an Infantry Company. Master Sergeant Cathcart distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chungbangp'yong, Korea, on 18 February 1952. On the morning of 18 February 1952, the company of which Sergeant Cathcart was a member was engaged in an attack against a large hostile force occupying a strategic and well-fortified hill. In the ensuing action, Sergeant Cathcart observed that the leader of the assaulting platoon had been killed and the friendly troops had been pinned down by the intense enemy fire. Without hesitation, he rushed to the men, rallied them, and personally led them toward the crest of the hill only to be met by such a tremendous volume of fire that a withdrawal was necessary to save the friendly force from annihilation. Upon reaching the base of the slope, Sergeant Cathcart realized that several wounded were still on the fireswept hill. Without regard for his personal safety, he traveled back up the slope directly in the face of the heavy enemy fire to evacuate his stricken comrades. Six times, Sergeant Cathcart made his way almost to the edge of the enemy bunkers, and six times, he returned with a wounded man. Through his utter fearlessness and completely selfless devotion to his men and his duty, Sergeant Cathcart saved the lives of several of his comrades at great risk to his own. The extraordinary heroism display by Sergeant Cathcart on this occasion reflects the greatest credit on himself and is in keeping with the most esteemed traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 257 (May 20, 1952)

CAUTHEN, JOE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joe H. Cauthen, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 187th Airborne Regimental Combat Team, 11th Airborne Division. Sergeant Cauthen distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Wonju, Korea, on 14 February 1951. On that date, Sergeant Cauthen was serving as a squad leader of the 1st platoon of Company E when his company was given the mission of seizing Hill 255. This objective had previously been secured by an enemy force estimated at battalion strength. As the platoon spearheaded the attack and neared the crest of the hill, they encountered intense machine-gun and small-arms fire. At one point during the attack and when within assault distance of the enemy, a member of the platoon observed an enemy machine-gun position and threw a hand grenade into it. The enemy gunner instantly grasped the grenade and was attempting to throw it back when Sergeant Cauthen stood erect, heedless of enemy fire, and killed him before he could release the grenade. Although heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy, the platoon was forced to withdraw momentarily because of the intensity of enemy fire. Two additional attempts were made to assault the hill before the platoon overran the hostile positions and engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, securing the objective. Throughout the attack and during the assault, Sergeant Cauthen displayed outstanding courage and aggressive leadership, personally killing thirty of the enemy and silencing one machine gun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 429 (June 14, 1951)

CAVAZOS, RICHARD E.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard E. Cavazos (0-64593), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while as Company Commander of Company E, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Cavazos distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sagimak, Korea, on the night of 14 June 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Cavazos led his men in a raid on the entrenched enemy upon whom heavy casualties were inflicted. When a heavy barrage was laid on the position by the enemy, Lieutenant Cavazos withdrew the company and regrouped his men. Lieutenant Cavazos three times led the company through the heavy barrage in assaults on the enemy position, each time destroying vital enemy equipment and personnel. When the United Nations element was ordered to withdraw, Lieutenant Cavazos remained alone on the enemy outpost to search the area for missing men. Exposed to heavy hostile fire, Lieutenant Cavazos located five men who had been wounded in the action. He evacuated them, one at a time, to a point on the reverse slope of the hill from which they could be removed to the safety of the friendly lines. Lieutenant Cavazos then made two more trips between the United Nations position and the enemy-held hill searching for casualties and evacuating scattered groups of men who had become confused. Not until he was assured that the hill was cleared did he allow treatment of his own wounds sustained during the action
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 832 (September 10, 1953)
Born: January 31, 1929 at Kingsville, Texas
Home Town: Kingsville, Texas
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross w/OLC (Vietnam)

CEH, JOSEPH F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph F. Ceh (0-988565), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Ceh distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kangsan'- ni, Korea, on 30 October 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Ceh was participating in an assault on a vital enemy-held hill. When the company commander and other officers of the company were wounded in the action, Lieutenant Ceh assumed command of the company and successfully led the men in routing the hostile troops from the position. Although he had been painfully wounded in the legs during the assault, Lieutenant Ceh immediately set about preparing for the enemy counterattack. Dragging himself from position to position, Lieutenant Ceh personally checked to assure that each man of the forward element was placed in position and supplied with ammunition to give maximum fire power and security. During this check of the positions, Lieutenant Ceh found that a machine-gun crew had been annihilated by the intense mortar fire. Noting that the weapon was not damaged, Lieutenant Ceh crawled to it and directed a withering hail of fire into the enemy ranks. Throughout the counterattack Lieutenant Ceh consistently refused evacuation and assisted the wounded and distributed ammunition, contributing greatly to the successful defense of the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 510 (May 25, 1953)
Home Town: Logan, Ohio

*CERRI, JOE V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Joe V. Cerri (0-1926012), Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Leader with Company G, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Cerri distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on the morning of 11 June 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Cerri was at a point on the main line of resistance which was subjected to an artillery and mortar barrage, immediately followed by a ground assault by a numerically-superior force. Lieutenant Cerri deployed his men in the most advantageous fighting positions and then led them into the hand-to-hand combat which was raging on the position. Disregarding all thoughts of personal safety, Lieutenant Cerri climbed to the top of the trenches and remained constantly exposed to direct fire and shouted words of encouragement to his men. While in this position, Lieutenant Cerri was wounded by hostile grenade fragments and fell down a steep bank directly into the path of the enemy's main assault wave. Though in great pain, Lieutenant Cerri fired into the enemy ranks until he lost consciousness. As remnants of the enemy force commenced a withdrawal, several of their soldiers dragged Lieutenant Cerri back toward hostile positions. After the battle, an Allied search patrol found Lieutenant Cerri's lifeless body entangled in barbed wire a few hundred yards in front of enemy lines
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 733 (August 8, 1953)
Home Town: La Salle, Illinois

CHAMBERLAIN, GEORGE D.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to George D. Chamberlain (RA7040810), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Chamberlain distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in near Yongsan, Korea, on 16 September 1950. During the morning of 16 September, Sergeant Chamberlain was a member of Company K when that unit was subjected to a savage attack by a numerically superior enemy force. The enemy succeeded in penetrating through one of the platoons which was near the squad he commanded. Disregarding completely the deadly enemy fire, Sergeant Chamberlain left his covered position and want to the assistance of the platoon sergeant of the overrun platoon. He then rallied his squad and with the remainder of the other platoon, led a counterattack which retook the position and routed the enemy force leaving 103 of their dead on the position. Although wounded at the beginning of the action, and in great pain, he personally led the counterattack, exposing himself throughout to a withering hall of enemy fire and inspiring all members of the unit by his heroic example.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 95 (February 24, 1951)
Home Town: Pulaski, Kentucky
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

CHAMBERLAIN, SMITH B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Smith B. Chamberlain (0-27587), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company E, 2d Battalion, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Chamberlain distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on 3 June 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Chamberlain, a platoon leader, was ordered to make the initial crossing of a river and to lead his men in an attack on the first objective in an allied assault to capture a vital, enemy-held position. While Lieutenant Chamberlain was organizing his men for the crossing, the platoon was subjected to heavy enemy fire. Ordering his men to take cover, Lieutenant Chamberlain waded the river to check it for depth and swiftness and then swam back and re-crossed with a rope to be used as a guide line. While the platoon was moving across the river, one of the men lost his footing and the swift current carried him downstream toward the swirling rapids. Lieutenant Chamberlain rescued this man and three others in similar mishaps and sustained rib injuries when he was hurled against rocks and boulders in the water. Once the men had crossed the river, Lieutenant Chamberlain reorganized them and, after a valiant three-hour struggle, succeeded in securing the first objective. When the platoon was relieved, Lieutenant Chamberlain went to the battalion aid station for treatment of his side injury and grenade wounds which he suffered during the fighting. Upon return, he found that a bridge which had been constructed across the river had been knocked out by an enemy counter-attack and the Allied elements had withdrawn to the-opposite bank. Again swimming the river, though suffering from a possible rib fracture and subjected to heavy machine-gun fire, Lieutenant Chamberlain repeatedly tried to establish a guide line, but heavy rains had swollen the river until it was impossible to successfully navigate it with the rope. Refusing to be stopped, Lieutenant Chamberlain made continuous trips back and forth with an inflated air mattress carrying wounded men and equipment and rescuing men who had become marooned on the rocks when they attempted to swim. The following morning, Lieutenant Chamberlain was successful in establishing a guide line across the river. He then organized a thirty-man patrol and led them in the recovery of the ground lost the previous day.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 684 (July 23, 1953)
Home Town: New York

CHAMBERS, LORAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Loran E. Chambers (0-2212061), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company C, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Chambers distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Pallin, Korea, on 8 February 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Chambers received orders to counterattack and recapture Hill 296. Undercover of darkness, he alerted his platoon and advanced to the base of the hill and then launched an attack on the enemy positions. Meeting a murderous hail of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, the attack stalled and the platoon was pinned down. He ordered his platoon to fall back while he furnished covering fire. Realizing that artillery support would be needed against the numerically superior enemy force, he directed his platoon to fall back while he remained in position to furnish covering fire. Although wounded while covering the withdrawal of his platoon, he remained in the area, heedless of enemy fire, searching for wounded and missing men. After regrouping his platoon and directing an artillery barrage on the objective, he led his men in a successful assault on the hill, routing the enemy and securing the objective. Not until he was finally ordered did he reluctantly leave his platoon and return to the medical aid station for treatment of his wounds.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 284 (May 7, 1951)
Home Town: Brown, Illinois

CHAMPENY, ARTHUR S.
(Third Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to Arthur S. Champeny (0-8264), Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Colonel Champeny distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, on 5 September 1950. Colonel Champeny came under direct attack by a numerically superior enemy force which had broken through the Regimental Sector. Confusion developed throughout the area and in the burning village where the Regimental Command Post was located. Small enemy groups had infiltrated the village. Colonel Champeny calmly directed and supervised the withdrawal of his depleted Regiment and the Regimental Command Post. When the new Regimental Command Post had been established, Colonel Champeny returned to reorganize battered elements of the Regiment. He came under fire and was wounded twice. Although severely wounded, he gave instructions for organizing the new defensive positions and transmitted the plans to Division Headquarters. His military poise and battle courage inspired the regiment to withstand the assault.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 127 (October 20, 1950)
Born: at Briggs, Wisconsin
Home Town: Suffolk, Massachusetts
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWI), Distinguished Service Cross w/2d OLC (WWII)

*CHANEY, DONALD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald L. Chaney (RA16323879), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Private Chaney distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Shindo, Korea, on 9 August 1950. While participating in an attack, Private Chaney's platoon was given the difficult mission of wresting and securing triangulation hill from the enemy who had deeply entrenched positions on its summit. As the platoon attacked up the forward slopes of the hill, it was pinned down by intense automatic weapons and small-arms fire. Private Chaney voluntarily and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, stood erect and firing his automatic rifle from the hip charged up the hill. In this action he killed five of the enemy before he was wounded in the right shoulder by a burst of enemy machine-gun fire. Disregarding orders from his superior to go to the rear for medical treatment, and despite excruciating pain in his right shoulder, Private Chaney changed position with his automatic rifle, shifting it to his left side and continued forward. By his act of aggressiveness and courage he single-handedly wiped out two machine-gun emplacements and inflicted heavy casualties upon the enemy, thereby enabling the platoon to secure the hill.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 39 (January 23, 1951)
Home Town: Cass, Michigan

CHECK, GILBERT J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Gilbert J. Check, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Check distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Chindong-ni, Korea, on 2 August 1950. On that date, the 27th Infantry Regiment was ordered to attack in the vicinity of Chindong-ni and Colonel Check organized a task force with the 1st Battalion as the nucleus. Throughout the day he remained at the head of his unit, constantly exposing himself to heavy enemy fire, as he led his force in an advance of twenty-two miles into enemy held territory. He consistently outmaneuvered the enemy, overran strong points and smashed roadblocks. When he was ordered to return for the purpose of consolidating the regiment's position, he supervised the loading and evacuation of the wounded and returned in an orderly manner. The exemplary leadership of Lieutenant Colonel Check so inspired his unit that they disrupted enemy communications, destroyed road blocks and inflicted many casualties
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 68 (September 15, 1950)

CHILES, JOHN H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John H. Chiles, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Chiles distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Chaun-ni, Korea, during the period 17 through 25 May 1951. During this period Colonel Chiles' unit was holding the right flank of the Eighth Army, under constant attack by an enemy force estimated to be 30,000 in strength. Throughout the action Colonel Chiles moved from one unit to another with complete disregard for his personal safety, directing the defensive actions along the line and exhorting his men to hold. When extremely heavy enemy artillery and mortar barrages made friendly positions untenable, he personally selected new positions and led the withdrawals. His calm, fearless conduct while under heavy enemy fire was an invaluable source of inspiration to all members of his command, and his personal leadership at critical points was a major factor in the successful defense of the area.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 514 (July 5, 1951)

*CLAGG, VAN EDWARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Van Edward Clagg (RA35448007), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Clagg distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Majon-ni, Korea, on 21 November 1950. On that date, Sergeant Clagg was serving as wire chief of a motorized patrol which had been given the mission of establishing contact with the enemy. While traveling through a narrow mountainous pass, the patrol was ambushed at 1500 hours by an estimated five hundred fanatical, hostile soldiers and came under intense automatic and small-arms fire. Ordering his men to take cover, and heedless of the enemy's concerted effort to neutralize his position, Sergeant Clagg fearlessly manned a machine-gun on his vehicle and delivered deadly, accurate fire into the on-rushing enemy. In the ensuing action, he received severe facial wounds but steadfastly continued to sweep the charging foe with withering fire until he fell mortally wounded. Sergeant Clagg's valorous act enabled other members of his unit to reach available cover and establish an effective defense. His superb personal bravery, sustained courage, and willing self-sacrifice saved the lives many of his comrades.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 109 (May 3, 1951)
Home Town: Gallia, Ohio

CLARK, HAROLD T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold T. Clark, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving while serving with the United States Military Advisory Group, Korea, deployed as Advisor to 16th Republic of Korea Regiment. Second Lieutenant Clark distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Yongchon, Korea, on 5 and 6 September 1950. At 0330 hours on 5 September 1950, an enemy attack spearheaded by tanks penetrated the defense line of the 16th Republic of Korea Regiment, forcing them to withdraw. Lieutenant Clark organized the engineers into a holding force to cover the withdrawal of friendly troops and repeatedly exposed himself to automatic-weapons and small-arms fire in coordinating the fire and movement of the holding force. At 0900 hours the regiment was again attacked by a numerically superior enemy force and became disorganized. At this point, he manned a vehicular mounted .50 caliber machine-gun, ordered the driver to proceed down the road toward the enemy, and personally launched a one- man counterattack. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lieutenant Clark moved forward under heavy mortar, automatic, and small-arms fire and engaged the enemy with withering counter-fire. Inspired by his intrepid actions, the Korean officers and men quickly rallied and joined him the counterattack, driving forward 6,000 yards and inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy. At 1000 hours on 6 September 1950, an American convoy passing through enemy infested territory was stopped by heavy anti- tank, mortar, machine-gun, and rifle fire. The firing attracted the attention of Lieutenant Clark, who fearlessly proceeded into the area under heavy enemy fire to assist the convoy. He directed the men to cover, organized them, and then directed counter-fire on the enemy positions. He repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire while directing this defensive action, and aggressively engaged the enemy until assistance arrived and the enemy was dispersed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 75 (February 15, 1951)

CLARK, HARRY A., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harry A. Clark, Jr. (0-33937), Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Clark distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Um-Dong, Korea, on 17 March 1953. On that date, Colonel Clark was on a position that was subjected to an intense attack by approximately two enemy companies, which succeeded in overrunning the friendly position and were threatening the security of the entire regimental sector. Upon receiving word of the acute situation, Colonel Clark moved immediately to the scene of the battle. Organizing a counterattacking force, he led the men toward the position through a devastating barrage of enemy artillery and mortar fire. When he reached the crest of the hill, Colonel Clark was wounded by fragments from an enemy grenade. Refusing medical aid, he immediately set up a perimeter of defense and began directing the evacuation of men who had been wounded in the initial advance. After he was certain that all of the seriously wounded men had been evacuated from the area, Colonel Clark regrouped his men and, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, led the small force in a direct attack upon the overwhelming enemy forces, engaging them in bitter hand-to-hand combat. Though he was wounded a second time in this phase of the action, he steadfastly refused evacuation and continued to direct the men in repelling the enemy and mopping up small pockets of resistance. Hastily placing the men in an effective perimeter defense, Colonel Clark moved among the men shouting words of encouragement and checking their fields of fire in preparation for the expected enemy counter- attack. While he was moving toward the command post, he was wounded for the third time in the legs, making it impossible for him to move. Though he was completely exhausted and suffering from shock, he continued to direct the men by use of runners until he was carried to a bunker and later evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 505 (May 23, 1953)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

CLARK, WILLIAM D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William D. Clark (0-27448), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Captain Clark distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Republic of Korea on in the vicinity of Mungdungni, Korea, on 7 October 1951. On that date, a friendly infantry company was engaged in an attack against a numerically superior hostile force occupying heavily fortified hill positions. As the friendly troops neared their objective, they were subjected to a mortar and artillery barrage, couple with a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from the enemy positions. With the company commander and all company officers wounded by the intense hostile fire, the friendly troops, most of whom were inexperienced and under fire for the first time, became disorganized. Realizing that the confusion of men might result in their annihilation and that, without an organized effort, the attack was lost, Major Clark immediately rushed forward through the heavy enemy fire and assumed command of the faltering friendly troops. Through his self-confident manner and personal example of fearlessness, he rallied the men and led them forward in a renewed assault. Although he was painfully wounded by the fire pouring down from the hostile emplacements, Major Clark refused to be evacuated. Directing the friendly troops, he continually urged them onward with words of encouragement. His great tactical skill and complete disregard for his personal safety so inspired the friendly troops that they swept forward and routed the hostile force from the hill with heavy casualties. The extraordinary heroism and completely selfless devotion to duty displayed by Major Clark throughout this action reflect the greatest credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 70 (February 5, 1952)
Home Town: Elizabeth City, Virginia

*CLAWSON, PAUL EUGENE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Paul Eugene Clawson (0-1334968), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company F, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Clawson distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Seoul, Korea, on 21 May 1951. On that date, Company F was given the mission of attacking and securing Hill 329, held by a well-entrenched and determined enemy force. As the assaulting elements fought their way up the slope, handicapped by the slippery footing caused by an earlier rain, they suddenly came under a heavy volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire that effectively pinned them down. Realizing that the present position was untenable, Lieutenant Clawson immediately moved to the head of his unit and rallied his men. Leading them in a massed assault against the final objective, he personally killed three enemy soldiers that had been holding up their advance. As the attack continued, Lieutenant Clawson observed one of his men fall wounded. Unhesitatingly, he moved through the intense enemy fire and carried the injured man to safety. Returning, he picked up the wounded man's weapon and continued to lead the assault until he was shot and instantly killed by a burst of fire from an enemy machine gun. Due to Lieutenant Clawson's selfless courage and inspiring leadership, the objective was won shortly after he fell. The extraordinary heroism displayed by Lieutenant Clawson in this action reflected great credit upon himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 630 (August 11, 1951)
Home Town: Mercer, Pennsylvania

*CLEABORN, EDWARD O.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Edward O. Cleaborn (RA14325051), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private Cleaborn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kuri, Korea, on 15 August 1950. On this date, Private Cleaborn's organization attacked a ridge on which the enemy was occupying well-prepared positions with excellent observation and fields of fire. In addition, some infiltration and flanking action by enemy troops had occurred and his platoon was pinned down almost immediately by machine-gun fire from the rear. Despite the extreme hazard from heavy interlacing machine-gun fire, Private Cleaborn gained the ridge and killed the machine-gun crews to the font and other enemy troops who attempted to re-man the guns. Disregarding burns on his hands from continuous firing when his platoon commenced a withdrawal, Private Cleaborn remained on the ridge to cover their withdrawal and permit the evacuation of the wounded. He continued firing from this position, thus denying the enemy access to adjacent high ground and was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 169 (November 13, 1950)
Home Town: Shelby, Tennessee

CLEMONS, JOSEPH GORDON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Gordon Clemons, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company K, 3d Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Clemons distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 28 October 1952. On that date, Lieutenant Clemons, a platoon leader, led the attack platoon in a counterattack on a vital position which had been overrun earlier that night by the enemy. As the platoon neared the first enemy bunker, Lieutenant Clemons silenced its occupants with accurate and deadly fire and then led the men up the trenches, neutralizing each bunker they encountered. Upon nearing the crest of the objective, the group encountered heavy fire and was forced to withdraw. Discovering that their ammunition was almost exhausted, Lieutenant Clemons divided the remaining supply between the men and then led a volunteer group back into the trenches in a fierce charge, only to be repulsed by the enemy. Displaying superior leadership and aggressiveness, he reorganized the men and urged them into another assault. Constantly exposing himself to hostiles fire, he shouted words of encouragement and engaged the enemy in hand-to-hand combat, fighting viciously until the numerical superiority of the foe again forced the platoon to withdraw. Lieutenant Clemons superior devotion to duty in leading his men time and again into hand-to-hand combat in the face of overwhelming odds was an inspiration to all those with whom he served.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 616 (June 30, 1953)

*CLINCH, WILLARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Willard L. Clinch (RA12284679), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Clinch distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pabalmak, Korea, on 12 February 1951. On that date, Company C was engaged in an assault against a well-fortified and camouflaged enemy force holding positions on Hill 350. As Corporal Clinch led his squad forward, the men were suddenly subjected to intense and accurate fire from hidden enemy snipers. As the men began to falter, he moved out toward the objective, shouting words of encouragement to his squad and urging them to follow. Inspired by his courage, the men renewed their assault and had moved to within thirty yards of the crest of the hill when they were met by a devastating volume of small-arms and automatic-weapons fire from the hostile emplacements. This forced them to seek cover. With the enemy hurling grenades down the hill, the positions soon became untenable and Corporal Clinch, realizing that his men faced annihilation, unhesitatingly charged forward across the fire-swept terrain. Upon reaching a point ten yards form the enemy defense, he knelt and threw grenades until he had succeeded in neutralizing the enemy resistance at that point. Then, while urging his men forward in the assault, he was hit and mortally wounded by sniper fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 716 (September 22, 1951)
Home Town: Madison, New York

*CLINE, JAMES E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to James E. Cline (RA15011181), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Sergeant Cline distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sojon- ni, Korea, on 6 February 1951. On that date, Company I launched an attack against an estimated enemy battalion in an effort to regain positions previously lost to the numerically superior enemy force. Sergeant Cline, a squad leader in the company, deployed his 57-mm. recoilless rifle squad in a position form which effective flanking fire could be placed on the enemy to cover the advance of the company. Locating an enemy machine-gun that was firing directly at his squad, he succeeded in knocking the weapon out of action and killing the crew. A second machine-gun opened fire on his squad and Sergeant Cline, shifting his fire to meet the new threat, silenced the gun and wounded the crew members. The deadly effectiveness of Sergeant Cline's fire drew the attention of the enemy to his position, thereby enabling the friendly troops to advance. When all 57-mm. ammunition was expended, he seized his automatic carbine and, despite the intense enemy fire, continued placing a steady stream of fire on the hostile positions until he was killed by a burst of enemy fire. As a result of his aggressive actions the company was able to seize and secure the objective, killing an estimated 400 enemy troops.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 462 (June 26, 1951)
Home Town: Jefferson, Ohio

CLINE, JAMES V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James V. Cline (RA13365172), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a machine-gunner with an Infantry Company of the 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division. Private First Class Cline distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Karhyon-ni, Korea, on 15 June 1952. Late on the night of 15 June 1952, the company in which Private Cline served was occupying defensive positions on an important hill when it was exposed to an intense mortar and artillery bombardment followed by a hostile attack. As the foe began to advance toward the friendly positions, an enemy artillery round landed near Private Cline's machine-gun emplacement, burying the gun crew and overturning their weapon. Quickly digging himself free, Private Cline hurriedly righted his gun, cleaned the dirt from it, and began firing at the advancing enemy, finally throwing back their assault. Although other enemy elements had penetrated the friendly perimeter to his right, he remained at his post and, when a machine-gun supported the second wave of attackers, he skillfully destroyed the weapon and single-handedly turned back the hostile advance. Another wave of the foe moved forward supported by a pack howitzer. This weapon was fired only once before Private Cline found the range and killed its entire crew. By this time the hostile infantrymen had advanced to within grenade range of his position, and one of the exploding enemy grenades seriously wounded Private Cline. Despite the fact that both of his legs were riddled with shrapnel and his right arm was all but useless, he swung his gun around and fired continuously into the advancing waves, successfully hurling them back. His ammunition supply finally exhausted, Private Cline, using a pistol and grenades, assisted in routing the foe who had penetrated the defense perimeter. In this action another hostile grenade wounded him in the face, forcing him to submit to medical treatment. During the extended fanatical assault, Private Cline personally accounted for more than one hundred of the enemy casualties.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 716 (November 21, 1952)
Home Town: Washington, Pennsylvania

*CODY, GEORGE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George R. Cody (0-59948), Captain (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the Heavy Mortar Company, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Captain Cody distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir in North Korea, on 1 December 1950. Captain Cody's company was in support of the 3d Battalion, which was attempting to break out of an encirclement north of Hagaru-ri. After the wounded had been placed on vehicles for evacuation, the battalion proceeded about two miles when it was halted at approximately 1500 hours by murderous fire from a roadblock and well-entrenched positions on both flanks. In the ensuing encounter, the enemy inflicted many casualties causing disorder among the troops. Realizing that drastic action was required to save the column, Captain Cody rallied approximately twenty soldiers and, disregarding heavy enemy fire, led them in a fearless sweep up a rugged snow- covered hill and routed the enemy from their emplacements. Reaching the top of the hill, he continued to lead the attack against the retreating foe, and, while directing the action he was mortally wounded. Captain Cody's valorous act diverted hostile fire from the column and afforded the battalion time to reorganize and destroy the roadblock.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 153 (June 14, 1951)
Home Town: Tuscaloosa, Alabama

COLE, ROBERT E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert E. Cole (0-6284787), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company M, 3d Battalion, 29th Regimental Combat Team, 24th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Cole distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Sinsan- ni, Korea, on 2 September 1950. On this date, a section of Sergeant Cole's platoon was supporting Company L, 29th Infantry Regiment, in an attack on well-fortified enemy positions. When the advance faltered due to an enemy counterattack, Sergeant Cole made his way through intense enemy small-arms, mortar and automatic-weapons fire to reorganize the dispersed elements of his section. As the intensity of the attack increased, he crawled to the one remaining machine gun, removed the dead gunner and began pouring a deadly hail of fire into the ranks of the attacking enemy. Although twice wounded by enemy grenade fragments, Sergeant Cole refused to be evacuated and continued to deliver effective fire upon the enemy. When his ammunition was exhausted he withdrew, dragging his machine-gun with him. While organizing the few remaining elements of his section in preparation for a counterattack, he was ordered to the aid station for medical treatment. When the high ground was subsequently retaken, eighteen enemy dead were counted in the vicinity of where Sergeant Cole's machine-gun was mounted.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 212 (April 17, 1951)
Home Town: Prince Georges, Maryland

*COLLINS, CLARENCE H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Clarence H. Collins (RA39420849), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Collins distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Sajidong, Korea, on 2 September 1950. When his squad leader fell mortally wounded during a company assault on a bitterly defended enemy position, Corporal Collins promptly assumed command of the squad. Courageously leading his men in the advance, he continued the assault, directing a devastating marching fire upon the enemy. While rushing directly onto the hostile position and sweeping the enemy with fire from his weapon, corporal Collins received a severe shoulder wound that left his right arm useless. After having his wound bandaged by his platoon leader, he refused to be evacuated. Instead, seizing a pistol in his left hand, and with complete disregard for his recent wound, and exposed to direct enemy grenade and rifle fire, he again rushed forward to lead his squad. During the ensuing action his automatic rifleman fell wounded, whereupon Corporal Collins rushed to the side of his fallen comrade and, while administering aid, received mortal wounds. Inspired by the heroic leadership and self-sacrifice of Corporal Collins, his unit succeeded in completely annihilating the entrenched enemy, killing forty-nine while suffering the loss of only three.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 41 (March 6, 1951)
Home Town: Butte, California

COLVIN, DEWITT T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to DeWitt T. Colvin (RA14293669), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Corporal Colvin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pyoru, Korea, on 14 October 1951. When the advance of his unit was stopped before a strong enemy position and his platoon leader became a casualty, he assumed command of the platoon, reorganized it, and led it in a renewed assault, effectively employing his own automatic rifle to destroy a number of the enemy. Observing that fire from an enemy bunker was again delaying the platoon's advance, he crawled toward the position and silenced it with grenades, killing the six occupants. Continuing the advance with his platoon, although now severely wounded, he repeatedly urged his men forward, employing grenade and automatic-rifle fire to inflict more casualties upon the opposing force until he collapsed form his wounds. Observers estimated that by effective employment of his weapons he alone accounted for more than thirty enemy casualties.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 75 (August 6, 1952)
Home Town: Washington, Mississippi

*CONDON, STEPHEN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stephen A. Condon (RA37518416), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Squad Leader in a platoon of Company F, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Sergeant Condon distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Pyongyang, Korea, on 19 October 1950. On that date, Company F had the mission of enveloping and destroying hostile positions in the city of Pyongyang. As the lead squad, of which Sergeant Condon was leader, moved a short distance into the city, it encountered withering short-range fire from an enemy machine gun. Realizing that his squad was in imminent danger of annihilation unless the weapon was silenced, Sergeant Condon single-handedly charged the hostile emplacement and succeeded in destroying the machine-gun. While attempting to return to his squad, he was killed by a burst of small-arms fire.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 553 (July 17, 1951)
Home Town: San Bernardino, California

CONDOR, HERBERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Herbert W. Condor (0-58345), Second Lieutenant (Field Artillery), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company C, 58th Armored Field Artillery Battalion, 3d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Condor distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Pareyong, Korea, on 21 and 22 May, 1951. Lieutenant Condor was attached to Company B, 12th Republic of Korea Security Battalion, as a forward observer. Company B, occupying key terrain and screening the left sector of the 3d Infantry Division, was viciously attacked by a ruthless foe. From his forward observation post, Lieutenant Condor plotted devastating artillery concentrations on the assaulting force until the enemy attack was repulsed. Later, a reinforced hostile force ruthlessly charged the northwest side of the company perimeter. Constantly vulnerable to intense small-arms and mortar fire, he gallantly directed crippling artillery fire on the enemy until the position was overrun and he was captured. His resolute determination, courageous actions, and consummate devotion to duty contributed immeasurably to delaying the enemy's advance and enabled the division to accomplish its mission.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 84 (November 3, 1953)
Home Town: Adair, Kentucky

CONN, JACK L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jack L. Conn, First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Conn distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sanggamnyong, Korea, on 20 October 1952. On that night, Lieutenant Conn assumed command of a company whose commanding officer had been wounded and evacuated. Lieutenant Conn led the unit under heavy enemy fire to occupy newly-won positions which were being subjected to counter- attack. The only route to the position was along a narrow path under enemy fire. Without thought for his personal safety, Lieutenant Conn led the men toward their objective. When they became disorganized as a result of heavy concentrated fire, he moved among them, bolstering their morale and urging them forward. While doing this, Lieutenant Conn was wounded in the face, back and legs. Despite the pain from his wounds, he refused evacuation and remained with his men, receiving only such medical attention as could be rendered by the company aidman. Throughout the action, Lieutenant Conn continued to expose himself to hostile fire in order to encourage the men and coordinate their movements. Not until he was assured that the mission had been accomplished and that the position was adequately defended did he consent to be evacuated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 796 (August 29, 1953)

COOK, ARON E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Aron E. Cook (RA06289766), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Master Sergeant Cook distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Konjiam-ni, Korea, on 14 February 1951. Sergeant Cook's platoon was given the mission of securing an objective on Hill 578, which had been holding up the regiment's advance for two days. After overcoming heavy mortar, machine-gun and small-arms fire, Sergeant Cook so skillfully directed the seizure of the objective that no casualties were suffered by his platoon. While reorganizing his platoon, Sergeant Cook and the machine-gunner were wounded as the enemy launched a fierce counterattack. Disregarding his own wound, Sergeant Cook rushed forward and rolled his comrade from an exposed position to one of comparative safety and then began firing the machine-gun himself. The enemy, suffering extremely heavy losses as a result of his devastating fire, concentrated their assault against Sergeant Cook's position. When they pushed to within a few feet of his emplacement, Sergeant Cook leaped from his position and charged the enemy, throwing hand grenades. This sudden and aggressive act so demoralized the enemy that they broke and fled in confusion. Wounded a second time in this action, Sergeant Cook refused medical aid until he had assured himself that his platoon was effectively reorganized and its position consolidated.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 632 (August 11, 1951)
Home Town: Harris, Texas

*COOK, JOHN MELVIN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Melvin Cook (0-34294), Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Major Cook distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Taepyong-ni, Korea, on 16 July 1950. During an attack the enemy had penetrated the front lines and placed the battalion command post under intense small-arms fire. Major Cook organized the men at the command post and led them in a counterattack. He was instrumental in knocking out several automatic weapons by the use of grenades, he then engaged the enemy at close quarters, killing one with his pistol and bayoneting another. In this heroic action Major Cook was killed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 7 (July 23, 1950)
Home Town: Muscogee, Georgia

*COOPER, DONALD D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Donald D. Cooper (RA39292145), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private First Class Cooper distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Taeu-san, Korea, on 27 July 1951. On that date, Company B was assigned the mission of attacking and securing well-fortified hill positions from a numerically superior hostile force. As Private Cooper's squad advanced toward the objective, it was halted by a heavy volume of fire from a strong enemy position. Realizing that his comrades faced annihilation unless the enemy bunker was destroyed, Private Cooper voluntarily left his position of cover and single-handedly assaulted it. Despite the fact that the position was so heavily fortified that mortar and artillery fire had failed to neutralize it, Private Cooper moved across the fire-swept terrain armed only with his rifle and grenades and succeeded in killing the occupants of the emplacement. Private Cooper then fearlessly remained in his exposed position on the hillside and provided deadly accurate covering fire for his comrades who were attempting to consolidate their untenable positions. Inflicting numerous casualties among the enemy troops, he continued to pour a devastating volume of fire into the hostile positions until he was hit and mortally wounded by a burst, of fire from an enemy machine-gun.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 949 (November 28, 1951)
Home Town: Los Angeles, California

*COOPER, ROBERT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Cooper (RA19350356), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company L, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Corporal Cooper distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Changnyong, Korea, on 21 September 1950. Corporal Cooper's platoon was holding a position on Hill 409 when it was attacked by greatly superior numbers. He remained in position with his machine-gun for a period of four hours under constant artillery and mortar fire. Finally, despite an enemy banzai charge up the hill, he left the comparative safety of his foxhole an moved his weapon over an open route to an exposed position far down the hill in order to occupy a more favorable firing position. When his machine-gun was destroyed and he was wounded by enemy grenades, he continued to fight off the enemy with his pistol until his ammunition was exhausted. He then took his assistant's rifle and, ordering his helpers to the rear, held off his foes with rifle fire until he was killed by the enemy.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 50 (July 16, 1951)
Home Town: Powell, Montana

*COPE, RICHARD ALAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Alan Cope (0-60990), First Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Leader with Company K, 3d Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. First Lieutenant Cope distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kung-dong, Korea, on 6 October 1951. On that date, Lieutenant Cope's company was engaged in an assault against a numerically superior hostile force that was fanatically defending a series of strategic hill positions. As two of the friendly platoons moved forward up the precipitous slope, they were subjected to a devastating volume of small-arms and automatic weapons fire from the well-fortified enemy positions. Many of the friendly troops fell from the heavy fire, and those who were not wounded moved about their precarious positions seeking what cover they could on the bare hillside. Lieutenant Cope, who had been holding his platoon in reserve, immediately led his men forward in order to save the friendly force from annihilation. Although the only route of approach open to him led directly into the enemy fire, Lieutenant Cope steadfastly advanced, shouting words of encouragement to his men and urging them onward. Charging up the hill in a frontal assault against the enemy emplacements, he was mortally wounded and with his last remaining strength directed his men in the attack until he succumbed. Inspired by his fearlessness, the friendly troops swept forward and overran the hostile positions. Through his courage and unshakable determination, Lieutenant Cope saved the friendly force from almost certain destruction and enabled them to seize their objective at great cost to the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 47 (January 24, 1952)
Home Town: Cuyahoga, Ohio

COPELAND, LEE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lee E. Copeland (RA15203196), Corporal, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Platoon Gunner with the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Corporal Copeland distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Yong-dong, Korea, on 22 July 1950. When an enemy force of great strength launched a fanatical banzai attack against the 1st Battalion, Sergeant Copeland displayed great initiative and unfaltering fortitude. While his platoon withdrew to better ground, he held his position and started firing his machine-gun into enemy forces. As the enemy turned artillery and mortar fire upon him, he dashed from spot to spot carrying his machine-gun, stopping in each new position to fire his carbine and toss grenades while waiting for the machine-gun barrel to cool sufficiently to resume firing. Sergeant Copeland's effectiveness and heroic action enabled the platoon time to withdraw and set up a new defense. He then fought his way back into the Company perimeter where he continued to lend supporting fire and helped to organize the defense during the five-hour grueling attack. His leadership, courage, and exemplary conduct were an inspiration to the members of the Company and spurred them to victory despite the overwhelming disadvantages. Sergeant Copeland's outstanding performance and heroic action reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 2 (January 14, 1963)

*COPPLE, EARL L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Earl L. Copple (RA46024756), Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 3d Reconnaissance Company, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant First Class Copple distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Kumyangjang-ni, Korea, 18 January 1951. Sergeant Copple's reconnaissance patrol was ambushed and threatened with imminent annihilation. Immediately, with the first volley of merciless fire, he realized that the patrol had been cut off and surrounded. With complete disregard for his own safety, he dismounted from his vehicle, grasped several grenades, and charged an enemy machine-gun emplacement, throwing the grenades as he neared the position. Upon reaching the position, he threw back part of the cover, found one occupant still alive, and killed him with his rifle. The courageous act opened a route of escape for the beleaguered patrol and prevented it from suffering many more casualties. Finding the enemy machine-gun in the position he had destroyed still operative, he turned it on the enemy to cover the withdrawal of his comrades and continued firing until he was mortally wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 113 (March 4, 1951)
Home Town: Marion, Illinois

*COPPLE, ROBERT T. (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert T. Copple (ER15230476), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company K, 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Private First Class Copple distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chi'o-ri, Korea, on 22 and 23 April 1951. At approximately 2300 hours on 22 April 1951, Company K's defenses were attacked by a fanatically determined and numerically superior enemy force. Under heavy enemy pressure, the company was compelled to relinquish their positions three consecutive times, and finally to withdraw completely to prevent their annihilation by the encircling enemy force. Throughout this four-hour action, Private Copple assumed the difficult task of substituting for an artillery forward observation team. Despite the frequent movements of company K, Private Copple steadfastly remained in an exposed forward position, directing and adjusting artillery fire on the advancing enemy masses with devastating effect. Finally, when the company was ordered to withdraw completely from their positions, Private Copple voluntarily remained in his forward position, directing artillery fire on the enemy to cover his comrades as they fell back to more tenable positions. When last seen at about 0300 hours on 23 April 1951, he was still at his post with the hostile forces closing in from all directions. His courageous actions undoubted saved the lives of many of his comrades by holding back the enemy advance until the withdrawal of the friendly forces was completed.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 716 (September 22, 1951)
Home Town: Hamilton, Indiana

CORCORAN, LAURENCE M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Laurence M. Corcoran, Major (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as the Commanding Officer of an Infantry Regiment of the 1st Cavalry Division. Major Corcoran distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Haman, Korea, on 25 August 1950. Major Corcoran's company was attacked and overrun by enemy forces of superior numbers. Although wounded, Major Corcoran successfully reorganized the unit, personally led a counter-attack, and restored the position. Continually disregarding his personal safety, Major Corcoran effectively performed his mission for the next two days, directing his men in repulsing two additional attacks and efficiently reforming an attached Republic of Korea Army company that began to withdraw. When the enemy again assaulted the position on 28 August 1950, Major Corcoran courageously ignored a second wound, moved about the fire-swept area, and encouraged and inspired his men in continuing their defense. The following day, when the enemy once again attacked under a heavy barrage and succeeded in overrunning the sector, Major Corcoran directed the evacuation of the small group of men remaining and assisted the injured in successfully withdrawing to the rear.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 1098 (December 26, 1953)

CORDOVA, LAWRENCE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lawrence Cordova, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Infantry Company of the 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Cordova distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Tang-Wan-Ni, Korea, on 16 June 1952. On that date, Sergeant Cordova, while leading an automatic rifle team in a raid on a strategic hill, consistently exposed himself to an intense barrage of hostile fire to direct accurate and deadly fire into the enemy ranks. In his attempt to pin down the hostile troops so that the assault forces could move in, Sergeant Cordova unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own safety, rose from his covered position and charged the strongly fortified enemy emplacements, using hand grenades and carbine fire. When he had exhausted his supply of ammunition, Sergeant Cordova took an automatic rifle from one of his comrades and moved directly into the enemy positions. Sergeant Cordova refused to be stopped by the overwhelming numerical superiority of the enemy forces until his platoon leader gave him a direct order to withdraw. He then continued to expose himself to hostile fire while directing the other members of the platoon in providing covering-fire for the evacuation of the dead and wounded.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 511 (May 26, 1953)

CORLEY, JOHN T.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to John T. Corley, Lieutenant Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 3d Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Lieutenant Colonel Corley distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Haman, Korea, during the period 21 through 23 August 1950. Two of Colonel Corley's companies had as their objective the key hill to the regimental sector, Battle Mountain. Company L led off the attack, gained the objective and while attempting to secure the position was driven back by a counterattack. Quickly estimating the situation, Colonel Corley moved from his forward command post under small-arms, machine-gun and mortar fire to a position about two hundred yards from the summit of Battle Mountain to reorganize Company L. He stopped the retreat and reorganized the position. The counterattack was checked, Colonel Corley stayed on this position until the enemy attack had been repelled. He called for artillery fire, but the liaison officer was unable to communicate with his guns. Colonel Corley returned to his command post and obtained communications through Regiment to the guns. He then directed fire on the right flank of Battle Mountain where the enemy was in the process of regrouping. This fire was effective. He then ordered Company L to retake Battle Mountain. Colonel Corley moved from his command post to Company L, where he coordinated small-arms, mortar, and artillery fire. When the attack of Company L was stopped, he directed Company I to move through Company L. Company I gained the approach ridge but later was forced to withdraw. Again Colonel Corley reorganized the men and placed Company I in reserve behind Company L. On 23 August 1950, the companies completed the mission of capturing Battle Mountain.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 141 (October 27, 1950)
Born: August 4, 1914 at Brooklyn, New York
Home Town: Brooklyn, New York
Other Award: Distinguished Service Cross (WWII)

*CORNER, STANFORD OSCAR (MIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Stanford Oscar Corner (RA37145071), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Medical Aidman with Battery A, 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division. Sergeant Corner distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir, North Korea, during the period 26 through 30 November 1950. On the morning of 28 November 1950, the enemy attacked in great strength and, after isolating Battery A from the battalion, inflicted heavy casualties. Unmindful of his safety, Sergeant Corners constantly moved about ministering to the wounded under intense mortar and small arms fire. Establishing an aid station and collecting point in a native house, he evacuated casualties form the base of the surrounding mountains, frequently carrying them on his back or on crude improvised litters. Reaching the shelter, he further treated and prepared the patients for removal to the battalion aid station. When the battery was ordered to withdraw for consolidation with the battalion, he placed the wounded on a truck, covered them with blankets and sleeping bags for protection against the bitter cold and, under enemy fire, accompanied the vehicle to a friendly position where, under direction of the medical noncommissioned officer, he continued his heroic efforts until he was seriously wounded. Sergeant Corner's valorous conduct, intrepid actions and selfless devotion to duty saved many lives, restored a large number of troops to combat effectiveness and reflect the utmost credit on himself and the honored traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 172 (July 2, 1951)
Home Town: Cherokee, Kansas

COUGHLIN, JOHN G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John G. Coughlin, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Colonel Coughlin distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces near Kusongpo-ri and Pungam-ni, Korea, during the period from 16 through 25 May 1951. On the night of 16 May 1951, when his regiment was holding an area of the Second Division line, the full force of a major enemy offensive was directed against its position. Colonel Coughlin personally and with outstanding bravery, directed his gallant forces in their stand against overwhelming odds. Displaying fearless leadership, Colonel Coughlin remained with his front line elements constantly for four consecutive days, continually exposing himself to intense hostile mortar, grenade and small-arms fire in order to maintain a completely accurate picture of the situation during this critical period. Under his superb guidance, each wave of the hostile assault was repulsed. When both the commander and the executive officer of his 2d Battalion were wounded and the battalion was giving way under repeated enemy mass attacks, Colonel Coughlin personally rushed to the threatened unit, forcefully eliminated impending confusion, and restored it to an effective defensive force. The 38th Infantry Regiment, under the gallant leadership of Colonel Coughlin, inflicted thousands of casualties upon the enemy and disrupted the offensive which the opposition had launched with the intention of annihilating the Second Division. On 22 May, the regiment, under Colonel Coughlin's skillful direction, counterattacked the enemy forces, surprising them and forcing them to withdraw after suffering heavy losses. As a result of this successful counterattack, the initiative was fully restored to our forces.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 516 (July 5, 1951)

*COUNCIL, DARREL D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Darrel D. Council (RA18320708), Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Regimental Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. Private First Class Council distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces at Panghwa-Gol, Korea, on 22 and 23 April 1951. When his unit was forced to fall back under an overwhelming enemy assault, this heroic soldier remained at his machine gun to cover the withdrawal. True to the highest traditions of the military service, Private First Class Council steadfastly manned his weapon alone, delivering a deadly fire into the oncoming enemy masses until his position was overrun.
Department of the Army: General Orders No. 64 (June 30, 1952)
Home Town: Delta, Texas

*COX, LARRY T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Larry T. Cox (RA38525933), Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company B, 11th Engineer Combat Battalion, 3d Infantry Division. Sergeant Cox distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Changwon, Korea, on 3 September 1950. While engaged in combat with the enemy, Sergeant Cox, without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, volunteered to evacuate a member of his platoon who had been wounded. In order to do so he came under heavy enemy fire from mortars and automatic-weapons. After effecting the evacuation of the wounded member of his platoon, Sergeant Cox returned to his platoon to further engage the enemy. Again on his own initiative and with complete disregard for his own personal safety while under heavy enemy fire, he attempted to outflank the enemy in order to secure a more advantageous position for his platoon's heavy weapons and while so doing was mortally wounded by the enemy.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 136 (October 26, 1950)
Home Town: Sabine, Louisiana

CRAIG, THOMAS K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Thomas K. Craig, Second Lieutenant (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company I, 3d Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Second Lieutenant Craig distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Chipyong-ni, Korea, on 1 February 1951. On that date, at approximately 0445 hours, a strong enemy force attacked friendly positions on Hill 335. Lieutenant Craig, with two squads of reinforcements, arrived as the enemy were driving a platoon back from the hill. Realizing that Hill 333 was the only natural defense line in the area, Lieutenant Craig reorganized the platoon and led them in a counterattack. Using bayonets, small-arms and grenades, they forced the enemy to retreat, then reestablished defensive positions. During the ten-hour battle that ensued, Lieutenant Craig continually demonstrated inspiring leadership and dauntless courage as he directed offensive and defensive actions against the numerically superior enemy. His gallant and persistent efforts were directly responsible for the enemy being driven from the hill, leaving an estimated 150 dead.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 366 (May 28, 1951)

CREGER, CHARLES L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Charles L. Creger (RA18286658), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Platoon Sergeant in an Infantry Company of the 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Creger distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Ukkonggi, Korea, on the morning of 29 September 1951. On that morning the company of which Sergeant Creger was a member was engaged in an assault against a heavily fortified, enemy-held hill. A sizeable hostile force was occupying a large bunker and intricate trench system directly in the path of the attack from which a heavy volume of fire poured forth, halting the assaulting friendly troops. Without hesitation, Sergeant Creger selected a squad of men and led them in a spirited attack. Charging up the slope through the concentrated fire of the enemy, Sergeant Creger maneuvered his men with such skill that the hostile troops were routed from their positions with heavy casualties. As he began to reorganize his men, Sergeant Creger observed that automatic weapons fire from adjacent hostile positions had wounded two of the friendly machine-gunners. Realizing that without covering fire the enemy automatic weapons posed a serious threat to his men as they attempted to consolidate the newly won position, Sergeant Creger dashed across the fire-swept terrain to one of the friendly machine-guns and poured a devastating volume of fire into the nearby enemy positions. His deadly accurate fire neutralized the hostile guns long enough for his men to reorganize and evacuate their casualties. After returning to the captured emplacement, Sergeant Creger led the friendly troops in a continuation of their assault. As the men advanced, they were subjected to the entire firepower of the hostile force. Without regard for his personal safety, Sergeant Creger singled out the key hostile emplacement and raced forward in a single-handed attack. Upon reaching a spot within a few yards of the enemy stronghold, he threw several grenades. The hostile troops immediately retaliated with a shower of their own grenades. Despite the explosions all about him, Sergeant Creger remained in his position and methodically lobbed grenades into the enemy emplacement until it was sufficiently neutralized for his men to resume their advance. Inspired by his personal example of fearlessness, the friendly troops swept forward and secured their objective.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 265 (May 24, 1952)
Home Town: Caddo, Louisiana

CRISPINO, FRED
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Fred Crispino (RA11148238), Master Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with 8th Ranger Battalion (the Wolfhound Raiders), 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Master Sergeant Crispino distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Kumhwa, Korea, on 28 September 1951. Early on the morning of 28 September 1951, Sergeant Crispino was returning to United Nations lines as point man of a sixteen-man patrol. Discovering an enemy ambush approximately twenty yards to the front, Sergeant Crispino alerted his men to their danger. Before the patrol was able to take cover the enemy attacked them with heavy small-arms fire and hand grenades. Sergeant Crispino received two serious wounds in the initial stages of the action. Despite of pain from his wounds, he charged the enemy position, firing his submachine-gun. During his courageous assault, he was again seriously wounded by a grenade. Sergeant Crispino once again charged the hostile position, hurling grenades and firing his machine-gun. By concentrating the attention of the enemy upon himself, Sergeant Crispino enabled the remainder of the patrol to take up a position on the enemy's flank. When his comrades reached the enemy position, they found Sergeant Crispino lying where he had collapsed from loss of blood with seven enemy dead around him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 805 (August 31, 1953)
Home Town: Hartford, Connecticut

CROMBEZ, MARCEL G.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Marcel G. Crombez, Colonel (Infantry), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer of the 5th Cavalry Regiment (Infantry), 1st Cavalry Division. Colonel Crombez distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Koksu-ri and Chipyong-ni, Korea on 15 and 16 February 1951. After the 23rd Infantry Regimental Combat Team was cut off and surrounded by five enemy divisions, a task force consisting of twenty-three tanks and one infantry company was organized and committed to attempt a break-through to the beleaguered force. Realizing the desperate plight of the besieged combat team, Colonel Crombez elected to lead the task force and, proceeding toward Koksu-ri on a narrow valley road, the unit came under devastating automatic weapons, mortar, small arms, and rocket launcher fire from a well-fortified road block, halting the advance. Colonel Crombez immediately coordinated an attack on the roadblock, pointing out targets to the tank gunners and directing the infantry in dispersing fanatical bazooka teams and antitank crews. When the lead tank was disabled and the tank company commander became a casualty, Colonel Crombez gallantly moved his own tank forward to spearhead the advance and, dominating and controlling the critical situation by sheer force of his heroic example, effected the break-through to the regimental combat team, contained the assault, and reopened vital lines of communication. Colonel Crombez's valor and intrepidity inspired his officers and men to fight with great courage and skill, culminating in a toll of approximately 500 enemy dead, routing remaining hostile troops, and reflecting utmost credit on himself and the esteemed traditions of the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 27 (January 29, 1952)

*CROW, DALE DUANE
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Dale Duane Crow (RA17277738), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company G, 2d Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Crow distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces in the vicinity of Sibi-ri, Korea, on 6 September 1950. On this date, while participating in an attack against a strongly defended enemy position on Hill 285, Private Crow was seriously wounded. While his wound was being dressed by a comrade, an enemy grenade fell nearby. Without hesitation, and with no concern for his own life, Private Crow threw his body over that of his comrade, thereby receiving the full blast of the grenade, which took his life.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No. 203 (December 20, 1950)
Home Town: Perkins, South Dakota

*CRYTZER, ROBERT E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert E. Crytzer (RA13219406), Private, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2d Infantry Division. Private Crytzer distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action against enemy aggressor forces during an enemy assault at Yongsan, Korea, on 12 August 1950. On this date Private Crytzer was in a foxhole with another soldier. The enemy made two attacks and was repulsed each time. On the third assault, the enemy advanced near enough to throw a grenade into the foxhole occupied by Private Crytzer and a fellow soldier. Private Crytzer fearlessly and without hesitating, threw himself on the grenade, and the explosion mortally wounded him.
Headquarters, Eighth U.S. Army, Korea: General Orders No 93 (October 3, 1950), as amended by General Orders 169 (1950)
Home Town: Allegheny, Pennsylvania

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