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Full Text Citations For Award of

The Distinguished Service Cross
 U.S. Air Force Recipients  - Korea 

 

To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE 
DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS
to

 

BAKER, ROYAL N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Royal N. Baker, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 336th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 14 February 1953. While leading a flight of F-86 aircraft near Imsan- dong, North Korea, Colonel Baker sighted four MIG-15s launching an attack on a flight of friendly aircraft who were apparently unaware of the impending attack. Colonel Baker, with outstanding valor and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, immediately initiated a fearless, aggressive attack on the enemy aircraft. He singled out one MIG, which was making a firing pass, as the focal point of his action. Realizing that the allied pilots under attack were in grave danger, Colonel Baker commenced firing at maximum range, boring unswervingly toward the target, until solid hits were scored in the tailpipe section, causing the MIG to smoke heavily and decelerate. Colonel Baker continued his undivided vigilance of the enemy craft until it went into a spin and crashed into the ground. Although low on fuel deep in enemy territory, Colonel Baker remained in the battle area until all friendly aircraft were safe from any immediate threat. Colonel Baker's cool, assured performance under fire, his unhesitating and selfless action in deflecting the enemy and saving the life of a pilot and his singleness of purpose in exposing himself fearlessly to enemy fire in order to protect those threatened is indicative of the highest degree of courage and gallantry.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 169 (April 3, 1953)
Born: at Corsicana, Texas
Home Town: McKinney, Texas


BLESSE, FREDERICK C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Frederick C. Blesse, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 September 1952. Leading a flight of four F-86s protecting fighter-bombers from possible attack by enemy MIGs, Major Blesse positioned his flight for an attack on four sighted MIGs. Singling out one of the MIGs, Major Blesse followed it up into an overcast and broke out between layers of clouds. As the two aircraft emerged from the clouds, Major Blesse was still in position, so he closed and fired, causing the MIG to burst into flames and the pilot to eject himself. Major Blesse then sighted a lone MIG, and positioned himself for another attack. The MIG began violent, evasive maneuvers, but through superior airmanship Major Blesse scored hits, causing the MIG to snap and spin. Major Blesse followed closely until the MIG recovered. He then scored hits with another long burst which caused the pilot to eject himself. Through his courage, keen flying ability and devotion to duty, Major Blesse reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the Untied States Air Force.
Special Orders GB-064, December 3, 1998, HQ Department of the Air Force
Born: August 22, 1921 at Colon, California
Home Town: Melbourne, Florida


BRYAN, WILLIAM W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William W. Bryan, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot with the 12th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 19th Fighter Bomb Group, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea during the period 1 through 21 February 1951. Displaying superb leadership, dauntless courage, and exceptional aeronautical skill, Major Bryan led his squadron of F-51 fighter aircraft on attacks against enemy transportation facilities and materiel. With total disregard for his personal safety, and ignoring the perils of enemy antiaircraft, automatic weapons, and small-arms fire, Major Bryan repeatedly flew over hazardous mountain terrain at low speed and minimum altitude in search of camouflaged enemy vehicles and supplies. During this period, Major Bryan personally succeeded in detecting 82 vehicles which had been cleverly camouflaged by the enemy. Before destroying those targets, he led his flight in low level passes over the areas pointing out the camouflage techniques, and completely disregarded the damage frequently inflicted upon his own aircraft by enemy fire. As a direct result of this valuable instruction in camouflage detection, Major Bryan's squadron was able to locate 466 enemy vehicles of which 389 were totally destroyed and the remainder severely damaged.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 103 (May 1, 1951)
Born: at Flint, Michigan
Home Town: Flint, Michigan


*DAVIS, GEORGE ANDREW, JR. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to George Andrew Davis, Jr. (A0-13035), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commander of the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, on 27 November 1951, during an engagement with enemy aircraft near Sinanju, Korea. While leading a group formation of thirty-two F-86 aircraft on a counter air mission, Major Davis observed six MIG-15 aircraft headed southward above the group. With exemplary leadership and superior airmanship, he maneuvered his forces into position for attack. Leading with great tactical skill and courage, Major Davis closed to 800 feet on a MIG-15 over Namsi. He fired on the enemy aircraft, which immediately began burning. A few seconds later, the enemy pilot bailed out of his aircraft. Continuing the attack on the enemy forces, Major Davis fired on the wingman of the enemy flight, which resulted in numerous strikes on the wing roots and the fuselage. As Major Davis broke off his relentless attack on this MIG-l5, another MIG-15 came down on him. He immediately brought his aircraft into firing position upon the enemy and after a sustained barrage of fire, the enemy pilot bailed out. Although low on fuel, he rejoined his group and reorganized his forces to engage the approximate 80 enemy aircraft making the attack. Against overwhelming odds, Major Davis' group destroyed two other MIG-15 aircraft, probably destroyed one and damaged one other.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 92 (April 4, 1952).
Born: December 1, 1920 at Dublin, Texas
Home Town: Lubbock, Texas
Personal Awards: Medal of Honor (Korea)


DIXON, JACOB W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Jacob W. Dixon (A0-5139), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding Officer, 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, Far East Air Forces, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 23 May 1951. Fully aware of the hazards and responsibilities involved, Colonel Dixon voluntarily flew a photographic reconnaissance mission deep into enemy territory. With exceptional ability, he planned and successfully executed the mission in an area where enemy interceptor aircraft were located, although he was alone in an unarmed airplane. Colonel Dixon chose a flight plan designed primarily to attract enemy aircraft to him and to draw them from two other elements of his flight. In addition, Colonel Dixon remained over the target area thirty minutes beyond the time planned in an effort to locate a suspected target. During his flight he frequently observed enemy MIG-type aircraft. Although the mission was originally planned to afford a considerable degree of overcast protection, Colonel Dixon tenaciously continued his mission even though the overcast has dissipated. As a result of his mission, much valuable information was gained with respect to enemy air potential communications centers, and facilities. Colonel Dixon's courage, leadership and ingenuity were in keeping with the highest tradition of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air forces, and the United States Air Force.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 188 (July 19, 1951)
Home Town: Lexington, Missouri
Personal Awards: Distinguished Service Cross (Korea), Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 8@ Air Medals


FERNANDEZ, MANUEL J., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Manuel J. Fernandez, Jr., Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 21 March 1953. During a fighter swoop over North Korea, Captain Fernandez sighted a flight of thirty MIGs, and attempted to release his external fuel tanks in preparation for battle. However, one of the tanks failed to release, impairing the maneuverability of his aircraft. However, despite this handicap, he fearlessly initiated a fierce attack on the last two MIGs in the enemy formation. Closing to twelve hundred feet, he opened fire on one MIG, scoring hits on the fuselage and wing. As he was closing again, the other MIG attached him; however, by a skillfully executed maneuver, he gained tactical advantage over the attacker, and his bursts scored hits which caused the enemy pilot to eject himself from the uncontrollable aircraft. Captain Fernandez then turned again to his initial adversary and, closing dangerously to one hundred and fifty feet, fired several bursts which caused the MIG to burst into flame and go spinning to earth. Captain Fernandez's outstanding flying skill and extraordinary courage in attacking this greatly superior number of enemy aircraft despite the hindrance to maneuverability enabled him to completely destroy two enemy aircraft.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 244 (May 21, 1953)
Born: April 19, 1925 at Key West, Florida
Home Town: Miami, Florida


FISCHER, HAROLD E. (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Harold E. Fischer, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft, 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 16 February 1953. On that date, while leading a flight of two F-86 Sabre Jets on an air superiority mission over North Korea, Captain Fischer sighted a formation of sixteen enemy MIG-15s heading south across the Yalu River. Disregarding the odds against him, he immediately initiated an attack. Although under intense enemy fire, Captain Fischer tenaciously pursued the leading MIG-15 through violent evasive maneuvers until he had destroyed it. Completely disregarding the fact that several enemy aircraft were still firing at him, Captain Fischer skillfully maneuvered his Sabre into firing position on another MIG-15 that was attacking his wingman. Again demonstrating extreme courage and outstanding flying skill, Captain Fischer pressed his attack until the MIG-15 was destroyed. These two victories in the face of counter attacks by such superior numbers unnerved the enemy to the extent that they withdrew into Manchuria before further attacks could be made. By his outstanding heroism, his complete disregard for personal safety and high sense of duty, Captain Fischer reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 9 (1954)
Born: at Lone Rock, Iowa
Home Town: Lone Rock, Iowa


FRELIGH, LAWRENCE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lawrence E. Freligh (A0-801757), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of a B-26 type aircraft, 6167th Air Base Group, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 December 1952. On that date, Major Freligh was directing a fighter-bomber attack over Ullyl, North Korea. While Major Freligh was pulling out of a run on the target, a forty millimeter anti-aircraft shell exploded inside the cockpit inches away from him, tearing a gaping hole the size of a man's fist in his hip. Although he was thrown into a temporary state of shock, Major Freligh struggled to maintain control of the aircraft, which had begun to lose altitude. Remaining conscious only through the utmost determination despite intense pain and the fact that his legs were paralyzed and his sight and hearing impaired, Major Freligh flew the aircraft back to base, guided only by the hand signals of his navigator. Upon reaching the base, Major Freligh elected to attempt a wheels-down landing, in order to prevent injury to the crew. This landing was skillfully accomplished by Major Freligh, although he was suffering excruciating pain, and could exert no rudder control. By his high personal courage, superior flying ability in the face of great difficulty, and devotion to duty beyond the normal call, Major Freligh reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 314 (10 July 1953)


GARRISON, VERMONT
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Vermont Garrison, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 5 June 1953. On that date, while leading a flight of four F- 86 aircraft near the Yalu River, Colonel Garrison sighted a formation of ten MIG-15s far below. Diving down, Colonel Garrison pressed dangerously close behind the lead MIG in order that the remainder of his formation could assume attacking positions. With one long burst of his guns, Colonel Garrison caused the MIG to explode and disintegrate. Then, at great risk to his life, Colonel Garrison flew directly through the debris from the explosion, in order to attack another enemy MIG and fully exploit the tactical advantage already gained. Courageously disregarding a hail of enemy fire from behind him, and in the face of heavy odds, Colonel Garrison, after violent maneuvering, closed on the second MIG, scoring hits which caused it to explode and crash. As a result of Colonel Garrison's intrepidity and keen flying skill, his flight was able to engage other MIGs in the forefront of the enemy formation, successfully destroying three of them. The enemy, having lost one-half of his force in less than two minutes, and thoroughly demoralized by the heroic and telling attack of Colonel Garrison and his formation, turned and withdrew from the scene of action in defeat. Through Colonel Garrison's selfless courage and inspiring leadership, the tide of battle was turned and his flight was credited with the destruction of five MIGs, two of which were destroyed by Colonel Garrison.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 387 (October 13, 1953)
Born: October 29, 1915 at Mount Victory, Kentucky
Home Town: Mount Victory, Kentucky


*GEBAUR, ARTHUR WILLIAM, JR. (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Arthur William Gebaur, Jr. (A0-11583), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 7th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 49th Fighter-Bomber Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 29 August 1952. Realizing that the successful accomplishment of three quick turn-around missions required the utmost in careful planning and execution, Colonel Gebaur determined it his duty to lead his squadron in all three attacks. Immediately after returning from the first mission, Colonel Gebaur carefully briefed the Group on the flak positions and evasive tactics to be employed on the next attack, then led the Group back to the target. After turning in on his bomb run, Colonel Gebaur received a damaging, glancing hit from an 85 millimeter explosive shell, but continued his attack, accurately scoring hits on the assigned target. Coming off his bomb run, Colonel Gebaur spotted eight quadruple .50 caliber gun positions firing at the Group. Completely disregarding the damage to his aircraft and with concern only for the safety of those he led, Colonel Gebaur attacked the blazing gun positions through intense smoke. Through Colonel Gebaur's superior airmanship, and high personal courage, the gun positions were silenced and the remainder of the Group successfully completed their attacks on the assigned target. Through his keen flying skill, outstanding gallantry in the face of a determined enemy and exemplary devotion to duty, Colonel Gebaur reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 134 (March 14, 1953)
Home Town: Kansas City, Missouri


GEORGI, WILLIAM F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William F. Georgi, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Flight Leader of four F-84 type aircraft, 49th Fighter-Bomber Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 11 December 1952. On that date, Colonel Georgi led his flight to the target, an important enemy truck marshaling area at Hwachan-ni, Korea. After a scathing bombing attack, Colonel Georgi led the flight to another truck marshaling area nearby where strafing attacks were initiated. On his second strafing attack, Colonel Georgi received several direct hits from the intense enemy anti-aircraft fire. Struggling to control his crippled aircraft, Colonel Georgi, utterly disregarding his personal safety, aggressively continued his attack, scoring hits on the enemy trucks. Pulling off the target, Colonel Georgi was informed that his number three man had been hit, sustaining crippling damage which necessitated a bail-out. Disregarding his own precarious position, Colonel Georgi regrouped the remainder of his flight and flew protective cover over the crippled aircraft's route. Not until he was sure the pilot had bailed-out and had been picked up by friendly troops did Colonel Georgi, then critically low on fuel, return to the nearest United Nations' airfield. Through his superb flying skill, extraordinary heroism in the face of fierce enemy opposition, Colonel Georgi reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 116 (March 6, 1953)
Born: at Nyack, New York
Home Town: Denver, Colorado


*HALTON, WILLIAM TIMOTHY (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to William Timothy Halton (A0-8510), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Deputy Commander of the 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 6 April 1952. Upon completion of a normal tour with the 136th Fighter-Bomber Group, Colonel Halton was assigned as Deputy Commander of the 18th Fighter-Bomber Wing with specific instructions not to fly combat missions. Colonel Halton persisted in his desire to fly in combat, and made a special request to fly additional missions in order to improve the Group's combat effectiveness by his own example. Colonel Halton set such an example by masterfully demonstrating that F-51 type aircraft could successfully operate in jet combat zones without fighter-interceptor cover. He demonstrated great heroism and superior airmanship in leading his flight on a dive-bombing attack on rail lines near Sonchon, Korea. Even through being attacked by a MIG and intense ground fire, Colonel Halton completely disregarded personal safety, pressing a vicious attack on the rail lines. Although the flight was attacked by enemy jet aircraft and subjected to heavy ground fire, Colonel Halton's inspiring leadership was responsible for numerous rail outs by the four aircraft in his flight. Undaunted by the fact that the enemy was increasing his operations in that area, Colonel Halton then led a reconnaissance of the main supply route to Sinuiju. The result of this highly successful mission was measured by the boost in the morale of the pilots.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 541 (October 22, 1952)
Home Town: Islip, New York


HICKS, FORREST L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Forrest L. Hicks, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving Navigator of an unarmed, unescorted B-26 aircraft, 6167th Operations Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, deployed over Ullyul, North Korea on 8 December 1953. During a pass on an enemy convoy near Ullyul, the pilot on his crew was severely wounded in the hip. After the engineer brought the ship under control, he called upon Lieutenant Hicks to come to the aid of the semi-conscious pilot, whose senses and strength were failing. The pilot could not be treated in his position, and his chances of survival after a bail-out were negligible. Realizing this, he entreated the crew to bail out and save themselves; but Lieutenant Hicks and the engineer elected to remain with him at great risk to their lives, to give aid and to help get the aircraft back to the base. Facing the rear of the aircraft, Lieutenant Hicks pointed directions and shouted instructions to the pilot, encouraging him to follow his instructions until the field could be reached. Lieutenant Hicks' calmness during this emergency, his decision to remain in the aircraft, and his aid in monitoring the controls were largely responsible for saving the pilot and the aircraft. Through his high personal courage, tenacity of purpose against great odds, and exemplary devotion to duty, Lieutenant Hicks reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the untied States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 388 (October 17, 1953)


JABARA, JAMES
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James Jabara, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 20 May 1951, while flying as an element leader in "Baker" Flight, a formation of six aircraft flying a combat patrol over the Sinuiju-Yalu River area. Shortly after arriving over his target area, a superior number of enemy high performance jet aircraft were sighted. When the drop tank signal was given, two of the friendly aircraft were forced to withdraw because they could not jettison their external drop tanks. Captain Jabara was unable to release one of his tanks and was about to withdraw when he sighted another, larger group of enemy fighters join the original group which was bearing down on the remaining element of his flight. Despite the difficulty of controlling his aircraft with one tank still hanging on, Captain Jabara led his element in an attack on the enemy aircraft. In the ensuing battle Captain Jabara successfully disrupted the enemy formation and turned the tide of the engagement in favor of the friendly forces. During the attack on this formation he destroyed one enemy aircraft, forcing the pilot to eject from his aircraft before the enemy aircraft exploded in mid-air. Breaking off from his attack, he sighted another enemy formation preparing to attack friendly aircraft. Although low on fuel, alone and outnumbered six to one, he flew into their midst to divert them from their objective. During this process he shot down a second MIG-15, bringing his number of kills to six and making him the first jet ace in history.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 131 (May 22, 1951)
Born: October 10, 1923 at Muskogee, Oklahoma
Home Town: Wichita, Kansas


JOHNSON, JAMES K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James K. Johnson, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 30 June 1953. Colonel Johnson was leading a flight of four F-86 aircraft deep within enemy territory when a flight of twelve enemy MIG aircraft was sighted at an altitude of thirty-five thousand feet. Colonel Johnson immediately initiated a forceful attack and concentrated on destroying one of the enemy aircraft. Closing on the single MIG, Colonel Johnson held his fire until he was within twelve hundred feet, at which time he scored numerous hits on the wing and fuselage of the enemy aircraft. To assure that he did not lose his tactical advantage, and with full knowledge of the potential danger from the other MIGS in the enemy flight, Colonel Johnson continued on his attack. With unswerving singleness of purpose, Colonel Johnson began firing from a range of six hundred feet, continuing his devastating barrage until he was only fifty feet form the enemy aircraft, at which time it began to burn and disintegrate. Only then did Colonel Johnson turn to face the fire of the other MIGs. While expertly maneuvering to escape the attacking enemy aircraft, Colonel Johnson experienced a loss of engine power which later proved to be the result of damage caused by debris from the destroyed enemy aircraft. In spite of the handicap of a disabled aircraft, he valiantly turned to attack the enemy MIGs, and by superb airmanship and aggressiveness, outmaneuvered them until they withdrew from the area. Colonel Johnson then brought his disabled aircraft back to base.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 409 (November 12, 1953)


LEDFORD, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to James H. Ledford, Technical Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the 6167th Operations Squadron, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 8 December 1952. While serving as Engineer on an unarmed, unescorted B-26 aircraft deployed over Ullyul, North Korea, during a pass on an enemy convoy near Ullyul, the pilot was severely wounded in the hip. The aircraft went into a steep dive, and Sergeant Ledford quickly grabbed the control column, pulling the aircraft up just in time to avert a crash. The pilot could not be treated in his position, and his chances for survival after a bail-out were negligible. Realizing this, he entreated the crew to bail out and save themselves, but Sergeant Ledford and the navigator elected to remain with the aircraft to give aid to the pilot and help get the aircraft back to the base. Sergeant Ledford monitored the instruments for the wounded pilot, giving him all the assistance possible. Since they were very low on fuel, it was only through Sergeant Ledford's skillful control of power settings that they were able to reach a friendly airfield. After touchdown, Sergeant Ledford applied the emergency air brakes safely, bring the aircraft to a stop. Through is calmness during the emergency, his decision to remain in the aircraft and his direct aid to the pilot in flying the aircraft, Sergeant Ledford was instrumental in saving the pilot and the aircraft.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 388 (October 17, 1953)


MacARTHUR, DAVID W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to David W. MacArthur, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Forward Air Controller, 5th ROK Regiment (Attached), 7th Republic of Korea Division, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea from 21 to 23 April 1951. After the Fifth Regiment was overrun and surrounded by Chinese Communist forces, annihilation was imminent. Although morale of the men was badly shaken, Lieutenant MacArthur reorganized the group and despite intense enemy mortar, small arms and artillery fire, continued to direct effective air strikes against enemy positions for several hours. During this period, as he talked friendly fighters into their targets, he was wounded, his radio jeep was destroyed, and his interpreter and radio bearer killed by his side. Undaunted, Lieutenant MacArthur rallied the disorganized troops and led them from impending disaster. For two days, traveling a distance of fifty miles, exhausted and without food, Lieutenant MacArthur and his depleted force successfully evaded capture and continued to harass the enemy. Although many of his own men became casualties, Lieutenant MacArthur, through resourcefulness in the face of bitter enemy action, kept a small contingent intact and led them to safety.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 279 (December 18, 1951)
Home Town: Massachusetts


McCONNELL, JOSEPH JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Joseph Jr. McConnell, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 39th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 18 May 1953. Leading two F-86s on an air superiority mission over North Korea, he sighted a formation of twenty-eight MIG-15 type aircraft. Determined to accomplish his mission and with complete disregard for the numerical odds against him, he immediately attacked. Although under fire himself, he pressed his attack to such extent that he completely disorganized the enemy formation, destroying one of the MIGs and damaging another. Several enemy aircraft were then firing at him but, seeing that the other Sabre in his flight was also being fired upon, he completely ignored enemy cannon fire directed at himself and destroyed the MIG that was pursuing his wingman. These victories, in spite of counterattacks by such superior numbers, completely unnerved the enemy to the extent that they withdrew across the Yalu before further attacks could be made. Through his courage, keen flying ability and devotion to duty, Captain McConnell reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the Untied States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 244 (May 21, 1953)
Born: at New Hampshire Home Town: Apple Valley, California


MOORE, LONNIE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Lonnie R. Moore (A0-693467), Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an F-86 aircraft, 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 12 July 1953. On that date, Captain Moore led a flight of four F-86s screening for friendly fighter bombers operating immediately south of the Yalu River. Because of fuel shortage his second element had to return to base. Continuing the escort, Captain Moore and his wingman, although dangerously low on fuel, sighted a formation of twenty enemy aircraft positioning to attack the friendly fighter bombers. With utter disregard for his personal safety, Captain Moore dived upon the lead MIG of the enemy formation and leveled out in firing range of eighteen enemy aircraft, thereby exposing himself to their concentrated fire. With heroic disregard for the hail of enemy cannon fire from behind, Captain Moore closed upon the enemy formation leader, and after a violent engagement, shot down the lead enemy aircraft. Captain Moore and his wingman, although under vicious attack and surrounded by numerous enemy aircraft, fought with great courage and tenacity. In the course of this engagement, while under continuous enemy fire, Captain Moore again maneuvered into position and destroyed a second MIG-15, as his wingman was destroying a third enemy aircraft. The enemy's formation was so disrupted and the enemy pilots so demoralized by Captain Moore's daring and aggressive destruction of their leader and another MIG that the tide of battle was turned and the enemy retreated in confusion across the Yalu River. Through his extraordinary heroism and flying skill in the face of great personal risk, Captain Moore was instrumental in enabling the friendly fighter bombers to complete a mission vital to the success of the United Nations war effort. Having overstayed his maximum time during this encounter, Captain Moore had insufficient fuel remaining to return to his base and was forced to land on an emergency strip at Paengnyong-do. Through his extraordinary heroism, his peerless leadership, courage and unselfish devotion to duty, Captain Moore reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 15 (26 January 1954)
Home Town: Fort Walton, Florida


MORSE, JOHN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John Morse, Jr., First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot with the 111th Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 136th Fighter-Bomber Group, in action against enemy forces near Sinanju, Korea on 17 November 1951. As flight leader of four F-84 aircraft, Lieutenant Morse was briefed to find and destroy two locomotives north of Sinanju. Due to restricted visibility in the area, he ordered his flight to orbit at a safe altitude while he reconnoitered the area at low level. Exposing himself to intense ground fire, he sighted the two locomotives and made a successful skip-bombing attack, destroying one and damaging the other. Although his aircraft sustained direct hits on his first pass, Lieutenant Morse returned to attack the damaged locomotive in the face of intense and accurate ground fire from heavy and automatic weapons. Through Lieutenant Morse's superior airmanship and aggressiveness, this highly important and hazardous mission was successfully completed.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 45 (June 13, 1952)


NAJARIAN, JOHN J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to John J. Najarian, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as the Pilot of an SA-16 rescue aircraft with the 3d Air Rescue Squadron, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 11 June 1951. Lieutenant Najarian was informed that a fighter pilot had been forced to abandon his aircraft near Kyomipo, Korea, deep in enemy territory, and he was directed to proceed to that location and determine if the rescue could be effected. The distance involved prevented Lieutenant Najarian from arriving before dark. Arriving at the scene, fighters circling the area told him that the downed pilot was in the river but that his exact position could not be determined because of darkness. In spite of the fact that the landing would have to be made on an unknown river, at night under enemy fire, and without knowing the depth of the river or the location of rocks and sandbars, Lieutenant Najarian decided to attempt the rescue. Disregarding intense enemy antiaircraft and small-arms fire which precluded the use of landing lights, he lined his aircraft up with the course of the river and made an instrument letdown and landing, descending at the rate of two hundred feet a minute until impact with the water. Since the landing had been made above the estimated position of the pilot, he turned his plane around and taxied downstream searching for the downed airman. During this turn the aircraft came close to the bank of the river from which enemy troops were firing. The pilot flashed a small light to enable his rescuers to find him and was picked up. Intense enemy fire prevented the use of lights, so Lieutenant Najarian made a hurried take-off on instruments and returned the pilot to a United Nations base in Korea.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 221 (August 31, 1951)


NICHOLS, DONALD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Donald Nichols, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Office of Special Investigations, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 17 April 1951. Accompanied by five Korean specialists, Captain Nichols proceeded behind enemy lines in an unarmed helicopter to procure material of important intelligence value. Despite fragmentation hits scored on the engine and intense antiaircraft and automatic weapons fire encountered over hostile territory, Captain Nichols, determined to complete the assignment, directed the mission to continue. Landing in an area only a few miles from a major enemy supply depot Captain Nichols coolly and efficiently photographed the material, recorded all inscriptions and technical data, and supervised dismantlement of vital parts and loaded them aboard the helicopter. Although receiving heavy, accurate enemy fire on the return flight to friendly territory and suffering serious damage to a rotor blade, the crippled aircraft limped out to sea and, after flying eighty miles over the Yellow Sea along the Korean coast, made an emergency landing on a friendly island from which the group was subsequently evacuated. Captain Nichols voluntarily risked his life to wrest information of inestimable value from the very grasp of the enemy.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 159 (June 22, 1951)
Home Town: Hallandale, Florida


O'DONNELL, EMMETT, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Emmett O'Donnell, Jr., Major General, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, Bomber Command, Far East Air Forces (Provisional), in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea from 13 July to 16 September 1950, during three important combat missions over enemy targets. On 13 July 1950, General O'Donnell led and directed the strike of fifty-two aircraft which dropped four hundred and forty-nine tons of explosives on railroad yards and shop installations at Wonsan, resulting in the complete destruction of railroad repair facilities in that area. On 16 August 1950, he led and directed ninety-eight aircraft in a maximum effort strike during which eight hundred and forty-six tons of explosives were dropped on reported enemy materiel and troop concentrations in the Waegwan area, breaking up enemy preparations for an attack in that sector. On 16 September 1950, General O'Donnell led and directed an eighty aircraft strike which dropped six hundred tons of bombs on targets in the Pyongyang area, causing extensive damage to oil refineries, warehouses, and a steam power plant. During these strikes, his aircraft was subject to attack by enemy aircraft and ground antiaircraft fire, and he was in danger of death or capture by the enemy. His exemplary action in constantly risking his life while personally leading his flight, although in a position where such duty was not required of him, was a source of inspiration for other members of his command, reflecting great credit on himself and the military service.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 53 (October 30, 1950)
Born: 1906 at Brooklyn, New York
Home Town: Brooklyn, New York


ORR, ROBERT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Robert H. Orr, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Group Leader of thirty-six F-84 type aircraft, 49th Fighter-Bomber Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 17 November 1952. On that date, Colonel Orr skillfully led his Group to the target, an important heavily defended enemy troop and supply concentration at Kapal-li, Korea, which was obscured by low clouds, haze, and fog. While Colonel Orr was initiating his napalm run, his aircraft was seriously damaged by enemy anti-aircraft fire. Struggling to control his crippled aircraft, Colonel Orr, utterly disregarding his own personal safety, heroically continued his attack, scoring two direct hits which guided succeeding pilots to the almost invisible target. After all Squadrons had completed their devastating highly successful attack, Colonel Orr, using both hands and all his strength to control his heavily damaged aircraft, reformed his Squadrons, and led them safely home. Through his selfless courage in the face of the enemy, his keen airmanship, marksmanship, and devotion to duty, Colonel Orr upheld the highest traditions of the military service, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 38 (January 23, 1953)


*PARKER, ROBERT BLAINE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Blaine Parker (A0-18003), First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Rescue Helicopter Pilot with Detachment F, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 November 1950. Lieutenant Parker departed Anju, Korea, and flew an unarmed helicopter more than ninety miles over enemy occupied territory in an attempt to rescue a naval pilot downed near the Manchurian border. Lieutenant Parker undertook this hazardous mission fully aware that hostile opposition could be expected and the return flight would tax the maximum range of the craft and involve night flying for which it was not equipped. Aided by two naval fighter aircraft in the area, he located the pilot, with utter disregard for possible sniper fire, landed the helicopter and effected the rescue. During the return flight, this mission was further imperiled by darkness, poor visibility and a dwindling fuel supply. Despite the odds against him, Lieutenant Parker bravely continued on until he reached friendly lines but crashed while attempting an emergency landing. Lieutenant Parker's extraordinary act of heroism in which he gave his life, and consummate devotion to duty reflect untold glory on himself and the noble traditions of the United State Air Force.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 98 (April 26, 1951)
Home Town: Jonesboro, Tennessee


PARR, RALPH S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Ralph S. Parr, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an F-86 type aircraft, 334th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 30 June 1953. On that date, while leading a formation of two F-86 type aircraft on a combat air patrol deep in enemy territory, Captain Parr was attacked by a formation of ten enemy MIGs. Exhibiting superb airmanship and extraordinary gallantry, Captain Parr positioned himself on the attackers. Despite the imminent threat from the hail of cannon fire from behind, Captain Parr selected his target, and with a long burst from his guns, destroyed one of the enemy MIGs. Against superior numbers of enemy aircraft, Captain Parr, although under a continual hail of enemy cannon fire, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, again valiantly counter-attacked another of the threatening aircraft. Utilizing extraordinary flying skill, Captain Parr tenaciously followed the enemy through a series of violent, evasive maneuvers until he gained the advantage and scored multiple hits on the MIG, causing it to burst into flame. While turning to move to surprise another of the enemy aircraft, Captain Parr broke off his attack to answer a call of distress from a friendly aircraft, escorting it safely back to base. Captain Parr's keen flying skill in turning the tide of battle despite overwhelming odds and his high personal courage in protecting a fellow pilot evidenced conspicuous gallantry in action, and reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces and the United States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 33 (February 27, 1954)
Born: July 1, 1924 at Portsmouth, Virginia
Home Town: Portsmouth, Virginia
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam)


PARTRIDGE, EARLE EVERARD
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Earle Everard Partridge, Major General, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea from 14 July to 28 September 1950. During this period General Partridge personally, and at the risk of his life from enemy ground fire and enemy air patrols, performed repeated reconnaissance flights in unarmed aircraft deep into enemy territory and over the enemy front lines. He performed many of these flights with his Army counterpart, Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker, in order that they as a team could better perform their respective duties. Included in these flights were the first night reconnaissance missions flown by the United Nations Forces. The knowledge gained by General Partridge from these reconnaissance flights was invaluable to him in making tactical decisions and contributed largely to the successful accomplishment of his mission and the ultimate success of the United Nations Forces in driving the invading enemy back to the 38th Parallel. In addition to the above, and with personal disregard not only of health but of life itself, he was constantly present at the most advanced Air Force bases and on the battlefield at great personal risk, inspiring personnel of his command and other United Nations Forces with his own aggressiveness and courage. Where acts of courage were common, General Partirdge's fearlessness and courageous leadership were outstanding.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 39 (October 5, 1950)
Born: at Wichendon, Massachusetts
Home Town: Fort Slocum, New York


*RHOADS, JOHN KYLER (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to John Kyler Rhoads (A0-756701), Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot of an RF-80 type aircraft, 45th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the over the Sinuij, Uiju, Sinanju Triangle of North Korea on 27 July 1953. On that date Captain Rhoads volunteered to fly over an extremely dangerous target to obtain photo intelligence of great importance to the United Nations. He was to photograph six airfield in the Sinuiju, Uiju, Sinanju triangle, one of the most heavily defended areas. After he had successfully photographed five of the assigned targets, his aircraft was struck by automatic weapons fire at an altitude of twelve thousand feet. Captain Rhoads' escort immediately warned him to bail out, since flames were trailing out two hundred feet behind his aircraft. Captain Rhoads ignored this imminent threat to his life, and after cutting off the fuel, attempted an air start. Again his escort warned him to bail out, but Captain Rhoads refused to abandon his aircraft, electing, at great risk to his life to attempt to return to base with the photographs he had taken. Captain Rhoads continued his efforts to start the engine until an explosion in the tail of the aircraft caused it to plummet to earth before he could bail out.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 372 (September 10, 1953)
Born: February 28, 1921 at San Francisco, California
Home Town: San Francisco, California


SAVAGE, RICHARD L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Richard L. Savage, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Pilot with the 730th Bombardment Squadron, 452nd Bombardment Wing (Light), in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 7 April 1951. Demonstrating outstanding technical skill and courage, Lieutenant Savage piloted his B-26 aircraft on a low-level bombing mission against enemy rail targets; and, on the first attack his aircraft was subjected to intense enemy ground fire and half way through the run he suffered a direct hit from a 40-millimeter gun. Although he was wounded five times, Lieutenant Savage pressed his attack with excellent results. In spite of intense pain and the difficulty of maneuvering his damaged aircraft, he continued the attack on enemy troops and gun emplacements to obtain maximum results from his mission. On the fifth strafing run a direct hit blew the nose wheel off the aircraft and a second hit necessitated feathering the left engine only a few feet above the ground. Fragments from a third direct his severely damaged the hydraulic system, radio equipment, air speed indicator, and the engine instruments. Lieutenant Savage flew the crippled aircraft for more than an hour before crashing-landing at a friendly air base. As a result of his skill and determination, he destroyed one bridge, three automatic weapons positions, and an unknown number of enemy troops and supplies.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 242 (October 4, 1951)
Born: April 22, 1924 at Los Angeles, California
Home Town: Manhattan Beach, California


*SHIELDS, EVERETT L. JR., (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Everett L. Shields, Jr. (A0-2231086), First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving a Pilot with the 428 Fighter-Bomber Squadron, 58th Fighter-Bomber Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces over a valley southeast of Kumsong, Korea, on 19 July 1953. On that date, Lieutenant Shields led an element in a flight of four aircraft against heavy and automatic weapon positions. The first element dropped proximity-type bombs for flak suppression, but as Lieutenant Shields started his gradual napalm run, he was informed that the bombs had been infective. Lieutenant Shields acknowledged this warning, but continued his napalm run at an altitude of two hundred feet. This extremely shallow run exposed the element for an extended time to intense and accurate automatic and small-arms fire, which was directed down on the aircraft from both ridges surrounding the target. As Lieutenant Shields approached the target he received a direct hit just aft of the cockpit. He informed the flight of his condition, but continued his hazardous napalm run without regard to the condition of his plane. Approximately fifty feet over the target he released both napalm tanks, scoring direct hits which covered two gun positions in a sheet of flame. Through his courage, keen flying ability and devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Shields reflected great credit upon himself, the Far East Air Forces, and the Untied States Air Force.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 377 (September 18, 1953)


*SPATH, CHARLES RAY (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Charles Ray Spath (A0-1910283), First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 335th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter-Interceptor Wing, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces over Simanju, Korea on 3 February 1952. Lieutenant Spath was flying Number Four position in a flight of four F-86 type aircraft on a combat air patrol over the Simanju area when a large formation of MIG-15s was sighted. Though overwhelmingly outnumbered, the flight leader positioned his flight for an attack. When the engine in the Number Three aircraft failed, Lieutenant Spath continued to cover it even though he had to slow his aircraft to dangerously low speed. The MIGs quickly attacked the disabled Number Three aircraft, but were repeatedly repulsed by Lieutenant Spath's superlative airmanship and marksmanship. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Lieutenant Spath continued to fight although outnumbered three to one. Finally, three MIGs converged upon him, and due to the slow speed of his aircraft, he was unable to evade them. One MIG scored hits on Lieutenant Spath's aircraft and as it started burning and lost power, he advised his leader that he was bailing out. Then, even though his aircraft was burning, Lieutenant Spath, with extreme coolness, deliberately exposed himself to the cannon fire of numerous MIGs to allow the pilot of the disabled aircraft sufficient time to make a successful air start.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 509 (October 7, 1952)
Home Town: Hamilton, Ohio


STRATEMEYER, GEORGE E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to George E. Stratemeyer, Lieutenant General, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, Far East Air Forces, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea from 14 July to 28 September 1950. During the early days of the conflict, General Stratemeyer personally performed aerial reconnaissance of advanced airfields which were under attack by enemy aircraft and under fire by ground weapons, enabling him to plan immediately the most effective utilization of his combat air forces in the initial defensive phase. He directed the evacuation by air of American citizens from those advanced fields, continually subjecting himself to great danger. Subsequent flights were made in unarmed and unescorted aircraft to forward airstrips to appraise the situation during the gradual, forced withdrawal of our troops. Personally, and at the risk of his life, in order to direct comprehensively the efforts of the Far East Air Forces in close support of the Eighth Army in Korea, he pressed forward on the ground by vehicle and on foot to the outermost advanced positions. The firsthand knowledge gained by General Stratemeyer from these reconnaissance missions was invaluable to him in planning the coordination of air support with ground combat activity, and contributed largely in enabling the ground troops to wrest the initiative from the enemy and assume the offensive in driving the invading enemy from the area of south of the 38th Parallel.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 46 (October 22, 1950)
Born: November 24, 1890 at Cincinnati, Ohio
Home Town: Orlando, Florida


TUNNER, WILLIAM H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to William H. Tunner, Major General, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as Commanding General, Combat Cargo Command (Provisional), Far East Air Forces, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 20 October 1950. General Tunner masterfully executed the loading, transporting, and dropping of troops of the 187th Regimental Combat Team of the 11th Airborne Division in its daring behind-the-lines operation in the Sukchon-Songchon area north of Pyongyang, Korea, designed to trap the enemy and seal off his escape routes. General Tunner personally led the flight of transports over the drop zones approximately thirty-five miles behind enemy front lines in an area known to contain enemy ground forces and antiaircraft batteries. After the discharge of airborne troops together with their supporting materiel, General Tunner again led his transports over the area to drop necessary supplies to the units until they could joint forces with United Nations' elements driving relentlessly north. General Tunner, through his extraordinary operational skill and his bold execution of daring plans, accomplished with notable precision and success an airborne feat that included an unprecedented drop of heavy equipment in combat, and transported a friendly fighting force deep behind enemy lines.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 47 (October 22, 1950)
Born: July 14, 1906 at Elizabeth, New Jersey


VOJVODICH, MELE, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Mele Vojvodich, Jr., Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 15th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Group, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 3 January 1953. On that date Captain Vojvodich volunteered to fly an unarmed RF-86 type aircraft on an extremely hazardous mission of greatest importance to United Nations forces. Captain Vojvodich, exhibiting outstanding personal courage and skill, flew his unarmed aircraft deep into heavily defended enemy territory despite constant attacks from enemy aircraft. On his way to the target complex, he experienced a complete radio failure, and in addition, his drop tanks failed to jettison. Notwithstanding these obstacles, Captain Vojvodich, recognizing the vital importance of his assigned mission, elected to complete the photograph runs on his targets, exposing himself to firing passes from enemy aircraft. In order to insure complete coverage, Captain Vojvodich returned to re-photograph his first target, despite the presence of numerous enemy aircraft in the area. The intelligence data Captain Vojvodich obtained at great personal risk was of immeasurable value to subsequent United Nations operation in Korea.
Headquarters: Far East Air Forces: General Orders No. 216 (May 2, 1953)
Born: March 28, 1929 at Steubenville, Ohio
Home Town: Steubenville, Ohio


WHISNER, WILLIAM T., JR.
(Third Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Second Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Distinguished Service Cross to William T. Whisner, Jr., Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving as a Pilot with the 25th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, 4th Fighter Interceptor Group, FIFTH Air Force, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 23 February 1952. On that date Major Whisner destroyed an enemy MIG-15 aircraft attacking an F-86 piloted by a member of his own group. Major Whisner flew to the immediate aid of the pilot in the face of the enemy's great numerical superiority. With an expertly executed maneuver, he attacked the MIG-15 which was pressing full attack on the friendly aircraft and forced the enemy to break away. As Major Whisner bore in to deter the enemy action, another MIG-15 swept down on his tail and began lobbing shells at his aircraft. In spite of the imminent danger of losing his own life, Major Whisner continued to force the first MIG-15 to break away, and, in the face of overwhelming odds, destroyed the enemy aircraft. The downed MIG-15 raised Major Whisner's record of enemy aircraft destruction to five and one-half and established him as the seventh jet ace of the Korean campaign.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 94 (April 11, 1952)
Born: at Shreveport, Louisiana
Home Town: Shreveport, Louisiana
Personal Awards: 2@ Distinguished Service Crosses (WWII), Distinguished Service Cross (Korea)

 


WILKERSON, DESMOND R. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Desmond R. Wilkerson (AF39946254), Private First Class, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy of the United Nations while serving with the Detachment F, 3d Air Rescue Squadron, in action against enemy forces in the Republic of Korea on 28 November 1950. Private Wilkerson participated in the helicopter rescue of a navy pilot downed more than ninety miles behind enemy lines. On his own initiative he volunteered for this mission in order to administer medical aid should it be required, fully realizing the maximum range of the aircraft might not be adequate for the return flight and that it was not equipped for the night flying which would be involved. After the helicopter landed near the naval pilot, Private Wilkerson, further demonstrating a total disregard for his personal safety, leaped form the craft and helped the airman aboard, despite the immediate possibility of enemy sniper fire. The extremely hazardous nature of the mission was further increased during the return flight by darkness, poor visibility, and a rapidly diminishing fuel supply. The aircraft finally crashed behind friendly lines while attempting an emergency landing, and Private Wilkerson was killed. Private First Class Wilkerson's extraordinary act of heroism in which he gave his life, and consummate devotion to duty reflect untold glory on himself and the noble traditions of the United State Air Force.
General Headquarters Far East Command: General Orders No. 104 (May 1, 1951)
Home Town: Midvale, Utah

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