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Full Text Citations For Award of
 

The Air Force Cross in Vietnam

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To All Who Shall See These Presents Greeting:

This is to Certify that
The President of the United States of America
Authorized by Title 10, Section 8742, United States Code
Takes Pride in Presenting


THE AIR FORCE CROSS
to

 

ADAMS, VICTOR R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Victor R. Adams, Technical Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force while serving as a UH- 1F Helicopter Aerial Gunner of the 20th Special Operations Squadron, SEVENTH Air Force, near Duc Co, Republic of Vietnam, on the night of 26 - 27 November 1968. On that date, Sergeant Adams' aircraft was shot down by hostile ground fire and crashed in dense jungle. Disregarding his own injuries and the imminence of hostile activity, he assisted the co-pilot from the burning helicopter and returned to rescue the trapped personnel. He succeeded in pulling another man from the wreckage, before the severity of the fire and subsequent explosions forced him to abandon further rescue efforts. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Sergeant Adams reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, 11@ Air Medals, Purple Heart


*ALLEE, RICHARD KENNETH (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Kenneth Allee (0-84263264), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105 Thunderchief Pilot while serving with the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, SEVENTH Air Force, in action over Southeast Asia on 21 December 1968. On that date, Major Allee was attacking an extremely important supply and storage area containing a large concentration of unfriendly forces and located in one of the most heavily defended areas of Southeast Asia. During the initial phase of his dive bombing attack, Major Allee's aircraft sustained critical damage from lethal antiaircraft artillery fire defending this important target. Although his aircraft was burning, he demonstrated professional dedication and exceptional valor by continuing his attack and delivering his ordnance directly on target. Knowing that his mission was now accomplished, Major Allee attempted recovery from his dive bombing attack but the severity of the damage sustained by his aircraft made recovery unsuccessful and his aircraft was observed impacting in the immediate target area. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Allee reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Port Jervis, New York
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 12@ Air Medals, 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals, Purple Heart


ALLISON, JOHN V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John V. Allison, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy of the United States as Aircraft Commander of an HH-53 Rescue Helicopter of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group, as part of an all-volunteer joint U.S. Army and Air Force raiding force in the Joint Chiefs of Staff-directed heliborne assault mission to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam, on 21 November 1970. On that date, Lieutenant Colonel Allison flew a helicopter loaded with Special Forces troops into an extremely hostile environment. Prior to landing, he recognized that circumstances existing in the vicinity of the objective were considerably different than expected. He correctly assessed the new conditions, and at risk of life under adverse circumstances and without direction, implemented an alternate plan. Acting on his own, Colonel Allison's decision to undertake a new plan and deliver sustained accurate fire on the major enemy threat, a guard billet played a large part in the tactical success of the operation. After all buildings were searched, Colonel Allison, without regard for his personal safety, landed and picked up and safely returned his troops through heavy surface-to-air missile activity. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Lieutenant Colonel Allison reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star, 2@ Meritorious Service Medals, 4@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


ARMSTRONG, LARRY D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Larry D. Armstrong, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Aircraft Commander in the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 8 February 1968. On that date, Major Armstrong led two aircraft against one of the largest, most important, and most heavily defended airfields in North Vietnam. Despite inclement weather, Major Armstrong descended to extremely low altitude for a visual high-speed run across the airfield. Although faced with a barrage of withering antiaircraft artillery fire, Major Armstrong remained as top cover and directed the rescue effort, which expeditiously recovered two downed airmen. As a result of his actions, Major Armstrong was successful in neutralizing a threat to Free World forces in Southeast Asia. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Armstrong reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


*ATTERBERRY, EDWIN LEE (POW-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Edwin Lee Atterberry (AF-18487925), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 11 May 1969 to 14 May 1969. On 11 May 1969, Lieutenant Colonel Atterberry escaped from the North Vietnamese prison camp known as "The Zoo" and was recaptured twelve hours later. He was subjected to brutal torture for confessions pertaining to camp leadership, organization and details of his escape plans. He was last seen by other prisoners of war on 14 May 1969, and the North Vietnamese later reported that Lieutenant Colonel Atterberry had died. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Lieutenant Colonel Atterberry reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (At the time he was shot down and captured, Lieutenant Colonel Atterberry was serving with the 67th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, Udorn Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force.)
Born: March 3, 1934 at Klondike, Texas
Home Town: Dallas, Texas
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star w/V, 4@ Air Medals, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


BAER, ALLAN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Allan R. Baer, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller and Pilot of an O-2 airplane at Nha Trang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in the Republic of Vietnam, from 30 January 1968 to 1 February 1968. During that period, Colonel Baer was virtually a one-man command post for the battle of Nha Trang, directing and conducting close air support missions night and day, resulting in the neutralization of over three hundred of the hostile attacking force. On no less than eleven separate occasions, Colonel Baer's aerial skill and courage in the face of intense unfriendly ground fire were the decisive factors in the defeat of the hostile forces. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Baer reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal


*BALDWIN, ROBERT LANOUE (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Lanoue Baldwin (0-09184374), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a UH-1 pilot in E Flight, 20th Special Operations Squadron, 14th Special Operations Wing, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 31 March 1967. On that date, Major Baldwin volunteered to pilot his unarmed helicopter to evacuate severely wounded American ground troops under heavy hostile fire. Despite intense and accurately directed automatic weapons fire which severely damaged his aircraft and inflicted serious wounds upon his person, Major Baldwin, with undaunted determination, indomitable courage, and professional skill, successfully delivered ammunition and water to the beleaguered ground forces and began rescue of wounded personnel. Again devastating ground fire struck his aircraft, causing it to crash. Disregarding his own serious wounds, Major Baldwin attempted to save the other wounded until his loss of consciousness prevented any further action. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Baldwin reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Tomah, Wisconsin


BEALE, ROBERT S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Robert S. Beale, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-105 Thunderchief pilot on a missile suppression mission on an isolated vital military target near Hanoi, North Vietnam, on 16 December 1967. On that date, Major Beale braved many concentrations of heavy antiaircraft artillery fire and eighteen surface-to-air missiles as he successfully led his missile suppression flight in diverting the hostile defenses away from the main strike force. He contributed to the destruction of one missile site only three miles from the center of the heavily defended target area and damaged at least one other missile complex. As a result of his actions, the main strike force suffered no losses, encountered only four missiles, and successfully destroyed this vital military target. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Beale reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 12@ Air Medals


BLACK, ARTHUR NEIL (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Arthur Neil Black (AF-12666475), Airman Third Class, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Pararescueman on an HH-43B helicopter of Detachment 3, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action 40 miles south of Vinh, North Vietnam on 20 September 1965. On that date, Airman Black participated in an extremely hazardous attempted recovery of a downed pilot. This mission required a flight of over 80 miles, mostly over hostile controlled territory. Evaluation of the environment in which the downed pilot was located indicated that maximum performance would be demanded from each crewmember if successful recovery was to be effected. Though exposed to intensive hostile ground fire, Airman Black, with complete disregard for his own safety, performed with courage and professional precision in a supreme effort to rescue a fallen comrade. Airman Black's courageous action and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American fighting man under attack by an opposing armed force. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Airman Black reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: December 16, 1944 at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
Home Town: Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


BODE, JOHN R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John R. Bode, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller and Air Liaison Officer with the 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division (U.S. Army), at Fire Support Base Crook, Republic of Vietnam, from 5 June 1969 to 7 June 1969. During that period, Major Bode planned, directed, and controlled the employment of all the combined Air Force and Army tactical air assets in the decisive defeat of a numerically superior ground force. Displaying exceptional gallantry under intense and sustained hostile ground fire and unparalleled devotion to duty, Major Bode flew 6 missions and more than 17 hours at tree top level under overcast ceilings of less than 1000 feet, both day and night. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Major Bode reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star, 15@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


BOYD, CHARLES GRAHAM (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Charles Graham Boyd, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a combat strike pilot of an F-105D Thunderchief of the 421st Tactical Fighter Squadron, 388th Tactical Fighter Wing, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action approximately 35 miles northwest of Hanoi, North Vietnam, on 22 April 1966. On that date, Captain Boyd volunteered to participate in a flight with the mission of destroying Surface to Air Missile (SAM) Sites posing a threat to flights striking a bridge in the Phu Tho area. While attacking a hostile SAM site, Captain Boyd saw two missiles streak toward his aircraft. His superb airmanship and instant reaction enabled him to evade the missiles, which burst very near his aircraft. Without hesitation, Captain Boyd continued the attack on the hostile missile site. As he made a second pass through the intense flak which filled the sky around him, Captain Boyd's aircraft received a direct hit by anti-aircraft fire and he was forced to eject himself in a heavily populated, hostile area. The selfless act of making repeated attacks through intense ground fire after barely avoiding two missiles was far beyond the normal call of duty. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Boyd reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: April 15, 1938 at Rockwell City, Iowa
Home Town: Rockwell City, Iowa
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, 2@ Silver Stars (Vietnam), 3@ Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 3@ Bronze Stars w/V, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, 2@ Air Medals, AF Commendation Medal, 3@ Purple Heats, Prisoner of War Medal


BOYD, WILLIAM, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to William Boyd, Jr., Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-130 pilot of the 774th Tactical Airlift Squadron, 463d Tactical Airlift Wing, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at Kham Duc, Republic of Vietnam on 12 May 1968. On that date, Colonel Boyd flew an emergency evacuation mission into Kham Duc Airfield as it was being overrun by hostile forces. Realizing that the friendly ground forces and Vietnamese civilians remaining at Kham Duc had virtually no chance for survival except evacuation by his aircraft, Colonel Boyd, without regard for his personal safety, flew through a veritable hail of hostile fire into the besieged field and successfully evacuated more than one hundred troops and civilians. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Boyd reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


BRICKEL, JAMES R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to James R. Brickel, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as a photo reconnaissance pilot of the 20th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, Udorn Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near Thai Nguyen, North Vietnam, on 10 March 1967. On that date, Colonel Brickel led a flight of two RF-101C photo reconnaissance aircraft on a bomb damage assessment mission against one of the most highly defended targets in North Vietnam. Despite a direct hit by an anti-aircraft artillery flak that extensively damaged his aircraft, Colonel Brickel continued to the target and acquired one hundred percent photographic coverage. He then made a successful withdrawal from hostile territory on a single engine and landed at his home base. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: 1930 at New York, New York
Home Town: New York, New York
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Air Force Distinguished Service Medals, Silver Star (Vietnam), 2@ Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 11@ Air Medals


*BRITT, AQUILLA FRIEND (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Aquilla Friend Britt (3065105), Major, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as commander of a strike force of twenty F-105 Thunderchiefs against a heavily defended target in North Vietnam on 25 October 1967. Through extremely heavy barrages of surface-to-air missiles and antiaircraft fire, Major Britt, with undaunted determination and indomitable courage, safely guided the strike force on a devastating attack against the primary target. His superb planning, leadership, and gallantry, displayed under intense conditions, were the key factors that led to the destruction of this highly significant military target. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Britt reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: El Cajon, California
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 5@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Purple Heart, 20@ Air Medals


BRITTON, WARNER A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Warner A. Britton, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an armed enemy of the United States as Helicopter Flight Leader aboard an HH-53 Rescue Helicopter of the 40th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Group, as part of an all-volunteer joint U.S. Army and Air Force raiding force in the Joint Chiefs of Staff-directed heliborne assault mission to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam, on 21 November 1970. On that date, Colonel Britton led a flight of troop-carrying helicopters on a night mission into an extremely hostile environment in the heart of North Vietnam. Although initial conditions following off-loading troops in the objective area were considerably different than planned, he correctly assessed the new circumstances and at risk of life under direct close range ground fire, again landed, picked up a load of troops, and moved them to a new location. His final departure from the objective area was through an intense array of surface-to-air missiles which he evaded with calm, exceptional flying skill. Colonel Britton, without regard for his personal safety, contributed immeasurably to the tactical success of the rescue attempt. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Colonel Britton reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: April 1, 1925 at Liberal, Kansas
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, 9@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


BROUGHTON, JACKSEL M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jacksel M. Broughton, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force in Southeast Asia while serving with the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, SEVENTH Air Force, in action over North Vietnam on 5 February 1967. On that date, Colonel Broughton was Mission Commander of a flight of a two wing F-105 Thunderchief strike force which attacked a heavily defended target in North Vietnam. Despite serious aircraft malfunctions, marginal weather, and grave damage to his aircraft from an exploding surface-to-air missile, he placed his armament directly on target, scattering fire and debris which illuminated the target for easy acquisition by the following strike force. Disregarding the crippled condition of his aircraft, which minimized his chances for recovery to friendly territory, Colonel Broughton then willfully acted as a decoy to divert hostile aircraft approaching the strike force. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Colonel Broughton reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 3@ Air Medals


*BROWER, RALPH WAYNE (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Ralph Wayne Brower (3109303), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-3E pilot of the 37th Aero Space Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in Southeast Asia on 9 November 1967. On that date, captain Brower attempted the night extraction of a ground reconnaissance team. Despite full knowledge that two helicopters had been shot down and a third severely damaged by intense, accurately directed hostile fire, Captain Brower, with determination, indomitable courage, and profession skill, established a hover on a steep slope within one hundred yards of hostile weapons positions and brought the wounded survivors aboard. The hostile forces closed in quickly, and as the helicopter departed, it was shot down. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Brower reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Stow, Ohio


*BUCHER, BERNARD LUDWIG (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Bernard Ludwig Bucher (558354), Major, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-130 Aircraft Commander of the 774th Tactical Airlift Squadron, 463d Tactical Airlift Wing, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at Kham Duc, Republic of Vietnam on 12 May 1968. On that date, Major Bucher volunteered to attempt the rescue of friendly forces from the Kham Duc airfield. Hostile forces had completely encircled the airfield. The surrounding terrain was extremely hazardous with 300 to 350 foot hills at each end of the runway. Shell fragments, munitions, and other debris littered the entire runway. After careful evaluation of the danger and realizing the hopeless position of the remaining defenders if they were not evacuated, Major Bucher elected to try the landing. Approaching the field from a steep angle of attack to avoid as much of the hail of enemy fire as possible, he successfully landed his aircraft and immediately began loading the defenders. After loading, Major Bucher faced the task of taking off through the heavy hostile fire. An abandoned bulldozer and a crashed helicopter blocked much of the runway. After an amazingly successful takeoff, Major Bucher's aircraft was seen to crash and catch fire. During the entire action, Major Bucher displayed the highest traditions of a professional Air Force Officer. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Bucher reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Eureka, Illinois


BURROUGHS, WILLIAM DAVID (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to William David Burroughs (FR-27184), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 15th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron, SEVENTH Air Force, in Southeast Asia on 11 July 1966. On that date, Major Burroughs flew his unarmed and unescorted RF-101 Voodoo against a strategic target of vital importance situated along a critical northeast railroad only thirty-five nautical miles northeast of Hanoi. This target was of singular value, and the immediate area defenses were as concentrated, menacing, and vicious as any in the annals of air warfare. Refusing to be deterred by a direct hit from a deadly missile which caused major structural damage to his aircraft, Major Burroughs courageously pursued his mission and obtained important photo intelligence of this strategic target. By his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of an armed hostile force, Major Burroughs reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: September 29, 1932 at Indianhead, Maryland
Home Town: Indianhead, Maryland
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 2@ Bronze Stars w/V, 2@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Prisoner of War Medal


CALDWELL, WILLIAM R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to William R. Caldwell, Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-130E Instructor Pilot for the 776th Tactical Airlift Squadron, An Loc Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at An Loc, Republic of Vietnam, on 15 April 1972. On that date, Captain Caldwell flew a tactical emergency airdrop of critically needed ammunition to a besieged concentration of allied forces located in a heavily defended area. En route to the target, his aircraft was severely damaged by hostile anti-aircraft fire, fatally injuring the Flight Engineer and wounding other crew members. Realizing bailout of the injured crew members would be extremely difficult, Captain Caldwell, without regard for his personal safety, remained at his station and flew the aircraft to a successful two-engine landing, thereby saving the lives of his crew. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Caldwell reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, 4@ Meritorious Service Medals, 4$ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal


CAMPBELL, JESSE W.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Jesse W. Campbell, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a C-123 aircraft pilot of the 311th Air Commando Squadron, 315th Special Operations Wing, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at Kham Duc, Republic of Vietnam on 12 May 1968. On that date, Major Campbell volunteered to attempt the rescue of a three- man USAF Combat Control Team from the Special Forces Camp at Kham Duc. Hostile forces had overrun the forward outpost and established gun positions on the airstrip. They were raking the camp with small arms, mortars, light and heavy automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire. The camp was engulfed in flames and ammunition dumps were continuously exploding and littering the runway with debris. In addition, eight aircraft had been destroyed by the intense enemy fire and one aircraft remained on the runway reducing its useable length to only 2200 feet. To further complicate a landing, the weather was deteriorating rapidly. Although fully aware of the extreme danger and likely failure of such an attempt, Major Campbell set up the approach from approximately 7300 feet above the airfield. Through a superior display of pilot expertise, he side slipped the C-123 aircraft steeply to an altitude of 500 feet above the ground. The landing roll was terminated near the point where the Combat Control Team was reported to be hiding. While on the ground, the aircraft was the target of intense hostile fire. A rocket landed in front of the nose of the aircraft but failed to explode. Once the Combat Control Team was aboard, the C-123 succeeded in getting airborne despite the hostile fire directed across the runway in front of the aircraft. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Major Campbell reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.


CAMPBELL, THOMAS A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Thomas A. Campbell, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an A-1E Skyraider Pilot in Southeast Asia on 2 June 1968. On that date, Major Campbell led a successful search and rescue effort for a downed Navy pilot near the Ho Chi Minh Trail. After his aircraft had been hit by ground fire, he remained in the area for an hour directing aircraft strikes. He voluntarily risked his life on repeated passes to protect the rescue helicopter and suppress hostile gun positions. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Major Campbell reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Bronze Star, Air Medal


*CARROLL, JOHN LEONARD (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to John Leonard Carroll (423460132), Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Control pilot serving with the 20th Tactical Air Support Squadron, 56th Special Operations Wing, SEVENTH Air Force, in action after being shot down in Xiangkhoang Province, Laos, on 7 November 1972. On that date, Major Carroll personified the American Fighting Man's Code of Conduct. When faced with the despair of surrender or the prospect of survival, and confronted with overwhelming odds, Major Carroll elected to fight. Armed only with a rifle, revolver, and hand grenades, Major Carroll held off two enemy companies in an attempt to permit aircraft to effect his rescue. During the fire fight with the approaching enemy, Major Carroll was wounded in the leg by enemy gunfire. Despite being seriously wounded, he pressed the fight. Major Carroll fought with bravery, tenacity, and courage until the moment of his death. He took every action to maximize his own rescue. Major Carroll refused to surrender as long as he had the means to resist. His courage and selfless devotion to duty are an inspiration to all American fighting men. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship and agressiveness in the face of the enemy, and in the dedication of his service to his country, Major Carroll reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: May 6, 1940 at St. Louis, Missouri
Home Town: Decatur, Georgia
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross, Distinguished Flying Cross, 7@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


CARTER, WILLIAM ROGERS
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to William Rogers Carter, Captain [then First Lieutenant], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Forward Air Controller and Pilot of an OV-10 Aircraft in Laos from 6 March 1971 to 7 March 1971. On those dates, Captain Carter flew his lightly armed observation aircraft into a heavily defended hostile area to aid in rescue of seven crewmen. He also directed the pickup of another pilot and was instrumental in the extraction of a team of 97 men. During this 36-hour ordeal, Captain Carter flew over 13 combat hours and directed 16 flights of fighter aircraft. After four unsuccessful rescue attempts the first day, Captain Carter returned to find the survivors out of food, water, and ammunition. Their capture appeared imminent. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and despite intense hostile fire which had destroyed three aircraft and severely damaged four others, Captain Carter strafed the enemy within 15 feet of the survivors. When strike aircraft arrived, he directed them against hostile positions, When his supply of marking rockets had been expended, he continued to direct the fighters by making low passes and rocking his air-craft's wings over enemy positions, exposing himself to a constant barrage of fire. Due to the courageous efforts of Captain Carter, all 104 men were brought out alive. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Carter reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 13@ Air Medals


CHERRY, FRED VANN (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Fred Vann Cherry (AO-2225916/AF-13416845), Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 15 August 1967 to 15 November 1967. During this period, Colonel Cherry demonstrated his extremely strong personal fortitude and maximum persistence in the face of severe enemy harassment and torture, suffering critical injuries and wounds. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Colonel Cherry reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (At the time he was shot down on 22 October 1965, Colonel Cherry was serving as an F-105 Pilot with the 35th Tactical Fighter Squadron.)
Born: March 24, 1928 at Suffolk, Virginia
Home Town: Suffolk, Virginia
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, 2@ Bronze Stars, 3@ Air Medals, Meritorious Service Medal, AF Commendation Medal, 2@ Purple Hearts, Prisoner of War Medal


CLARKE, COLIN A.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Colin A. Clarke, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as Pilot of an A-7 aircraft of the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action while directing a rescue helicopter to the site where two airmen had been shot down in North Vietnam on 17 November 1972. Although his own A-7 aircraft had been damaged, Major Clarke risked his life to save the two pilots. For the duration of the 9-hour rescue mission Major Clarke directed the successful rescue effort and provided close aerial support despite poor weather conditions. When a fuel tank was pierced by a tracer round, causing an explosion to the drop tank which damaged his aircraft, Major Clarke continued his valiant efforts until both airmen were picked up and returned to safety. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Major Clarke reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Bronze Star, 23@ Air Medals, Air Force Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Purple Heart


*CLAY, EUGENE LUNSFORD (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene Lunsford Clay (18497841), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an HH-3E Flight Engineer of the 37th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, 3d Air Rescue and Recovery Group, DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 9 November 1967. On that date, Sergeant Clay attempted the night extraction of a ground reconnaissance team after his helicopter had been severely damaged. Two other helicopters had been shot down and a third extensively damaged in previous attempts. During the rescue attempt, Sergeant Clay unhesitatingly exposed himself to hostile fire to assist the survivors to the aircraft. The hostile forces closed in quickly, and as the damaged helicopter departed, it was shot down. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Staff Sergeant Clay reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Arlington, Texas


*COBEIL, EARL GLENN (POW-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Earl Glenn Cobeil (FR-61453A), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as a Prisoner of War in North Vietnam from 5 November 1970 until his death while still in captivity on or about 5 November 1970. During this period, Lieutenant Colonel Cobeil demonstrated his extremely strong personal fortitude and maximum persistence in the face of severe enemy harassment and torture, suffering critical injuries and wounds. Through his extraordinary heroism and willpower, in the face of the enemy, Lieutenant Colonel Cobeil reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force. (At the time he was shot down on 5 November 1971, Lieutenant Colonel Cobeil was serving as Electronic Warfare Officer of an F-105 aircraft of the 333d Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Takhli Royal Thai Air Base, SEVENTH Air Force.)
Born: August 29, 1934 at Pontiac, Michigan
Home Town: Pontiac, Michigan
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Air Medal, 2@ Air Force Commendation Medals, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal


*CODY, HOWARD RUDOLPH (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Howard Rudolph Cody (3040275), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an Advisor-Pilot of a B-26B aircraft in the 1st Air Commando Squadron, 34th Tactical Group, Bien Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 24 November 1963 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Captain Cody voluntarily exposed himself and his aircraft during a low-level flight near hidden Viet Cong machine gun installations. This forced the Viet Cong to reveal their position which led to their destruction by cover aircraft. In this action, Captain Cody's aircraft was badly damaged by machine gun fire and he never gained control of his aircraft. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Cody reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: September 5, 1934 at Gulfport, Mississippi
Home Town: Gulfport, Mississippi
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Purple Hearts, 2@ Air Medals


*COLLINS, WILLARD MARION (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Willard Marion Collins (3038111), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving Pilot of an AC-47 aircraft of the 4th Air Commando Squadron (Fire Support), 14th Air Commando Wing, Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action near A Shau, Republic of Vietnam, on 9 March 1966. On that date, Captain Collins was Aircraft Commander of an AC-47 that was scrambled in defense of a Special Forces camp which was under heavy attack by hostile forces. Arriving over the area, Captain Collins attempted to locate the camp which was surrounded by mountainous terrain in a narrow valley and obscured by heavy clouds. He made two attempts to penetrate into the valley but was forced to withdraw. On his third attempt, he entered the valley at tree top level, and managed to locate the camp. With complete disregard for his personal safety, and fully aware of his aircraft's vulnerability to ground fire, Captain Collins maneuvered into position. He made two firing passes against the hostile forces. It was on the second pass that both engines exploded from the impact of ground fire. Demonstrating superb airmanship and skill, Captain Collins successfully crash landed his battle torn aircraft. After landing, Captain Collins rallied his crew and attempted to establish defense positions away from the aircraft. He then discovered that one crew member was injured and could not be moved, and he refused to abandon the aircraft for more favorable defensive positions; instead he established a perimeter defense of the aircraft until rescue helicopters arrived. Although attacked by hostile forces in the area, Captain Collins continuously fought off his attackers enabling three of his crew members to be rescued. The valuable minutes which he gave his crew, and for which he paid the supreme sacrifice was directly responsible for their rescue. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Captain Collins reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Quincy, Illinois


*CONLEY, EUGENE OGDEN (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Eugene Ogden Conley (19872), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism while serving as an F-105 Thunderchief Pilot with the 354th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action over North Vietnam on 21 January 1967. On that date, Colonel Conley was the Seventh Air Force's mission commander for a two-wing strike force launched against a heavily defended rail yard in the vicinity of Hanoi. Coolly evaluating the hostile force's defensive posture, he skillfully led the first flight through the concentrated flak barrages and picked his way past the deadly surface-to-air missiles. After visually acquiring the target, he scanned the area for the heaviest concentration of hostile fire upon which to unload his deadly weapons in order to minimize the threat to those he led. He attacked his target and then, with complete disregard for his personal safety, he circled the target area to incite the defenders to unleash their full defensive might against him, thereby permitting his followers to destroy the target. Observing a hostile missile site near the target, he marked it, ordered an attack against it, and then fearlessly circled back over the target area to seek out other hostile defenses. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of hostile forces, Lieutenant Colonel Conley reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Akron, Ohio


CONRAN, PHILIP J.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Philip J. Conran, Major, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as Aircraft Commander of a CH-3E helicopter of the 21st Special Operations Squadron, 56th Special Operations Wing, Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at a classified location in Southeast Asia on 6 October 1969. On that date, while attempting to rescue the crew of a downed helicopter, Major Conran's aircraft was hit by intense hostile ground fire and he was forced to make a crash landing in the vicinity of the other aircraft. Once on the ground, he successfully evacuated his aircraft and assumed a major role in defending the crash site against an overwhelming hostile force until rescue was possible six hours later. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness n the face of hostile fire, Major Conran reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: 1937 at Hartford, Connecticut
Home Town: Avon, Connecticut
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, Airman's Medal, 7@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, 9@ Air Medals, 4 Meritorious Service Medals, 3 AF Commendation Medals, Purple Heart


*COOPER, WILLIAM EARL (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to William Earl Cooper (FR-52496), Lieutenant Colonel [then Major], U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as Pilot of an F-105 airplane and Commander of the 469th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Korat Royal Thai Air Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action on 24 April 1966. On that date, Lieutenant Colonel Cooper was the commander of a composite strike force of thirteen F-105 aircraft and 20 support aircraft whose mission was to destroy a vitally important military target in North Vietnam. With full knowledge of the vast defense network aligned against them, Colonel Cooper briefed the strike force to keep him in sight during the flight but to remain at a lower altitude. His alone took the risk of entering the effective missile envelope to assure target acquisition. Although encountering several severe thunderstorms, he displayed superb navigation and airmanship in bringing the strike force precisely over the pre-planned check point and setting the force directly on line to the target. Approximately 30 miles from the target, the countryside erupted with the heaviest anti-aircraft artillery barrage ever encountered by an attacking United States force. Colonel Cooper instructed his pilots to take necessary evasive action while he remained on course to insure accurate navigation through the clouds which were obstructing the mission route. To further complicate the situation, he was advised by radio contact that a hostile missile launch was imminent. Again disregarding his own safety, Colonel Cooper instructed his pilots to take evasive action while he remained on course. At this point hostile fire disabled his radio. Without radio contact with his pilots, Colonel Cooper pressed the attack with the strike force following below the clouds for visual target sighting. At this critical point, Colonel Cooper's aircraft received a direct hit from the hostile fire. The extraordinary heroism and exceptional airmanship displayed by Colonel Cooper are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: September 16, 1920 at Dothan, Alabama
Home Town: Albany, Georgia
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), 2@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Purple Heart, 8@ Air Medals


CORDER, JOHN A.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to John A. Corder, Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force as an F-4D Pilot in the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, Ubon Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, SEVENTH Air Force, in action in Southeast Asia on 8 February 1968. On that date, Captain Corder led two aircraft against one of the largest, most important, and most heavily defended airfields in North Vietnam. Despite inclement weather, Captain Corder descended to extremely low altitude for a visual high-speed run across the airfield. Although faced with a barrage of withering anti-aircraft artillery fire which severely crippled his aircraft, Captain Corder resolutely and skillfully pressed his attack against the target, damaging and destroying several aircraft on the ground. Captain Corder was finally forced to eject over hostile territory. He successfully evaded hostile search parties and was subsequently rescued by a friendly helicopter. As a result of his actions, Captain Corder was successful in neutralizing a threat to Free World forces in Southeast Asia. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Captain Corder reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: 1939 at Salem, Oregon
Home Town: Albany, Oregon
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), AF Distinguished Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star, 12@ Air Medals, 3@ Meritorious Service Medals, Purple Heart


*COURTNEY, TERENCE FRANCIS (MIA-KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Air Force Cross (Posthumously) to Terence Francis Courtney (323403859), Captain, U.S. Air Force (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as an AC-119K Aircraft Commander of the 18th Special Operations Squadron, An Loc Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action at An Loc, Republic of Vietnam, on 2 May 1972. On that date, while supporting friendly forces under intense enemy fire, Captain Courtney's aircraft was struck in the right wing by antiaircraft artillery fire. Both right engines began to burn profusely, with flames trailing from the wing to the tail of the aircraft. Control of the aircraft had become so difficult that Captain Courtney had to use all his strength to maintain control. He wrapped his arms around the yoke to keep the aircraft's nose from pitching down. When he could no longer control the aircraft, he ordered his crew to bail out. Immediately after the last man bailed out, the aircraft crashed and burst into flames. As a result of Captain Courtney's conscious and deliberate decision to sacrifice his own life by remaining at the controls of his doomed aircraft, seven of his crew were recovered with only minor injuries. His courage, gallantry, intrepidity, and sense of responsibility toward his fellow men overrode any desire or instinctive reaction for his own self-preservation. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness, Captain Courtney reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Home Town: Skokie, Illinois
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, 8@ Air Medals


CURTIS, THOMAS JERRY (POW)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Air Force Cross to Thomas Jerry Curtis (AO-3037787/FR52644), Captain, U.S. Air Force, for extraordinary heroism in military operations against an opposing armed force as Senior Pilot of an HH-43B helicopter of Detachment 3, 38th Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Squadron, Tan Son Nhut Air Base, Vietnam, SEVENTH Air Force, in action 40 miles south of Vinh, North Vietnam on 20 September 1965. On that date, Captain Curtis participated in an extremely hazardous attempted recovery of a downed pilot. This mission required a flight of over 80 miles, mostly over hostile controlled territory. Evaluation of the environment in which the downed pilot was located indicated that maximum performance would be demanded from each crewmember if successful recovery was to be effected. Though exposed to intensive hostile ground fire, Captain Curtis, with complete disregard for his own safety, performed with courage and professional precision in a supreme effort to rescue a fallen comrade. Captain Curtis's courageous action and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the American fighting man under attack by an opposing armed force. Through his extraordinary heroism, superb airmanship, and aggressiveness in the face of the enemy, Captain Curtis reflected the highest credit upon himself and the United States Air Force.
Born: August 24, 1932 at Houston, Texas
Home Town: Houston, Texas
Personal Awards: Air Force Cross (Vietnam), Silver Star (Vietnam), Legion of Merit, 3@ Distinguished Flying Crosses, Air Force Commendation Medal, Purple Heart, Prisoner of War Medal

 

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