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Full Text Citations For Award of
 

The Air Force Cross in Vietnam

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DALLMAN, HOWARD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Howard M. Dallman, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 345th Tactical Airlift Squadron, Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, as a C-130E Aircraft Commander in Southeast Asia on 5 February 1968. On that date, Colonel Dallman was flying a combat mission in support of friendly ground forces engaged in the defense of a beleaguered outpost. The mission was to fly 35,000 pounds of needed ammunition and a medical evacuation team from DaNang to Khe Sanh, which was under siege. Immediately after landing at Khe Sanh, the aircraft was hit by a volley of armor piercing rounds which ignited the explosive cargo. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Colonel Dallman elected to back the aircraft to a safe area where an explosion would not endanger the defending ground forces. There he directed the orderly evacuation of the medical evacuation team from the stricken aircraft. He then proceeded to fight the fire, which had spread to the cargo department. Through his actions he not only saved lives and a valuable aircraft, but also prevented a large portion of the Khe Sanh airfield from being destroyed by an explosion. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Dallman reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross, Distinguished Flying Cross, 4@ Air Medals


DAY, GEORGE EVERETT "BUD" (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to George Everett "Bud" Day (FR-49555), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 16 July 1969 to 14 October 1969. During this period, Colonel Day was subjected to maximum punishment and torture by Vietnamese guards to obtain a detailed confession of escape plans, policies, and orders of the American senior ranking officer in the camp, and the communications methods used by the Americans interned in the camp. Colonel Day withstood this punishment and gave nothing of value to the Vietnamese, although he sustained many injuries and open wounds to his body. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Colonel Day reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (At the time of his shoot down and capture, Colonel Day was assigned to Misty Super FAC's F-100 Squadron, Phu Cat Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force.)
Special Orders GB-1152, 10/29/1974, USAF
Born: February 24, 1925 at Sioux City, Iowa
Home Town: Sioux City, Iowa
Personal Awards: Medal of Honor (Vietnam), Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, 4@ Air Medals, 4@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


DAYTON, THOMAS E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Thomas E. Dayton, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an A-1 Tactical Fighter Pilot in Southeast Asia, from 5 December 1969 to 7 December 1969. On those dates, Major Dayton exerted all the courage and flying skill at his disposal in a fiercely opposed attempt to rescue a fellow airman from one of the most heavily defended areas in Southeast Asia. During the first two days of this largest search and rescue mission attempted in Southeast Asia, Major Dayton escorted helicopters into the search area on four separate occasions. Despite intense hostile fire during low altitude and slow speed required in this protective role, he repeatedly attacked hostile positions throughout the valley. Designated On-Scene Commander on the third day, Major Dayton continued his heroic rescue efforts with great vigor and determination despite the fact that fifteen previous attempts had failed, and with full knowledge that each return would again place his life in jeopardy. Notwithstanding these tremendous obstacles, Major Dayton persisted in his efforts, with the realization that the successful application of airpower would be the deciding factor. During the final rescue attempt, Major Dayton had to hold an orbiting position over the survivor to divert air strikes away from the survivor's position. Braving hundreds of rounds of hostile fire during these three days, Major Dayton took control of the recovery operation at its lowest ebb and heroically challenged and mastered this successful, unparalleled rescue mission. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Major Dayton reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Meritorious Service Medal, 12@ Air Medals, Joint Service Commendation Medal


DeBELLEVUE, CHARLES B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Charles B. DeBellevue, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Weapon Systems Officer in the 555th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 9 September 1972. On that date, while protecting a large strike force attacking a high priority target deep in hostile territory, Captain DeBellevue engaged and destroyed a hostile aircraft. Through superior judgment and use of aircraft capabilities, and in complete disregard for his own safety, Captain DeBellevue was successful in destroying his fifth hostile aircraft, a North Vietnamese MiG-19. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain DeBellevue reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


DeTAR, DEAN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Dean E. DeTar, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as the Commander of a Search and Rescue Force in Southeast Asia on 21 March 1970. On that date, Major DeTar led a force of twenty-nine aircraft against one of the most heavily defended locations in Southeast Asia to rescue an American airman. In spite of heavy opposing fire which inflicted severe losses on this and earlier rescue attempts, Major DeTar remained under constant attack while he led and inspired his forces to execute a successful rescue which saved the life of a fellow airman. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the opposing armed force, Major DeTar has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: at Iowa
Home Town: Iowa
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 6@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 16@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


DONELSON, NICHOLAS J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Nicholas J. Donelson, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105 pilot over North Vietnam on 23 August 1967. On that date, Captain Donelson was the mission commander for a force of thirty-two aircraft attacking a heavily defended rail yard in the vicinity of Hanoi. Repeated attacks against his force by hostile aircraft destroyed two friendly aircraft, and the intense barrage of anti-aircraft fire downed a third and severely damaged a fourth. In spite of this intense opposition, Captain Donelson, at great personal risk, led his force to the target and pressed the attack, inflicting severe damage to the rail yard and destroying a large amount of rolling stock. Captain Donelson's firm leadership, timely decisions, and professional competence in the face of intense opposition resulted in the successful accomplishment of this extremely hazardous mission. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Donelson reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


DONOHUE, FREDERIC M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Frederic M. Donohue, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy of the United States as Aircraft Commander of an HH-53 Rescue Helicopter of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group, as part of an all-volunteer joint U.S. Army and Air Force raiding force in the Joint Chiefs of Staff-directed heliborne assault mission to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam, on 21 November 1970. On that date, Major Donohue courageously flew the first aircraft directly over the compound at an altitude of forty feet at less than twenty knots airspeed. He fired upon the greatest threats to the ground rescue party which was following less than twenty seconds behind his aircraft. So precise was fire from his aircraft that guard towers were neutralized within ten feet of suspected prisoner cantonment buildings. Major Donohue, without regard for his personal safety, immeasurably contributed to the complete confusion and disorganization of enemy forces. He successfully completed a daring return penetration through numerous surface-to-air missiles, ground fire, and the threat of enemy aircraft. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Major Donohue reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: San Diego, California
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, 6@ Air Medals, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, 2@ Meritorious Service Medals, Joint Service Commendation Medal, 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals


DORSETT, TRACEY K., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Tracey K. Dorsett, Jr., Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Aircraft Commander in the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 8 February 1968. On that date, Captain Dorsett led two aircraft against one of the largest, most important, and most heavily defended airfields in North Vietnam. Despite inclement weather, Captain Dorsett descended to extremely low altitude for a visual high-speed run across the airfield. Although faced with a barrage of withering antiaircraft artillery fire which severely crippled his aircraft, Captain Dorsett resolutely and skillfully pressed his attack against the target, damaging and destroying several aircraft on the ground. He was finally forced to eject over hostile territory. He successfully evaded hostile search parties and was subsequently rescued by a friendly helicopter. As a result of his actions, Captain Dorsett was successful in neutralizing a threat to Free World forces in Southeast Asia. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Dorsett reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


*DRAEGER, WALTER FRANK, JR. (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Walter Frank Draeger, Jr. (3053337), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Pilot of an A-1 Skyraider with Detachment 10, 1131st Special Activities Squadron, in action on 4 April 1965, over North Vietnam. On that date, Captain Draeger volunteered to fly as a Fighter-Advisor with the Vietnamese Air Force into an area of known heavily concentrated antiaircraft artillery. He participated in a highly successful bombing mission of a vital Viet Cong target, contributing materially to its destruction. On the return flight from the primary target, Captain Draeger's flight leader was shot down by hostile ground fire. Captain Draeger immediately called or search and rescue assistance. Although completely alone and within range of the hostile ground fire, he orbited the area of his downed flight leader until the unarmed search and rescue aircraft arrived in the vicinity. Upon arrival in the area, over which Captain Draeger was flying protective cover, the unarmed rescue aircraft requested fire suppression assistance. Captain Draeger commenced a firing pass to allow the rescue aircraft to safely enter the area. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he made the strafing run into the hostile fire. Ignoring the air bursts from shore batteries, Captain Draeger pressed his attack and, in so doing, sacrificed his own life. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Draeger reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Deerfield, Wisconsin


DRAMESI, JOHN ARTHUR (POW)
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John Arthur Dramesi (FR-65320), Colonel [then Captain], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Pilot of an F-105 of the 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 388th Tactical Fighter Wing, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, PACIFIC Air Force, in action near Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, on 2 April 1967. On that date, Captain Dramesi was the leader of a flight of F-105 aircraft scheduled to strike a suspected surface-to-air missile site and perform reconnaissance of a hostile highway. Although intelligence reports indicated the area contained a heavy concentration of 37-mm. and 5-mm. flak position, deadly antiaircraft guns, and possible missile fire, Captain Dramesi successfully executed his attack and placed all ordnance on target. He then began his low level reconnaissance of the highway. When only a few miles from his target, his aircraft was hit by an intense barrage of ground fire and immediately burst into flames, forcing him to eject into the hostile jungle. Immediately after ejecting from his aircraft, Captain Dramesi acted as a ground forward air controller, pointing out targets and safest approaches. Repeated rescue attempts were met with withering fire from the ground. As the ground and air battle raged on, he continued to request ordnance, giving corrections which brought each successive strike closer to his own position. The last correction he had given brought the ordnance within a few meters of his last known position and no further transmissions were received from him. By his selfless and heroic concern for the rescue crews in the air, and his continued request for close ordnance delivery, Captain Dramesi displayed outstanding courage and exemplified the highest traditions and standards of the American fighting man's code. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and calm aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Dramesi reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Air Force Cross to John Arthur Dramesi (FR-65320), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force while a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from May 1969 to November 1969. For a full year, Colonel Dramesi planned an escape from a North Vietnamese prison camp near the edge of the city of Hanoi and escaped on the evening of 10 May 1969. Though later recaptured, this escape resulted in great embarrassment to the enemy and materially lifted the morale of all American prisoners in the camp. Though severely tortured, Colonel Dramesi refused to give information or submit to any demands. Many more brutalities were heaped upon him, and he remained in irons for six months. By his extraordinary heroism, loyalty, and discipline in the face of the enemy, Colonel Dramesi reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: February 12, 1933 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Grenlock, New Jersey
Personal Awards: 2@ Air Force Crosses (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Legion of Merit, 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, Air Force Commendation Medal, 5@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


ENGLE, CHARLES EDWIN (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Charles Edwin Engle (310467639), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller and Pilot of an O-1 aircraft of the 56th Special Operations Wing, SEVENTH Air Force, in Southeast Asia on 20 June 1970. On that date, while attempting to pinpoint a downed pilot's location, Captain Engle's aircraft was met with a hail of gunfire which severed the fuel line, drenching the aircraft and pilot. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Engle continued his efforts to suppress surrounding ground fire positions. When the pilot was located, a pickup was attempted. During the attempt, the rescue aircraft helicopter received heavy automatic weapons fire. Realizing that the rescue aircraft was in extreme danger of being shot down, Captain Engle, again with complete disregard for his own safety, dove his aircraft between the gun position and the helicopter, thereby allowing the helicopter to safely break away. After the ground fire was suppressed, other aircraft moved in for a successful pickup. Through his superb airmanship, aggressiveness, and extraordinary heroism, Captain Engle reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Carlos, Indiana
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 1Purple Heart, 3@ Air Medals


EPPINGER, DALE L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Dale L. Eppinger, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a UH-1P Helicopter Pilot near Duc Co, Republic of Vietnam, on 21 April 1969. On that date, Major Eppinger, against great odds, unhesitatingly descended his aircraft through intense ground fire to rescue a seven-man, long range reconnaissance patrol which was surrounded and in imminent danger of being overrun by a large hostile force. When his aircraft was shot down during the rescue attempt, Major Eppinger assumed immediate command of the ground defensive situation and, in a further display of courage and leadership, directed air strikes against the opposing forces until their attacks were thwarted, and all patrol members and aircrew man could be rescued. Through his superb airmanship, aggressiveness, and extraordinary heroism, Major Eppinger reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


*ETCHBERGER, RICHARD LOY (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Loy Etchberger (13409393), Chief Master Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force at Lima Site 85, in Laos, on 11 March 1968. On this date, Sergeant Etchberger was manning a defensive position when the base was overrun by an enemy ground force. The enemy was able to deliver sustained and withering fire directly upon this position from higher ground. His entire crew dead or wounded, Sergeant Etchberger continued to return the enemy's fire thus denying them access to the position. During this entire period, Sergeant Etchberger continued to direct air strikes and call for air rescue on his emergency radio, thereby enabling the air evacuation force to locate the surrounded friendly element. When air rescue arrived, Sergeant Etchberger deliberately exposed himself to enemy fire in order to place his three surviving wounded comrades in the rescuer slings permitting them to be airlifted to safety. As Sergeant Etchberger was finally being rescued, he was fatally wounded, by enemy ground fire. His fierce defense which culminated in the supreme sacrifice of his life, saved not only the lives of his three comrades but provided for the successful evacuation of the remaining survivors of the base. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Sergeant Etchberger reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: October 4, 1940 at Hamburg, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Hamburg, Pennsylvania
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals, Purple Heart


ETZEL, GREGORY A. M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Gregory A. M. Etzel, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-3E Pilot of the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 2 and 3 July 1967. On 2 July, Captain Etzel flew his helicopter into one of the most heavily defended areas of North Vietnam to rescue a downed F-105 pilot. Unable to effect a pickup because of oncoming darkness and intense small arms fire that damaged his aircraft, Captain Etzel withdrew from the area. After landing at a friendly base, he volunteered to continue rescue operations the next day. After minimum rest, he took off at first light and flew through intense automatic fire, dodged deadly missiles, and evaded attacking MiGs in search of the downed pilot. In the face of heavy small arms fire that severely damaged his helicopter, he located and rescued this valuable pilot. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Etzel reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, 5@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


FEINSTEIN, JEFFREY S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jeffrey S. Feinstein, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Weapon Systems Officer in the 13th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 388th Tactical Fighter Wing, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action against the Paul Doumer Bridge, a major north-south transportation link on Hanoi's Red River in North Vietnam, on 13 October 1972. On that date, while protecting a large strike force attacking a high priority target deep in hostile territory, Captain Feinstein engaged two enemy aircraft and destroyed one as they attacked the vulnerable chaff-dispensing flight. Having destroyed one of the aircraft and realizing that his wingman was coming under fire, Captain Feinstein continued his attack on the second enemy aircraft. This courageous and aggressive maneuver negated the immediate threat top this wingman and caused the second MiG-21 to flee the area in which he would constitute a threat to the strike forces. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Feinstein reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 4@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), 5@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Purple Heart, 19@ Air Medals


FEUERRIEGEL, KARL T.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Karl T. Feuerriegel, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller of the 21st Tactical Air Support Squadron, Nha Trang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at Nha Trang, Republic of Vietnam, on 30 January 1968. On that date, in conjunction with the Tet Offensive, a large, well-equipped hostile force entered the city, intent on overrunning military installations and releasing a large contingent of hostile captives from the local prison. The hostiles' entrenched positions prevented reinforcements from reaching the battle areas where friendly forces were in dire need of support. Lieutenant Colonel Feuerriegel, despite great personal risk from heavy automatic weapons fire, repeatedly attacked hostile positions in an O-2 aircraft armed with high explosive rockets. He systematically silenced three machine gun positions and neutralized two fortified hostile companies, thereby preventing the annihilation of beleaguered friendly units. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Lieutenant Colonel Feuerriegel reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 20@ Air Medals


FINCK, GEORGE C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to George C. Finck, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-7A Aircraft Commander of the 458th Tactical Airlift Squadron, Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near Duc Lap, Republic of Vietnam, on 24 August 1968. On that date, Major Finck flew the first night combat air drop ever flown in a C-7A through a hostile environment of heavy antiaircraft and automatic weapons fire in which five other aircraft had been shot down while attempting to re-supply the camp. Despite intense ground fire and battle damage to his aircraft, Major Finck made a second pass over the embattled camp to deliver sufficient ammunition, medical supplies, and water to the beleaguered defenders who would have been overrun without this vital re-supply. Through extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of an opposing armed force, Major Finck has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


FIRSE, JOHN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John A. Firse, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-3E Helicopter Rescue Crew Commander over North Vietnam on 11 June 1967. On that date, Captain Firse flew deep into hostile territory to rescue two downed American pilots. After rescuing one survivor from the dense jungle, he hovered over the second, with intense and accurate ground fire tearing into his unarmed aircraft and causing extensive damage. Despite continuing fire, Captain Firse persevered in the recovery effort until the second survivor was safely aboard. Although three of his tires were blown and the hull was extensively damaged from hostile fire, Captain Firse skillfully recovered at a forward operating base. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Captain Firse reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


FISH, MICHAEL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Michael E. Fish, Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-43B helicopter Pararescue Specialist of Detachment 11, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, during a rescue operation 25 miles southwest of Tuy Hoa Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 and 19 February 1969. During this period, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he was voluntarily lowered through intense hostile ground fire to treat and rescue four seriously injured Army UH-1 helicopter crew members, whose helicopter had been downed by hostile fire in a remote, mountainous, densely jungled canyon. He elected to remain on the ground overnight, fully realizing that he faced attacks by the hostile forces which completely surrounded him, and for more than fifteen hours, he treated and cared for the pilot, who was trapped inside the wreckage, until he could be freed. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Sergeant Fish reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


FLEENER, DELBERT W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Delbert W. Fleener, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as an O-1 Pilot in action near the District of Binh Duong, Republic of Vietnam, on 17 December 1965. On that date, Captain Fleener was diverted from his original target to search for a pilot who had been shot down over hostile held territory. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and though exposed to an intensive barrage of small arms, automatic weapons and antiaircraft fire, Captain Fleener continuously flew his aircraft at an extremely low altitude over the hostile positions in an effort to locate the downed pilot. The wreckage was sighted and almost entirely hidden by hostile forces attempting to camouflage the plane. With only four rockets, Captain Fleener made repeated low passes over the wreckage, firing one rocket on each pass. This daring and aggressive attack by Captain Fleener caused the hostile forces to disperse temporarily and denied them access to secret material and valuable radio equipment. After expending his ordnance, he landed his badly damaged aircraft on a nearby airstrip to refuel and rearm his aircraft. After returning to the area, he provided air cover for a helicopter crew which was attempting to discover the fate of the downed pilot. Although wounded in his right leg and in great pain, Captain Fleener continuously provided protection for the helicopter for over thirty minutes before being ordered to leave the area. While fighting off loss of consciousness, Captain Fleener successfully flew his crippled aircraft into a remote airstrip and landed without further incident. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Fleener reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 23@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


FLYNN, JOHN PETER (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John Peter Flynn, Major General [then Colonel], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 27 October 1967 to 10 November 1967. Captured at the height of the air war, General Flynn, the most senior officer in captivity, was exposed to forceful interrogation, intimidation, and brutal treatment because the enemy believe he was withholding valuable tactical information. Although suffering severe injuries, he was beaten and tortured for military information which, if obtained by the Vietnamese, would clearly have jeopardized the lives of those still flying. By his display of heroic resistance through this ordeal of extreme cruelties, General Flynn reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: July 17, 1922 at Cleveland, Ohio
Home Town: Cleveland, Ohio
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, Silver Star (Vietnam), 3@ Legion of Merit, 7@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star w/V, 15@ Air Medals, Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


FRANCISCO, MICHAEL C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Michael C. Francisco, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4E Aircraft Commander in Southeast Asia on 6 April 1972. On that date, Captain Francisco entered North Vietnam on four separate occasions to lead F-4 fighter-bombers against surface-to-air missile sites threatening air operations in South Vietnam. With complete disregard for his own personal safety and in the face of extremely heavy antiaircraft fire and hostile surface-to-air missiles, Captain Francisco repeatedly descended to dangerously low altitudes to insure the destruction of two missile sites in North Vietnam. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Francisco reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Defense Superior Service Medal, 7@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 5@ Meritorious Service Medals, 24@ Air Medals, Air Force Achievement Medal, Purple Heart


FUNDERBURK, LEONARD J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Leonard J. Funderburk, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller in Southeast Asia on 22 March 1971. On that date, Captain Funderburk flew his lightly armed observation aircraft into an extremely hostile air environment to support beleaguered allied ground forces during Operation Lam Son 719. When Captain Funderburk arrived on scene, a column of ten North Vietnamese tanks had already begun the final assault on the friendly forces. Captain Funderburk requested from tactical strike aircraft to protect the friendly forces from being decimated by the vastly superior firepower of the enemy. Realizing the life or death situation of the allies, Captain Funderburk, with complete disregard for his own safety, rolled in repeatedly on the advancing enemy tanks, armed only with marking rockets. He succeeded in halting the enemy tanks for a few precious minutes, and most of their fire was diverted to himself. Despite some of the most intense ground fire ever experienced, Captain Funderburk repeatedly made marking passes for the strike aircraft until the advancing tanks were halted. The results from the strikes directed by Captain Funderburk were three tanks destroyed and at least 1300 allied lives saved. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Funderburk reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 11@ Air Medals, 2@ Meritorious Service Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


GAMLIN, THEODORE R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Theodore R. Gamlin, Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, as a Ground Radio Operator, on 25 October 1969. On that date, while under heavy hostile mortar attack, and in dense ground fog, Sergeant Hamlin utilized his radio equipment to obtain assistance for wounded Allied personnel. Despite his own wounds, he made his way to an unsecure landing zone where he fully exposed himself to possible enemy fire in order to light the landing area for a rescue helicopter. After carrying the wounded men to the helicopter, he refused evacuation so he could further assist in the camp defense during the night. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Sergeant Gamlin reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


GIBSON, JAMES K.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to James K. Gibson, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an O-1 Pilot and Forward Air Controller in Southeast Asia on 2 February 1968. On that date, Major Gibson flew his unarmed aircraft against hostile forces which had attacked a friendly location. Despite intense automatic and antiaircraft weapons fire which damaged his aircraft and wounded him, Major Gibson, with undaunted determination and courage, repeatedly brought confusion and disorder to the hostile forces by diving his small aircraft at their positions and firing his individual weapon, thereby driving them out into the open where they came under the effective fire of friendly forces. His control and direction of fighter aircraft resulted in the defeat of the hostile forces and saved innumerable friendly lives. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Major Gibson reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


GILROY, KEVIN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Kevin A. Gilroy, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism while serving with the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, SEVENTH Air Force, as Electronics Warfare Officer of an F-105 aircraft, engaged in a pre-strike, missile suppression mission against the Thai Nguyen Steel Works in North Vietnam on 10 March 1967. On that date, Captain Gilroy guided his pilot in attacking and destroying a surface-to-air missile installation protecting one of the most important industrial complexes in North Vietnam. He accomplished this feat even after formidable hostile defenses had destroyed the lead aircraft and had crippled a second. Though his own aircraft suffered extensive battle damage and was under constant attack by MiG interceptors, antiaircraft artillery, automatic weapons, and small arms fire, Captain Gilroy aligned several ingenious close range attacks on the hostile defenses at great risk to his own life. Due to his technical skill, the attacks were successful and the strike force was able to bomb the target without loss. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship and aggressiveness, Captain Gilroy has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


GONZALES, LEONARD A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Leonard A. Gonzales, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as Aircraft Commander of a UH-1F gunship helicopter of the 20th Special Operations Squadron, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near Duc Co, Republic of Vietnam, on the night of 26 - 27 November 1968. On that date, Major Gonzales went to the aid of a six-man Special Forces Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol that was in danger of being overrun by a large, well-armed hostile force. Major Gonzales made continued minigun and rocket passes at treetop level, even after his wingman had been hit. His aggressive attacks sufficiently quelled the hostile fire to allow a transport helicopter to pick up the beleaguered patrol. Through his superb airmanship, aggressiveness, and extraordinary heroism, Major Gonzales reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


GREEN, JOE B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Joe B. Green, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-3E Rescue Crew Commander of the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam, on 30 March 1968. On that date, Major Green led a force of four rescue helicopters over hostile territory in low overcast weather to reach the survivors from four downed United States helicopters. Intelligence briefings had disclosed that it was impossible to neutralize the hostile gun emplacements at the rescue site. Despite the knowledge that two additional helicopters were shot down while he was approaching the area Major Green elected to make the initial rescue attempt. He persisted in the rescue attempt after hostile fire forced him away from the site. He made two additional approaches, courageously maintaining the aircraft in a stationary hover until the four most severely wounded survivors were rescued. Only then did fuel shortage, aircraft malfunctions, and the critical nature of the survivors' wounds compel him to leave the area. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Green reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Carlisle, Pennsylvania


GRIGGS, JERRY M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jerry M. Griggs, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Rescue Crew Commander of an HH-3E helicopter of the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam, on 30 March 1968. On that date, Major Griggs flew over hostile territory in low overcast weather to reach the survivors from six American helicopters which had been shot down by hostile fire. After his aircraft received substantial battle damage from intense opposing ground fire, Major Griggs, with undaunted determination, indomitable courage, and professional skill, persisted in the rescue attempt until he rescued four survivors, although he sustained further battle damage from the intense hostile ground fire. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Griggs reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Elko, Nevada


GRUVER, JOHN C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John C. Gruver, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as aircraft commander of a UH-1F helicopter near Dak To, Republic of Vietnam, on 21 March 1967. On that date, Captain Gruver flew in support of friendly ground forces who were partially encircled in a bomb crater and unable to take evasive action because of their wounded members. He initially hovered in the hostile field of fire to suppress flames threatening a downed Army helicopter and then returned to evacuate the wounded. With the ground party freed to withdraw, Captain Gruver remained in the area to fly repeated fire suppressing passes in support of their movement. His determination and aggressive airmanship in the face of hostile resistance saved an aircraft from destruction and a highly trained team of American fighting men from capture or death. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Gruver reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


GUARINO, LAWRENCE NICHOLAS (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Lawrence Nicholas Guarino (12054029/0-798126), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as Senior Ranking Officer of a North Vietnamese prison camp during the period 11 May 1968 to 22 September 1969. Following the execution of a carefully conceived escape plan by two of his officers, Colonel Guarino, who was known by the enemy to be the Senior Ranking Officer in the camp, immediately came under maximum pressure including savage torture without parallel. Colonel Guarino exhibited exceptional heroism, courage and determination during this period. Displaying great resilience when back in communication, he assumed command once again and slowly built the prisoner organization. Through his extraordinary heroism, and maximum resistance in the face of a brutal enemy, Colonel Guarino reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (Colonel Guarino was serving with the 44th Tactical Fighter Squadron at the time he was shot down and captured on 14 June 1965.)
Born: April 16, 1922 at Newark, New Jersey
Home Town: Newark, New Jersey
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, 15@ Air Medals, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


GUSTAFSON, GERALD C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Gerald C. Gustafson, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105 Aircraft Commander of the 33d Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, SEVENTH Air Force, in action over North Vietnam on 19 November 1967. On that date, Major Gustafson's aircraft was severely damaged by a surface to air missile while he was assisting another pilot who had received battle damage and had been wounded. Major Gustafson refused to leave his comrade until other escort aircraft could be vectored in to give the wounded pilot assistance in reaching his home base safely. Only then, did Major Gustafson egress to a safer area where he was force to eject from his own stricken aircraft. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Major Gustafson reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: at St. Peter, Minnesota
Home Town: St. Peter, Minnesota


GUY, THEODORE WILSON (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Theodore Wilson Guy (AO-1911304), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 25 January 1972 to 25 May 1972. During this period, Colonel Guy was subjected to maximum punishment and torture by Vietnamese guards to obtain a detailed confession of escape plans, policies, and orders that he had issued as the senior ranking officer in the prisoner of war camp in which he was commander, and the communications methods used by the Americans interned in the camp. He withstood this punishment and gave nothing of value to the Vietnamese while sustaining many wounds to his body. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower in the face of the enemy, Colonel Guy reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (Colonel Guy was serving as a pilot in the 559th Tactical Fighter Squadron at the time he was shot down and captured on 22 March 1968.)
Born: April 18, 1929 at Elmhurst, Illinois
Home Town: Elmhurst, Illinois
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 6@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, 10@ Air Medals, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


HACKNEY, DUANE D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Duane D. Hackney, Airman Second Class, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, as a Paramedic (Pararescueman) on an unarmed HH-3E Rescue Helicopter near Mu Gia Pass, North Vietnam, on 6 February 1967. On that date, Airman Hackney flew two sorties in a heavily defended hostile area. On the first sortie, despite the presence of armed forces known to be hostile, entrenched in the vicinity, Airman Hackney volunteered to be lowered into the jungle to search for the survivor. He searched until the controlling Search and Rescue agency ordered an evacuation of the rescue crew. On the second sortie, Airman Hackney located the downed pilot, who was hoisted into the helicopter. As the rescue crew departed the area, intense and accurate 37-mm. flak tore into the helicopter amidships, causing extensive damage and a raging fire aboard the craft. With complete disregard for his own safety, Airman Hackney fitted his parachute to the rescued man. In this moment of impending disaster, Airman Hackney chose to place his responsibility to the survivor above his own life. The courageous Pararescueman located another parachute for himself and had just slipped his arms through the harness when a second 37MM round struck the crippled aircraft, sending it out of control. The force of the explosion blew Airman Hackney through the open cargo door and, though stunned, he managed to deploy the unbuckled parachute and make a successful landing. He was later recovered by a companion helicopter. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Airman Hackney reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: at Flint, Michigan
Home Town: Flint, Michigan
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 4@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Airman's Medal, 17@ Air Medals, 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals, Purple Heart


HACKNEY, HUNTER F.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Hunter F. Hackney, Colonel [then Major], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-7A Aircraft Commander of the 458th Tactical Airlift Squadron, Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near Duc Lap Republic of Vietnam, on 25 August 1968. On that date, Major Hackney flew two drop passes delivering vitally needed ammunition through vicious concentrations of antiaircraft and automatic weapons fire in which his aircraft sustained severe battle damage, disabling it and causing him to recover at a forward base. Realizing that the defenders of Duc Lap could not survive through the night without resupply of small arms ammunition, Major Hackney obtained a new aircraft and volunteered to reenter this hostile environment in which five other aircraft had perished. With tenacious courage, he delivered his cargo, again sustaining heavy battle damage. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of an opposing armed force, Major Hackney has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: California


HALL, JAMES H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to James H. Hall, First Lieutenant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Pilot in the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 8 February 1968. On that date, Lieutenant Hall led two aircraft against one of the largest, most important and most heavily defended airfields in North Vietnam. Despite inclement weather, Lieutenant Hall descended to extremely low altitude for a visual high-speed run across the airfield. Although faced with a barrage of withering antiaircraft artillery fire, Lieutenant Hall resolutely and skillfully pressed his attack against the target, damaging and destroying several aircraft on the ground. When the lead crew was finally forced to eject over hostile territory, Lieutenant Hall remained as top cover and directed the rescue effort, which expeditiously recovered the two downed airmen. As a result of his actions, Lieutenant Hall was successful in neutralizing a threat to Free World forces in Southeast Asia. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, First Lieutenant Hall reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, 15@ Air Medals


*HAMILTON, JOHN SMITH (MIA-KIA)
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to John Smith Hamilton (AO-2228034), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an A-1E Pilot of the 602d Fighter Squadron (Commando), Udorn Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in North Vietnam on 19 April 1967. On that date, Colonel Hamilton was engaged in a search and rescue mission near Hoa Binh City when his aircraft was shot down by North Vietnamese MiG-17s. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Colonel Hamilton reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: September 3, 1926 at Fort Bayard, New Mexico
Home Town: Silver City, New Mexico
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, 5@ Air Medals


HARDING, JAMES C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to James C. Harding, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an A-1 Tactical Fighter Pilot of the 1st Special Operations Squadron, Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near Tchepone, Laos from 10 April 1972 to 13 April 1972. During this period, Major Harding was the on-scene commander of an extremely hazardous and complex search and rescue mission that was attempting to recover a downed American pilot who was located in Laos. Major Harding made repeated passes at low altitude and airspeed, directly over a hostile gun position, in order to draw antiaircraft fire and pinpoint its position. In spite of battle damage to his aircraft, Major Harding repeatedly counterattacked the numerous heavy gun positions, thereby allowing the vulnerable rescue helicopters to effect a safe and successful recovery of the downed pilot. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Major Harding reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Department of the Air Force, Special Order GB-722 (November 22, 1972)
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 3@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), 2@ Legion of Merit, 9@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 2@ Bronze Stars, 4@ Purple Hearts, Meritorious Service Medal, 40@ Air Medals, 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals


HARP, TILFORD W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Tilford W. Harp, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism and airmanship while engaged in a humanitarian mission as Co-Pilot of an Air Force C-5A aircraft in action at Saigon, Vietnam, on 3 April 1975. On that date, his aircraft, carrying 330 passengers and crew, experienced a serious in-flight emergency which could have resulted in the loss of life for all aboard. With no aircraft controls except one aileron and the engines, Captain Harp provided exceptionally vital assistance to the Aircraft Commander in guiding the crippled aircraft to a crash landing in a rice paddy, thereby saving the lives of 176 of the people on board. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Captain Harp reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Airman's Medal


HENNING, HAL P.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Hal P. Henning, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105 Pilot in Southeast Asia on 27 October 1967. On that date, Captain Henning was the leader of a force of twenty F-105 Thunderchiefs assigned to attack an extremely vital military storage area in the vicinity of Hanoi, North Vietnam. En route to the target, his aircraft was extensively damaged by shrapnel from a surface-to-air missile. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Henning continued on to the assigned target with his crippled aircraft. Diving through intense antiaircraft fire, delivering his bombs precisely on target, he was successful in heavily damaging the storage complex. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Henning reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 4@ Meritorious Service Medals, 12@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


*HICKMAN, VINCENT JOSEPH (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Vincent Joseph Hickman (58450), Captain, U.S. Air Force, for for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an Advisor-Navigator of a B-26B aircraft in the 1st Air Commando Squadron, 34th Tactical Group, Bien Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 14 January 1964. On that date, Captain Hickman voluntarily exposed himself during low level flights over hidden Viet Cong machine gun installations. Despite heavy machine gun fire, which repeatedly struck the aircraft, Captain Hickman aggressively continued his efforts to locate and destroy machine gun installations until the badly damaged aircraft crashed and burned. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Hickman reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: New York, New York


HOBLIT, JERRY N.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jerry N. Hoblit, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105F Pilot of the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in aerial action near Thai Nguyen, North Vietnam on 23 April 1967. On that date Captain Hoblit and his Electronic Warfare Officer flew the F-105F Wile Weasel in support of a strike force of fighter-bombers targeted upon the Thai Nguyen steel mill in North Vietnam. Once the flight separated, Captain Hoblit set his element up as a decoy to draw fire from a surface-to-air missile site. After outmaneuvering three missiles, Captain Hoblit led his wingman into a dive bomb to destroy this complex. As he fired his anti-radiation missiles at a second site, yet another site launched a missile and severely damaged the Wild Weasel leader's aircraft. Captain Hoblit diverted attention from the wounded aircraft, narrowly evading missiles fired at him. Despite having expended his bombs and missiles, Captain Hoblit pressed the attack, leading his wingman into a high angle strafe pass in the face of fierce automatic weapons fire; he continued the attack until assured his team leader had safely egressed the area. Captain Hoblit remained behind to assist in the successful rescue of an RF-4C Phantom reconnaissance jet aircrew that had been shot down earlier. When Captain Hoblit finally landed at a forward air base, maintenance personnel confirmed high explosive incendiary rounds of ground fire had damaged his aircraft. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Hoblit reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


HOGGATT, RALPH S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Ralph S. Hoggatt, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an A-1E Skyraider pilot of the 602d Tactical Fighter Squadron (Commando), Udorn Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 11 November 1967. On that date, Colonel Hoggatt led a search and rescue force over a heavily defended troop concentration and supply area on the Ho Chi Minh Train in an effort to rescue a downed pilot. Despite intense and accurate hostile fire which destroyed his wingman's aircraft and crippled his own, Colonel Hoggatt, with undaunted determination, indomitable courage, and professional skill, remained in this hostile area alone and unaided, to provide the fire support and cover necessary to permit the recovery of his wingman from hostile territory in the face of antiaircraft artillery. Disregarding his personal safety and his heavily damaged aircraft, he remained in the area for nearly two hours after the recovery of his wingman in order to direct follow-on rescue forces to the scene. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Hoggatt reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 4@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Meritorious Service Medal, 16@ Air Medals


*HOLLAND, LAWRENCE THOMAS (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Lawrence Thomas Holland (555441686), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force in Southeast Asia while serving as Pilot of an F100D Supersabre of the 615th Tactical Fighter Squadron, in action in Southeast Asia, on 12 June 1965. On that date, Major Holland led a flight of F-100 aircraft against a heavily defended area which had been captured by the Viet Cong. He was directed to destroy automatic weapons positions and structures within the target area. Major Holland led his flight on one low level attack and destroyed a significant gun position. However, heavily concentrated automatic weapons fire from several other ground positions was reported. With complete disregard for his personal safety and despite the withering ground fire, Major Holland continued the attack and delivered his ordnance directly on target. His outstanding dedication to duty, superior initiative, and mission performance resulted in the destruction of numerous hostile ground positions of vital significance to the Viet Cong. Major Holland's courage and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American fighting man. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, and in dedication of his service to his country, Major Holland reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Alhambra, California
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross, 4@ Air Medals, Purple Heart, Air Force Commendation Medal


HOPKINS, JAMES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to James R. Hopkins, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as Commanding Officer, 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 29 June 1966. On that date, Colonel Hopkins was Mission Commander of a large strike force of F-105 Thunderchiefs tasked with destroying a large petroleum, oil, and lubricant storage area at Hanoi, North Vietnam. Despite adverse weather and the most intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire ever encountered over North Vietnam, including deadly surface-to- air missiles, he led his force in totally destroying this vital military target. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Hopkins reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Norman, Oklahoma


HORINEK, RAMON ANTON (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Ramon Anton Horinek (FR-49644), Lieutenant Colonel [the Captain], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller and Pilot of an O-1 Airplane of the 1st Air Commando Group, Bien Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, PACIFIC Air Force, in action with friendly forces in Southeast Asia, from 16 February l966 to 19 February l966. Captain Horinek successfully directed air strikes which permitted the safe withdrawal of friendly forces and destruction of an evacuated site despite repeated machine gun hits on his light aircraft. While providing support for an attack against a second site his aircraft was again struck by hostile fire. Realizing the importance of his presence, he landed on the site airstrip, knowing that the approaches were dominated by the enemy. On foot, and under constant fire, he directed strikes which dislodged the enemy and permitted resumption of aircraft evacuation from the strip. Throughout the period, alternately in the air, and on the ground, he continued to direct strikes while repeatedly exposed to fierce hostile fire, until the site was successfully evacuated. Captain Horinek's gallantry and professionalism permitted the safe withdrawal of many friendly troops and prevented the recovery of quantities of munitions and supplies by the enemy. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Horinek has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: December 9, 1932 at Atwood, Kansas
Home Town: Atwood, Kansas
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), 3@ Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, 7@ Air Medals, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


HUDSON, JACKSON L.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jackson L. Hudson (FR-78723), Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as the pilot of an A-1E Skyraider in the 602d Special Operations Squadron, Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 6 October 1969. Captain Hudson led, and was responsible for the success of, one of the largest search and rescue efforts ever attempted in Southeast Asia. With complete disregard for his own safety and despite extremely intense ground fire, he made several low level passes delivering ordnance within ten meters of the survivors' positions. He led and coordinate the final attack which eventually incapacitated an estimated 400 to 600 enemy forces and saved the lives of 54 persons. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Hudson has reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Hapeville, Georgia
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 12@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


HUNT, RUSSELL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Russell M. Hunt, Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a mechanic on a UH-1 helicopter of E Flight, 20th Special Operations Squadron, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 31 March 1967. On that date, Sergeant Hunt's aircraft was shot down while participating in the evacuation of a beleaguered party of American and Allied ground forces. Despite painful injuries and continuous hostile fire, Sergeant Hunt rendered aid to increasing numbers of wounded personnel. When hostile actions forced a movement of the ground party, Sergeant Hunt assisted in carrying his mortally wounded aircraft commander in an exhausting trek to a designated landing zone. In the landing area, Sergeant Hunt again exposed himself to the hostile field of fire to give manual landing directions to the recovery helicopters, refusing evacuation until all seriously wounded personnel had been airlifted from the scene. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Sergeant Hunt reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.

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